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  • 1.
    Ciupijus, Z.
    et al.
    Leeds university.
    MacKenzie, Robert
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Forde, C.
    Leeds university.
    The worker branch in Yorkshire as a way of organising Polish migrants: exploring the process of carving out diasporic spaces within the trade union structure2018In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While post-2004 Polish labour migration to the UK was underpinned by diasporic spaces instrumental in facilitating social and labour market adjustments, the institutions of the host society such as trade unions also sought to establish links with migrants. The analysis of interactions between UK unions and EU migrants focused on organising strategies and specific provisions such as English language learning. However, the discussion tended to ignore the impacts of diasporic influences, from ethnicity and native languages of migrants to the outcomes of migrant worker organising. Drawing on ethnographic and qualitative data, this paper discusses how Polishness, in its ethnic, historic and linguistic manifestations, has affected the internal dynamics of a migrant worker organisation created by a major UK trade union. The explicit acknowledgement of diasporic particularities of post-2004 Polish migrants not only enabled labour organising activities but also shaped the migrant worker organisation from within. The strength of diasporic influences on one hand and the chosen form of union organising on the other created conditions for the development of diasporic spaces within the institution of the host society.

  • 2. De Poli, Silvia
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Schueller, Simone
    The drowning-refugee effect: media salience and xenophobic attitudes2017In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 24, no 16, p. 1167-1172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study whether salient media coverage of refugees drowning in the Mediterranean affects individual xenophobic attitudes. We combine a randomized survey experiment - a variant of the classic trolley dilemma' - that implicitly elicits individual attitudes towards foreigners, with variation in interview timing, and find that such issue salience significantly decreases xenophobic attitudes by 2.2 percentage points. Our results thus support the idea that exposure to news describing immigrants as victims (instead of a threat) can significantly affect public opinion and mitigate bias against immigrants.

  • 3.
    Grip, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Knocking on the Doors of Integration: Swedish Integration Policy and the Production of a National Space2019In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to theoretical discussions on how immigrant integration is produced as a part of redefining national policy to local everyday practice, and what this tells us about the society in which the policy is formed. Integration is from this perspective a way to understand imagined social communities, how they are produced, who is considered to belong, and who is not. Document analysis and interviews with immigrants, local politicians, and officials in small- and medium-sized Swedish towns give insights into both what taken-for-granted assumptions the integration policy builds on and reproduces, and what consequences the integration policy have for the persons the policy is intended for. It is shown that the Swedish integration policy is itself a part of the production of a Swedish space as a container with closed doors, where immigrants are not given equal access and possibilities. This is created by putting sameness and difference at the core of the integration policy and by describing integration as an act of entering the Swedish space. © 2019, The Author(s).

  • 4.
    MacKenzie, Robert
    et al.
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Forde, Chris
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Ciupijus, Zinovious
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Networks of Support for New Migrant Communities: Institutional Goals versus Substantive Goals2012In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 631-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role of support mechanisms for new migrant communities provided by networks of statutory, third sector and refugee community organisations. The article explores the dynamics of the relationships between support groups, with analysis located in the urban context of NorthTown. The findings point to the possibility of tension between migrant support groups where there is a perceived need to compete over resources or political influence.  Moreover, it is argued that there is a risk that institutional goals of organisational sustainability may take precedence over substantive goals of support provision. The ability of support groups to assert agency in terms of strategic responses to structural constraints on sustainability is explored. It is argued that an organising logic based on the creation of a political community within the new migrant population can prove more sustainable than contingent communities based on commonalities of language or nationality.

  • 5.
    Nordfeldt, Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    A Dynamic Perspective on Homelessness: Homeless Families in Stockholm2012In: European Journal of Homelessness, ISSN 2030-2762, E-ISSN 2030-3106, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 105-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on homelessness among families with children in Sweden, and particularly on the situation of homeless families in Stockholm. The objective is to contribute to the understanding of homelessness by suggesting an intersectional analysis that both includes different levels of analysis – that is, at structural, institutional and household levels – and allows gender, class and migration parameters to be taken into consideration. On the structural level, a restructured housing market in combination with a disman-tling of housing policy has raised the threshold for entering the primary housing market, especially for individuals and families with limited economic resources. In addition to the risk of being discriminated against based on ethnicity, this restructuring has appreciably raised the difficulty of entering the market on a more general level. At the institutional level, local social authorities offer solutions to homelessness that have been developed for more traditional groups of homeless people, namely, single men with alcohol or drug problems; they lack the means to change the structural conditions of the housing market or the distribution of housing, and can only expand the secondary housing market, in which people are at risk of becoming 'trapped' as the gap between the primary and secondary housing markets becomes increasingly large. On the individual/household level, a combination of single motherhood, immigra-tion and limited financial resources clearly increases the risk of homelessness and exclusion from other social arenas.

  • 6.
    Uppal, Charu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Understanding our Stories: How Fijians perceive representation of minorities in Shortland Street2012Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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