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  • 51. Eklöv, A. G.
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effect of artificial instream cover on density of 0+ brown trout1998In: Fisheries Management & Ecology 5: 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52. Eklöv, A.
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Brönmark, C.
    Larsson, P.
    Berglund, O.
    Influence of water quality, habitat and speciess richness on brown trout populations1999In: J. Fish Biology 54: 33-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53. Eklöv, A.
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Brönmark, C.
    Larsson, P.
    Berglund, O.
    Response of stream fish to improved water quality: a comparison between the 1960s and 1990s1998In: Freshwater Biology 40: 771-782Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54. Eklöv, A.
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Kristiansen, H.
    The effect of depth on the interaction between perch (Perca fluviatilis) and minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus)1994In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish 3: 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55. Elso, J. I.
    et al.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Habitat use, movements and survival of individual 0+ brown trout (Salmo trutta) during winter2001In: Archiv für Hydrobiologie 152: 279-295, Vol. 152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Enefalk, Åsa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Winter sheltering by juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta): Effects of stream wood and an instream ecothermic predator2017In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In boreal streams, juvenile salmonids spend substantial amounts of time sheltering in the streambed and in stream wood, presumably as a means of protection against the physical environment and from terrestrial endothermic predators. Relatively little is known about sheltering by salmonids in response to instream ectothermic predators.We tested the effects of burbot (Lota lota) on the winter sheltering behaviour of PIT-tagged 0+ brown trout (Salmo trutta) in daylight and darkness. Sheltering in the streambed by trout was studied in the presence and absence of fine wood bundles.We found that the use of streambed and fine wood was lower in darkness than in daylight. Availability of fine wood significantly decreased sheltering in the streambed, and this effect was more pronounced in daylight than in darkness. The presence of a burbot significantly decreased sheltering in the streambed, had no effect on use of fine wood and resulted in a higher number of exposed trout.Our results indicate that juvenile brown trout decrease streambed sheltering in response to a burrowing, ectothermic predator.

  • 57.
    Eros, Tibor
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology. Balaton Limnological Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary.
    Gustafsson, Pär
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Forest-Stream linkages: Effects of Terrestrial Invertebrate Input and Light on Diet and Growth of Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) in a Boreal Forest Stream2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subsidies of energy and material from the riparian zone have large impacts on recipient stream habitats. Human-induced changes, such as deforestation, may profoundly affect these pathways. However, the strength of individual factors on stream ecosystems is poorly understood since the factors involved often interact in complex ways. We isolated two of these factors, manipulating the flux of terrestrial input and the intensity of light in a 2 x 2 factorial design, where we followed the growth and diet of two size-classes of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and the development of periphyton, grazer macroinvertebrates, terrestrial invertebrate inputs, and drift in twelve 20 m long enclosed stream reaches in a five-monthlong experiment in a boreal coniferous forest stream. We found that light intensity, which was artificially increased 2.5 times above ambient levels, had an effect on grazer density, but no detectable effect on chlorophyll a biomass. We also found a seasonal effect on the amount of drift and that the reduction of terrestrial prey input, accomplished by covering enclosures with transparent plastic, had a negative impact on the amount of terrestrial invertebrates in the drift. Further, trout growth was strongly seasonal and followed the same pattern as drift biomass, and the reduction of terrestrial prey input had a negative effect on trout growth. Diet analysis was consistent with growth differences, showing that trout in open enclosures consumed relatively more terrestrial prey in summer than trout living in covered enclosures. We also predicted ontogenetic differences in the diet and growth of old and young trout, where we expected old fish to be more affected by the terrestrial prey reduction, but we found little evidence of ontogenetic differences. Overall, our results showed that reduced terrestrial prey inputs, as would be expected from forest harvesting, shaped differences in the growth and diet of the top predator, brown trout.

  • 58.
    Erős, Tibor
    et al.
    Balaton Limnological Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Pär
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry A.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Aquatic-terrestrial linkages: effects of terrestrial invertebrate input and light on a boreal stream communityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Filipsson, Karl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Erlandsson, Ann
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of temperature and a piscivorous fish on diel winter behaviour of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)2019In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 64, no 1+, p. 1797-1805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low winter temperatures constrain predator-detection and escape capabilities, making poikilotherms vulnerable to predation. Investigations of temperature effects on predator-prey interactions can therefore be of special importance in light of ongoing climate change, where winter temperatures are predicted to increase substantially at northern latitudes. Behavioral responses of stream fishes to terrestrial predators in winter are well recognised, whereas responses to predatory fish have received little attention. Using stream flumes, we examined the anti-predator behaviour of one-summer-old brown trout (Salmo trutta) at 3 and 8 degrees C in the presence and absence of burbot (Lota lota) under night, dawn, and daylight conditions. Burbot was placed upstream of the trout, separated by net screens. Lower temperature and the presence of burbot reduced trout activity. Light increased trout shelter use, and trout sheltered more in the presence of burbot. An interaction between the presence of burbot and light conditions affected trout position in the flumes: at night and dawn, trout positioned themselves further downstream when burbot were present than when absent, whereas during the day, trout maintained the same position in the presence or absence of the predator. Our results suggest that piscivorous fish, in addition to terrestrial predators, shape the behaviour of prey fishes in streams during winter. We show how predator avoidance results in altered diel patterns of juvenile brown trout under winter conditions, and that temperature has additional effects on trout behaviour.

  • 60.
    Giller, Paul
    et al.
    Natl Univ Ireland Univ Coll Cork, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Cork, Ireland..
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    The relationship between individual habitat use and diet in brown trout2015In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salmonids exhibit considerable variation within and between individuals in growth, diet, foraging strategy and habitat use, but little is known about how these characteristics covary. Previous work has shown that habitat use strongly influences growth rates in brown trout (Salmo trutta). We examined individual variation in diet of PIT-tagged Salmo trutta in three stream enclosures in relation to individual habitat use, size, sex and growth. Each enclosure consisted of a fine substratum pool and a coarse substratum riffle. By placing antennae between these habitats, we continuously monitored habitat use under field conditions. Fish were recaptured four times over the 2-month study period, and diet, which was examined through stomach flushing, was related to habitat use over the previous 48h. Individual fish growth was also measured. Based on habitat use, trout were classified as either movers or stayers, with stayers being of two types, those using only pools and those using only riffles and movers using and swimming between pools and riffles. The stayers in pools took more terrestrial prey than the stayers in riffles, whereas the latter fed more on aquatic invertebrates such as the crustacean Gammarus pulex, the plecopteran Leuctra and cased caddis larvae. Movers had diets intermediate between the stayers in pools and the stayers in riffles. Results of canonical correspondence analysis showed that variation in diet amongst individual fish over the study period was significantly influenced by enclosure, growth and % time spent in the pool during the day. Graphical models of diet analysis showed that population and mean individual prey diversity tended to differ amongst enclosures and suggested that stayers in pools consumed a greater prey diversity, whereas stayers in riffles consumed more prey. Discriminant analysis of diets revealed significant discrimination by habitat and sex on two of the four sampling occasions, based on daytime habitat use, but only on one date based on night-time habitat use. Stoneflies and terrestrial prey contributed most to the separation.

  • 61.
    Gordon, T. A. C.
    et al.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Harding, H. R.
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, U.K..
    Clever, F. K.
    School of Science and the Environment, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, U.K..
    Davidson, I. K.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Davison, W.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Montgomery, D. W.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Weatherhead, R. C.
    Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), Aberystwyth University, U.K..
    Windsor, F. M.
    School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, U.K..
    Armstrong, J. D.
    Marine Scotland Science, Freshwater Fisheries Laboratory, U.K..
    Bardonnet, A.
    ECOBIOP, UMR 1224, INRA, Univ. Pau & Pays Adour, France.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Britton, J. R.
    Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, U.K..
    Cote, I. M.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    D'agostino, D.
    School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, U.K..
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Harborne, A. R.
    Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, U.S.A..
    Kahilainen, K. K.
    Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Metcalfe, N. B.
    Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, MVLS, University of Glasgow, U.K..
    Mills, S. C.
    CRIOBE, EPHE PSL Research University, French Polynesia Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, France.
    Milner, N. J.
    APEM Ltd, School of Biological Sciences, U.K..
    Mittermayer, F. H.
    Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Fishes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Germany.
    Montorio, L.
    ESE, Ecology and Ecosystem Health, Agrocampus Ouest, France.
    Nedelec, S. L.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Prokkola, J. M.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Rutterford, L. A.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Salvanes, A. G. V.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Simpson, S. D.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Vainikka, A.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Pinnegar, J. K.
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, U.K..
    Santos, E. M.
    Biosciences, University of Exeter, U.K..
    Fishes in a changing world: learning from the past to promote sustainability of fish populations2018In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 804-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations of fishes provide valuable services for billions of people, but face diverse and interacting threats that jeopardize their sustainability. Human population growth and intensifying resource use for food, water, energy and goods are compromising fish populations through a variety of mechanisms, including overfishing, habitat degradation and declines in water quality. The important challenges raised by these issues have been recognized and have led to considerable advances over past decades in managing and mitigating threats to fishes worldwide. In this review, we identify the major threats faced by fish populations alongside recent advances that are helping to address these issues. There are very significant efforts worldwide directed towards ensuring a sustainable future for the world's fishes and fisheries and those who rely on them. Although considerable challenges remain, by drawing attention to successful mitigation of threats to fish and fisheries we hope to provide the encouragement and direction that will allow these challenges to be overcome in the future.

  • 62.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Book review: Fishes and Forestry, worldwide watershed interactions and management2007In: Fish and FisheriesArticle, book review (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Distributional ecology of Etheostoma radiosum and E. spectabile : A test of oxygen tolerances1989In: Southwestern Naturalist 34: 539-541Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effects of predation and discharge on habitat use by brown trout (Salmo trutta) and grayling (Thymallus thymallus) in artificial streams1999In: Arch. Hydrobiol. 145: 433-446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effects of predation, trout density and discharge on habitat use by brown trout, Salmo trutta, in artificial streams1994In: Freshwater Biology 32: 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effekt av biotiska interaktioner på öringens och harrens habitatutnyttjande1999Report (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effekter av flöde, särskilt minimitappning, på fiskfaunan1991In: Dimensionering av minimitappning från miljö- och fiskesynpunkt, Report to Vattenfall , 1991Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Field survival of brown trout eggs in a perforated incubation chamber1992In: North American Journal of Fisheries Management 12: 833-835Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    First record of the banded darter in the New York portion of the Susquehanna drainage1982In: NY Fish and Game Journal 29: 215-216Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Geografisk variation i mikrohabitat utnyttjande hos öring1999Report (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Habitat use and feeding behavior of thirteen species of benthic stream fishes1991In: Env. Biol. Fish. 31: 389-401Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Inledning till workshops- kan vannkraftutbyggninger bli miljövennlige?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Interactive segregation between the stream fishes Etheostoma simoterum and E. rufilineatum1988In: Oikos 51: 193-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nedströmspassag i Emån2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 75.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Partial migration in brown trout: environmental effects and applications2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Partial migration in salmonids: effects of food and the role of individual variation in behaviour and metabolic rates2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Stream regulation, fish habitat and connectivity- some examples from Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    The effect of discharge and predation on habitat use by wild and hatchery brown trout (Salmo trutta)1992In: Regulated Rivers: Research and ManagementArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Vattenkraft, Förnyelsebar energi, Energieffektivisering och Miljö2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 80.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Öringens och harrens habitat och mikrohabitatutnyttjande1998Report (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Öringens och harrens val och utnyttjande av Vojmåns mikrohabitat. Delrapport 21998Report (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Överlevnad hos öringrom i en ny sorts inkuberings behållare1999Report (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, E.
    Infiltrationskapacitet i Vombs vattenverksdammar- undersökning av klorofyll a, totalfosfor och grumlighet under ett år1995Report (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, E.
    Eklöv, A.
    Effects of predation and intraspecific interactions on habitat use and foraging by brown trout, Salmo trutta, in artificial streams1997In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish 6: 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Infiltrationskapacitet i Vombs vattenverksdammar - Undersökning av klorofyll a, totalfosfor, grumlighet under ett år1995Report (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Vattnet i skogen och skogen i vattnet - kantzonens betydelse för skogliga vattendrag2004In: Inte bara träd – hållbart mångbruk av skogslandskapet / [ed] Olsson, Nyberg, Bladh och Månsson, Stockholm: Carlssons förlag , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Eklöv, Anders
    Effects of Predation and Intraspecific Interactions on Habitat Use and Foraging by Brown Trout in Artificial Streams1997In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied habitat use, foraging rates and behavior of 10 cm and 12 cm long brown trout, Salmo trutta, at two densities, 1.5 and 3.0 fish. m−2, in artificial streams that contained either the amphipod, Gammarus pulex, alone or G. pulex together with the piscivore, northern pike, Esox lucius. Gammarus were stocked in and largely restricted to the pools at a density of 128 Gammurus. m−2. pool−1 Large trout (12 cm) used pools more and riffles less when small trout (10 cm) were present than when small trout were absent. Small trout consumed fewer Gammarus when together with large trout than when alone, but showed no difference in habitat use in the presence and abscnce of large trout. Habitat use and number of Gammarus consumed per trout were not affected by trout density for either size-class when alone. For both size-classes of trout, use of pools and foraging rates were higher in the absence than in the presence of pike, and pike primarily resided in the pools. The number of aggressive interactions by both size-classes of trout decreased when pike was present. Our results indicate that for habitats that differ in food resources and predation risk, size structure may affect habitat use and foraging by brown trout.

  • 88.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Gustafsson, Pär
    Länsstyrelsen i Värmland.
    Forest-stream linkages: the response of brown trout to woody and terrestrial invertebrate inputs2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Brothers, E. B.
    Intrastream variation in growth rates and time of first otolith increment formation for young-of-the-year Etheostoma simoterum (Percidae)1991In: J. Fish Biol. 38: 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Brönmark, C.
    Eklöv, A.
    Larsson, P.
    Berglund, O.
    Water quality and the stream fish fauna of southern Sweden: an environmental success story!1999In: Lakeline 19(2): 14-15, 38-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 91.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, O.
    Re-establish of connectivity in the regulated river Emån2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Connectivity is a two-way street:: the need for a holistic approach to fish passage problems in regulated rivers2009In: Rivers Research and Applications: an international journal devoted to river research and management, ISSN 1535-1459, E-ISSN 1535-1467, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1268-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract

    We evaluated the effects of a rehabilitation project, whose goal was to re-establish longitudinal connectivity for anadromous

    trout in the regulated river Ema°n. We used a holistic approach, by tagging and following both upstream-migrating spawners

    (N¼348) and downstream-migrating smolts (N¼80) and kelts as they passed two hydroelectric plants (HEP 2-3) with naturelike

    fishways.

    When migrating upstream, 8488% of the spawners stopped, primarily at spawning grounds, before reaching HEP2. The

    proportion of stoppers was lower (56%) for fish that had been to the fishways in previous years, indicating that the recolonization

    rate is likely to increase over time. Of the spawners that approached the fishway at HEP2, 77% rapidly located the fishway

    situated next to the tail-race, resulting in an attraction efficiency of 81% and a passage efficiency of 95%. The time required to

    locate the fishway inside the former channel at HEP3 was substantial, but the attraction efficiency (89%) and passage efficiency

    (97%) were nevertheless high.

    The kelts swam downstream mainly in spring, using spill gates and the fishways, to swim past HEP2 and 3 and continue

    downstream to the Baltic Sea. Iteroparity was confirmed by the fact that 20% of the spawners were tagged in previous years.

    Smolt loss was about 30% for both HEPs, with a higher turbine-induced loss 30% for fish passing through Francis runners than a

    Kaplan runner. Fifteen per cent of the tagged smolt reached the sea and none of these fish had swum through the Francis runners.

    It will probably take many years before longitudinal connectivity is fully re-established in the river Ema°n, due to substantial

    losses of both upstream-migrating spawners (35% loss) and downstream-migrating smolts (50%) and kelts. In addition, smolt

    production in areas upstream of HEP3 is far below carrying capacity. Thus, additional measures that not only facilitate

    movement of upstream spawners, but also reduce mortality and injuries of downs

  • 93.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Ecological connectivity in rivers and its relevance for salmonid ecology2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Longitudinal connectivity and remedial measures in a Swedish river2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Restoring ecological connectivity in rivers to improve conditions for anadromous brown trout Salmo Trutta2010In: Salmonid Fisheries: Freshwater Habitat Management / [ed] Paul Kemp, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 148-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Länsstyrelsen i Värmland.
    Engqvist, Therese
    Länsstyrelsen i Kalmar.
    Effect of trash diverters ad overhead cover on downstream migrating brown trout smolts2012In: Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, ISSN 0925-8574, E-ISSN 1872-6992, Vol. 48, no November, p. 25-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Power plant dams constitute barriers for downstream migration by smolts. The purpose of this study was to measure guidance efficiency of existing trash diverters and the use of overhead cover in combination with trash diverters to guide brown trout (

    Salmo trutta L.) smolts away from turbine intakes into trash spillway gates at two power plants in the Emån River, southern Sweden. A total of 44 trout smolts were caught, radio-tagged, released at the two power plants and tracked daily for six weeks. The trash diverter at the lower power plant had a significant guiding effect, as the proportion of smolt that entered the spillway gate was significantly greater than the relative proportion of water that flowed through the gate (52% vs 17%). In contrast, there was no evidence of a guidance effect at upper Finsjö, where the proportion of smolts that entered the spillway gate did not differ significantly from the relative proportion of water that flowed through the gate (0% vs 10%). The lack of a guidance effect at upper Finsjö could not be explained. The effect of overhead cover was tested at the upper power plant as illumination from outdoor, overhead lamps at the power station was believed to attract smolts to the turbine intake. This was accomplishing by setting up and removing a tarpaulin placed between the trash deflector and the turbine intake approximately every 2–5 days for about one month, so that 52.6% of the time the tarpaulin was in place and 47.4% of the time it was not. The presence of the tarpaulin reduced turbine passage, as 31% of the smolts swam through the trash spillway gate instead of the turbines when the tarpaulin was in place, whereas all smolts entered the turbines when no tarpaulin was used. For fish that passed through the turbines, mortality was higher at the upper power plant, equipped with two twin-Francis turbines, than at the lower one, equipped with a single Kaplan turbine.

  • 97.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Forsberg, J.
    Löwgrean, M.
    Fiskvägar som restaureringsåtgärd för fragmenterade fiskpopulationer i reglerade vattendrag2006Report (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Kriström, B
    Leonardsson, K
    Ranneby, B
    Årsrapport: samhällsekonomisk analys av alternativa åtgärder i flödespåverkade vattendrag: Emån och Ljusnan2009Report (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Tielman, J
    Longitudinal connectivity and remedial measures in the River Emån2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Greenberg, Larry
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Dahl, J.
    Effect of habitat type on growth and diet of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) in stream enclosures1998In: Fisheries Management & Ecology 5: 331-348Article in journal (Refereed)
1234 51 - 100 of 174
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