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  • 1.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    De Keyser, A.
    EDHEC Business School, FRA.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, NOR.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, NOR.
    Gruber, T.
    Loughborough University, GBR.
    Justice (is not the same) for all: The role of relationship activity for post-recovery outcomes2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 134, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread adoption of the justice framework in service recovery literature, research findings vary as to what dimension - distributive, interactional, procedural - is most important. This paper contributes to this debate by considering how an easily accessible variable like relationship activity (i.e., the frequency of visiting and purchasing from a company) moderates the impact of the justice dimensions on post-recovery customer outcomes. Findings show that distributive justice is the only dimension impacting word-of-mouth (WOM) and repurchase behavior for low- and medium-relationship-activity customer segments. For a high-relationship-activity segment, all justice dimensions have a positive and balanced impact on WOM and/or repurchase behavior. This research demonstrates the potential of a segmented approach for recovery, while also providing managers with valuable insights into how they can use readily available information to adapt their service recovery efforts.

  • 2.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Otterbring, Tobias
    University of Agder, NOR; Institute of Retail Economics, SWE.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Science, NOR.
    Money for nothing?: The impact of compensation on customer bad-mouthing behavior in service recovery encounters2023In: Marketing letters, ISSN 0923-0645, E-ISSN 1573-059X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 69-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As one of the retailer’s most potent recovery tactics to offset disgruntled customers, firms invest heavily in compensation to increase customer satisfaction and improve loyalty. However, the effectiveness of this tactic remains unclear. This study examines whether firm-offered compensation affects customers’ emotional responses and bad-mouthing behavior (i.e., telling others about a particular problem). Importantly, the study investigates whether the level of collaboration during the recovery encounter moderates the link between compensation and customers’ emotional responses, and whether collaborative efforts influence the effectiveness of compensation. The findings indicate that collaboration during the recovery encounter is necessary if compensation is to mitigate negative emotional responses, with downstream effects on bad-mouthing behavior. In confirming the importance of collaboration during recovery encounters, the findings have critical managerial and financial implications.

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  • 3.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Dept Mkt, N-2411 Elverum, Norway..
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Tjansteforskning CTF, Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Dept Mkt, N-2411 Elverum, Norway..
    Moving Toward Collaborative Service Recovery: A Multiactor Orientation2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service recovery research has traditionally been firm-centric, focusing primarily on the time and effort expended by firms in addressing service failures. The subsequent shift to a customer-centric orientation addressed the customer's role in recovery situations, and the recent dyadic orientation has explored the effectiveness of their joint efforts. However, earlier conceptualizations failed to take adequate account of the complexity of service recovery encounters in which multiple actors collaborate and integrate resources. This study explores how multiactor collaborations influence the customer's experience of service recovery by adopting a multiactor orientation and by applying service-dominant logic. After reviewing the customer experience literature, a collaborative recovery experience framework is developed that emphasizes the joint efforts of multiple actors and customers to achieve a favorable recovery experience. In a contextualization, the usefulness of the new framework to explain customer experiences in collaborative service processes is shown. Finally, further research avenues are proposed.

  • 4.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Gruber, Thorsten
    The Influence of Collaborative Judgement on Customer’s Service Recovery Experience2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Åkesson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Gruber, Thorsten
    Conceptualizing the Holistic Co-recovery Customer Experience2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ben Letaifa, Soumaya
    et al.
    Univ Quebec, Dept Strategy, CP 8888 Succursale Ctr Ville, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    The role of social platforms in transforming service ecosystems2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 1933-1938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to define and conceptualize the role of social platforms in transforming service ecosystems. The study explores how prime social movers use social platforms to enable transformation. The empirical context is Tunisia, a-service ecosystem in transformation from repression to democracy. The study builds on ecosystems within management research and service ecosystem frameworks in service-dominant logic (SDL) and describe and analyze the process of institutionalization of social change. Using narratives from interviews, the research focuses on how people, especially social movers during the Arab Spring in Tunisia come together and integrate disruptive social resources to make a social revolution a reality. This study contributes with: (1) a comprehensive conceptualization of the role of social platforms in the institutionalization of a social change, (2) clarifying the change of social transformation that starts with people, evolves to meso and macro levels, and transforms society, and (3) identifying a new service transformation framework for service ecosystems. 

  • 7.
    Dehling, Sebastian
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    How do actors coordinate for value creation?: A signaling and screening perspective on resource integration2022In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Although service research typically asserts that institutions coordinate actors' value creation processes, institutions and resources are not necessarily transparent, aligned, or pre-existing. This paper aims to develop a more granular perspective on how actors coordinate for value. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on the established concepts of signaling and screening theory, this paper adopts a service marketing perspective to explore how independent heterogeneous actors coordinate for value creation at the individual level. Illustrative cases of corporate startup collaborations are presented in support of the proposed conceptual framework. Findings Actors share and acquire information through signaling and screening activities in a coordinative dialogue with other actors. These resource integration activities (for resource creation and matching) affect actors' valuations and future actions. Originality/value The one-sided explanations of coordination in the existing literature reflect the dominance of the institutional theory. By contrast, the proposed agency-oriented perspective based on the integration of signaling and screening functions offers a more granular conceptualization of the resource integration process. As well as capturing how actors use coordinating dialogue to match resources and institutions, this account also shows that matching is a core element of resource integration rather than an antecedent. The findings indicate paths for future research that focus on the actor.

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  • 8.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Kristensson, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    New service development from the perspective of value co-creation in a service system2014In: Handbook on Research in Service Marketing / [ed] Roland T Rust, Ming-Hui Hung, Boston: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Kleinaltenkamp, M
    McHugh, P
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Watts, J
    Windahl, C
    Institutional logics matter2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael
    Freie Universita¨t Berlin, Germany.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Hedmark University College, Norway.
    McHugh, Patricia
    National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Institutional logics matter when coordinating resource integration2014In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 291-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration has become an important concept in marketing literature. However, little is known about the systemic nature of resource integration and the ways the activities of resource integrators are coordinated and adjusted to each other. Therefore, we claim that institutions are the coordinating link that have impact on value cocreation efforts and are the reference base for customers’ value assessment. When conceptualizing the systemic nature of resource integration, we include the regulative, normative, and cognitive institutions and institutional logics. This article provides a framework and a structure for identifying and analyzing the influence of institutional logics on resource integration in service systems.                  

  • 11.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Norway.
    Service Systems as a Foundation for Resource Integration and Value Co-creation2012In: Toward a Better Understanding of the Role of Value in Markets and Marketing: Special Issue / [ed] Naresh K. Malhotra, Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, Vol. 9, p. 79-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim is to introduce a sociological perspective on resource integration and value co-creation into service research using a service systems approach. Methodology/approach - Conceptual and a case study of the service system a Telecom Equipment and Service Provider is embedded in is reported. Findings - The service practice of the service system is framed by social structures of signification, legitimation, and domination. However, the practice is also independent of the structures since it is embedded in and shapes the structural realm. Research implications and limitations - Drawing on structuration and practice theory, the chapter offers a new framework describing how social and service structures and practices can inform and reveal mechanisms of service system dynamics. Based on the framework, three propositions are developed focusing on the mechanisms of resource integration and value co-creation. The implications need to be generalized in future research by studying other empirical contexts. Practical implications - The chapter provides some tentative guidelines on how organizations can design service systems that enable and support customers and other actors in their resource integration and value co-creation processes by paying attention to social structures and forces and not only resources as such. Originality - The chapter explicates how social structures have implications for value co-creation and resource integration in service system. It makes systematic use of structuration and practice theory to understand the social dimensions of service systems. A distinction between intended and realized resource integration is made.

  • 12.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    A new conceptualization of service innovation grounded in SD-logic and service systems2013In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Components of a Complex ServiceSystem2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Conceptualizing Service Innovation: Value co-creating Relationships in Service Systems2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Crisis behaviors as drivers of value co-creation transformation2022In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The paper aims to conceptualize how behavioral shifts in times of crisis drive the transformation of value co-creation. Design/methodology/approach Referencing two empirical contexts, the paper explores how digital service platforms facilitate changes in actors' mental models and institutional arrangements (legal, social, technological) that drive transformation of value co-creation in service ecosystems. Findings The proposed conceptual framework contributes to existing research by identifying micro-level changes in actors' mental models and macro-level changes in institutional arrangements enabled by digital service platforms in service ecosystems. In particular, the framework identifies motivation, agility and resistance as moderators of behavioral shifts in times of crisis. This account offers a finer-grained theorization of the moderating factors and underlying mechanisms of service ecosystem transformation but does not extend to the ensuing "new normal." Practical implications The proposed framework indicates how digital platforms support shifts in actors' behavior and contribute to the transformation of value co-creation. While the enablers are situation-specific and may therefore vary according to the prevailing conditions, the actor-related concepts advanced here seem likely to remain relevant when analyzing the transformation of value co-creation in other crisis situations. Originality/value The new conceptual framework advanced here clarifies how behavioral shifts during a crisis drive the transformation of value co-creation and suggests directions for future research.

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  • 16.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    How platforms foster service innovations2020In: Organizational Dynamics, ISSN 0090-2616, E-ISSN 1873-3530, Vol. 49, no 3, article id 100721Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    New service development: Key concepts and performance drivers2023In: Elgar Encyclopedia of Services / [ed] Faïz Gallouj, Camal Gallouj, Marie-Christine Monnoyer, Luis Rubalcaba, Markus Scheuer, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Encyclopedia of Services is a ground-breaking resource that offers a unique overview of what constitutes the main source of wealth and employment in our contemporary economies, namely services. This title contains one or more Open Access chapters.

  • 18.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Overview of the Book2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of Service Management / [ed] Bo Edvardsson, Bård Tronvoll, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, 1st, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Handbook of Service Management has a broad scope and includes different perspectives of the diverse and complex service management field. The book is structured in five broad themes: service management, service strategy, service leadership and transition, service design and innovation, service interaction, quality and operation and technology in service. We have included contributions for different academic disciplines such as marketing, management, human resources, service operations management, informatics, and computer science to secure different perspectives. More than 100 service scholars from around the world have contributed with a total of 47 chapters. This introductory chapter provides a brief summary of each chapter and a definition of service management.

  • 19.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, BårdKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    The Palgrave Handbook of Service Management2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    his handbook provides an innovative, thorough overview of service management. It draws together an impressive, international group of leading scholars who offer a truly global perspective, exploring current literature and laying out guidance for future research. Beginning with defining service as a perspective on value creation, and service management as “a set of organizational competencies for enabling and realizing value creation through service,” it then moves on to follow the evolution of service research. From there, the book is structured into six main themes: perspectives on service management; service strategy; service leadership and transition; service design and innovation; service interaction; quality and operations; and service management and technology. This book is valuable reading for academics, lecturers, and students studying service management, operations management, and service research. 

  • 20.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Value co-creation and value-in-context:: Understanding the influence of duality of structures2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Gruber, Thorsten
    Expanding understanding of service exchange and value co-creation: a social construction apporach2011In: Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, ISSN 0092-0703, E-ISSN 1552-7824, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 327-339Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Hedmark Univ Coll, Elverum, Norway.
    Höykinpuro, R
    Complex service recovery processes: how to avoid triple deviation2011In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, E-ISSN 1758-8030, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 331-349Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    A conceptualisation of service innovation as reconfiguration of actors, resources and institutions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration.
    Key concepts in Service Innovation Research - ACTORS, RESOURCES AND INSTITUTIONS2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Understanding Key Market Challenges Through Service Innovation2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of Service Management / [ed] Bo Edvardsson, Bård Tronvoll, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, 1st, p. 613-627Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation is a crucial source of competitive advantage across firms and markets and has become critical to firm growth and profitability. Firms face market challenges both when designing and introducing new service offerings to the market. Service innovation can be used as a lens to understand how firms can overcome market challenges to improve their performance. This chapter provides an integrating framework to explain three key market challenges: novelty, diffusion and value capture from the perspective of engaged actors. The chapter shows how the framework can be applied and finishes with some theoretical implications and managerial guidelines. 

  • 26.
    Findsrud, Rolf Gunnar
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Hedmark University Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway..
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group.
    CONCEPTUALIZING RESOURCE INTEGRATION IN VALUE CO-CREATION USING THEORIES OF MOTIVATION2016In: WHAT'S AHEAD IN SERVICE RESEARCH?: NEW PERSPECTIVES FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIETY / [ed] RussoSpena, T & Mele, C, UNIV NAPLES FEDERICO II, DEPT ECON MGMT & INST , 2016, p. 165-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although resource integration plays a vital role in value co-creation not much attention has been on defining, conceptualizing and theorizing this phenomenon within Service dominant logic. The focus has so far been on actors' knowledge and skills, but not on how motivation drives actors in their resource integration. By bringing theories of motivation to resource integration process, this paper extends the conceptualization of resource integration within service dominant logic to encompass drivers of actors' activities including factors affecting the prioritizing and intensity of effort, and sustainability of the service ecosystem. This paper offers eight premises that conceptualize resource integration in value co-creation processes.

  • 27.
    Findsrud, Rolf Gunnar
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Motivation: The missing driver for theorizing about resource integration2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 493-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration is vital to value co-creation. However, most research focuses on competencies as enablers of resource integration and the social aspects that guide them. Based on a literature review of resource integration and motivation theories, this article proposes including motivation as a driver of resource integration and integrating concepts from motivation theories into the resource integration process. This approach extends the understanding and conceptualization of actors’ resource integration processes, such that motivation determines the direction, intensity, and persistence of effort. When they engage in behavioral and cognitive activities, actors interact with resources, which informs the actors and influences their competences and motivation. Accordingly, motivation is central for a clear understanding of the psychological mechanisms of resource integration processes, as motivation expands the explanatory power of sociological factors by including intensity and persistence.

  • 28.
    Hekkula, Anu
    et al.
    HANKEN School of Economics.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    HANKEN School of Economics.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Different approaches to service innovation and their contribution of value co-creation2013In: 1st Workshop on service innovation research. / [ed] Bo Edvardsson , Maria Colurcio , Lars Witell, Rome: Aracne editrice, 2013, p. 37-42Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Högström, Claes
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. BI Norwegian Sch Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Tronvoll, Bard
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center. Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Strategic brand management: Archetypes for managing brands through paradoxes2015In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 391-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although brands are acknowledged as significant assets in a firm's value creation and differentiation process, branding literature often describes opposing perspectives and contradictory demands. This article develops a framework of three strategic brand management archetypes that provide new insights into the complexity and often paradoxical ambiguity of branding. By combining an empirical qualitative study with extant brand management and relational exchange theory, the authors suggests that firms create, reinforce, switch, or allow certain brand management archetypes to coexist to optimize specific effects and manage paradoxes. From a managerial perspective, the article suggests that understanding strategic brand management and related paradoxes is fundamental for organizations to achieve desired effects with their value creation. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc All rights reserved.

  • 30.
    Högström, Claes
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Høyskolen i Hedmark.
    The enactment of socially embedded service systems: Fear and resourcing in the London Borough of Sutton2012In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 427-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognising the importance of value-creating systems in action is vital for understanding how value is co-created through resource integration and mutual service provision. Value-creating systems are inherently dynamic and grounded in on-going human action. This article adopts structuration and enactment theory to enhance insights into how complex systems enable value co-creation. The concept of embeddedness (structural, cultural, political and cognitive) clarifies the duality of complex service system structures, in which behaviour and structure are intertwined through a process of socialisation. Actors in a complex service system act on the surrounding context and interpret the contextual responses of their actions through a sense-making process. The sense-making process then influences an actor’s mental models of the value that has been co-created, which implies a complex service system that has been socially constructed through negotiation and consensually validated through its own enactment. This study applies the framework to a case setting focused on fear of crime in the London Borough of Sutton.

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  • 31.
    Karpen, Ingo Oswald
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Jaakkola, Elina
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Conduit, Jodie
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Circular service management: toward conceptual understanding and service research priorities for a more sustainable future2023In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 50-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Service managers increasingly strive to achieve sustainability through strategies centered on circularity. With a focus on saving, extending and (re)generating resources and their enclosing service systems, circularity can contribute to environmental, social and financial gains. Yet, the notion of circularity is surprisingly understudied in service research. This article seeks to provide an initial conceptual understanding of circular service management, introducing illustrative strategies and research priorities for circular service management. This paper provides a roadmap for scholars, practitioners and policymakers to develop a deeper understanding of the opportunities from adopting circular services. Design/methodology/approach: The authors explore the concept of circular service management by drawing upon existing literature on sustainability, circularity and service research. Strategies of circular service management and research priorities emerge on the basis of industry best practice examples and research on sustainability challenges and opportunities. Findings: Service researchers have largely ignored the concept and role of circularity for service businesses. Extant research on the topic nearly exclusively features in non-service journals and/or does not seek to advance service theory through circularity. This article argues that circular service management enables the implementation of service thinking in the pursuit of sustainability and outlines four types of circular service management strategies. Originality/value: The authors introduce the concept of circular service management and highlight the role of service research for designing and managing circular systems and operations. This article also offers a research agenda connecting managerial challenges and opportunities with key service research priorities for circular service management. This provides a roadmap for scholars, practitioners and policymakers to develop a deeper understanding of pursuing circular services, thereby contributing to a more sustainable future. 

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  • 32.
    Koskela-Huotari, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Emergence of novel resources in service ecosystems2018In: The SAGE Handbook of Service-Dominant Logic / [ed] Vargo, S. L. and Lusch, R. F., London: Sage Publications, 2018, p. 372-387Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Polese, Francesco
    et al.
    Univ Salerno, Italy.
    Pels, Jaqueline
    Univ Torcuato Tella, Argentina.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Hedmark Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Bruni, Roberto
    Univ Cassino & Southern Lazio, Italy.
    Carrubbo, Luca
    Univ Salerno, Italy.
    A4A relationships2017In: Journal of service theory and practice, ISSN 2055-6225, E-ISSN 2055-6233, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1040-1056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of actors that allow them to relate to others actors in the system through shared intentionality (orientation) and the nature of the A4A relationship and the results that such interactions bring to the emergent system based on this shared purpose (finality). Design/methodology/approach - The topic is approached by theoretical analysis and conceptual development of three integrative frameworks: the sociological perspective, service-dominant logic and a particular perspective of system thinking: the viable system approach (vSa). Findings - The A4A relationships involve value co-creation based on actors integrating their resources and acting with intentionality to obtain value by providing benefits to other parties and by belonging to the emergent viable system; actor acts for other actors directly involved in the relationship generating positive effects for the whole system in which it is contextualized. Research limitations/implications - Future empirical research might better support findings. Social implications - Many social implications deriving from an augmented role of actors engaged within social relationships in co-creation exchanges. From the title of the paper A4A over on the manuscript describes numerous social inferences of actors in co-creation. Originality/value - A4A is a relationship formed by actors that interact for the benefit of the whole system in which are involved. They find own benefit from the benefit created for the system in which they live and act. In A4A relationships the value of the single actor comes from the participation to the viability of the whole system.

  • 34.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    et al.
    Linköping University .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University .
    Sorhammar, David
    Stockholm University.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Inland Norway University, Norway.
    Resource integration through digitalisation: a service ecosystem perspective2019In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 35, no 11-12, p. 974-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As digitalisation increasingly encompasses entire service ecosystems, it modifies resource integration patterns that connect ecosystem actors through strong and weak ties. To clarify how technological development contributes to this change, and how resource integration transforms the service ecosystem, this qualitative case study explores the digitalisation strategy of a market-leading systems integrator in the maritime industry. Based on 40 depth interviews with managers, the findings show how technology increasingly serves as a key operant resource in the transformation of resource integration patterns. The study contributes to ecosystem dynamics research by identifying major differences between the pre-digitalised and digitalised states of a service ecosystem, and demonstrates the dual role of technology in both increasing pattern complexity and facilitating coordination of that complexity.

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  • 35.
    Sklyar, Alexey
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Hanken School of Economics, Finland; Linköping University.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Organizing for digital servitization: A service ecosystem perspective2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 104, p. 450-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harnessing digital technology is of increasing concern as product firms organize for service-led growth. Adopting a service ecosystem perspective, we analyze interfirm and intrafirm change processes taking place as firms pursue digital servitization. The study draws on in-depth interviews with 44 managers involved in organizing activities in two multinational industry leaders. Our findings identify major differences between the two focal firms in terms of digital service-led growth and associated ecosystem-related activities. The study disentangles underlying processes of organizational change in the ecosystem and suggests that within-firm centralization and integration play a key role in the capacity to organize for digital servitization. For managers, the findings highlight the need to foster service-centricity in order to take full advantage of digitalization beyond purely technological benefits. 

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  • 36.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University.
    Managing digital servitization: A service ecosystem perspective2021In: Management and Information Technology after Digital Transformation / [ed] Peter Ekman, Peter Dahlin & Christina Keller, Routledge, 2021, p. 23-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the authors argue that, in the absence of a clear management focus on how data will create value for customers, the incumbent firm’s digital servitization journey will fail. What is required is a purposeful and coordinated effort to manage the firm’s strong and weak business relationships. Hence, it is a journey that goes beyond the individual firm and encompasses integration of resources among actors embedded within a larger structure, the service ecosystem. Incumbent firms need to recognise that going digital does not mean they can cut all of their strong “analogue” links; they need to investigate which ones will continue to be important to create value for their customers. Otherwise, the firm risks becoming data-driven but lacking any contextual competences, knowledge or skills related to solving customers’ problems. A digital servitization transformation requires maintenance of a balance between weak and strong relationships linked to creating value for – and with – customers.

  • 37. Toth, Z.
    et al.
    Kowalkowski, C.
    Sklyar, A.
    Sörhammar, D.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Wirths, O.
    A Paradox Theory Approach to Tensions in Digital Servitization: The Case of the Aerospace and Maritime Industries2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Trischler, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Rohnebaek, Maria
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Advancing Public Service Logic: moving towards an ecosystemic framework for value creation in the public service context2023In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the theoretical foundation for studying the ecosystemic nature of value creation is lacking within the public service logic (PSL). To address this limitation, the paper uses a theory synthesis to clarify service-related key concepts and develop four premises that position PSL as an ecosystemic framework. These premises 1) position PSL as a mid-range theoretical framework, 2) propose the service ecosystem as an analytical framework, 3) define service (not services) as the basis for PSL, and 4) acknowledge the mediating role of the public service organization in value co-creation. Research directions guide the future development of PSL.

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  • 39.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    A Dynamic Model of Customer Complaining Behaviour from the Perspective of Service-Dominant Logic2012In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 46, no 1/2, p. 284-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of customer complaining behaviour as a dynamic process in accordance with the service-dominant logic perspective of marketing.

    Design/methodology/approach - The study reviews the common behaviour models of customer complaints and relates this to the service-dominant logic perspective in order to develop and describe a dynamic conceptual model of customer complaining behaviour.

    Findings - The proposed model posits three categories of complaining behaviour due to a customer’s unfavourable service experience: (i) no complaining response, (ii) communication complaining responses and (iii) action complaining responses.

    Research limitations/implications - Empirical validation of the proposed conceptual model is needed.

    Practical implications - The proposed model can be used by managers to understand the various behaviour responses of customer complaints that the company experiences. In addition, the model assists in framing appropriate managerial responses, including service recovery and improved service design.

    Originality/value - The study represents a thorough conceptual examination of the complaint process and proposes a dynamic model of customer complaining behaviour based on the service-dominant logic perspective.

  • 40.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Complainer Characteristics When Exit is Closed2007In: International Journal of Service Industry Management, ISSN 0956-4233, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 25-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Customer Complaint Behaviour in Service2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    It is vital for every service provider to get feedback from its customers.

    This is especially important when a customer has perceived an unfavourable service experience. One way to receive feedback from these customers is to encourage and make it easy for them to complain.

    Scholarly knowledge about complaint behaviour gives the service provider valuable insight about service problems and how to improve e.g. service offerings, service processes and interactions, to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty and profit. For that reason it is argued that customers who have an unfavourable service experience should be encouraged to complain, because if not, the provider risks losing the customer and thus future revenue.

    Previous research within complaint behaviour has mainly focused on the static description of motivation, antecedents, or the outcome response of complaint behaviour. The research has mainly explored different features linked to the market, the provider, the service and/or individual customer’s issues. To learn more about the customer’s complaint behaviour there is a need to take a dynamic and processual approach. This may help providers to serve customers more correctly and prevent unfavourable service experiences.

    The main aim of this dissertation is to enhance the knowledge of the dynamic behavioural processes in customer complaint behaviour. The dissertation will contribute to conceptualise different aspects of customer complaint behaviour. In addition, the dissertation will give an empirical grounded understanding of contextual and emotional aspects that may help to recognize the complexity of the complaint behaviour process.

    The contribution is a portrayal of different models describing the dynamic process of complaint behaviour including a new customer complaint behaviour model. Customer complaint behaviour is viewed as action and reaction - as a dynamic adjustment process that occurs during and/or after the service interaction, rather as a post-purchase activity. In order to capture these adjustments, a new conceptual complaint model is suggested which holds three thresholds for complaint behaviour and emphasis three different behavioural categories in the complaint process. Further, the dissertation gives an explanation of contextual and emotional issues that influence the complaint behaviour. The dissertation also includes an epistemological framework to anchor the paradigmatic belongings of service research as a basis for the design of studies in the area of customer complaint behaviour.

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  • 42.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Expanding the Scope of Service Recovery2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of Service Management / [ed] Bo Edvardsson, Bård Tronvoll, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 849-868Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex service ecosystems, service recovery becomes vital for the competitiveness and survival of both firms and their network partners. Current service recovery literature highlights three types of recovery outcomes: customer, procedural, and employee. This chapter expands the scope to argue for a fourth recovery component, the network recovery. The introduction of network recovery moves service recovery beyond its traditional customer context to include business-to-business settings. Network recovery is portrayed according to network characteristics, network structure, network relationships, and network dynamics. The proposed description of varied service recovery outcomes thus emphasizes both network recovery and a service recovery strategy.

  • 43.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Hedmark Univ Coll, Elverum, Norway.
    Negative emotions and their effect on customer complaint behaviour2011In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 111-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to investigate pre-complaint situations and has a threefold purpose: to identify a set of negative emotions experienced in unfavourable service experiences, to examine the patterns of these negative emotions and to link these negative emotions to complaint behaviour.

    Design/methodology/approach – To fulfil the threefold purpose previously outlined, the study uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. A critical incident technique is applied. The empirical data are derived from 25 in-depth interviews and the results of a questionnaire survey of 3,104 respondents.

    Findings – A total of 20 observed negative emotions are reduced to a second-order construct with five latent categories of negative emotions: shame, sadness, fear, anger and frustration. These categories coincide with three categories of negative emotions in the agency dimension: other-attributed, self-attributed and situational-attributed. The study finds that the negative emotion of frustration is the best predictor for complaint behaviour towards the service provider.

    Research limitations/implications – The results are limited by the fact that the data are entirely self-reported. Moreover, the generalisabilty of the results is limited by the fact that the findings relate to one service industry in one country.

    Originality/value – The study provides a comprehensive conceptual understanding of both pre-complaint negative emotions and how these emotions affect customer complaint behaviour.

  • 44.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Brown, Stephen W.
    Center for Services Leadership, W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.
    Gremler, Dwayne D.
    College of Business, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Paradigms in service research2011In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 560-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Recent discussions of the service-dominant logic (S-D logic) and the creation of a multidisciplinary service science highlight the need for a paradigmatic discussion that provides directions for ongoing service research. This article aims to examine different epistemological foundations and proposes a framework to describe and better understand the development and future of service research.

    Design/methodology/approach – Using the proposed framework, an assessment of 60 selected award-winning and most cited articles is categorized using the paradigmatic framework.

    Findings – Four paradigms are found to be prominent in service research: positivistic, hermeneutic, dialogic, and monologic. The positivistic option has been the dominant paradigm employed by service scholars, suggesting service scholars need to apply the three alternative paradigms more as a means to enrich and extend the service research discipline.

    Research limitations/implications – There is a need to discuss the fundamental beliefs and worldviews (ontological and epistemological positions) guiding service research. Paradigms are critical determinants and drivers of good research.

    Originality/value – A new framework for analyzing paradigmatic foundations in service research and directions for the future design of service research studies is proposed. The suggested framework could inspire scholars to reflect on their ontological and epistemological foundations and provide paradigmatic guidance within service research. This provides a basis for continuous expansion of the service research field.

  • 45.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Critical examination of academic marketing and service research’s philosophical foundation2024In: Journal of Services Marketing, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The philosophical foundations determine how an academic discipline identifies, understands and analyzes phenomena. The choice of philosophical perspective is vital for both marketing and service research. This paper aims to propose a social and systemic perspective that addresses current challenges in service and marketing research by revisiting the philosophy of science debate. Design/methodology/approach: The paper revisits the philosophy of science debate to address the implications of an emergent, complex and adaptive view of marketing and service research. It draws on critical realism by combining structuration and systemic perspectives. Findings: A recursive perspective, drawing on structures and action, is suggested as it includes multiple actors’ intentions and captures underlying drivers of market exchange as a basis for developing marketing and service strategies in practice. This is aligned with other scholars arguing for a more systemic, adaptive and complex view of markets in light of emerging streams in academic marketing and service research, ranging from value cocreation, effectuation, emergence and open source to empirical phenomena such as digitalization, robotization and the growth of international networks. Research limitations/implications: The reciprocal dynamic between individuals and the overarching system provides a reflexivity approach intrinsic to the service ecosystem. This creates new avenues for research on marketing and service phenomena. Originality/value: This paper discusses critics, conflicts and conceptualization in service research. It suggests a possible approach for service research and marketing scholars capable of responding to current complexities and turbulence in economic and societal contexts. 

  • 46.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Defining and Framing Service Management2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of Service Management / [ed] Bo Edvardsson, Bård Tronvoll, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, 1st, p. 19-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Service management is an academic discipline, a concept, and a practice, making it critical to define and illustrate. The core of service management is to carry out meaningful and vital tasks, solving problems, and realizing outcomes of value for customers, firms, and other engaged actors. Service management is focused on actor-driven processes and outcomes, organized in service ecosystems and shaped by available resources, norms, rules, and habits and defined as: “a set of competencies available for actors in the ecosystem, enabling and realizing value creation through service.” This emphasizes the crucial role of actors and their competencies for service provision, including creating value for themselves and others. Nevertheless, service management is about “getting things done”: realizing value outcomes by managing the necessary supporting prerequisites, structures, competencies, and resources.

  • 47.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Explaining how Platforms Foster Innovation in Service Ecosystems2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2418 Elverum, Norway.;Karlstad Univ, CTF Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2418 Elverum, Norway.;Karlstad Univ, CTF Serv Res Ctr, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Exploring Customers' Experiences of Service Co-Recovery2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 189-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of a service recovery situation shows that the intended service exchange has failed because resource integration has failed. In the co-recovery process, multiple actors (including the customer) interact to cocreate a favorable customer experience following this service failure. The aim of this paper is to extend an existing understanding of the activities and interactions that serve as resource integration drivers in customer co-recovery experiences. The article explores recovery situations in an interview-based empirical study. Based on the findings, the study develops an empirically derived model (5C), identifying and defining drivers of customer co-recovery and suggesting how firms should engage customers and other actors in the process. To heighten the practical implications, the study conceptualizes the customer recovery process by suggesting a "wheel of customer co-recovery" model. Overall, the article contributes to a deeper understanding of service recovery and the drivers of customers' experiences of service co-recovery.

  • 49.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    How firms configure and deploy innovation platforms to foster service innovations2020In: Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, IEEE Computer Society, 2020, p. 1608-1617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation research has extended the study of service ecosystems to embrace the role of platforms, thus creating a sustainable advantage in competitive markets. Making creative and effective use of innovation platforms requires a better understanding of how key actors foster service innovation by engaging with multiple actors, understanding dynamic structures and managing the innovation process. This article explains how firms configure and use innovation platforms to foster service innovations. Drawing on agency-driven and structure-driven concepts, the framework developed in this paper, links the innovation platform to renew ongoing business. Constituted by shared structures, including norms, standards, and rules together with value co-creation logics, the innovation platform functions as the institutionalized site focused on innovative resource integration and value co-creation processes. The usefulness of the framework is shown by describing how six firms use three categories of a platform to pursue innovation.

  • 50.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Understanding how service ecosystem actors collaborate for value cocreation2024In: A Research Agenda for Service Marketing / [ed] Olivier Furrer , Mikèle Landry , Chloé Baillod , and Jie Y. Kerguignas, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2024, p. 69-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many approaches to understanding value cocreation embedded in a service ecosystem. Usually, the value cocreation has portrayed “ecosystem as a structure.” In this chapter, the authors emphasize the ecosystem “as an agency,” focusing on the actor’s essential role. The ecosystem lens has developed with the key concepts of actors’ resources and institutional arrangements, shaping value cocreation. Some authors have defined “service ecosystems” as relatively self-contained, self-adjusting systems of resource-integrating actors connected by shared institutional arrangements and mutual value creation through service exchange. Accordingly, value cocreation in service ecosystems is “coordinated through actor-generated institutions and institutional arrangements.” However, the authors argue that the key role of actors, their collaboration, and the orchestration of research in value cocreation processes is still underdeveloped and needs more attention. Agency-structure theories should then discuss the actor’s key role for value cocreation by looking at both societal- and individual-focused realms, thus including social aspects of service ecosystems. Next, the chapter offers a brief review of the service ecosystem literature and discusses the key role of collaborating actors in service ecosystems; finally, it provides suggestions for future service research grounded in a service ecosystem view on value cocreation.

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