Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 114
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alavian-Ghavanini, Ali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lin, Ping-I
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University.
    Rimfors, Sabina Risen
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lejonklou, Margareta Halin
    Uppsala University.
    Dunder, Linda
    Uppsala University.
    Tang, Mandy
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindh, Christian
    Lund University.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine Mt Sinai, New York, USA.
    Rueegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Prenatal Bisphenol A Exposure is Linked to Epigenetic Changes in Glutamate Receptor Subunit Gene Grin2b in Female Rats and Humans2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 11315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and to effects on epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, at genes involved in brain function. High doses of BPA have been shown to change expression and regulation of one such gene, Grin2b, in mice. Yet, if such changes occur at relevant doses in animals and humans has not been addressed. We investigated if low-dose developmental BPA exposure affects DNA methylation and expression of Grin2b in brains of adult rats. Furthermore, we assessed associations between prenatal BPA exposure and Grin2b methylation in 7-year old children. We found that Grin2b mRNA expression was increased and DNA methylation decreased in female, but not in male rats. In humans, prenatal BPA exposure was associated with increased methylation levels in girls. Additionally, Iow APGAR scores, a predictor for increased risk for neurodevelopmental diseases, were associated with higher Grin2b methylation levels in girls. Thus, we could link developmental BPA exposure and Iow APGAR scores to changes in the epigenetic regulation of Grin2b, a gene important for neuronal function, in a sexual dimorphic fashion. Discrepancies in exact locations and directions of the DNA methylation change might reflect differences between species, analysed tissues, exposure level and/or timing.

  • 2. Andersson, K.
    et al.
    Bakke, J. V.
    Björseth, O.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Clausen, G.
    Hongslo, J. K.
    Kjellman, M.
    Kjärgaard, S.
    Levy, F.
    Mölhave, L.
    Skerfving, S.
    Sundell, J.
    TVOC and health in non-industrial indoor environments. Report from a Nordic scientific consensus meeting at Långholmen in Stockholm1997In: Indoor Air 1997;7:78-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Angelova, Radostina
    et al.
    Bulgaria.
    Naydenov, Kiril
    Denmark.
    Hägerhed-Engman, Linda
    Swedish National Testing and Research Institute.
    Melikov, Arsen
    Danmark.
    Popov, Todor
    Bulgaria.
    Stankov, Peter
    Bulgaria.
    Bornehag, Carl Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    The response rate in postal epidemiological studies in the context of national cultural behaviour2012In: 10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012, 2012, Vol. 2, p. 1429-1434Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of national cultural differences on the response rate, obtained in questionnaire based epidemiological studies on allergy and asthma, performed in Sweden (DBH) and Bulgaria (ALLHOME). The two studies used one and the same methodology, but the obtained response rate was different: 78.8% in DBH and 34.5% in ALLHOME. The differences in the obtained response rate and the reasons for these differences were analyzed on the basis of the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions’ indexes, which clearly show the distinction in the national cultural behaviour of people in Sweden and Bulgaria. It was found that national culture could strongly influence the response behaviour of people in epidemiological studies and Hofstede’s indexes can be useful tool when designing and performing epidemiological studies, and in particular - questionnaire surveys.

  • 4. Arbuckle, T.
    et al.
    Hauser, R.
    Swan, S.
    Mao, C.
    Longnecker, M.
    Main, K.
    Whyatt, R.
    Mendola, P.
    Legrand, M.
    Rovet, J.
    Till, C.
    Wade, M.
    Jarrell, J.
    Matthews, S.
    Vliet, G.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Mieusset, R.
    Meeting report: Measuring endocrine-sensitive endpoints within the first year of life2008In: Environmental Health Perspective (in press)Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bauer, A. Z.
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA.
    Kriebel, D.
    University of Massachusetts, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA.
    Herbert, M. R.
    Harvard Medical School, Charlestown USA.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Swan, S. H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY 10029, USA.
    Prenatal paracetamol exposure and child neurodevelopment: A review2018In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The non-prescription medication paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is currently recommended as a safe pain and fever treatment during pregnancy. However, recent studies suggest a possible association between APAP use in pregnancy and offspring neurodevelopment. Objectives: To conduct a review of publications reporting associations between prenatal APAP use and offspring neurodevelopmental outcomes. Methods: Relevant sources were identified through a key word search of multiple databases (Medline, CINAHL, OVID and TOXNET) in September 2016. All English language observational studies of pregnancy APAP and three classes of neurodevelopmental outcomes (autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and intelligence quotient (IQ)) were included. One reviewer (AZB) independently screened all titles and abstracts, extracted and analyzed the data. Results: 64 studies were retrieved and 55 were ineligible. Nine prospective cohort studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Data pooling was not appropriate due to heterogeneity in outcomes. All included studies suggested an association between prenatal APAP exposure and the neurodevelopmental outcomes; ADHD, ASD, or lower IQ. Longer duration of APAP use was associated with increased risk. Associations were strongest for hyperactivity and attention-related outcomes. Little modification of associations by indication for use was reported. Conclusions: Together, these nine studies suggest an increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following prenatal APAP exposure. Further studies are urgently needed with; precise indication of use and exposure assessment of use both in utero and in early life. Given the current findings, pregnant women should be cautioned against indiscriminate use of APAP. These results have substantial public health implications.

  • 6. Bergman, Åke
    et al.
    Andersson, Anna-Maria
    Becher, Georg
    van den Berg, Martin
    Blumberg, Bruce
    Bjerregaard, Poul
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Bornman, Riana
    Brandt, Ingvar
    Brian, Jayne V
    Casey, Stephanie C
    Fowler, Paul A
    Frouin, Heloise
    Giudice, Linda C
    Iguchi, Taisen
    Hass, Ulla
    Jobling, Susan
    Juul, Anders
    Kidd, Karen A
    Kortenkamp, Andreas
    Lind, Monica
    Martin, Olwenn V
    Muir, Derek
    Ochieng, Roseline
    Olea, Nicolas
    Norrgren, Leif
    Ropstad, Erik
    Ross, Peter S
    Rudén, Christina
    Scheringer, Martin
    Skakkebaek, Niels Erik
    Söder, Olle
    Sonnenschein, Carlos
    Soto, Ana
    Swan, Shanna
    Toppari, Jorma
    Tyler, Charles R
    Vandenberg, Laura N
    Vinggaard, Anne Marie
    Wiberg, Karin
    Zoeller, R Thomas
    Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: A reply to a "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors.2013In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 12, p. 69-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU.

  • 7.
    Bjorvang, R. D.
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Gennings, C.
    Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York.
    Lin, Ping-I
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hussein, G.
    Centrasjukhuset Karlstad.
    Kiviranta, H.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Kuopio, Finland.
    Rantakokko, P.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Kuopio, Finland.
    Ruokojarvi, P.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Kuopio, Finland.
    Damdimopoulou, P.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York.
    Persistent organic pollutants, pre-pregnancy use of combined oral contraceptive and time-to-pregnancy in SELMA cohort2018In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 295, p. S63-S63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Boman Lindström, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    von Kobyletzki, Laura
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hallerbäck, M.U.
    Central Hospital Karlstad.
    Lindh, C.H.
    Lund University.
    Jönsson, B.A.
    Lund University.
    Knutz, Malin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Shu, Huan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Perfluorinated compounds in serum from 2, 373 pregnant women in Sweden2014In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, p. 927-929Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Mönsteranalys av inomhusluft: Undersökning av luftkvaliteten i sjuka hus med flytspackelproblem1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den hälsomässiga effekten som rapporteras i samband med sjuka-hus syndromet (SBS), vars orsak är okänd, kan betraktas som ett mönster av icke specifika symptom såsom irritationer i ögon, näsa och mun, upplevelser av torra sletnhinnor och hud, hudrodnad, mental trötthet och upplevelse av svag men ihållande lukt. Aven exponeringar i inomhusluften kan beskrivas som ett mönster av en mängd olika ämnen, exempelvis VOC, partiklar, sporer m. m. Detta innebär att en av svårigheterna med att undersöka SBS problem är att koppla mönster av symptom till mönster av föroreningar, vilket är mycket komplicerat. Syftet med den genomförda studien har varit att (a) undersöka om det fanns mönsterskillnader med avseende på luftföroreningar (e g. VOC) mellan bostäder med, respektive utan, kaseinhaltigt flytspackel, (b) avgöra om eventuella kritiska substanser kunde hänföras till golvkonstruktionen, (c) studera hur tekniska faktorer (eg. ventilation, temperatur, relativ luftfuktighet) var kopplade till eventuellt kritiska VOC-ämnen, (d) undersöka om det fanns skillnader i symptommönster för boende i lägenheter med, respektive utan, kaseinhaltigt flytspackel. Tekniska mätningar och enkätundersökningar med avseende på de boendes klagomål på inomhusmiljön gjordes i tre bostadsområden. Två områden med uttalade flytspackelproblem (SBS) och ett friskt referensområde. De tre bostadsområdena kunde indelas i nio olika gårdar med 50-130 lägenheter per gård. Enkätundersökningar gjordes i de nio gårdarna med en svarsfrekvens på 75-90 % (n=1309). Tekniska mätningar genomfördes i 6-10 slumpmässigt utvalda lägenheteri varje gård (n=66). De tekniska mätningarna innefattade VOC i inomhusluften (eg. TVOC, enskilda ämnen), specifik emission av VOC från golvkonstruktionen (FLEC), ventilation, temperatur, relativ luftfuktighet m.m. Mönsteranalyser gjordes med Hierchical Cluster Analysis (H CA) och Principal Component Analysis (PCA)). Studien har inte kunnat identifiera någon enskild faktor (eg. TVOC, enskilda VOCämnen, naturliga grupper av,VOC-ämnen) som på ett konsistent sätt kunde förklara de uplevda problemen. Mönsteranalysen kunde emellertid identifiera 8 kritiska ämnen som kunde associeras till lägenheter med kaseinhaltigt flytspackel. Dessa 8 ämnen var bensaldehyd, oktanal, heptanal, dekanal, nonanal, 2-etylhexanol, metylheptenon, oktan. Studien visade vidare att andelen kritiska ämnen av TVOC var signifikant högre i inomhusluften i lägenheter med kaseinhaltigt flytspackel. De två enskilda VOC-ämnena bensaldehyd och 2-etylhexanol kunde eventuellt hänföras till golvkonstruktionen med kaseinhaltigt flytspackel. Det fanns vidare en svag korrelation mellan ammoniak under golvmattor och koncentrationen av 2-etylhexanol i inomhusluften respektive koncentrationen av ammoniak i inomhusluften och en svag korrelation mellan temperatur inomhus och vissa aldehyder i inomhusluften. Slutligen kunde olika mönster av symptom identifieras. Dessa mönster bestod emellertid av naturliga grupper såsom allmänsymptom, slemhinnesymptom och hudsymptom samt klagomål på luftkvaliteten. Studien har visat att flerfaktoriella analysmetoder (mönsteranalys) kan vara en alternativt sätt att studera SBS-problem. En användning av sådana metoder innebär att stora datamaterial blir mer överskådliga vilket kan ge nya hypoteser. Det kan också innebära att ur sensorisk synvinkel mer relevanta exponeringsmått kan identifieras.

  • 10.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Phthalate exposure heralds birth defects2015In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 64, p. VI-VIArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    The shift in human health from infection-related diseases to chronic illnesses and the importance of indoor chemical exposure2018In: Handbook of Environmental Chemistry, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 109-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been recently estimated that the pattern of the global burden of diseases – expressed as disability-adjusted life years (DALY) – has changed over the last 20 years and a shift from communicable disorders to noncommunicable disorders has been observed. This shift is more pronounced in high-incomecountries. Even though there is lack of knowledge regarding the cause(s) behind the increase in chronic diseases/disorders, there are scientifically based suspicions that environmental factors do play an important role in interaction with genetic predisposition. Especially diffuse emissions of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from consumer products are a matter of concern. The four reasons for concern with human EDC exposure are: The low-dose effect and a non-monotonic dose-response relationshipEarly life sensitivity and the persistency of effectsThe large number of EDC sources in our daily lifeThe wide range of health effects A full chain model is proposed which is following chemicals from their sources over environmental exposures in food, air, and dust over to human uptake and finally to human health effects. The model also includes modifying factors for environmental exposures, different pathways for human uptake, and biological mechanisms involved in health effects. With scientific information in this model risk management should be possible and result in preventive actions in order to reduce children’s exposure to health relevant factors. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.

  • 12.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Arne, M
    Janson, C
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Boman, G
    Emtner, M
    Physical activity and quality of life in subjects with chronic diseases; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared to rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 141-147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Blomquist, G.
    Gyntelberg, F.
    Järvholm, B.
    Malmberg, P.
    Nordvall, L.
    Nielsen, A.
    Pershagen, G.
    Sundell, J.
    Dampness in Buildings and Health. Nordic interdisciplinary review of the scientific evidence on associations between exposure to dampness and health effects, NORDDAMP2001In: Indoor Air 2001;11:72-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Bonini, S.
    Custovic, A.
    Malmberg, P.
    Matricardi, P.
    Skerfving, S.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Verhoeff, A.
    Sundell, J.
    Dampness in Buildings as a Risk Factor for Health Effects, EUROEXPO. A multidisciplinary review of the literature (1998-2000) on dampness and mite exposure in buildings and health effects2004In: Indoor Air 2004;14:243-257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Carlstedt, Fredrik
    Cty Council Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Bo A. G.
    Lund Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Lindh, Christian H.
    Lund Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Jensen, Tina K.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Environm Med, Odense, Denmark..
    Bodin, Anna
    Cty Council Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Carin
    Cty Council Varmland, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Swan, Shanna H.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Prenatal Phthalate Exposures and Anogenital Distance in Swedish Boys2015In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Phthalates are used as plasticizers in soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and in a large number of consumer products. Because of reported health risks, diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) has been introduced as a replacement for di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in soft PVC. This raises concerns because animal data suggest that DiNP may have antiandrogenic properties similar to those of DEHP. The anogenital distance (AGD)-the distance from the anus to the genitals-has been used to assess reproductive toxicity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the associations between prenatal phthalate exposure and AGD in Swedish infants. METHODS: AGD was measured in 196 boys at 21 months of age, and first-trimester urine was analyzed for 10 phthalate metabolites of DEP (diethyl phthalate), DBP (dibutyl phthalate), DEHP, BBzP (benzylbutyl phthalate), as well as DiNP and creatinine. Data on covariates were collected by questionnaires. RESULTS: The most significant associations were found between the shorter of two AGD measures (anoscrotal distance; AGDas) and DiNP metabolites and strongest for oh-MMeOP [mono(4-methyl-7-hydroxyloctyl) phthalate] and oxo-MMeOP [mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate]. However, the AGDas reduction was small (4%) in relation to more than an interquartile range increase in DiNP exposure. CONCLUSIONS: These findings call into question the safety of substituting DiNP for DEHP in soft PVC, particularly because a shorter male AGD has been shown to relate to male genital birth defects in children and impaired reproductive function in adult males and the fact that human levels of DiNP are increasing globally.

  • 16.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Choi, H
    Schmidbauer, N
    Spengler, J
    Sundell, J
    Sources of propylene glycol and glycol ethers in air at home2010In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 4213-4237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Choi, H
    Schmidbauer, N
    Spengler, J
    Sundell, J
    Hasselgren, M
    Common Household Chemicals and the Allergy Risks in Pre-School Age Children2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, MSSM, New York.
    Gennings, C.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, MSSM, New York.
    A novel approach to chemical mixture risk assessment: Linking data from population based epidemiology and experimental animal tests2018In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 295, p. S52-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hederos, C-A
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hedlin, G
    Six-year follow-up of an intervention to improve the management of preschool children with asthma2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1939-1944Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Holme, J
    Hagerhed-Engman, L
    Sundell, J
    Mattsson, J
    Culturable mold in indoor air and its association with moisture-related problems and asthma and allergy among Swedish children2010In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 20, p. 329-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, United States.
    Kitraki, E.
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greec.
    Stamatakis, A.
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Panagiotidou, E.
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greec.
    Rudén, C.
    tockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shu, H.
    tockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindh, C.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ruegg, J.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gennings, C.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, United States.
    A Novel Approach to Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment—Linking Data from Population-Based Epidemiology and Experimental Animal Tests2019In: Risk Analysis, ISSN 0272-4332, E-ISSN 1539-6924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans are continuously exposed to chemicals with suspected or proven endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Risk management of EDCs presents a major unmet challenge because the available data for adverse health effects are generated by examining one compound at a time, whereas real-life exposures are to mixtures of chemicals. In this work, we integrate epidemiological and experimental evidence toward a whole mixture strategy for risk assessment. To illustrate, we conduct the following four steps in a case study: (1) identification of single EDCs (“bad actors”)—measured in prenatal blood/urine in the SELMA study—that are associated with a shorter anogenital distance (AGD) in baby boys; (2) definition and construction of a “typical” mixture consisting of the “bad actors” identified in Step 1; (3) experimentally testing this mixture in an in vivo animal model to estimate a dose–response relationship and determine a point of departure (i.e., reference dose [RfD]) associated with an adverse health outcome; and (4) use a statistical measure of “sufficient similarity” to compare the experimental RfD (from Step 3) to the exposure measured in the human population and generate a “similar mixture risk indicator” (SMRI). The objective of this exercise is to generate a proof of concept for the systematic integration of epidemiological and experimental evidence with mixture risk assessment strategies. Using a whole mixture approach, we could find a higher rate of pregnant women under risk (13%) when comparing with the data from more traditional models of additivity (3%), or a compound-by-compound strategy (1.6%).

  • 22.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
    Lindh, C.
    Lunds universitet.
    Reichenberg, A.
    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.
    Wikström, S.
    Örebro University.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Evans, S. F.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
    Sathyanarayana, S.
    University of Washington, Seattle.
    Barrett, E. S.
    Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ.
    Nguyen, R. H. N.
    University of Minnesota.
    Bush, N. R.
    University of California, San Francisco.
    Swan, S. H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
    Association of Prenatal Phthalate Exposure with Language Development in Early Childhood2018In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 172, no 12, p. 1169-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Prenatal exposure to phthalates has been associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes, but little is known about the association with language development. Objective: To examine the association of prenatal phthalate exposure with language development in children in 2 population-based pregnancy cohort studies. Design, Setting, and Participants: Data for this study were obtained from the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and Child, Asthma and Allergy (SELMA) study conducted in prenatal clinics throughout Värmland county in Sweden and The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES) conducted in 4 academic centers in the United States. Participants recruited into both studies were women in their first trimester of pregnancy who had literacy in Swedish (SELMA) or English or Spanish (TIDES). This study included mothers and their children from both the SELMA study (n = 963) and TIDES (n = 370) who had complete data on prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite levels, language delay, and modeled covariables. For SELMA, the data were collected from November 1, 2007, to June 30, 2013, and data analysis was conducted from November 1, 2016, to June 30, 2018. For TIDES, data collection began January 1, 2010, and ended March 29, 2016, and data analysis was performed from September 15, 2016, to June 30, 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mothers completed a language development questionnaire that asked the number of words their children could understand or use at a median of 30 months of age (SELMA) and 37 months of age (TIDES). The responses were categorized as fewer than 25, 25 to 50, and more than 50 words, with 50 words or fewer classified as language delay. Results: In the SELMA study, 963 mothers, 455 (47.2%) girls, and 508 [52.8%] boys were included. In TIDES, 370 mothers, 185 (50.0%) girls, and 185 (50.0%) boys were included in this analysis. The prevalence of language delay was 10.0% in both SELMA (96 reported) and TIDES (37 reported), with higher rates of delay in boys than girls (SELMA: 69 [13.5%] vs 27 [6.0%]; TIDES: 12 [12.4%] vs 14 [7.6%]). In crude analyses, the metabolite levels of dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate were statistically significantly associated with language delay in both cohorts. In adjusted analyses, a doubling of prenatal exposure of dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate metabolites increased the odds ratio (OR) for language delay by approximately 25% to 40%, with statistically significant results in the SELMA study (dibutyl phthalate OR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.03-1.63; P =.03]; butyl benzyl phthalate OR, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.07-1.49; P =.003]). A doubling of prenatal monoethyl phthalate exposure was associated with an approximately 15% increase in the OR for language delay in the SELMA study (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.31; P =.05), but no such association was found in TIDES (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.23). Conclusions and Relevance: In findings from this study, prenatal exposure to dibutyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate was statistically significantly associated with language delay in children in both the SELMA study and TIDES. These findings, along with the prevalence of prenatal exposure to phthalates, the importance of language development, and the inconsistent results from a 2017 Danish study, suggest that the association of phthalates with language delay may warrant further examination.

  • 23.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Larsson, Malin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Boman Lindström, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hasselgren, Mikael
    Centre for Clinical Research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad.
    Bodin, Anna
    Centre for Clinical Research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Centre for Clinical Research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad.
    Carlstedt, Fredrik
    Centre for Clinical Research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    Centre for Clinical Research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad.
    Nånberg, Eewa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Jönsson, Bo A. G.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University.
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Department of Public Health, Unit of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    The SELMA study: a birth cohort study in Sweden following more than 2000 mother-child pairs2012In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 456-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  This paper describes the background, aim and study design for the Swedish SELMA study that aimed to investigate the importance of early life exposure during pregnancy and infancy to environmental factors with a major focus on endocrine disrupting chemicals for multiple chronic diseases/disorders in offspring.

    Methods:  The cohort was established by recruiting women in the 10th week of pregnancy. Blood and urine from the pregnant women and the child and air and dust from home environment from pregnancy and infancy period have been collected. Questionnaires were used to collect information on life styles, socio-economic status, living conditions, diet and medical history.

    Results:  Of the 8394 reported pregnant women, 6658 were invited to participate in the study. Among the invited women, 2582 (39%) agreed to participate. Of the 4076 (61%) non-participants, 2091 women were invited to a non-respondent questionnaire in order to examine possible selection bias. We found a self-selection bias in the established cohort when compared with the non-participant group, e.g. participating families did smoke less (14% vs. 19%), had more frequent asthma and allergy symptoms in the family (58% vs. 38%), as well as higher education among the mothers (51% vs. 36%) and more often lived in single-family houses (67% vs. 60%).

    Conclusions:  These findings indicate that the participating families do not fully represent the study population and thus, the exposure in this population. However, there is no obvious reason that this selection bias will have an impact on identification of environmental risk factors.

  • 24.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Reichenber, A.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States.
    Swan, S. H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States.
    Language Development of Young Children Is Not Linked to Phthalate Exposure: Reply2019In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 173, no 5, p. 499-499Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reichenberg, Avi
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Wikström, Sverre
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Koch, Holger M.
    Institute of the Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany.
    Jonsson, B. A.
    Lund University.
    Swan, Shanna H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen and children's language development at 30 months2018In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 51, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine prenatal APAP exposure in relation to language development in offspring at 30 months of age. Method: A population-based pregnancy cohort study including 754 women who enrolled in the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal, Mother and child, Asthma and allergy (SELMA) study in pregnancy week 8-13. Two exposure measures were used: (1) maternally reported number of APAP tablets taken between conception and enrollment; (2) APAP urinary concentration at enrollment. Language development at 30 months was assessed by nurse's evaluation and parental questionnaire, including the number of words the child used (<25, 25-50 and >50). Main study outcome; parental report of use of fewer than 50 words, termed language delay (LD). Results: 59.2% of women enrolled in weeks 8-13 reported taking APAP between conception and enrollment. APAP was measurable in all urine samples and urinary APAP was correlated with the number of APAP taken during pregnancy (P < 0.01). Language delay was more prevalent in boys (12.6%) than girls (4.1%) (8.5% in total). Both the number of APAP tablets and urinary APAP concentration were associated with greater LD in girls but not in boys. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for LD among girls whose mothers reported >6 vs. 0 APAP tablets was 5.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-31.94). The OR for LD in girls whose mothers' urinary APAP was in the highest compared to the lowest quartile was 10.34 (95% CI 1.37-77.86). While it cannot be ruled out, our available data do not support confounding by indication. Conclusions: Given the prevalence of prenatal APAP use and the importance of language development, these findings, if replicated, would suggest that pregnant women should limit their use of this analgesic during pregnancy. (C) 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reichenberg, Avi
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Wikström, Sverre
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Koch, Holger M.
    Institute of the Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany.
    Swan, Shanna H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reply to Shukla et al., Commentary on: Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen and children's language development at 30 months2018In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 51, p. 86-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundel, Jan
    Tech Univ Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    The Full Chain Model Following SVOCs Indoor From Sources to Health Effects2011In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 22, no 1, p. S160-S160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J
    The healthy pet keeping effect2004In: Allergy 2004;59(5):554Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Hagerhed, L.
    Janson, S.
    Pet-keeping in early childhood and airway, nose and skin symptoms later in life2003In: Allergy 2003;58(9):939-944Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Hagerhed-Engman, L.
    Sigsggard, T.
    Janson, S.
    Aberg, N.
    Dampness at home and its association with airway, nose and skin symptoms among 10 851 preschool children in Sweden: a cross sectional study2005In: Indoor Air 2005 15 (Suppl 10) 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Hägerhed-Engman, L.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Ventilation rate in 390 Swedish homes and the association to allergic symptoms in children. A case control study2005In: Indoor Air 2005 15:275-280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Lundgren, B.
    Weschler, C.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Hägerhed-Engman, L.
    Phthalates in indoor dust indoor and their association to building characteristics2005In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 113, no 10, p. 1399-1404-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study of 198 Swedish children with persistent allergic symptoms and 202 controls without such symptoms, we reported associations between the symptoms and the concentrations of n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in dust taken from the childrens' bedrooms. In the present study we examined associations between the concentrations of different phthalate esters in the dust from these bedrooms and various characteristics of the home. The study focused on BBzP and DEHP because these were the phthalates associated with health complaints. Associations have been examined using parametric and nonparametric tests as well as multiple logistic regression. For both BBzP and DEHP, we found associations between their dust concentrations and the amount of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) used as flooring and wall material in the home. Furthermore, high concentrations of BBzP (above median) were associated with self-reported water leakage in the home, and high concentrations of DEHP were associated with buildings constructed before 1960. Other associations, as well as absence of associations, are reported. Both BBzP and DEHP were found in buildings with neither PVC flooring nor wall covering, consistent with the numerous additional plasticized materials that are anticipated to be present in a typical home. The building characteristics examined in this study cannot serve as complete proxies for these quite varied sources. However, the associations reported here can help identify homes where phthalate concentrations are likely to be elevated and can aid in developing mitigation strategies.

  • 33.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Dampness in buildings and health (DBH). Report from an on-going epidemiological investigation on the association between indoor environmental factors and health effects among children in Sweden2004In: Indoor Air. 2004;14 (Suppl 7):59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Janson, S.
    Potential self-selection bias in a case control study on indoor environmental factors and their association to asthma and allergy among pre-school children2006In: Scandinavian J Public Health 2006 34(5):534-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundell, J.
    Weschler, C.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Potential selection biases2005In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 112, p. 1393-1397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sundell,, J.
    Weschler, C.J.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Lundgren, B.
    Hasselgren, M.
    Hägerhed-Engman, L.
    The association between asthma and allergic symptoms in children and phthalates in house dust: a nested case-control study2004In: Environmental Health Perspective 2004;112(14):1393-1397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Bölling, Anette
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Holme, Jörn
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nygaard, Unni C
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Bertelsen, Randi
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Nånberg, Eewa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bodin, Johanna
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Sakhi, Amrit Kaur
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Thomsen, Cathrine
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Becher, Rune
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
    Pulmonary phthalate exposure and asthma: Is PPAR a plausible mechanistic link?2013In: EXCLI Journal, ISSN 1611-2156, E-ISSN 1611-2156, Vol. 12, p. 733-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their extensive use as plasticisers in numerous consumer products, phthalates have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. An increasing number of epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to phthalates may be associated with worsening or development of airway diseases. Peroxisome Proliferation Activated Receptors (PPAR)s, identified as important targets for phthalates in early studies in rodent liver, have been suggested as a possible mechanistic link. In this review we discuss the likelihood of an involvement of PPARs in asthma development and exacerbation due to pulmonary phthalate exposure. First, we go through the literature on indoor air levels of phthalates and pulmonary phthalate kinetics. These data are then used to estimate the pulmonary phthalate levels due to inhalation exposure. Secondly, the literature on phthalate-induced activation or modulation of PPARs is summarized. Based on these data, we discuss whether pulmonary phthalate exposure is likely to cause PPAR activation, and if this is a plausible mechanism for adverse effects of phthalates in the lung. It is concluded that the pulmonary concentrations of some phthalates may be sufficient to cause a direct activation of PPARs. Since PPARs mainly mediate antiinflammatory effects in the lungs, a direct activation is not a likely molecular mechanism for adverse effects of phthalates. However, possible modulatory effects of phthalates on PPARs deserve further investigation, including partial antagonist effects and/or cross talk with other signalling pathways. Moreover other mechanisms, including interactions between phthalates and other receptors, could also contribute to possible adverse pulmonary effects of phthalates.

  • 38.
    Callesen, M.
    et al.
    Denmark.
    Weschler, C.
    Denmark.
    Jensen, T.
    Denmark.
    Clausen, G.
    Denmark.
    Toftum, J.
    Denmark.
    Beko, G.
    Denmark.
    Bornehag, Carl Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Denmark.
    Hoest, A.
    Denmark.
    The adjuvant effect of phthalate exposure on IgE sensitisation in early childhood2012In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 67, p. 654-655Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Carlstedt, F.
    et al.
    Landstinget i Värmland.
    Jonsson, B. A. G.
    Lunds universitet.
    Bornehag, C. -G
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    PVC flooring is related to human uptake of phthalates in infants2013In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 32-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) flooring material contains phthalates, and it has been shown that such materials are important sources for phthalates in indoor dust. Phthalates are suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Consecutive infants between 2 and 6 months old and their mothers were invited. A questionnaire about indoor environmental factors and family lifestyle was used. Urinary metabolites of the phthalates diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP), and dietylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were measured in the urine of the children. Of 209 invited children, 110 (52%) participated. Urine samples were obtained from 83 of these. Urine levels of the BBzP metabolite monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) was significantly higher in infants with PVC flooring in their bedrooms (P < 0.007) and related to the body area of the infant. Levels of the DEHP metabolites MEHHP (P < 0.01) and MEOHP (P < 0.04) were higher in the 2-month-old infants who were not exclusively breast-fed when compared with breast-fed children. The findings indicate that the use of soft PVC as flooring material may increase the human uptake of phthalates in infants. Urinary levels of phthalate metabolites during early life are associated with the use of PVC flooring in the bedroom, body area, and the use of infant formula. Practical Implications This study shows that the uptake of phthalates is not only related to oral uptake from, for example, food but also to environmental factors such as building materials. This new information should be considered when designing indoor environment, especially for children.

  • 40.
    Choi, H.
    et al.
    Univ Albany, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Rensselaer, NY 12144 USA..
    Byrne, S.
    Univ Albany, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Rensselaer, NY 12144 USA..
    Larsen, L. S.
    Danish Technol Inst, Mycol Lab, Taastrup, Denmark..
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Thorne, P. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Occupat & Environm Hlth, Iowa City, IA USA..
    Larsson, L.
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Sebastian, A.
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Tech Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden.
    Residential culturable fungi, (1-3,1-6)-beta-d-glucan, and ergosterol concentrations in dust are not associated with asthma, rhinitis, or eczema diagnoses in children2014In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative reporting of home indoor moisture problems predicts respiratory diseases. However, causal agents underlying such qualitative markers remain unknown. In the homes of 198 multiple allergic case children and 202 controls in Sweden, we cultivated culturable fungi by directly plating dust, and quantified (1-3, 1-6)-beta-d-glucan and ergosterol in dust samples from the child's bedroom. We examined the relationship between these fungal agents and degree of parent or inspector-reported home indoor dampness, and microbiological laboratory's mold index. We also compared the concentrations of these agents between multiple allergic cases and healthy controls, as well as IgE-sensitization among cases. The concentrations of culturable fungal agents were comparable between houses with parent and inspector-reported mold issues and those without. There were no differences in concentrations of the individual or the total summed culturable fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-beta-d-glucan, and ergosterol between the controls and the multiple allergic case children, or individual diagnosis of asthma, rhinitis, or eczema. Culturable fungi, (1-3, 1-6)-beta-d-glucan, and ergosterol in dust were not associated with qualitative markers of indoor dampness or mold or indoor humidity. Furthermore, these agents in dust samples were not associated with any health outcomes in the children.

  • 41.
    Choi, H.
    et al.
    SUNY Albany, Rensselaer, NY 12144 USA.
    Thorne, P.
    Univ Iowa, Coll Publ Hlth, Iowa City, IA USA.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Response to Miller2015In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 117-117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Choi, H.
    et al.
    SUNY Albany, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Albany, NY 12222 USA..
    Thorne, P. S.
    Univ Iowa, Dept Occupat & Environm Hlth, Iowa City, IA USA..
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Tech Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden.
    Response to Rylander2014In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 223-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Choi, Hyunok
    et al.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Risks of Multiple Allergy Diseases and Asthma From Indoor Exposure to Modern Chemicals and Mould Species2011In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 22, no 1, p. S173-S173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Choi, Hyunok
    et al.
    SUNY Albany, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Sch Publ Hlth, Albany, NY 12222 USA..
    Schmidbauer, Norbert
    Norwegian Inst Air Res, POB 100,2027 Kjeller,Inst 18, N-2007 Kjeller, Norway..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Tech Res Inst Sweden, Box 857, SE-50115 Boras, Sweden..
    Non-microbial sources of microbial volatile organic compounds2016In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 148, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The question regarding the true sources of the purported microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) remains unanswered. Objective: To identify microbial, as well as non-microbial sources of 28 compounds, which are commonly accepted as microbial VOCs (i.e. primary outcome of interest is Sigma 28 VOCs). Methods: In a cross-sectional investigation of 390 homes, six building inspectors assessed water/mold damage, took air and dust samples, and measured environmental conditions (i.e., absolute humidity (AH, g/m(3)), temperature (degrees C), ventilation rate (ACH)). The air sample was analyzed for volatile organic compounds (mu g/m(3)) and; dust samples were analyzed for total viable fungal concentration (CFU/g) and six phthalates (mg/g dust). Four benchmark variables of the underlying sources were defined as highest quartile categories of: 1) the total concentration of 17 propylene glycol and propylene glycol ethers (Sigma 17 PGEs) in the air sample; 2) 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol monoisobutyrate (TMPD-MIB) in the air sample; 3) semi-quantitative mold index; and 4) total fungal load (CFU/g). Results: Within severely damp homes, co-occurrence of the highest quartile concentration of either E17 PGEs or TMPD-MIB were respectively associated with a significantly higher median concentration of Sigma 28 VOCs (8.05 and 1338 mu g/m(3), respectively) compared to the reference homes (430 and 4.86 mu g/m(3), respectively, both Ps <= 0.002). Furthermore, the homes within the highest quartile range for Sigma fungal load as well as AH were associated with a significantly increased median Sigma 28 VOCs compared to the reference group (8.74 vs. 4.32 mu g/m(3), P=0.001). Within the final model of multiple indoor sources on E 28 VOCs, one natural log-unit increase in summed concentration of Sigma 17 PGEs, plus TMPD-MIB (Sigma 17 PGEs TMPD-MIB) was associated with 1.8-times (95% CI, 1.3-2.5), greater likelihood of having a highest quartile of Sigma 28 VOCs, after adjusting for absolute humidity, history of repainting at least one room, ventilation rate, and mold index (P-value =0.001). Homes deemed severely mold damaged (i.e., mold index =1) were associated with 1.7-times (95% CI, 0.8-3.6), greater likelihood of having a highest quartile of Sigma 28 VOCs, even though such likelihood was not significant (P-value =0.164). In addition, absolute humidity appeared to positively interact with mold index to significantly elevate the prevalence of the highest quartile category of Sigma 28 VOCs. Conclusion: The indoor concentration of Sigma 28 VOCs, which are widely accepted as MVOCs, are significantly associated with the markers of synthetic (i.e. E17 PGEs and TMPD-MIB), and to less extent, microbial (i.e., mold index) sources. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Choi, Hyunok
    et al.
    SUNY Albany, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Albany, NY 12222 USA.
    Schmidbauer, Norbert
    Norwegian Inst Air Res, POB 100, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway.;Norwegian Inst Air Res, Inst Tveien 18, N-2007 Kjeller, Norway.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Tech Res Inst Sweden, Box 857, SE-50115 Boras, Sweden.
    Volatile organic compounds of possible microbial origin and their risks on childhood asthma and allergies within damp homes2017In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 98, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Risk of indoor exposure to volatile organic compounds of purported microbial origin on childhood symptoms of wheezing, rhinitis, and/or eczema, and doctor-diagnosed asthma, rhinitis, and eczema, respectively, remain unclear. Objective: To test hypotheses that total sum of 28 microbial volatile organic compounds (Sigma 26 MVOCs): 1) poses independent risk on doctor-diagnosed asthma, rhinitis, and eczema, respectively, as well as multiple symptom presentation with a minimum of the two of the above conditions (i.e. case); 2) is associated with significant interaction with absolute humidity (AH) on additive scale. Methods: In a case-control investigation, 198 cases and 202 controls were examined during November 2001 March 2002 period through homeindoor air sampling, air quality inspection, and health outcome ascertainment. Results: Not only the Sigma 28 MVOCs but also the global MVOC index were significantly higher within the homes of the cases with a high AH, compared to the controls with a low AH (all Ps < 0.001). Only the cases, but not the controls, were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the exposure variables of interest (Sigma 28 MVOCs) per quartile increase in AH (P < 0.0001 for the cases; P = 0.780 for the controls). Only among the children who live in a high AH homes, a natural log (ln)-unit of Sigma 28 MVOCs was associated with 2.5-times greater odds of the case status (95% CI, 1.0-6.2; P = 0.046), compared to 0.7-times the odds (95% CI, 0.4-1.0; P = 0.074) of the same outcome among the low AH homes. Specifically, joint exposure to a high MVOCs and high AH was associated with 2.6-times greater odds of the doctor-diagnosed asthma status (95% CI, 0.7-8.91; P = 0.137). Conclusion: Joint occurrence of high Sigma 28 MVOCs and AH was associatedwith a significant increase in the case status and asthma risks in an additive scale.

  • 46.
    Choi, Hyunok
    et al.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Spengler, John
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sources of Glycol Ether Exposure at Home2011In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 22, no 1, p. S38-S38Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Choi, Jieun
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, Coll Human Ecol, Seoul 120749, South Korea..
    Chun, Chungyoon
    Yonsei Univ, Coll Human Ecol, Seoul 120749, South Korea..
    Sun, Yuexia
    Tianjin Univ, Sch Environm Sci & Engn, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China..
    Choi, Yoorim
    Yonsei Univ, Coll Human Ecol, Seoul 120749, South Korea..
    Kwon, Suhyun
    Yonsei Univ, Coll Human Ecol, Seoul 120749, South Korea..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundell, Jan
    Tsinghua Univ, Sch Architecture, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Associations between building characteristics and children's allergic symptoms: A cross-sectional study on child's health and home in Seoul, South Korea2014In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 75, p. 176-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cross-sectional study on the home environment and asthma and allergy in children was carried out among children 1-8 years old in Seoul, South Korea from 2009 to 2010. Questionnaires were distributed to 5107 parents through daycare centers and kindergartens; 2755 parents responded, a response rate of 54%. Seven percent and 23% of children were reported to have doctor-diagnosed asthma and hay fever, respectively. A majority (57%) of the families reported having PVC flooring in child's or parents' bedroom. More than 96% of homes used a floor heating system. PVC was used more often as a floor covering in single family houses than in apartments (67% vs. 49%, p < 0.001). PVC flooring was significantly associated with eczema in the previous 6 months (AOR 1.54,95% Cl 1.13-2.09) when adjusted for gender, age, family allergy, socioeconomic status and environmental tobacco smoke. Older buildings tended to have dampness problems, and, consequently, were positively correlated with the prevalence of wheeze. Floor moisture significantly increased the association between PVC and symptoms of wheezing (AOR 2.57, 95% Cl 1.36-4.82) and eczema (AOR 1.97, 95% Cl 1.18-3.28). Apartments without mechanical ventilation in bedrooms were associated with a slight increase in asthma and allergy among children. This study suggests that building characteristics and home exposure can partly explain recent increases in asthma and allergy among children in Seoul. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 48.
    Clausen, G.
    et al.
    Denmark.
    Host, A.
    Denmark.
    Toftum, J.
    Denmark.
    Beko, G.
    Denmark.
    Weschler, C.
    Denmark; USA.
    Callesen, M.
    Denmark.
    Buhl, S.
    Denmark.
    Ladegaard, M. B.
    Denmark.
    Langer, S.
    Sweden.
    Andersen, B.
    Denmark.
    Sundell, J.
    Denmark; China.
    Bornehag, Carl Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Denmark.
    Children's health and its association with indoor environments in Danish homes and daycare centres - methods2012In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 467-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principle objective of the Danish research program Indoor Environment and Childrens Health (IECH) was to explore associations between various exposures that children experience in their indoor environments (specifically their homes and daycare centers) and their well-being and health. The targeted health endpoints were allergy, asthma, and certain respiratory symptoms. The study was designed with two stages. In the first stage, a questionnaire survey was distributed to more than 17 000 families with children between the ages of 1 and 5. The questionnaire focused on the childrens health and the environments within the homes they inhabited and daycare facilities they attended. More than 11 000 questionnaires were returned. In the second stage, a subsample of 500 children was selected for more detailed studies, including an extensive set of measurements in their homes and daycare centers and a clinical examination; all clinical examinations were carried out by the same physician. In this study, the methods used for data collection within the IECH research program are presented and discussed. Furthermore, initial findings are presented regarding descriptors of the study population and selected characteristics of the childrens dwellings and daycare centers. Practical Implications This study outlines methods that might be followed by future investigators conducting large-scale field studies of potential connections between various indoor environmental factors and selected health endpoints. Of particular note are (i) the two-stage design a broad questionnaire-based survey followed by a more intensive set of measurements among a subset of participants who have been selected based on their responses to the questionnaire; (ii) the casebase approach utilized in the stage 2 in contrast to the more commonly used casecontrol approach; (iii) the inclusion of the childrens daycare environment when conducting intensive sampling to more fully capture the childrens total indoor exposure; and (iv) all clinical examinations conducted by the same physician. We recognize that future investigators are unlikely to fully duplicate the methods outlined in this study, but we hope that it provides a useful starting point in terms of factors that might be considered when designing such a study.

  • 49.
    Deng, Qihong
    et al.
    Cent S Univ, Sch Energy Sci & Engn, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China.;Cent S Univ, Inst Environm Hlth, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Chan
    Cent S Univ, Sch Energy Sci & Engn, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Norback, Dan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Occupat & Environm Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Yinping
    Tsinghua Univ, Sch Architecture, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Weiwei
    Cent S Univ, Sch Energy Sci & Engn, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China.;Cent S Univ, Inst Environm Hlth, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Yuan, Hong
    Cent S Univ, Inst Environm Hlth, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China.;Cent S Univ, Xiangya Hosp 3, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Sundell, Jan
    Cent S Univ, Sch Energy Sci & Engn, Changsha 410083, Hunan, Peoples R China.;Tsinghua Univ, Sch Architecture, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Early life exposure to ambient air pollution and childhood asthma in China2015In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 143, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early life is suggested to be a critical time in determining subsequent asthma development, but the extent to which the effect of early-life exposure to ambient air pollution on childhood asthma is unclear. Objectives: We investigated doctor-diagnosed asthma in preschool children due to exposure to ambient air pollution in utero and during the first year of life. Methods: In total 2490 children aged 3-6 years participated in a questionnaire study regarding doctor-diagnosed asthma between September 2011 and January 2012 in China. Children's exposure to critical air pollutants, sulfur dioxide (SO2) as proxy of industrial air pollution, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as proxy of traffic pollution, and particulate matter <= 10 mu m in diameter (PM10) as a mixture, was estimated from the concentrations measured at the ambient air quality monitoring stations by using an inverse distance weighted (IDW) method. Logistic regression analysis was employed to determine the relationship between early-life exposure and childhood asthma in terms of odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: Association between early-life exposure to air pollutants and childhood asthma was observed. SO2 and NO2 had significant associations with adjusted OR (95% CI) of 1.45 (1.02-2.07) and 1.74 (1.15-2.62) in utero and 1.62 (1.01-2.60) and 1.90 (1.20-3.00) during the first year for per 50 mu g/m(3) and 15 mu g/m(3) increase respectively. Exposure to the combined high level of SO2 and NO2 in China significantly elevated the asthmatic risk with adjusted OR (95% CI) of 1.76 (1.18-2.64) in utero and 1.85 (1.22-2.79) during the first year compared to the low level exposure. The associations were higher for males and the younger children aged 3-4 than females and the older children aged 5-6. Conclusions: Early-life exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with childhood asthma during which the level and source of air pollution play important roles. The high level and nature of combined industrial and traffic air pollution in China may contribute to the recent rapid increase of childhood asthma. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 50.
    Derakhshan, Arash
    et al.
    rasmus MC, Acad Ctr Thyroid Dis, NL-3051 GE Rotterdam, Netherland.
    Shu, Huan
    Stockholms universitet.
    Broeren, Maarten A. C.
    Maxima Med Ctr, Lab Clin Chem & Haematol, NL-5504 DB Veldhoven, Netherlands.
    de Poortere, Ralph A.
    Maxima Med Ctr, Lab Clin Chem & Haematol, NL-5504 DB Veldhoven, Netherlands.
    Wikstrom, Sverre
    Örebro University.
    Peeters, Robin P.
    rasmus MC, Acad Ctr Thyroid Dis, NL-3051 GE Rotterdam, Netherland.
    Demeneix, Barbara
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, Lab Evolut Regulat Endocriniennes, Paris.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY.
    Korevaar, Tim I. M.
    Erasmus MC, Acad Ctr Thyroid Dis, NL-3051 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Reference Ranges and Determinants of Thyroid Function During Early Pregnancy: The SELMA Study2018In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 103, no 9, p. 3548-3556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Establishing reference ranges as well as identifying and quantifying the determinants of thyroid function during pregnancy is important for proper clinical interpretation and optimizing research efforts. However, such data are sparse, specifically for triiodothyronine measurements, and most studies do not take into account thyroid antibodies or human chorionic gonadotropin. Objective: To determine reference ranges and to identify/quantify determinants of TSH, free T4 (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total T4 (TT4), and total triiodothyronine (TT3). Design, Setting, and Participants: This study included 2314 participants of the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal, Mother and child, Asthma and allergy study, a population-based prospective pregnancy cohort of mother-child pairs. Reference ranges were calculated by 2.5th to 97.5th percentiles after excluding thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb)-positive and/or thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb)-positive women. Intervention: None. Main Outcome Measures: TSH, FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 in prenatal serum. Results: After exclusion of TPOAb-positive women, reference ranges were as follows: TSH, 0.11 to 3.48 mU/L; FT4, 11.6 to 19.4 pmol/L; FT3, 3.72 to 5.92 pg/mL; TT4, 82.4 to 166.2 pmol/L; and TT3, 1.28 to 2.92 nmol/L. Additional exclusion of TgAb-positive women did not change the reference ranges substantially. Exposure to tobacco smoke, as assessed by questionnaires and serum cotinine, was associated with lower TSH and higher FT3 and TT3. Body mass index (BMI) and gestational age were the main determinants of TSH (only for BMI), FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3. Conclusions: We show that the exclusion of TgAb-positive women on top of excluding TPOAb-positive women hardly affects clinical reference ranges. We identified various relevant clinical determinants of TSH, FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 that could reflect endocrine-disrupting effects and/or effects on thyroid hormone transport or deiodination.

123 1 - 50 of 114
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf