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  • 51.
    Eneroth, Filip
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    “Ooooh, so strong”: Ironic Responses to Donald Trump’s Presidential Tweets2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    After Donald Trump won the presidency, his use of social media has gotten massive attention because of its incredibly inappropriate content. Many people question how appropriate his use of Twitter is, and in the linguistic field prominent voices point out that the former businessman does not have the skills to speak; he only talks (McWhorter, 2017). As America’s President with views of his own about worldly events, it is of special interest to see how people interact with him online. Because of the low 39% approval rating, one can assume that many disagree with him, possibly in a way involving irony. One sub-type of irony is described as “the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning” (Merriam-Webster, 2018), and it is reasonable to assume that some responses to Trump’s tweets use irony to present an alternative view of his actions or opinions. The study sets out to find replies to Trump’s tweets that are ironic and identify if they correspond to earlier developed theories of irony. The replies are examined to determine which of Grice’s maxims of conversation that is flouted the most. The data included 337 replies of which 78 (23%) were shown to follow an ironical pattern, mostly in order to ridicule and condemn Trump. 88 % of all comments disagree with Trump’s tweets. The most applicable theory of irony is the echoic interpretation theory by Wilson and Sperber, and the most flouted maxim is relevance.

  • 52.
    Engqvist, Pontus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Does playing video games have an effect on English vocabulary acquisition?: The correlation between English vocabulary acquisition and the playing of video games in ninth grade learners of English in Sweden2019Student paper other, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There have been many different studies done around the subject of Extramural English, where researchers Sundqvist and Sylvén (2012) have drawn the conclusion that there is a correlation between video games and learners of English improving upon their English vocabulary. This study focuses time spent on whether or not playing video games for an extended amount of time will help with a student’s English vocabulary. This was done by having the students answer a demographic questionnaire in which they answer whether or not they regularly play video games, and answers approximately how many hours a week they do play. The study is looking for a correlation between improved vocabulary scores and longer periods of time spent playing video games every week.

    The study also looks into specific vocabulary that is commonly found in video games and compares different groups which have spent different amounts of time each week playing video games. Do video games help a learner’s English vocabulary and if so, does an increased amount of time spent on playing video games correlate to a higher score on the vocabulary tests, and do students who plays video games have an easier time with some of the specific vocabulary? The study found that there is indeed a correlation and that if a student spends time playing video games their English vocabulary proficiency will most likely increase as well. A student who spends more than ten hours a week on playing video games had higher average scores than those who played less than ten hours a week. Incidentally the students who did not play video games at all had the lowest average scores in the vocabulary tests. Lastly students who spent time playing video games had an easier time answering the questions relating to words that are commonly used in video games.

  • 53.
    Engvall, Cecilia
    Karlstad University. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centrum för språk- och litteraturdidaktik.
    A study of the VAKT learning styles and their importance for Swedish EFL students2009Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a paper about Swedish upper secondary students’ awareness of the four learning styles in the acronym VAKT (visual, auditory, kinesthetic and tactile) and whether they are important for getting a certain grade in English. In my study I investigate learning styles of students of English as a second language at upper secondary school in Sweden. I also investigate the students’ awareness of their own learning style and to what extent they feel that all learning styles are represented in their classrooms. My results show that learning styles are of some importance and should be mentioned in teacher education today. This essay also brings up motivation and a discussion on how the VAKT learning styles and similar learning styles can help students feel motivated in and outside the classroom. There are also results on how students see their own use of English in their future and what their goals with learning English are.

  • 54.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Using the F-measure to test formality in sports reporting: A comparison of the language used in soccer and horse polo articles in two British newspapers2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the formality level of the language used in twenty articles from two sports that seem to cater to different social classes (soccer and horse polo). The articles that serve as the data were published in two different types of British newspapers, one broadsheet (The Daily Telegraph) and one tabloid (The Daily Express) from September 2010 through November 2017. The study uses a quantitative method by means of the F-measure, and a qualitative analysis of two articles whose results deviate from the rest. The quantitative results show that there is a difference in formality in sports articles on the two sports soccer and horse polo, where articles on polo score higher on the F-measure in both newspapers. Most articles on horse polo follow the pattern of the informational production with features like a high ratio of nouns, pronouns, long words, and adjectives often found in academic papers and legal documents etc. Articles on soccer follow the involved production, characterized by a high ratio of verbs, adverbs, pronouns, and WH-questions often found in spoken interaction. The qualitative analysis shows that the article on soccer which has a much higher F-score than the rest is an informative article on the price of season tickets, and that the polo article with a very low Fscore contained a lot of quoted speech.

  • 55.
    Eriksson, Linda Elisabet
    Karlstad University.
    Teachers’ and students’ attitudes and perceptions toward varieties of English in Swedish upper secondary school2019In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12-13 april, 2018 / [ed] Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2019, 27, Vol. 27, p. 207-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates teachers’ and students’ attitudes and perceptions toward the teaching and learning of varieties of English in a Swedish upper secondary school context. Data from 129 student questionnaires and nine semi-structured teacher interviews are analyzed. The results show that British English (BrE) appears to retain a prominent role amongst upper secondary students in Sweden as their ideologized values reveal that they feel that BrE sounds more pleasant and intelligent than AmE. However, American English (AmE) is the preferred variety of English amongst the participating students. The results also show that teachers predominantly teach British Standard English (BrSE) and American Standard English (AmSE), which they consider to be the ‘correct’ varieties of English. Teachers agree it is important to teach a wide range of Englishes, but do so by contrasting them with BrSE and AmSE. This study further suggests that other varieties of English are treated as a “funny thing” by the participating teachers, and argues that teachers must be made aware of their own language attitudes.

  • 56.
    Estival, Dominique
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Henderson, John
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Laughren, Mary
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Mollá, Diego
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Bow, Cathy
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Nordlinger, Rachel
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Rieschild, Verna
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Stanley, Alexander W.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Mrowa-Hopkins, Colette
    Flinders University, Australia.
    Learning from OzCLO, the Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad2013In: 51st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Teaching Natural Language Processing, Sofia: Association for Computational Linguistics, 2013, p. 35-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad (OzCLO) started in 2008 in only two locations and has since grown to a na- tionwide competition with almost 1500 high school students participating in 2013. An Aus- tralian team has participated in the Interna- tional Linguistics Olympiad (ILO) every year since 2009. This paper describes how the competition is run (with a regional First Round and a final National Round) and the or- ganisation of the competition (a National Steering Committee and Local Organising Committees for each region) and discusses the particular challenges faced by Australia (tim- ing of the competition and distance between the major population centres). One major fac- tor in the growth and success of OzCLO has been the introduction of the online competi- tion, allowing participation of students from rural and remote country areas. The organisa- tion relies on the good-will and volunteer work of university and school staff but the strong interest among students and teachers shows that OzCLO is responding to a demand for linguistic challenges.

  • 57.
    Fraser, Helen
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Communicating about communication: Intercultural competence as a factor in the success of interdisciplinary collaboration2011In: Human Communication Science: A Compendium / [ed] Robert Dale, Dennis Burnham and Catherine J. Stevens, Sydney: Australian Research Council Research Network in Human Communication Science , 2011, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines describe themselves as studying ‘communication’. However observation of interdisciplinary discussion suggests that ‘communication’ may be conceptualized in different ways by different disciplines. This paper aims to promote mutual understanding among disciplines, not by proposing a universally valid definition of communication to which all disciplines should subscribe, but by, first, offering a set of questions that can be used to help disciplinary groups communicate their own views on communication to colleagues from other disciplines, and then creating a (preliminary) typology to map out the range of possible positions that can be taken in relation to those questions. Noting that academic disciplines have distinct cultures, the paper presents some concepts of intercultural communication as understood in applied linguistics that may be useful in facilitating interdisciplinary communication about communication.

  • 58.
    Fraser, Helen
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Communication about communication: Intercultural competence as a factor in the success of interdisciplinary collaboration2009In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 135-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines describe themselves as studying ‘communication’. However observation of interdisciplinary discussion suggests that ‘communication’ may be conceptualized in different ways by different disciplines. This paper aims to promote mutual understanding among disciplines, not by proposing a universally valid definition of communication to which all disciplines should subscribe, but by, first, offering a set of questions that can be used to help disciplinary groups communicate their own views on communication to colleagues from other disciplines, and then creating a (preliminary) typology to map out the range of possible positions that can be taken in relation to those questions. Noting that academic disciplines have distinct cultures, the paper presents some concepts of intercultural communication as understood in applied linguistics that may be useful in facilitating interdisciplinary communication about communication.

  • 59.
    Fungula, Bob
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.
    Oral Corrective Feedback in the Chinese EFL Classroom: Methods employed by teachers to give feedback to their students2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is an empirical study based on English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' experiences. The study is on Chinese EFL teachers’ usage of different oral corrective feedback (OCF) types as well as their own beliefs as to what strategies they make use of most frequently and what they do to improve their own OCF. Semi-structured interviews and non-participant observations were employed as instruments for the data collecting process. Four Chinese EFL teachers were interviewed, one male and three female, with varied amounts of professional experience and of different ages. Four observations were made in the classrooms of the same teachers as a supplement to the interviews. The interviews were analyzed by means of content analysis. The results indicate that Recast is the most commonly used feedback method and that the teachers had different thoughts on which feedback method was the most effective or the one they most frequently used. Furthermore, the results indicate that there are differences between teachers’ beliefs about their feedback strategies and the observation results.

  • 60.
    Garibovic, Eldina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Arbetssätt för elever med svenska som andraspråk: Tips på hur pedagoger kan arbeta2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine how teachers currently working with students who have a mother tongue other than Swedish. The investigation has been carried out using three qualitative research interviews. It has been shown that some educators believe that inclusion in the regular classroom instruction has been giving the best results for students' language development. It has provided great opportunities for discussion and group work. Teachers have given tips on how to work with these students so that they develop in the Swedish language. I have been through the literature revealed that multilingualism opens up many avenues for children, but it also puts obstacles. Barriers preventing students' language development but also social development. Syllabus for Swedish as a second language show that the students will develop the linguistic skills so they can communicate in different contexts.

  • 61.
    Goddard, Cliff
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Griffith University.
    Semantic analysis2010In: Handbook of Natural Language Processing / [ed] Nitin Indurkhya and Fred J. Damerau, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2010, 2, p. 93-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Green, Evelina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Can you pronunce January?: A comparative study of Swedish students learning English in an at-home environment and a study-abroad environment2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there is a difference between Swedish learners of English in an at-home environment compared to Swedish learners of English who studied English abroad for a year, in their ability to distinguish between certain English phoneme. The method used to investigate was through a questionnaire where the informants had to identify words containing the sounds /z/, /θ/, /ð/, /ʃ/, /ʒ/, /tʃ/, /dʒ/ and /w/. The results showed that the informants who had been abroad were more familiar with the sounds than the informants who had studied in a Swedish senior high school over the same period of time. It was found that the sound /z/ was the hardest sound to identify, followed by /ʒ/, for both groups of informants. 

  • 63.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Wholesale Apocalypse: Brand Names in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake2016In: Names, ISSN 0027-7738, E-ISSN 1756-2279, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 88-98, article id 1159448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinages pervade Margaret Atwood’s post-apocalyptic novel Oryx and Crake (2003). Most of the neologisms in the novel denote corporations and their products and form part of a thoroughgoing critique of consumerism. The coinages are jarringly hyperbolic and their orthography often evokes contrary connotations. However, in the thematic context of the novel, coining practices follow certain patterns and function as effective, if ambiguous, satirical tools. On one level, the practice of branding is thoroughly satirized. On another, however, the neologisms point to both the limitations and possibilities of satire when dealing with the themes addressed in the novel: commoditization, environmental damage on a planetary scale, and a vision of the imminent end of humanity itself.

  • 64.
    Gustafsson, Sofia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Barns språkutveckling genom lek2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Children`s Language Development through Play

  • 65.
    Hallén, Alexsandra
    Karlstad University.
    Is Sherlock Really that Observant?: A qualitative study of the relation between non-observances of observational maxims and characterization in the TV-series Sherlock2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how often a character of a TV-series non-observed the conversational maxims, and if non-observances can be used for characterization in TV-series. The aim of this study was also to examine how much conversations and generally unknown conversational rules can affect people and their entire perception of others. The study focused on the main character of the TV-series Sherlock and investigated how often Sherlock breaks the conversational maxims, in what ways he does so, and how 20 respondents would describe Sherlock based on his conversational input. The most frequent non-observance turned out to be flouts and the most commonly non-observed maxim was the maxim of relation. According to the survey that the respondents answered, there seems to be a correlation between Sherlock’s conversational input and how they would describe him. In general, the respondents applied more negative personality traits to Sherlock when describing him based on excerpts where he did not observe the conversational maxims, whereas they described Sherlock in a more positive manner when he followed the conversational maxims.

  • 66.
    Hammarqvist Kristensen, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Linguistic sexism in a digitally native news outlet: A study on linguistic sexism at lexical and discourse levels in Buzzfeed News2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 2018, most news articles are consumed online from a digitally native news outlet and it is therefore appropriate to examine the presence of linguistic sexism in the digitally native news site Buzzfeed News. The material is made up of 159 articles collected from Buzzfeed News. Selected features at the lexical and discourse levels are analysed using a quantitative method with qualitative elements. The selected features at the lexical level include generic pronouns and nouns, focused on the affix -man- and naming practices for females and males. At the discourse level, the selected features include how females and males are described in terms of their relationships, appearance and age-related words. Linguistic sexism is found to be expressed at both the lexical and discourse levels in the material. It is mainly expressed in naming practices, the use of relationship words and age-related words.

  • 67.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The fact of metafiction in nineteenth-century children's literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder Book and Elizabeth Stoddard's Lolly Dinks's Doings2016In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two American books for children: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys (1851) and Elizabeth Stoddard’s Lolly Dinks’s Doings (1874). In both books, fairy tales or myths are framed by a contemporary American setting in which the stories is told. It is in these realistic frames with an adult storyteller and child listeners that metafictional features are found. The article shows that Hawthorne and Stoddard use a variety of metafictional elements. So, although metafiction has been regarded as a postmodernist development in children’s literature, there are in fact instances of metafiction in nineteenth-century American children’s literature.

  • 68. Hultgren Korkis, Jenny
    An investigation of Swedish beauty vloggers’ use of code-switching between Swedish and English2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Much research has been done in the area of code-switching; that is, changing from one language to another in the middle of the same utterance, especially in bilingual communities. Yet, there seems to be little research done on code-switching between English and Swedish among Swedish young adults. In this study, the speech of four different young beauty vloggers will be investigated with regard to their use of code-switching between English and Swedish. All four have Swedish as their first language. The results show that the amount and the types of code-switching differ between the four vloggers in the study.  The results also show that code-switching occurs relatively frequently, and that it is especially common to use English words and expressions with Swedish morphology. This is also supported by previous studies. Furthermore, two areas were found to be especially prone to code-switching: commerce (i.e. the make-up industry with imported brands and names), and youth culture; i.e. the vloggers seem to want to code-switch to be trendy and to communicate something about their identity.

  • 69.
    Högqvist, Marion
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Chinese English major students and the apprenticeship of observation: The influence of previous student experiences on current beliefs about English language teaching2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “The apprenticeship of observation” is a person’s previous experiences as a student and it can greatly affect a person’s beliefs about teaching. This paper aimed to study the effect that previous student experiences had had on English major students at a university in China. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect data. The questionnaire was distributed to 117 undergraduate English majors. The results showed that the English majors considered their previous experiences as students to have greatly affected their current beliefs about English language teaching. The results further showed that the effects had mainly been positive and that the English major students considered “methods for English teaching”, “content”, and “lesson planning” to be the areas that had been affected most. These results were in accordance with most previous studies on the topic.

  • 70.
    Jaime, Ruti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centrum för språk- och litteraturdidaktik.
    How do I pronounce this word?: Strategies used among Swedish learners of English when pronouncing unfamiliar words2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to identify some of the strategies students used when pronouncing unfamiliar words. Questionnaires were handed out to 94 students in the 9th grade in a medium-sized Swedish town. In addition, two teachers and 13 students were interviewed. The results indicate that the students had acquired some basic knowledge about the English sound system from phonetic training in their past education. However, there seemed to be a tendency among the students to use the trial-and-error strategy to a larger extent than using tools such as phonetic transcription in order to figure out the pronunciation of a word. The results also show that the teachers did not teach planned lessons on pronunciation, but instead it was more common that they responded to errors made by students. In conclusion, the results show that the students' knowledge in pronunciation in general was limited. In addition, there seemed to be a connection between the way the students and the teachers approached pronunciation and the student's ability to solve pronunciation issues.

     

     

     

  • 71.
    Jansson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Johansson Kokkinakis, Sofie
    Gothenburg University.
    Ribeck, Judy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Sköldberg, Emma
    Gothenburg University.
    A Swedish Academic Word List: Methods and Data2012In: Proceedings of the 15th EURALEX International Congress / [ed] Ruth Vatvedt Fjeld & Julie Matilde Torjusen, Oslo: University of Oslo , 2012, p. 555-560Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic language often presents a challenge to students, both language learners and native speakers. Therefore there is a need for educational language tools such as academic vocabulary resources. To date, resources developed have mainly focussed on learners of English; similar support is not yet available for Swedish. This paper reports on three different approaches to compiling a corpus of authentic academic text material used in academic settings. The purpose is to compose an empirical basis for the construction of a Swedish academic word list which can be used in language teaching. Because we have chosen to follow the method used for the creation of The Academic Word List (Coxhead 2000), the corpus content is crucial to the final content of our word list.

  • 72.
    Jansson, Tommy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Swedish or English: A Study of L1 and L2 Preference and  Speaking Proficiency among High-functioning Upper Secondary School Students within Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is both quantitative and qualitative in nature. In order to support or discard the hypothesis that high-functioning, autistic upper secondary school students speak more freely in English than in their native language Swedish, an experiment with a narrative format was conducted with students both within and without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Measurements of lexical density, hesitations and long pauses in the narrative were applied to assess the quality of produced speech. A questionnaire survey for teachers of this age category of students was also carried out. The analyses of the results are primarily quantitative, but a portion of the questionnaire is also thematically analysed. The study shows that there is initial support for the hypothesis.

  • 73.
    Johansson, BrittInger
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Tvåspråkiga elevers stöd i skolan2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med undersökningen har varit att ta reda på vilket stöd våra tvåspråkiga elever får inom skolan. Jag har valt att göra en litteraturgenomgång för att ta del av vad som tidigare är skrivet inom ämnet, därefter har jag använt mig av kvalitativa intervjuer för att ta del av fem lärares syn på vilket stöd tvåspråkiga elever får. Mina resultat visar att undervisningen ser olika ut på skolorna. Kunskap och samarbete mellan alla lärarkategorier gynnar elevens kunskapsutveckling. Modersmålsundervisningen anses extra viktig eftersom det är på det språk man fungerar bäst som man inhämtar kunskap. Även ämnet svenska som andraspråk anses viktigt eftersom eleven där får en individuell svenskundervisning som är anpassad efter deras nivå. Min slutsats för undersökningen är att alla som undervisar andraspråkselever behöver kunskap i ämnet. Kunskapen ligger till grund för det samarbete som är nödvändigt för att tvåspråkiga elever ska nå skolans mål.

  • 74.
    Jonsson, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Students' Oral Participation in the CLIL Classroom.: A comparative study of oral participation of CLIL students and students taught through their native language Swedish.2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown that participation and interaction in a language classroom are important. Especially so in the CLIL classroom where the target language is both the subject of study and the medium of instruction. However, it can be difficult for a teacher to get students to participate orally. Many researchers claim that students’ oral output in the CLIL classroom is minimal, and that they speak less than students who are taught through their native language.

    The aim of this paper was to study Swedish CLIL students’ oral participation and to find out whether the amount of oral classroom interaction was similar in a CLIL classroom and in a classroom where Swedish was the medium of instruction. I also wanted to investigate if male and female students interacted to the same extent, and whether the amount of interaction was evenly distributed within the classroom.

    The results show that CLIL students’ oral participation tended to be very high. The CLIL students produced even more total oral output than students in the control groups, which had their native language as their medium of instruction.

  • 75.
    Järnebrand, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Det ständigt närvarande svenskämnet: Om högstadieelevers attityder till det språk de använder i andra ämnen än svenska2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 76.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Learning how to make requests in English: Pragmatic input in Swedish EFL textbooks2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching should not only aim at providing learners with

    the linguistic resources to communicate in English, but also develop learners’ pragmatic

    competence in order for them to be able to use language efficiently and appropriately for

    different purposes. The present study examines what pragmatic input learners receive from

    two Swedish EFL textbook series regarding the speech act of request. The analysis was

    conducted by identifying all instances of requests and all metapragmatic information about

    the specific speech act. In addition, the present study also focused on finding exercises that

    provide learners with the opportunity to practice making requests. The findings show that the

    two examined EFL textbook series differ in terms of which directness levels are most

    frequently used, and both series lack explicit information about requests that may increase

    students' understanding of this speech act. Moreover, request exercises are few and practicing

    requests is rarely the main learning objective. Consequently, teachers will need to use

    supplemental material and exercises in order for learners to develop their pragmatic

    competence in the case of requests.

  • 77.
    Kenalemang, Lame Maatla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Things Fall Apart: An Analysis of Pre and Post-Colonial Igbo Society2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Chinua Achebe (1930- 2013) published his first novel Things Fall Apart (TFA) in 1958. Achebe wrote TFA in response to European novels that depicted Africans as savages who needed to be enlightened by the Europeans. Achebe presents to the reader his people’s history with both strengths and imperfections by describing for example, Igbo festivals, the worship of their gods and the practices in their ritual ceremonies, their rich culture and other social practices, the colonial era that was both stopping Igbo culture and also brought in some benefits to their culture. TFA therefore directs the misleading of European novels that depict Africans as savages into a whole new light with its portrayal of Igbo society, and examines the effects of European colonialism on Igbo society from an African perspective. Hence this essay is an attempt to show an insight of pre and post colonialism on Igbo society. It is argued that the interaction between the whites and the Igbo people had both negative and positive consequences. It is evident in Achebe’s novel that the Europeans greatly influenced the lifestyle of Igbo society. 

  • 78.
    Khan, Mohammad Miraz Hossain
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    See how far we’ve come: A corpus study of the source metaphor JOURNEY2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study is based on conceptual metaphor theory (CMT), which Lakoff and Johnson introduced in 1980. Data were taken from the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), and three phrases (a long road, bumpy road and fork in the road) were investigated, in order to see how far the conceptual metaphor theory can be corroborated using authentic data. Journey was taken as the source domain of the three phrases. After analysis it was found that altogether 79% were metaphorical tokens, 18% were literal uses and 3% ‘other’ uses of the three phrases. In the metaphorical tokens of the three phrases six conceptual metaphors were identified and the most common conceptual metaphor was LONG-TERM PURPOSEFUL (LABOURIOUS) ACTIVITIES ARE JOURNEYS which made up 63% of all metaphorical tokens. The conceptual metaphor RECOVERING FROM PHYSICAL ILLNESS (OR GRIEF) OR PHYSICAL (OR MENTAL) SUFFERING IS A JOURNEY was only found in metaphorical tokens of the phrase a long road. The study shows that CMT can be used to explain the majority of the tokens in the corpus. However, one conceptual metaphor often mentioned in previous accounts, LOVE IS A JOURNEY, turned out to be quite rare.

  • 79.
    Khlentzos, Drew
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Mental categories in natural languages2007In: Mental States: Vol. 2: Language and Cognitive Structures / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Drew Khlentzos, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Khlentzos, Drew
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Mental states: Evolution, function, nature2007In: Mental States: Vol. 1: Evolution, Function, Nature / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Drew Khlentzos, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Klevskog, Emma
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Teaching and Assessing Student's Accents: The Challenge of Working with the Multitude of Accents in the English-Speaking World2019Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, English is a world language and more English accents have appeared. Today it is more difficult to teach English in Sweden due to the fact that we do not know when, where or how we are going to use English in the future. This study therefore focuses on how English teachers in Swedish upper secondary school teach and assess students’ accents and the challenge of working with the multitude of accents of the English-speaking world. This study is based on a questionnaire that was sent electronically to English teachers. The results from this study show that English teachers in Swedish upper secondary schools work with different English accents in class. The results also show that over fifty percent of the teachers do not let students choose accents for them to work with; most of the teachers’ choose which accents should be introduced and worked with in class. Moreover, students’ grades are not affected by the accent they speak, which is in line with the English syllabus. In conclusion, it is clear that British and American English are still dominant in Swedish school today.

  • 82.
    Kure-Bonne, Tatiana
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    El maravilloso viaje de Nils Holgersson a través de Suecia de Selma Lagerlöf: similitudes y diferencias en dos versiones de su traducción al español: Causas y consecuencias en la traducción de algunos culturemas y topónimos.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the patterns used in the translation into Spanish of some Swedish place names and cultural and natural characteristics in Selma Lagerlöf’s novel The wonderful adventures of Nils. Two translations that emerged in different socio-historical contexts in Spain are compared in order to determine how they diverge. The results show that the first translation largely adapts the Sweden-specific concepts to the notions that are recognizable by the Spanish reader. The second translation, on the contrary, offers to a greater extent culture-specific phenomena to its readers. Place names are mainly adopted without modifications. Despite this, both translators rather use a strategy mix in order to adjust the text to its juvenile audience and to preserve both the didactic and the entertaining values of the Swedish text.

  • 83.
    Kusuran, Amir
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    L2 English spelling error analysis: An investigation of English spelling errors made by Swedish senior high school students2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Proper spelling is important for efficient communication between people with different first languages in the 21st century. While Swedish functions as an intranational language within Sweden, it sees little to no use outside of Scandinavia. English fills the role as a second language that all Swedish students must learn, yet more focus appears to be given to grammar rather than spelling. Spelling is important and knowing the kinds of spelling errors Swedish learners of English tend to make can help educators improve the spelling proficiency of their students. The aim of this study is to investigate the spelling errors made by senior high school students in Sweden by analyzing a collection of essays written by students and gathered in the Uppsala Learner English Corpus (ULEC). The results of this study show that spelling proficiency nearly doubled for students in their third year in senior high school compared to their first year, yet the distribution of spelling errors remained the same. Additionally, some particular sounds that appear to be especially problematic for Swedish spellers were identified, such as /ə/, /l/, /s/ and /k/.

  • 84.
    Landström, Philip
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Foreign language anxiety among Chinese senior middle schoolstudents: A case study2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Anyone who has been learning a new language knows the feeling of anxiety when facedwith the task to use it in the classroom and in real life. Foreign Language Anxiety isconcept developed by Horwitz et al. (1986) to describe and measure this specific form ofanxiety. In this study, the anxiety levels of a class of Chinese senior middle schoolstudents taking an English class have been measured. The levels were measuredaccording to the Foreign Language Anxiety Scale, developed by Horwitz et al. (1986). 59informants participated in the study. The data were analysed to find which factors invokethe most anxiety. To gather qualitative data and gain further insight, two sets of groupinterviews were performed. The results show that a majority of the students suffer fromanxiety in class. Teacher-generated anxiety seems to be the most provoking factoraccording to the analysis.

  • 85.
    Lepp, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    A study of the use of English and other languages in TV-commercials in Sweden2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This investigation is about the English language in Swedish TV-commercials. Theinvestigation shows that there are commercials in Sweden that involve other languages thanSwedish. The languages found in this study apart from Swedish were English, Italian andGerman. The results show that the most common language was Swedish, which was used in405 (96.4%) of the 420 commercial spots of which the data consists. In 57.6% of thecommercials Swedish was the only language that was used compared to the 3.6% spots whichonly included English. Swedish was used together with English, Italian or German in 159commercials. There were 168 ads which contained some form of English, as the onlylanguage or together with Swedish. The results show that there was no major differenceregarding the time when the commercials containing only Swedish were broadcast. The sameconclusion could be drawn for the commercials which contained Swedish together withEnglish. The commercials which only included English were broadcast most frequently in themorning and at night. In conclusion, Swedish was the language used to the greatest extent.Furthermore, English appeared in nearly 50% of the commercials even though it was onlyused exclusively in a few ads.

  • 86.
    Lepp, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    El uso de la música como estrategia didáctica en la enseñanza del pretérito perfecto compuesto en la sala escolar de ELE en Suecia2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the teaching of the past perfect tense in the Swedish classroom ofSpanish as a foreign language. The purpose of this essay is to see if it is profitable to teach thepast perfect tense with songs in Spanish, which include the past perfect tense in the lyrics, asan educational resource. The participants are thirtyfour students, divided into two groups, inthe eight grade who study Spanish as a foreign language, and eight Spanish teachers. Thestudy was made through observations in class, two tests by the students and a survey with theteachers.The results of the study show that the teachers who participated in the study consider that themajority of their students have problems learning the past perfect tense. Furthermore, theresults show that the students who were part of the first group, who received an inductiveeducation including Spanish music, increased their abilities of using the past perfect tenseboth with regular and irregular verbs. The students who were part of the second group andwho learnt/were taught by means of the deductive approach increased their abilities to use thepast perfect tense less than the first group when it came to the irregular verbs. However, theylearnt to use the past perfect tense with regular verbs better than the first group.Furthermore, we also investigated if there were any differences according to the interest andthe motivation to learn between the boys and the girls. The results were slightly higher amongthe girls.

  • 87.
    Lidström, Oscar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Högstadieelevers attityder till dialekt: Uppfattningar i allmänhet och i undervisningssituationer i synnerhet2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to find out about secondary school students attitudes towards dialect. This has been done by respondents from two different schools in the county of Värmland1 who responded to a web survey. The schools are located in Kil 2 and Arvika3. Of the respondents' answers, a general result was compiled, where the answers of both survey groups were weighed together. The groups' responses have then been compared to point out differences that exist about attitudes to dialect. Attitudes apply to both the general view of dialect but also more specifically when it comes to teaching situations.

    The overall result shows that the attitudes of dialect in general are predominantly positive. The situations in which the dialect is preferred are informal, for example in contact with family and friends. The results show that the dialect is avoided to a greater extent in terms of formal situations, as in contact with teachers and staff at school as well as during lesson. The majority of respondents have stated that they are perceived as more formed when they speak standard language in teaching situations. Contrary to this, the result shows that the majority of respondents take the teacher seriously if he/she speaks dialectically in connection with teaching situations. It is thus possible to point out that the respondents (of all judgment) consider it more important that they speak standard language than the teachers do. Another aspect that is contradictory in this regard is that the results show that the respondents to a large extent consider that teachers should adapt their language to standard Swedish.

    When the answers between the two study groups are compared, it appears that the respondents from Arvika have a somewhat more positive view of dialect in general compared to those from Kil. However, these differences are marginal. Greater differences are found in formal situations. Respondents from Arvika consider it not as important to speak standard languages in relation to teaching situations compared to those from Kil. Teachers who speak dialectically are also taken more seriously among respondents from Arvika. This is also evidenced by the fact that the respondents from Kil consider that teachers should adapt their language to standard Swedish to a higher extent compared with respondents from Arvika.

  • 88.
    Lindberg, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Tidig språkstimulering: Vad har föräldrar till barn i förskolan för uppfattning om tidig språkstimulering?2010Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to contribute with knowledge about parents’ perceptions of the meaning of early (0-6 years old) language stimulation of their children.

     

    By doing interviews with open questions the parents’ perspective and perceptions became visible, based on the following issues:

    Which perceptions do parents of children in preschool have of early language stimulation?

    How do parents of children in preschool describe their work with language at home?

    How do parents of children in preschool think of the cooperation between preschool and the home in childrens’ language development?

     

    The conclutions to been drawn from the findings of this study are that parents of children in preschool see that it is important to start language stimulation directly at birth, in everyday life and in social situations. The results also shows that parents are connecting language with dialects, conflicts and that parental involvement in the preschool language development is influenced by parents own engagement.

  • 89.
    Lindh, Simon
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centrum för språk- och litteraturdidaktik.
    Online computer game English: A study on the language found in World of Warcraft2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine the language from a small sample of texts from the chat channels of World of Warcraft and analyze the differences found between World of Warcraft English and Standard English. In addition, the studywill compare the language found in World of Warcraft with language found on other parts of the Internet, especially chatgroups. Based on 1045 recorded chat messages, this study examines the use of abbreviations, emoticons, vocabulary, capitalization, spelling, multiple letter use and the use of rare characters. The results of the investigation show that the language of World of Warcraft differs from Standard English on several aspects, primarily in the use of abbreviations. This is supported by secondary sources. The results also show that the use of language is probably not based on the desire to deliver a message quickly, but rather to reach out to people. In addition, the results show that the language found in World of Warcraft is more advanced than a simple effort to try to imitate speech, thereby performing more than written speech.

  • 90.
    Lindholm, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Tengberg, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    The reading development of Swedish L2 middle school students and its relation to reading strategy use2019In: Reading Psychology, ISSN 0270-2711, E-ISSN 1521-0685, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 782-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This two-year longitudinal study investigated Swedish L2 middle school students’ reading development and its relation to reported strategy use. Reading comprehension was measured on three occasions and strategy use was examined using the Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory (MARSI) scale. The results show that student reading comprehension scores develop significantly over the last two years of middle school (grades 5–6). As expected, second-generation immigrant students score higher than first-generation immigrants, but the differences are not statistically significant. The study shows no gender-related differences in relation to reading strategy use. Boys and girls use strategies to a similar extent. However, good readers reported using all types of reading strategies, particularly global strategies, to a greater extent than poor readers. Interestingly, the reading achievement of boys was strongly correlated to the reported use of global strategies, while the reading achievement of girls was not correlated to strategy use at all. Implications of the study and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  • 91.
    Lindqvist, Linda
    Karlstad University. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT.
    How Views on Presentations Change Pupils' Premises: A Study on Similarities and Differences between Presentations2009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    The purpose of this essay was to show the pupils as presenters from their own and their teachers’ perspective. This was done regarding presentations by studying and comparing the applicability of the two structuralist theories media ecology theory and structural semiotic theory. The theories were used as model bases, aimed to correspond to opinions and experiences of Swedish upper secondary school pupils. Through a didactic approach, I intended to find out how pupils’ relations to presentations differ depending on how they regard them. Focus was on if they thought of presentations as comprehensive experiences or found similar elements in mediated and unmediated presentation contexts. An empirical field study was accomplished through qualitative interviews with pupils and teachers. The word “presentation” was treated as a discourse since data showed that respondents included diverse meanings and functions in the word. The analysis was based on the qualitatively collected empirical data that were applied on my models. Constructionism functioned as theoretical framework. My study indicated that the discourse presentation needs to be investigated further. 

     

  • 92.
    Ljung Egeland, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Olin-Scheller, ChristinaKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).Tanner, MarieKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).Tengberg, MichaelKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Tolfte nationella konferensen i svenska med didaktisk inriktning: Textkulturer2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Ljung Egeland, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Roberts, TimKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).Sandlund, EricaKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Language and Literature in Education (from 2013).Sundqvist, PiaKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Language and Literature in Education (from 2013). Universitetet i Oslo.
    Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12-13 april, 20182019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den svenska föreningen för tillämpad språkvetenskap (ASLA, Association Suédoise de Linguistique Appliquée) är den svenska avdelningen av internationella AILA (Association Internationale de Linguistique Appliquée). ASLA grundades 1966 och har till uppgift att främja forskning kring praktiska problem med anknytning till språk, förmedla kontakt mellan språkforskare i Sverige och andra länder, samt rekrytera till de forskningsnätverk som AILA organiserar.

    ASLA-föreningen arrangerar regelbundet symposier vid olika svenska lärosäten där såväl svenska som utländska deltagare möts. För närvarande hålls symposiet vartannat år och den 12–13 april 2018 välkomnade Karlstads universitet deltagare från inte mindre än 15 länder. Temat för ASLAsymposiet 2018 var ”Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande)”, på engelska ”Classroom research and language/languaging”. Föreliggande volym representerar fjorton av de bidrag som presenterades vid symposiet och som på olika sätt anknyter till symposiets tema. Volymen speglar den bredd och det djup som den tillämpade språkvetenskapen och ASLA:s verksamhet representerar: från barn till vuxna, från aktionsforskning med lärare till språkandets många faser och både i och utanför skolan.

  • 94.
    Lund, Simon
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Good cop, bad cop?: A corpus analysis on the semantic prosody of the noun cop2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The public opinion on the favourability towards the police varies greatly in the different populations in the United States. This is a corpus linguistic study that investigates a possible change in semantic prosody of the word cop. The study also investigates the distribution of the keyword in the different subcorpora to see if it has driven an overall change in the semantic prosody. The source is the Corpus of Historical American English, dating from 1800 to 2009. The Corpus of Historical American English is divided into four subcategories that have a median of 51% fictional material throughout the corpus. The four subcategories in the corpus are fiction, news, popular magazines, and non-fictional books. The data are divided into two categories, the first one being the positive/neutral category and the second category being the negative category. Neutral/positive is when cop is used with neutral or positive connotations and the negative is when cop is used with negative connotations. The period studied is that of 1859 to 2009 and this time span is divided into four periods to be more manageable. The distribution of the word in the subcorpora shows that the cop is used mostly in fictional material. The results show that the use of cop in contextual positive or neutral situations increase during the time span. To further this matter additional studies on cop in other corpora from America and other parts of the speaking world would benefit the knowledge on the noun’s semantic prosody and to further knowledge in the public opinion on the police.

  • 95.
    Lundgren, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education.
    Understanding is mediated by metaphors.: A study of metaphors in British and American newspaper articles dealing with science.2009Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We use metaphors in our daily language – deliberately, and unconsciously. The purpose of this paper was to investigate if journalists use metaphors to explain difficult information concerning science. This study, of British and American newspaper articles dealing with science, especially health, shows that journalists use metaphors to explain difficult information. However, is there a specific underlying conceptual metaphor? I have analyzed 58 metaphors from 12 newspaper articles to get an answer. The result shows that every one of the articles contains linguistic metaphors. I have found 17 conceptual metaphors, and the majority of the linguistic metaphors can be traced back to the conceptual metaphors THE BODY IS A FACTORY and TREATING ILLNESS IS FIGHTING A WAR. The journalists give the small units, and processes, inside our body human characteristics and functions. This makes some procedures easier to understand. The reason is that our experiences contribute to our understanding of the metaphors. Metaphors enable the reader to understand complex matters in familiar terms

  • 96.
    Moesby, Cecilia
    Karlstad University.
    Vilken betydelse har modersmålsinlärning för inlärningen av ett andraspråk?: Att lära sig svenska2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 97.
    Morrissey, Lochlan
    et al.
    Karlstad University. Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Griffith University.
    A Lexical Semantics for Refugee, Asylum Seeker and Boat People in Australian English2017In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 389-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms refugee, asylum seeker and boat people are of particular prominence in the Australian discourse surrounding immigration policy, and are widely used in day-to-day conversation among Australians. Despite their frequency of use, a lexico-semantic study of the terms has not been carried out to date. This paper fills this gap by proposing a semantic analysis of them. The study is based on a corpus created from online comments to the Australian television programme Go Back To Where You Came From (Season 1, SBS 2011). After introducing the data and analytical framework—object-oriented semantics—we discuss the terms’ lexical semantics. While the discussion of immigration issues is emotionally laden, our results suggest that the default semantics of the terms do not include evaluative components. Rather, speakers tend to evaluate the agreed-upon semantic specifications differently depending on their political views. We show how each term represents a specific node in a network of concepts for translocating individuals, but may in context also be applied to neighbouring nodes that lack a lexicalization. While the terms are seemingly used interchangeably, our analysis instead emphasizes the influence of the underlying conceptual structure and the resulting constrained plasticity of nominal meaning in context.

  • 98. Muir, Hollie
    Corrective written feedback in upper secondary school: A case study comparing teachers’ teaching practices as well as their approaches and preferences towards corrective written feedback2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper was to examine what types of feedback, both local/global and direct/indirect corrective written feedback (CWF), teachers gave on students’ compositions. Six teachers, three from China and three from Sweden, took part in the study. The feedback given on the compositions was also compared with teachers’ approaches and preferences towards corrective written feedback to see if there were any similarities and differences in how they used CWF. A qualitative approach was used in the analysis of the data from the students’ compositions, as well as using semi-structured interviews to see if their approaches and preferences matched the teachers’ teaching practices. The overall results of the study concluded that both the Swedish and Chinese teachers focused their error corrections mostly on local errors. The Swedish teachers also made an overall higher percentage of total error corrections than the Chinese teachers. The Chinese teachers marked more global errors than the Swedish teachers, whereas the Swedish teachers marked more local errors. When comparing these results to the six teachers’ approaches and preferences, the Swedish teachers’ answers matched more the written CWF they gave on the students’ compositions than the Chinese teachers. This, therefore, shows that the Swedish teachers have an overall broader understanding of their own use of CWF in terms of their approaches and preferences and the feedback they give on students’ compositions.

  • 99.
    Musgrave, Simon
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Haugh, Michael
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    The use of ontologies as a tool for aggregating spoken corpora2014In: Best Practices for Spoken Corpora in Linguistic Research / [ed] Ş̧ükriye Ruhi, Michael Haugh, Thomas Schmidt, & Kai Wörner, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 225-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Nickles, Matthias
    et al.
    Technische Universität München.
    Pease, Adam
    Articulate Software.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Zaefferer, Dietmar
    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.
    Ontologies across disciplines2007In: Ontolinguistics: How Ontological Status Shapes the Linguistic Coding of Concepts / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Dietmar Zaefferer, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2007, p. 23-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
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