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  • 1. Costello, Eugene
    et al.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Transhumant pastoralism in historic landscapes: Beginning a European perspective2018In: Historical Archaeologies of Transhumance across Europe / [ed] Costello, E. & Svensson, E., Taylor & Francis, 2018, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pastoralism offers a vast field of study, and within it transhumant practices represent an important range of past and contemporary human mobility strategies. In its widest sense, transhumance may simply be described as the seasonal movement of livestock. The Oxford English Dictionary adds some environmental qualification to this by defining transhumance as “the action or practice of moving livestock from one grazing ground to another in a seasonal cycle, typically to lowlands in winter and highlands in summer”. The wide-ranging geographic and social implications of such a definition mean, of course, that the study of transhumant practices permits a very wide perspective on human society, touching on themes as diverse as livestock management, economic responsiveness, social mobility and competition for land. Furthermore, use of the relative words ‘lowlands’ and ‘highlands’ means that a considerable proportion of the earth’s surface may be considered as potential settings for transhumance. There are consequently many ways in which people might conceive of and define the practice, and there has not been one, but many transhumant pastoralisms in Europe during historical times

  • 2.
    Ullén, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Kulturkonservativa sprider lögner om Breivik2012In: Dagens industri, ISSN 0346-640X, Vol. Februari, no 26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ullén, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Lundberg förstör för konstruktiva samtal2012In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, Vol. Februari, no 27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    van Geelkerken, F.W.J.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Law.
    Biometrics in the Dutch passport: security measures or measuring security?2011In: 25th IVR World Congress of Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy: Workgroup 26: Technology and Law - Selected problems / [ed] Prof. dr. dr. hc. Ulfrid Neumann, Frankfurt am Main: Goethe Universität , 2011, p. 396-397Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    EU-regulation stipulates that all EU-passports should contain twofingerprints of the bearer embedded in an RFID-chip in the cover of the passport. The Netherlands, however, takes fourfingerprints, and next to embedding them in an RDIF-chip in the cover of a passport they are stored in one centralised database which is directly accessible for law enforcement and security services.

    A number of general cases voicing complaints about the mandatory storage of four fingerprints in a centralised database have been filed at lower courts, none of which have been declared admissible up to now. Next to that several cases of people refusing to give fingerprints are in courts at the moment.

    In my presentation I will give an overview of both the EU- and Dutch-legislation and elaborate on the different cases in court at the moment.

  • 5.
    Washington, Haydn
    et al.
    Kensington Campus, Australia.
    Chapron, Guillaume
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Kopnina, Helen
    International Business Management Studies, the Netherlands.
    Curry, Patrick
    The Ecological Citizen, United Kingdom.
    Gray, Joe
    University of London, United Kingdom.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Foregrounding ecojustice in conservation2018In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 228, p. 367-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Justice for nature remains a confused term. In recent decades justice has predominantly been limited to humanity, with a strong focus on social justice, and its spin-off – environmental justice for people. We first examine the formal rationale for ecocentrism and ecological ethics, as this underpins attitudes towards justice for nature, and show how justice for nature has been affected by concerns about dualisms and by strong anthropocentric bias. We next consider the traditional meaning of social justice, alongside the recent move by some scholars to push justice for nature into social justice, effectively weakening any move to place ecojustice centre-stage. This, we argue, is both unethical and doomed to failure as a strategy to protect life on Earth. The dominant meaning of ‘environmental justice’ – in essence, justice for humans in regard to environmental issues – is also explored. We next discuss what ecological justice (ecojustice) is, and how academia has ignored it for many decades. The charge of ecojustice being ‘antihuman’ is refuted. We argue that distributive justice can also apply to nature, including an ethic of bio-proportionality, and also consider how to reconcile social justice and ecojustice, arguing that ecojustice must now be foregrounded to ensure effective conservation. After suggesting a ‘Framework for implementing ecojustice’ for conservation practitioners, we conclude by urging academia to foreground ecojustice. © 2018

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