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  • 51.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The Uncanny Relationship of Mediatization and Surveillance in Developing Countries2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite being a relatively young field of academic inquiry, mediatization research is already considered to be a prominent theoretical framework for understanding the long term effects of contemporary media saturation. Yet, the empirical research on mediatization conducted so far have focused primarily on Western countries, and was implemented mainly in Europe. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that especially within the context of developing countries (and also an alarming number of developed ones) media technologies and ICTs are increasingly being used for control over information - together with the heavy surveillance of dissidents and activists. Intertwined merging of mediatized electronic communication with the processes of digitalization; and convergence of various media forms (shortly called the meta-process of mediatization) inevitably leads to increase in the possibilities of their monitoring - and as the recent revelations of the NSA contractor Edward Snowden and the whistle blower organization WikiLeaks about the global pervasive state surveillance conducted by US and European intelligence agencies in close cooperation with a number of private companies clearly showed, transforms the society into the ‘surveillance society’ (Lyon, 2001). Thus, in line with Stig Hjarvard’s detection that whether the “mediatization has positive or negative consequences cannot be determined in general terms; it is a concrete, analytical question that needs to be addressed in terms of specific contexts, where the influence of specific media over certain institutions is gauged” (2008, p. 114) this presentation aims to focus upon the negative consequences of mediatization and its relationship to increased public and private surveillance with a study on Azerbaijan - where mediatization process is promoted by the modernization upgrades of telecommunications and mobile telephony infrastructure through a number of foreign aids and grants, provided by international organizations and NGOs for the purposes of adjustment towards the governing European and global standards.

  • 52.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Turkey and Copyleft Music Production: Reflectionson Bandista2013In: IASPM@Journal, ISSN 2079-3871, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 80-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on copyleft music production in Turkey through a case study on Bandista, amusic collective with strong oppositional stance formed in 2006 in Istanbul. Describing itsmusical performances as "situationist experiment of rage and rapture" Bandista becameimmensely popular in the Turkish political music scenery after releasing its debut album De tefabula narratur in 2009 under the copyleft scheme. The article tries to look at the copyleft withthe notion of 'music as performance' in mind, and argues that copyleft politics are essential,especially for new music bands to form themselves as independent actors within the musicscene.

  • 53.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    What do we really know about online news readers?: Critical reflections on importance of qualitative studies of newspaper user comments2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years witnessed an explosion in increased user interactivity brought into online news environments due to the advances in digital technologies and convergence of various online and offline journalistic practices. This phenomenon already started to be explored by academics from different research spheres, but mainly in the form of quantitative studies, focusing very little, if at all, on the content of user comments and reader responses, leaving out the qualitative side of the problem. In this sense this article is an attempt to contribute to uses and gratification perspective of studying news and their consumption from the standpoint of critical theory, that is to engage into a critical analysis of online user interactivity. First part of the article provides a short theoretical exploration of the current research field, whereas second part conducts experimental empirical analysis of reader responses for three news articles chosen from TheLocal.se, English-language based news website providing international audience news articles about Sweden. Article ends with a discussion of possibility of unified theoretical approach to user comments, as well as a call for more concentrated and widened research of online user interactivity both from quantitative and qualitative sides.

  • 54.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    When States Strike Back: Failures of Mediatized Activism in Azerbaijan and Turkey2016In: tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society / Unified Theory of Information Research Group, ISSN 1726-670X, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 496-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an empirically grounded conceptual investigation of the failures of mediatized activism in 2011 in Azerbaijan and Turkey. By analyzing two specific cases, namely the complete dispersion of corporate social media based opposition in Azerbaijan, and arrests of Anonymous led hacktivistsin Turkey, the article aims to contribute to the discussion on the future of mediatized activism in the face of the growing pervasive surveillance, conducted by state intelligence agencies in collaboration with private infotainment and telecommunications companies. By elaborating on the shortcomings and the promises of social media based activism and hacktivism, the article discusses the possibility of building alternative online spaces, which can bring these two types of mediatized activism together, and help to connect activists with the rest of the society—especially the otherwise consenting middle classes of semi-authoritarian countries.

  • 55.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Who exactly needs to be 'saved'?: Looking back at fundamental concepts of media and communication in relation to political struggles and social movements of developing countries2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research conducted within political communication, and generally in social sciences, seems to be infected by overemphasis put on the concept of 'agency', especially when involved into discussion of 'power'. This problem seems to be most pressing particularly in relatively newer fields of scientific inquiry, such as feminist, queer and postcolonial studies. However, as Bourdieu points out, "by constructing the objective structure of the distribution of the properties attached to individuals or institutions, one acquires an instrument for forecasting the probable behaviours of agents occupying different positions within that distribution" (2004, p. 58). In this sense this article is an attempt, especially in relation to the most recent failures happening in countries effected by Arab Spring, to revisit some fundamental concepts of political communication in order to understand these failures and draw better map for the future of struggles started to flourish in developing countries. First part of the article is concerned with the definition of objective truth, and what it means within the scientific inquiry of media and communication, and benefits mostly from Kuhn-Popper debate. Second part is inclined towards the concepts of 'subjectivity', 'power' and 'critical reflexivity', especially from the perspective of feminist epistemology, and tries to reflect onto the current debates about women rights and women movements in Middle East, Caucasus and Central Asia, same timely following the renewed discussions happening in advanced industrial democracies.

  • 56.
    Mehrabov, Ilkin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University.
    Mediatization, Migration and Home-making: Ontological and Material Dimensions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study of human and virtual mobility, earlier theories of globalization foregrounded mediated and imagined dimensions such as cultural fusion, flows and cross-border encounters with material aspects (i.e. economic and ecological globalization) often overlooked or underplayed. Over the past ten years, the totalizing logics that underlie globalization and media penetration were sought to be counter-balanced by more context-specific paradigmatic interventions such as transnationalism (Vertovec, 1999; 2009; Khagram and Levitt, 2008) and mediatization (Krotz, 2008; Hepp, 2010) highlighting the meta character of both processes. Technological connectivity, the notion of ‘home’ and everyday attributes and significance of ‘at-homeness’ figured as some of the key issues in studies of transnational migration and migrant experience.

    Drawing upon empirical work (2008-present) on migrant communities in Sweden, this paper concerns itself with the ontological and material dimensions of home and home-making in a highly media-saturated (or, mediatized) social and cultural environment. Using mediatization and Bourdieuian sociology as analytical tropes, we construe home and home-making as a dynamic and open-ended spatiotemporal process rather than a static category. As such, this paper raises concern over linear and juxtaposed constructions of ‘home’ and ‘host’ contexts (i.e. home vs. host) and their roles in the migrant life and experience. Home as both an individual and social attribute is constituted in multiple ways within and through social-cultural networks and everyday mediated practice. The materialistic bases of Bourdeauian sociology makes visible the inter and intra-group dynamics and power geometries that characterize spaces and practices of belonging. Consideration of media penetration and current forms of use within the framework of mediatization helps reveal points where continuity and/or change are apparent, further nuancing research on migrant belonging.

    Material dimensions and causes such as socioeconomic status and spatial limitations give rise to certain sensations and particular constructions of home. Added to these are intra-group dynamics and individual virtual experiences, which weigh heavily, yielding both unity and tension fields. Alison Blunt and Robyn Dowling (2006:199) emphasize that "lived experiences and spatial imaginaries of transnational migrants revolve around home in a range of ways: through, for example, the relationships between home and homeland, the existence of multiple homes, diverse home-making practices, and the intersections of home, memory, identity and belonging" As our own research also illustrates, a shared homeland does not necessarily prompt shared understandings and feelings of home and at-homeness. These categories are never singular, but always contested with current modes of communication and mediation adding to their complexity. Through ethnographic observations and in-depth interviews with migrants originating from Turkey, Azerbaijan and Russia, this paper presents a case study of everyday constructions, experiences and broader significance of home and at homemaking in the lives of the study group.

  • 57. Niang, Ibrahima
    et al.
    Scharff, ChristelleWamala, CarolineKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on M4D Mobile Communication for Development: M4D 2014, General Tracks2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT.
    Journalism, transparency and credibility2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Credibility is fundamental to news media, without it journalism cannot exist.  In recent years many practitioners and researchers have proposed that a new norm, transparency, is changing the way journalism builds credibility. Moreover, it is also suggested that transparency actually improves journalistic credibility and that users will put greater trust in news media as a results of this shift in journalistic practice. Previous research on transparency has investigated journalists’ attitudes and news production settings as well as to what extent transparency is employed in the actual news contents. Although transparency is beginning to be explored on the production and content side, and often praised, no study so far have investigated if different forms of transparency have uniform, if any, effect on user perceptions. Thus, a vital link is missing in exploring if a movement towards a transparency norm is likely or even desirable.

     

    In this study we try to address this, by employing a web-based experimental study to investigate if, and to what extent, different frequently used transparency techniques – such as corrections, timestamps and different forms of user-generated contributions – impinge on journalistic credibility. Consequently, the results will inform what, if any, forms of transparency that could be eligible in journalism practice.

  • 59.
    Pettersson, John Sören
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    A brief evaluation of icons suggested for use in standardised information policies: Referring to the Annex in the first reading of the European Parliament on COM (2012) 00112014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The principle of “informed consent” as prescribed by national laws and EU directives makes it necessary to inform users about all the intended data processing when they submit data. Conveying the sometimes highly complex clauses of privacy policies to the subjects concerned is generally hard.

    This report takes a look at the icons appearing in Annex to Article 13a of the European Parliament legislative resolution of 12 March 2014 on the Proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the protection of individual with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data (General Data Protection Regulation).  COM (2012) 11.

    In particular, the report presents the result of a small-scale test in which the participants failed to understand the graphic scheme of the proposal as well as the pictographic parts of the icons.

  • 60.
    Pettersson, John Sören
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Information Systems and Project Management. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    Meints, Martin
    Unabhängiges Landeszentrum für Datenschutz (ICPP) .
    D3.13: Study on Usability of IMS2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Usability is an important factor influencing the acceptance of technology-related products and subsequently the decision process to use or buy them. For this reason usability has been of interest in market research for many years. However, in the context of user-controlled Identity Management Systems (IMS) hardly any comparative usability studies have been published. This document gives an overview of established evaluation methods and criteria for usability and analyses which methods and criteria are suited for user controlled IMS. The selected methods and criteria are applied to twelve IMS in six functional classes. These classes include user controlled identifier management, policy management, form filling, context monitoring and history management. Nine of these IMS are further analysed in depth and the results of the tests are published in this report.

  • 61. Sjøvaag, Helle
    et al.
    Kammer, Aske
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    The characteristics of external pluralism in the Nordic media system2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT.
    Larsson, Anders
    Oslo Universitet.
    Researching Politicians Online. Identifying Research Directions2013In: CeDEM2013 Krems 22-24 May, 2013: Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government. / [ed] Peter Parycek & Noella Edelmann, Krems, 2013, p. 387-394Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Larsson, Caroline Wamala
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Approaches to development in M4D studies: An overview of major approaches2015In: Promoting social change and democracy through information technology / [ed] Admasu Shibiru, Biplab Loho Choudhury, Caroline Wamala Larsson, Euphrasia Susy Suhendra,Kiran Prasad, Osée Kamga, P. Vigneswara Ilavarasan, Rasika Dayarathna, IGI Global, 2015, 1, , p. 23p. 26-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no doubt that the proliferation of mobile phones in developing regions has opened up a range of possibilities and new avenues for individuals, governments, development agencies and civil society organisations. But we also know that development is a disputed concept and conveys a range of different connotations. Therefore in this chapter we examine the areas, where mobile phones are discussed as vehicles for development (i.e. M4D), and how mobile communication is related to the idea(s) of development today. To examine this, we have reviewed M4D articles in three major conference series and open source journals during 2008-2012. Three dominant areas of M4D emerge out of our sample: livelihood, health and civic participation. We find that M4D is largely based on an economic understanding of development and biased towards techno-determinism. We conclude this chapter by suggesting a future path for studying the impact of mobile communication in developing regions, something what we label as a dialectical approach.

  • 64.
    Wilkins, Karin
    et al.
    University of Texas at Austin.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The privatization of development through global communication industries:Living Proof?2013In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 165-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development is meant to alleviate problems in the interests of the public good, yet thegrowing dominance of private donors problematizes this conceptualization. Workingthrough a political-economic analysis of development, we see global communications asan industry that channels wealth from citizens into the hands of few corporate moguls,who then have the resources to assert their agendas in a global development context.We begin by conceptualizing development and social change within communicationstudies, paying attention to the privatization of aid within global capitalism. Next,we contextualize our case study, describing the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundationand ONE, promoted by Bono, as the funding and management settings of the LivingProof campaign. We analyze the initiative’s construction of development problems,its articulation of how communication is expected to work toward social change, andits conceptualizations of success. The dominant theme of Living Proof program is that“real people” have achieved development success, which can be shared as “proof” withwebsite consumers. We conclude by considering how such a framing serves the agenda of privatized development within a neoliberal project.

  • 65.
    Zacarias, Orlando P.
    et al.
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Wamala, Caroline VictoriaKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centrum för genusforskning (from 2013).
    Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on M4D Mobile Communication Technology for Development: M4D 2016, General Tracks2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Zola, Enrica
    et al.
    Spain.
    Kassler, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT (from 2013).
    Minimizing the impact of the handover for mobile users in WLAN: A study on performance optimization2016In: Computer Networks, ISSN 1389-1286, E-ISSN 1872-7069, Vol. 107, p. 292-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IEEE 802.11 based Wireless LANs are an important piece in today’s communication infrastructure in order to provide high speed wireless Internet access to static or quasi mobile users. For large WLAN deployments (i.e., Campus or enterprise WLAN), it is important to understand the impact of user mobility and handovers on the system performance. In this article, we have developed a performance model for a set of networked 802.11 based WLAN Access Points, which is based on a Mixed Integer Linear Program (MILP). The objective function tries simultaneously to maximize the total system rate while at the same time minimizing the number of handovers for a configurable handover signaling rate. Because of the conflicting nature of the two objective functions, such multi-objective optimization is difficult to explore. A detailed evaluation of the model using several scenarios involving both different numbers of static and mobile users shows that our formulation allows trading off those two objectives in a robust way. 

12 51 - 66 of 66
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