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  • 51.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Susanne Opfermann and Yvonne Roth, red., Stories av Elisabeth Stoddard2004In: American Studies in Scandinavia 36.1 (2004): 131-133Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Telling Lives in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Elizabeth Stoddard's The Morgesons, Octavia Butler's Kindred, and Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The Bereaved Post-9/11 Orphan Boy: Representing (and Relativizing) Crisis and Healing, Tradition and Innovation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bereaved Post-9/11 Orphan Boy: Representing (and Relativizing) Crisis and Healing, Tradition and Innovation

     

    The sorrowing child is a central figure in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2005) and Brian Selznick’s The Invention of Hugo Cabret (2007). These best-selling and award-winning novels – both of which break traditional frames of the novelistic genre through their use of visual material – feature a bereaved boy whose personal quest is to re-connect with his dead father. Nine-year-old Oskar Schell in Foer’s novel has recently lost his father in the 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers, which makes him a “Twin Tower orphan” even though his mother is still alive. In Selznick’s novel, Hugo Cabret’s father has died in a fire in a museum, which has made Hugo fatherless as well as motherless. The setting is Paris in the 1930s, but I will argue that The Invention of Hugo Cabret has much in common with Foer’s novel and that it may fruitfully be read as a post-9/11 narrative. Although these two novels are formally innovative, the function of the orphan harks back to earlier uses of this figure in, for instance, nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century fiction where the fictional orphan’s cultural work is nothing less than to heal the adult world. Despite their traditional use of the orphan, however, I will suggest that both of these novels have the potential to raise public awareness about pre-9/11 wars and crises outside the boundaries of the USA, thus providing a more nuanced perspective on the national crisis and the War on Terror triggered by the Twin Tower attack in September 2001.

  • 54.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The Bereaved Post-9/11 Orphan Boy: Representing (and Relativizing) Crisis and Healing, Tradition and Invention2014In: American and British Studies Annual, ISSN 1803-6058, Vol. 7, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the sorrowing child in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2005) and Brian Selznick’s The Invention of Hugo Cabret (2007), which break traditional novelistic frames through their use of visual material. Through their employment of the orphan figure and their inventive, experimental formal aspects, both Foer’s and Selznick’s novels work as interventions in the debate about the role of fiction after 9/11. Steering clear of a never-ending state of orphanhood, or a return to the nuclear family ideal of the 1950s, they offer different solutions to the family crisis triggered by the loss of a father in a burning building, and, by extension, to the national crisis triggered by 9/11. The bond between father and son that the novels portray represents an affective masculinity that is in line with the emotional narrative work that the two orphan boys perform in the plot and for the readers, which is similar to that of orphan girls in earlier American fiction. In addition to fulfilling the time-honored function of the orphan healing the adult world in a crisis-laden present, Foer’s Oskar and Selznick’s Hugo are post-9/11 “inventions” that highlight the uses of invention in a post-9/11 world.

  • 55.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    the cleverest children's book written here: Elizabeth Stoddard's _Lolly Dinks's Doings_ and the Subversion of Social Conventions2008In: Enterprising Youth: Social Values and Acculturation in Nineteenth-Century American Children's Literature / [ed] Monika Elbert, New York: Routledge , 2008, p. 149-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    the cleverest child's book written here: Elizabeth Stoddard's Lolly Dinks's Doings2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The fact of metafiction in nineteenth-century children's literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder Book and Elizabeth Stoddard's Lolly Dinks's Doings2016In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two American books for children: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys (1851) and Elizabeth Stoddard’s Lolly Dinks’s Doings (1874). In both books, fairy tales or myths are framed by a contemporary American setting in which the stories is told. It is in these realistic frames with an adult storyteller and child listeners that metafictional features are found. The article shows that Hawthorne and Stoddard use a variety of metafictional elements. So, although metafiction has been regarded as a postmodernist development in children’s literature, there are in fact instances of metafiction in nineteenth-century American children’s literature.

  • 58.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    The Novelist as an Agent of Collective Remembrance2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    The Novelist as an Agent of Collective Remembrance: Pat Barker and the First World War2007In: Collective Traumas: Memories of War and Conflict in 20th-Century Europe / [ed] Conny Mithander, John Sundholm & Maria Holmgren Troy, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2007, p. 47-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    The (Post)memory of the First World War in Pat Barker's _Liza's England_ and _Another World_2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The Values in and of Nineteenth-Century American Fairy Tales: The Case of Horace E. Scudder2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s literature is often contested ground in regard to values, and that was definitely the case in the USA in the nineteenth century. Since American children’s literature was commonly seen as a way to inculcate moral values and useful knowledge into the budding citizens of the new nation, fairy tales were regarded with suspicion by some authors and publishers. Others, however, added their own fairy tales to those of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen, which were available in the US in translation.

    In this paper, I will examine two of those American books of fairy tales, written by the man of letters and editor Horace E. Scudder: Seven Little People and Their Friends (1862), and Dream Children (1864). Scudder, who was the editor of the prestigious Atlantic Monthly 1890-1898, probably did more to promote a more imaginative literature for American children than anybody else in the nineteenth century. For instance, he persuaded Hans Christian Andersen to contribute to the Riverside Magazine for Young People, a high-quality children’s periodical, which ran from 1867 to 1870 with Scudder as editor. Scudder also compiled The Children’s Book (1881), an anthology of literature – fables, stories, and poems – suitable for the first four grades in school. In 1894, he published a collection of his own essays on Childhood in Literature and Art. The question is: what values do Scudder’s fairy tales endorse?

     

  • 62.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    The Vampire Child: Predator and Prey2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Vampire Child: Predator and Prey

    If historically the vampire has unambiguously been cast as the sexual predator and the human being as the victim, the situation is slightly different in more recent novels featuring preteen vampire children that are eroticized by vampire or human adults. As James Kincaid observes in Erotic Innocence, in our culture stories of child molesting are among the most popular (3) – in their virus-like proliferation – and horrifying.Children are increasingly sexualized or eroticized at the same time as adults’ erotic responses to children are not only seen as criminal, but unimaginable (Kincaid 21). Kincaid points out that “[o]ur story of child molesting is a story of nightmare, the literary territory of the Gothic” (10). Not surprisingly, as the vampire novel is traditionally a gothic genre known for dealing in sexual transgressions, there are examples of incest and pedophilia in recent vampire novels. There is, for instance, the incestuous erotic relation between Claudia and her “vampire parents” Louis and Lestat in Anne Rice’s Interview with the Vampire (1976). Pedophilia is very much present in vampire novels such as S. P. Somtow’s Vampire Junction (1984) and John Ajvide Lindqvist’s Låt den rätte komma in (Let the Right One In) (2004). Both Somtow’s Timmy and Lindqvist’s Eli have also been subjected to physical maiming: they were castrated before they were turned into vampires in a distant past. Claudia, Timmy, and Eli are moreover doomed physically to be eternal children. In this paper, by focusing on two of Somtow’s vampire characters – Timmy and Lisa – and the black vampire orphan Shori in Octavia Butler’s Fledgling (2005), I will investigate the potential of the vampire child to go beyond dichotomous representations of children. I will argue that the vampire child is another turn of the screw when it comes to ambiguous or uncanny depictions of children and their relations to adults.

  • 63.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Trading Alien Cultures in Science Fiction by Octavia Butler2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    What will she give us all? Fur? Tails: Miscegenation and Medical Conditions in Octavia Butler's Science Fiction2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Octavia Butler mentioned her “ongoing fascination with biology [and] medicine,” when commenting on one of her own short stories (first published in 1987) in which she has combined elements from three genetic disorders to create the premises for the story. This fascination locates much of her oeuvre at the intersection of miscegenation and the medical. In many of her novels, she addresses the racist notion of miscegenation both literally and figuratively, and in biological as well as cultural contexts. Many of her main characters are what other characters often regard as miscegenated offspring; most are placed in situations where they have to embrace, or at least accept, interracial or inter-species biological and/or cultural relations – hybrid lives – in order to survive and possibly develop. For instance, the quotation “What will she give us all? Fur? Tails?” comes from Butler’s last novel, Fledgling (2005). The protagonist of this novel is a genetic experiment, a hybrid, whose African American ancestry is the solution to a problem but, at the same time, means that her family members are murdered due to enduring racist ideas originating in American slavery, which in this speculative novel has spread to another humanoid species. In this paper, I will focus on how Butler portrays and comments on miscegenation in Clay’s Ark (1984), a science fiction novel that features a physician as one of the main characters and depicts an alien infection that changes not only people’s lives but also their offspring.

  • 65.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    World War I, Postmemory and Wit(h)nessing Trauma in Pat Barker's _Liza's England_ and _Another World_2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Helmersen, Ole
    Gimeno, Ana
    Camilleri, George
    Quality Enhancement in Literature and Culture2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörns högskola.
    Wahlström, Helena
    Uppsala universitet.
    Making Home: Orphanhood, kinship, and cultural memory in contemporary American novels2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making Home explores the orphan child as a trope in contemporary US fiction, arguing that in the times of perceived national crisis concerns about American identity, family, and literary history are articulated around this literary figure. 

    Making Home moves scholarship on literary orphans in new directions. It focuses on orphan figures in a broad, multi-ethnic range of contemporary fiction by Barbara Kingsolver, Linda Hogan, Leslie Marmon Silko, Marilynne Robinson, Michael Cunningham, Jonathan Safran Foer, John Irving, Kaye Gibbons, Octavia Butler, Jewelle Gomez, and Toni Morrison. It also investigates genres as carriers of cultural memory, looking particularly at the captivity narrative, historical fiction, speculative fiction, the sentimental novel, and the bildungsroman. From a decisively literaryperspective, Making Home engages socio-political concerns such as mixed-race families, child welfare, and racial and national identity, as well as shifting definitions of familial, national, and literary home. By analyzing how contemporary novels both incorporate and resist gendered and raced literary conventions, how they elaborate on symbolic and factual meanings of orphanhood, and how they explore kinship beyond the nuclear and/or adoptive family, this book offers something distinctly new in American literary studies. It is a crucial study for students and scholars interested in the links between literature and identity, questions of inclusion and exclusion in national ideology, and definitions of family and childhood.

  • 68.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Ullén, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Guest Editors' Note: Currents and Countercurrents2015In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Wahlström, Helena
    Contemporary Literary American Orphans, the Nation, and the World2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Wahlström, Helena
    Kella, Liz
    Making Home: Orphanhood and Agency in Contemporary American Novels2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 71.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Wennö, Elisabeth
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Memory, Haunting, Discourse2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory, Haunting, Discourse brings together the work of scholars from ten countries. In twenty articles, these scholars investigate various relationships between memory and haunting, memory and different discourses, and discourses and haunting, in most cases with a focus on particular artefacts, or particular means of expression: fiction, autobiography, poetry, experimental and popular film, videotaped interviews, and artworks, such as photography, paintings, and installations.The anthology is divided into three sections. The first section explores memory as a phenomenon in art and philosophy, the second how memory functions in particular cultural contexts, while the third section addressess specific issues, often involving memory and trauma, that concern gender, race, ethnicity, nationality and age in construction of identity, and that are related to the impact of and resistance to dominant, oppressive discourses

  • 72.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Wennö, Elisabeth
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Space, Haunting, Discourse2008Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This anthology reflects the current interest in the concept of space as a revitalising approach to literary, social, mental, political and discursive phenomena. The contributions, which examine novels, films, art, and cultures, invite the reader to consider the function of space in human constructions as symbolic representation, analytical tool, discursive strategy and haunting effect. In a wider context they demonstrate the extent to which spatiality impacts on our lives and has ethical, political, historical and cultural implications.The contributors represent a wide range of disciplines in the Humanties: Literature, Photography, Art, Human Geography, Ethnic Studies, and Cultural Studies.Maria Holmgren Troy and Elisabeth Wennö are Associate Professors in English Literature at Karlstad University, Sweden

  • 73.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Wijkmark, Sofia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Introduction: Gothic and Uncanny Explorations2017In: Edda. Nordisk tidsskrift for litteraturforskning, ISSN 0013-0818, E-ISSN 1500-1989, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 108-114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Mithander, Conny
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Culture and Gender studies.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Culture and Gender studies.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Languages.
    Collective Traumas: Memories of War and Conflict in 20th-Century Europe2007Book (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Wahlström Henriksson, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Kella, Elizabeth
    Södertörn University.
    Holmgren Troy, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Bilda familj: Om föräldralösa barn, släktskap och nationsskapande i samtida amerikanska romaner2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 11-32Article in journal (Refereed)
12 51 - 75 of 75
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