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  • 51.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gibson, Laila
    Methods for collaborative geomedia2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fast pace of technical development within the tourism industry creates a gap between technology and the resources and knowledge of many small business owners. By launching the Geomedia approach within the research field in tourism studies, we are building a bridge between technology and people and connecting media with a place-based perspective. This also influences our method.

     

    In this paper we present a pilot study as part of an ongoing research project, where the purpose is to develop a method for site specific digital media productions. Taking our starting point in two specific tourist sites, one nature-based site and one cultural heritage site, we use the historical geography in a coordinated innovation process. We have been drawing on knowledge from various agents such as researchers, digital developers, the public sector, tourism business and users (visitors / locals). In this paper we will discuss the development of a place-based method.

  • 52.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Harkman, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Westlindh, Sara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Idrotten - en del av besöksnäringen: En utvärdering av Nordic Youth Hockey Trouphy2012Report (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Mats
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for the Studies of Social Sciences Didactics.
    Strategier för utveckling av Vänerns skärgård2007Report (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Hur uppfattar värmlänningarna Norge?2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: Politik Ekonomi Samhälle Kultur Media / [ed] P-O Norell & Lennart Nilsson, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 271-296Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Närheten till Norge skapar specifika förutsättningar i en region som Värmland. Närheten anses på regional strategisk nivå generera tillväxt, dvs skapa möjligheter. Vi har i tidigare forskning identifierat möjligheter men även utmaningar som exempelvis gränshinder som skapar svårigheter för invånare och företagare. I detta kapitel skall vi fokusera på närheten till Norge och på värmlänningarnas syn på denna närhet till broderlandet. I relation till detta analyserar vi hur medborgarna upplever sin boendemiljö, service på orten och allmänt sett hur bra de tycker att det är att bo där de bor. Vi ställer oss frågan hur nöjda medborgarna är med livet och relaterar det till landsbygdsperspektiv kontra stad. I kapitlet gör vi jämförelser mellan medborgarna i Värmland och boende i västra Värmland, det vill säga gränskommunerna Årjäng, Torsby, Eda och Arvika. Syftet med det är att jämföra de olika medborgargrupperna, alltså boende i gränsregionen kontra boende i övriga kommuner i Värmland, mot en tydlig strategi mot Norge. Frågan är om, och i så fall hur, Norge har betydelse för värmlänningarna? 

  • 55.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Is the proximity to Norway of importance for Swedish growth? What does Norway mean to the Swedish border region?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Methods for collaborative geomedia. Development of place based tourism experiences.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fast pace of technical development within the tourism industry creates a gap between technology and the resources and knowledge of many small business owners. By launching the Geomedia approach within the research field in tourism studies, we are building a bridge between technology and people and connecting media with a place-based perspective. This also influences our method.

     

    In this paper we present a pilot study as part of an ongoing research project, where the purpose is to develop a method for site specific digital media productions. Taking our starting point in two specific tourist sites, one nature-based site and one cultural heritage site, we use the historical geography in a coordinated innovation process. We have been drawing on knowledge from various agents such as researchers, digital developers, the public sector, tourism business and users (visitors / locals). In this paper we will discuss the development of a place-based method.

  • 57.
    Bryntesson, Elin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Strömberg, Josefine
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    En Reko, Eko eller Schysst resa?: - En studie om hur Svenska researrangörer förhåller sig till turismens hållbarhetsfenomen2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this bachelor thesis in tourism science is to study how two Swedish travel organizers, Ving and Fritidsresor, communicate and market the concept of sustainable tourism through text. Their comprehensions and conceptions of a sustainable approach have been research, along with a comparison with previous tourism science regarding the complex concept of sustainable tourism. The apprehension of these two tourism actors, have been presented by two qualitative methods, with a clear focus on the textual communication in a discourse analysis. The material has been collected from their individual homepages online with a direction towards the companies discourse about tourism sustainability.

    Through the approach of social constructivism, the travel organizers textual language and structure have been studied. The aim was to review how the language sense created a social constructed reality. Consequently, how the companies communicated the content of sustainable tourism and their apprehensions and interpretation of it. The text analysis has been studied from a micro-and a macro level, but has been complemented by a mail interview with informers from both Ving and Fritidsresor. The qualitative interview is a complement to the companies linguistic presentation, since it involves the informers own values regarding the same phenomenon. The theoretical part of this thesis is based on theoretical science regarding the textual sender and their social influences on their communication. Furthermore, the science based concept of sustainable tourism has been presented, as well as its utilization within the tourism industry. The theoretical part also includes today’s dissemination of information and Internet as a dominating media channel.

    The main substance of this thesis, is regarding the problematic of the complex concept of sustainable tourism. A sustainable development involves the whole society, therefore also tourism – with the purpose of indicate and resist negative impacts considering three dimensions: ecology, economy and social responsibility. Both Ving and Fritidsresor have showed an active role by presenting information about sustainability, where all dimension from the science-based concept is represented. Even so, differences between the two companies created meanings of sustainable tourism have been noted, which leads to the result of complexity in both theoretic and practical use. Fritidsresor has presented a more holistic approach to sustainable tourism, with a broader perspective of the social responsibility within tourism. Ving on the other hand, has more textual importance on the company’s work for quality to consumers. The communication of both travel organizers has created a significant focus on children justice but most of all text about nature and climate. Therefore, elements of the socio-cultural dimension land up in the background. Their apprehension of tourism is based on the company’s own social construction of the concept of sustainability, which creates a relatively unbalanced holistic perspective of sustainable tourism. Furthermore, it has been established that the travel organizers different approaches to sustainable tourism, is reflecting their intention with the communication of the information from the homepage. This is mostly considering the travel organizers choice of a practical use of the concept of sustainability within their marketing. The resulted difference involves Vings choice to concretely utilize the concept, through links and interest catching text. Meanwhile, Fritidsresor have a more formal and professional communication with a minor interest of attracting presumptive clients.

  • 58.
    Brännström, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Att dras över samma kam: En kvalitativ fallstudie om hur anställda vid en organisation upplever att deras varumärke påverkas av liknande verksamheters varumärken2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Having a strong brand is of great importance in our society as there are a great number of competing operations trying to achieve success on the market. It is therefore of great value if people have a positive image of the brand. However, there are a number of aspects that may influence the image of an organization in a negative way. A scandal within an organization is one aspect that can affect the brand image, as are the employees and the culture within the organization. These different aspects do not only affect the image of its own brand, but can also affect the image people have of similar operations, a spillover-effect. On that basis, the aim of this study is to examine how it is, being an employee, to stand next to a similar organization when media is writing about them. A qualitative case study examines how employees in one specific organization for instance were affected by a scandal in a similar organization. Interviews with employees highlight how they are affected in such cases. Aspects that has been studied are how they see their own organization in relation to a spillover-effect as well as how their organizational culture is affected, how their way of talking about their own organization is affected and how they work with their brand in different situations. 

    The result shows that the employees feel that they are affected by similar operations brand, especially in relation to a scandal. It makes them upset because many people have the wrong idea about them. Some of the employees kept quiet about where they were working although they stood up for their organization because of the scandal in the similar operation. Other employees were instead dedicated to live the brand and defending the organization and to try to change people’s image of the organization. This study shows however that defending the organization as an employee by the word of mouth might not be enough when a spillover-effect is in effect. More actions would potentially be needed to prevent negative impact on the brand.

  • 59. Bublitz, Hannelore
    et al.
    Kaldrack, IrinaRöhle, TheoKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.Winkler, Hartmut
    Unsichtbare Hände: Automatismen in Medien-, Technik- und Diskursgeschichte2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Im Verhältnis von Medien, Technik und Menschen gewinnt Unkontrolliertes an Terrain: ›Intelligente‹ Objekte scheinen nach eigenen Gesetzen zu handeln, im gesellschaftlichen Raum setzt sich durch, was niemand gewollt hat, Prozesse verselbstständigen sich. Der Band knüpft – durchaus kritisch – an die Geschichte einer populären Metapher an und wirft ein neues Licht auf Prozesse, die hinter dem Rücken der Subjekte nicht kalkulierbare Wirkungen haben. Mit der Perspektive der Automatismen verbunden, zeigt der Band mit Beiträgen aus dem Bereich der Kultur- und Medienwissenschaft, der Soziologie und Informatik, wie sich Strukturen jenseits bewusster Planung durch Selbststeuerung etablieren.

  • 60. Bublitz, Hannelore
    et al.
    Kaldrack, IrinaRöhle, TheoKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.Zeman, Mirna
    Automatismen – Selbst-Technologien2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Mit Automatismen zwangsläufig verbunden ist die Frage nach dem Selbst und nach den Bedingungen, die es hervorbringen. Automatismen setzen ein ›Selbst‹ einerseits voraus, andererseits ist zu fragen, wie ein ›Selbst‹ entsteht, wie es sich stabilisiert und reproduziert, und welchen Anteil hieran wiederum Automatismen haben. Auf Seiten der Technik kann das Konzept der Automatismen abgegrenzt werden gegenüber Theorien zum Automaten. Im Fokus des Bandes stehen Selbsttechnologien in einem umfassenden Sinne: kulturelle Muster der Selbstkonstitution, Prozesse der Selbststeuerung und Praktiken der Selbstführung wie auch Formen des Selbstmanagements.

  • 61.
    Burkart, Patrick
    et al.
    USA.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Geopolitics and the Popular2013In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Burnett, Robert
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Wikström, Patrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Music production in times of monopoly: The example of Sweden2006In: Popular music and society, ISSN 0300-7766, E-ISSN 1740-1712, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Bönner, Oskar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lärarperspektiv på geografiundervisning som behandlar en framtidsdimension: Utrymme, upplevelser och didaktik2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This student thesis research teacher perspectives on the future dimension in geography education by orientating around research questions on how they motivate the space, perceptions, experiences and teaching practices in addressing the future as a theme in their teaching. The survey was implemented by a qualitative study with six teachers educating in upper secondary schools in Sweden. Prior, of mainly Swedish research, on student perspectives have revealed a negative picture consisting students concern about sustainable development and future environment issues (Nerdahl 2014; Kramming 2017; Ojala 2010; 2015; Pettersson 2014; Saunders & Jenkins 2012; Torbjörnsson & Molin 2015). There is also a study which concludes that Swedish upper secondary school students can consider future as a infrequent, absent or even inappropriate theme in education (Torbjörnsson & Molin 2015). The results from this study show that from a geography teacher perspective the future dimension in education is definitely present and associated with positivity among the interviewed teachers. They also express successful approaches to teaching a future dimension in geography which coincide with previous research. Key factors from teacher perspectives can be defined as abilities to communicate in a positive and constructive approach. Prior studies also stresses the importance of teachers abilities to address hope (Hicks 2002; Ojala 2015) and communicating negative emotions with concerned students (Saunders & Jenkins 2012; Ojala 2015). This thesis also advocate for the teaching practice of relating to the future in plural (Hicks 2002). A futures approach could be another more recognized successful teaching approach on the future dimension in geography education in Swedish upper secondary schools. 

  • 64.
    Börjesson, Mathias
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Ny lärobok och ny undervisning?: Undersökning om hur förändrad läroplan förändrar läroböcker och undervisning2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 65.
    Carlsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Tidholm, Matilda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Maskinstyrning: Maskinstyrning och dess användning ur ett geodetiskt perspektiv2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 66.
    Carlsson, Malin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Larsson, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Larsson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Marknadsföring via evenemang av enmindre stad för att bidra tilldestinationsutveckling: Fallstudie Karlstad med exempel Putte i Parken ochSvenska Rallyt2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism has become a global phenomenon and there are various reasons why people choose totravel. It is important to be able to offer various activities to attract different audiences todestinations. Event tourism is a phenomenon that has grown around the world in recent yearsand an events main role is to give the destination a chance to get a place on the map throughtourism. In the event tourism, sport events and festivals are a central part. This essay deals withevents with a focus on marketing and destination development. The purpose of this essay is toexamine how and why events are used in the marketing of a smaller town through a case study ofKarlstad. This is to see how it contributes to destination development and by examining themusic festival Putte i Parken and the sport event Rally Sweden, as examples, we want to see if theevents are used in the marketing of a smaller town and, if so, build a deeper understanding ofhow it works. We chose Karlstad because it is a smaller town and we wanted to highlight thephenomenon of event marketing in a smaller context. Why we have chosen Putte i Parken andRally Sweden is that they are two of the major events in Karlstad. We have used a qualitativemethod in the form of semi-structured interviews with relevant people within the tourism andmarketing sector. Moreover, a quantitative content analysis was used to see how a smaller towncan use events to promote itself and to compare this with the response from the interviews. Theepistemological starting point used in this essay is social constructivism with a hermeneuticapproach. The theories that are used to answer the purpose of the paper are marketing, eventsand destination development. The theory is divided into four parts, where previous research isexplained and then continues with the theories, and a link between them. The empirical datadescribe our interviews with people at the municipality of Karlstad, the Great Event of Karlstad,Putte i Parken and Rally Sweden and we interviewed seven people in total. The empirical dataalso presents the quantitative content analysis. In the analysis of the essay, we have linked thetheories to empirical data to answer the purpose and our questions. We also discussed how welooked at the similarities and differences of the empirical material and the theories, but also whatthe content analysis has brought to the essay. The conclusion brings together our work and givesa brief summary of the essay. We answer the head questions and provide suggestions for furtherresearch that emerged during our work with the essay.

  • 67.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Book Review: Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the “Heart of Darkness” to “Africa Rising” by Mel Bunce, Suzanne Franks, and Chris Paterson2018In: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, ISSN 1077-6990, E-ISSN 2161-430XArticle, book review (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Constructive or destructive?: The effect of bloggers' criticism on journalists in Kenya2015In: The Future of Journalism 2015: Risks, Threats and Opportunities: Abstracts / [ed] Stuart Allan, Cardiff: Taylor & Francis, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Widely available media information technologies have spawned an unprecedented growth of lively debates on journalistic performance today. Indeed Web 2.0 technologies like blogs have attracted a huge participation of citizens to engage inscrutiny of content and operations of the traditional media. As a result, journalists and media organisations are now daily targets of a barrage of criticism—including insults—over poor quality of journalism. At the same time, traditional accountability instruments like the press councils are increasingly losing their significance as focus shifts to reforms on traditional media regulation as seen in the UK’s Leveson inquiry of 2011-2012. It is perhaps the reason there has been a growing body of research on participatory media regulation—greater involvement of citizens in traditional media accountability (see for instance, Fengler et al, 2014 on the EU-funded MediaAcT project). However, empirical studies on the new phenomenon—participatory media accountability—have so far been few and limited to the West. Additionally, researchers are surprisingly already celebrating the possibility of having a greater role for citizens in media accountability although among journalists this participation is still being treated with scepticism, according to Fengler et al. This study focuses on the effect of participatory media accountability through criticism by bloggers commenting on journalists’ performance in Kenya. It will involve interviews with newspaper journalists in Kenya with the aim of establishing if criticism on high-trafficblogs run by Kenyans affect their performance positively or negatively.

  • 69.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Criticism that matters: Journalists perspectives of ‘quality’ media critique2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Do bloggers who criticize the press ultimately matter?: (Re)defining media accountability in the age of citizen participation2017In: Comunicació. Revista de Recerca i d'Anàlisi, ISSN 2014-0304, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 107-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bloggers criticizing the traditional media over poor quality journalism are being touted as potentially influential instruments of media accountability. This paper questions whether in retrospect the old order of media accountability still has relevance in an increasingly networked media environment. The aim of the paper is to suggest a framework for understanding how bloggers criticizing the traditional journalism practice can be examined in a study on media accountability in the digital era. The essay interrogates the concept of media accountability and the significance of bloggers’ criticism on journalism practice.

  • 71.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Here come the critics: Journalistic discourse in Kenya and South Africa2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Media criticism in the African journalistic culture: An inventory of media accountability practices in Kenya2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Media-critical bloggers: Towards a framework for understanding participatory media accountability2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Participatory media accountability: Evaluating the relevance of bloggers’ criticism on journalism practice2015In: NordMedia 2015: Media Presence - Media Modernities, Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    #SomeoneTellCNN: Media accountability from the perspective of Kenyans on Twitter2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The ‘media arm’ of a global court: Cosmopolitanism and the International Criminal Court’s TV series on Kenya’s trials2015In: Geomedia 2016: Spaces and mobilities in mediatized worlds, Karlstad: Karlstad university , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a global body with a mission to deliver justice to humanity, the International Criminal Court (ICC) inspires an interesting discourse in cosmopolitanism studies. Arguably, it is the ICC that puts to effective practice moral cosmopolitanism (Pierik and Werner, 2010). Indeed, when the global court produces a TV series targeting local populations in Sub-Saharan Africa, it interestingly shifts the spotlight to an area that has taken an overtheoritical nature over the years—the relationship between the media and cosmopolitanism. Potentially illuminating empirical studies in this area have been few, Western-centric and limited to the paradigm of the reception of distant suffering. This paper empirically examines the influence of media texts on audiences. Inspired specifically by Ask the Court—a TV programme on YouTube on the trial of Kenya’s president, his deputy and a journalist over electoral violence in 2007-2008—this exploratory study questions whether the Hague-based court has a role in “cosmopolitanization” (Beck, 2006). Indeed, the questions guiding this research are: What are the manifestations of cosmopolitanism in the programme? Does the programme influence the audience to have a ‘cosmopolitan awareness’ of global justice? The results of the study are based on a textual analysis of a selection of Ask the Court episodes and a subsequent survey of a cross-section of audiences of the programme in Kenya.

  • 77.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The role of mobile media in development: The case of Kenya2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Extract. Inject. Repeat.: Expanding journalistic practice through civic technologies and data journalism2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Extract. Inject. Repeat.: Expanding journalistic practice through civic technologies and data journalism2018In: Nordic Data Journalism Conference (NODA18): “The second wave of data journalism research”, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Toussaint, Nothias
    Stanford University.
    A “hotbed” of digital empowerment?: Media criticism in Kenya between playful engagement and co-option2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Uppal, Charu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    New Pan-Africanism?: Expressions of African identity on Twitter2016In: Gender & change : challenges for Africa: Nordic Africa Days 2016, Uppsala 23-24 September, Uppsala: The Nordic Africa Institute , 2016, , p. 144p. 56-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will interrogate the question whether a collective identity of a new Pan-Africanism is emerging through social media in Africa. The study focuses on the use of the hashtag IfAfricaWasABar by Twitter users across the continent in July 2015. It will entail a qualitative content analysis of tweets that were accompanied by #IfAfricaWasABar to analyse the issues raised by African Twitter users as regards their identity. #IfAfricaWasABar was started by Motswana author Siyanda Mohutsiwa and was trending for several weeks in different countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The hashtag called upon Twitter users across Africa to satirize the Western media narrative of Africa as a country by coming up with hilarious lines that imagine the continent as a bar, which has interesting characters who in real life would define the continent's culture, politics and social life.

    Studies of Twitter use for expression of identity in Africa are few although there has been a marked increase of citizen participation on this social media platform (Portland Communications, 2012). Twitter has indeed turned into an interesting platform for deliberation and daily conversations among citizens. Such kinds of citizen engagement are turning out to offer an interesting forum for jokes as well as serious social and political discussion for discourses that appeal to citizens across the continent, who are both online and offline. In fact, in their recent study on the use of Twitter by Kenyans, Tully and Ekdale (2014) conclude that 'playful engagement' on Twitter is spurring significant deliberation as users "infuse developmental agendas in their comments, actions and interactions" (p.68).

    The article will argue that more than offering a platform for deliberation, Twitter as a new media technology in Africa is enabling African citizens to recreate an African identity in the global space. It will seek to revive the old debate on Pan-Africanism and its expressions on media space, which has so far been overshadowed a process of globalization. It will further trace and discuss the discourses in the nexus of Pan-Africanism, identity as well use of Twitter in Africa. The article will pose the question whether through Twitter, a "New Pan-Africanism" is emerging, where ordinary citizens rather than elites determine how Pan-Africanism should be defined and expressed on global space.        

  • 82.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Complicit Surveillance, Interveillance and the Question of Cosmopolitanism2015In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1473-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Cosmopolitanism and the Media: Cartographies of Change2015Book (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Jansson, AndréKarlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.Christensen, ChristianUppsala University, Sweden.
    Online Territories: Globalization, Mediated Practice and Social Space2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Christenson, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    A Framework for Assessment of Socioscientific Argumentation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A framework for assessment of socio-scientific argumentation

    The ability to produce a convincing argument with evidence to support a claim is important for participants in a democratic society. Research on students’ argumentation and reasoning on socio-scientific issues (SSI) has been extensive over the past decades due to its importance in science education. SSI provide a context where students can engage in reasoning and argumentation that involves the generation and evaluation of positions in response to complex issues which often lack definite solutions and have links to science and implications in society.

    Research includes a great variety among the analytical frameworks that have been developed to study students’ arguments. Most of these frameworks focus on either the structure of the argument or the content and are hard to use due to its complexity and in some cases more suitable to scientific argumentation rather than informal argumentation on SSI. Consequently, there is a need for frameworks that analyze the overarching patterns of socio-scientific arguments related to both the content as well as the structure. Accordingly, this framework should not be too complicated in its organization but possible to be used for assessment purposes for teachers as well as students own practice in order to improve their argumentation.

    Consequently, the aim of this research is to present a new analytical framework with focus on content, structure and the nature of the justifications that can be applied on socio-scientific argumentation. This framework is presented by applying it to authentic grade 12-students’ written arguments on a SSI about genetically modified organisms (GMO).

    There are two main components relating to the structural aspects: claim (decision) and justification (with pros and cons). Justification is defined as a combination of data, warrant and backings. The justification(s) that the arguers state in favor of their own claims are the pros and the justification(s) the arguers state against their own claims are the cons. Moreover, the justification can consist of value-laden statements when the arguers express their values on the issue and/or knowledge based statements when the arguers use conceptual knowledge to support their claims (and the content in the pros and cons are part of the content aspects, se below).

    The content aspect (knowledge) in the justifications (can be both pros or cons) is presented as different subjects that are based on the conceptual knowledge linked to a specific field or discipline such as politics, chemistry, economy etc. that arguers use in their justifications.

    Clearly, it is of great importance that the conceptual knowledge is relevant and scientifically correct, and this is why an explicit category about the conceptual knowledge is added to the framework:

    1. Correct and relevant content knowledge included
    2. Non-specific general knowledge (not directly related to the issue/focus)
    3. Incorrect content knowledge included (misconception or superficial scientific knowledge)

    This framework explicitly includes bot the structural and the content parts of a valid argument and will be fruitful both for future research on informal SSI-argumentation as well as in science education where the framework can be used as a tool assessing arguments considering both structure and content and consequently to assess the arguments as a whole.

     

  • 86.
    Christenson, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Analyzing informal argumentation on socioscientific issues concerning covering content and structure2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to generate a convincing and persuasive argument with evidence to support a claim is important for participants in a democratic society. Research has revealed a great variety among the analytical frameworks that have been developed to study students’ arguments. Many of these frameworks have limitations such as focusing on either the structure of the argument or the content and/or are hard to use due to its complexity and in some cases more suitable to scientific argumentation rather than informal argumentation on SSI. Accordingly, there is need for a framework that can be used for assessment purposes and that can be used as support for teachers assessment as well as students own practice in order to improve their informal argumentation. The aim of this research is to present a new analytical framework with focus on content and structure as well as the nature of the justifications that can be applied on informal argumentation on SSI. We present this framework by applying it to authentic grade 12-students’ written arguments on a SSI about genetically modified organisms (GMO). The framework consists of several elements and focus on claims and justifications in arguments. The justifications are categorized with regard to three aspects; subjects, pros/cons and knowledge/attitudes. Our hope is that this framework will be fruitful both for future research on informal SSI-argumentation and in school education. The framework can be used as a tool assessing arguments, their complexity regarding both structure and content and consequently to assess the arguments as a whole. The low complexity of the framework also makes it possible for students to use directly as a tool for practicing argumentation on SSI.

  • 87.
    Christenson, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Role-play as a means to practice students’ argumentation skills on socioscientific issues2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Role-play as a means to practice students’ argumentation skills on SSI

    Introduction

    A democracy is dependent on well-informed citizens capable of understanding and taking part in societal issues. It is important from a societal as well as at the individual perspective, that people understand questions including for example global environmental matters, health concerns and personal ethical dilemmas.  Hence, it has been recognized in research that it is essential for students to develop argumentation skills to be able to participate in debates about controversial SSI (socioscientific issues) (Kolstö, 2000). The language is fundamental in learning science, both in being able to argue as well as being able to understand the science content. A central aspect of learning science is to learn the language of science and therefore it is crucial that science education provides possibilities for students to practice and develop their language skills (Lemke, 1990; Wellington & Osborne, 2001). Thus, language is important both for argumentation and learning science. However, in classrooms, teachers’ talk tends to be dominating (Mortimer & Scott, 2003). A shift must be made in the verbal arena so that the students are the ones doing most of the talk. Thus, a challenge in science education is to construct meaningful and motivating practices to supporting this development. Role-play debate concerning SSI has previously been investigated in research (e.g. Simonneaux, 2001). Jimenez-Aleixandre et. al. (2000) found that students constructing arguments about genetics focused on making detailed claims without being able to justify them. In this study we investigate a role-plays potential to promote students’ abilities to argue about SSI. The study was guided by the questions 1) How are the students arguments constructed concerning content? 2) To what extent do the participating students put forward arguments during the role-play?

    Methodology

    A group of eight students in grade nine, which is the last year of compulsory school in Sweden, participated in a role-play debate. This was the last activity in a series of lessons with the purpose of enhance a high degree of communication in form of dialogues and discussions. The focus of the teaching sequence was on basic genetics usually dealt with in Swedish lower secondary school. The role-play concerned gene technology and whether GMO (genetically modified organisms) should be allowed or not. The students were given different characters representing a variety of views on the GMO issue to play. The roles were handed out in advance and the participants were encouraged to find arguments based on scientific knowledge to be able to argue from facts. The role-play debate was moderated by one of the authors. The moderator made sure that all students initially got to present themselves (their given characters) and to briefly present their standpoint. The role-play debate was video- and audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analyses focus on the content that the student use in their justifications when supporting their standpoints. We also analyzed how the time of talk was distributed between the participants.

    Findings

    The recording of the role-play debate was 48 minutes of length in total. After a short introduction, the students started to discuss the issue. Our analysis show that 82% of the time was devoted to students’ argumentation. The moderator hade a rather passive role, only making sure that the debate carried on in an orderly manner. The students’ arguments were focused on the GMO issue during the whole sequence. Concerning the content of the arguments, our analysis revealed three main themes that the students were referring to. These were 1) values (principles, ethics, beliefs etc.), 2) effects (examples and scenarios of consequences of GMO) and 3) solutions (suggestions and opinions about actions needed). Of these three themes, the effect theme was dominating the discussions. Within the themes, we found different categories of the content on which the arguments were based. For example, arguments about possible effects of GMO included a great variety of content concerning ecosystems, biodiversity, dispersion of GMO, effects on humans and animals, taste and quality of GMO-products etc. Since the discussion was mostly focused on the effects, most arguments were concerned with science. However, other aspects were included as well, for example small farmers struggle against large multinational companies, the growing gap between poor and rich and consequences for the world economy. The length of time as well as number of utterances made by the students differed to a great extent. Four of the students’ contributed to 85% of the talk. The number of utterances varied from 2-70. 

     Conclusions and implications

    It has been argued in science education research that students should learn how to argue with a scientific content, which includes that students must have the opportunity to train the language of science. This study shows that a role-play where students are given different characters and time to prepare arguments in advance, do have the potential to make students argue with commitment and focus, using a variety of scientifically based arguments. Our findings shows that students to a great extent can, on the contrary to the findings of Jiménez-Aleixandre et al. (2000), support their standpoints using scientific data in their justifications. We also found that students refer to different themes including numerous different aspects, indicating a high quality of students’ arguments (Christenson & Chang Rundgren, accepted). However, the speech time was unequal distributed among the students due to that some of the participants took a passive role during the role-play. The problem of some students being quiet has also been recognized by Albe (2008). Hence, Some students might need more practice to be able to fully participate in debates. In addition, group construction and the role of the teacher are other important aspects that need to be considered in future research.

    References

    Albe, V. (2008). When scientific knowledge, daily life experience, epistemological and social considerations intersect: Students’ argumentation in group discussions on a socio-scientific issue. Research in Science Education, 38, 67-90.

    Christenson, N. & Chang Rundgren, S-N. (accepted). A framework for teachers’ assessment of socioscientific argumentation: An example of the GMO issue. Journal of Biological Education.

    Jiménez-Aleixandre, M. P., Rodriguez, A. B., & Duschl, R. A. (2000). “Doing the lesson” or “doing science”: argument in high school science. Science Education, 84, 757-792.

    Kolstø, S. D. (2000). Consensus projects: teaching science for citizenship. International Journal of Science Education, 22(6), 645-664.

    Lemke, J. L. (1990). Talking science: Language, learning, and values. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Cooperation.

    Mortimer E. F., & Scott, P. (2003). Meaning making in secondary science classrooms. Buckingham: Open University Press.

    Simonneaux, L. (2001). Role-play or debate to promote students’ argumentation and justification on an issue in animal transgenesis. International Journal of Science Education, 23(9), 903-927.

    Wellington, J., & Osborne, J. (2001). Language and Literacy in science education. Buckingham: Open University Press. 

  • 88.
    Christenson, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The relationship of discipline background to argumentation on socio-scientific issues2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to prepare learners to engage in discussion and be able to make informed decisions on socio-scientific issues (SSIs), SSI-research has become an important field in biology- and science education. Research has revealed that justifications from various resources are involved in students’ informal reasoning and argumentation on SSIs. The importance of multi-disciplinary involvement of reasoning is shown in connection to the quality of argumentation as well as the number of reasons presented in the argumentation. In this study, to investigate the resources of reasons in students’ argumentation on SSIs in relation to study backgrounds, a model termed SEE-SEP covering three aspects (of knowledge, value and personal experience) and six subject areas (of Sociology/culture, Economy, Environment/ecology, Science, Ethics/morality and Policy), was adopted to analyze students’ reasons in different SSIs. A total of 208 upper secondary students (105 social-science majors and 103 science majors) from Sweden were invited to justify and expound their arguments on four SSIs including global warming, genetically modified organism (GMO), nuclear power and consumption. The results showed that (1) the group of social-science majors generated more numbers of reasons than the science majors; (2) the aspect of value was found to be used most in students’ argumentation without differences between students’ study backgrounds; (3) reasons from the subject area of science were presented most in the topics of nuclear power and GMO, with no difference between students’ study backgrounds; (4) personal experience was referred less often in students’ argumentation by both groups of students than the aspects of value and knowledge, especially in the topics of global warming, GMO and nuclear power, in which, the subject area of economy was also discussed less; (5) the social science major students used more resources from the subject area of environment/ecology than the science majors, regardless of SSI. In addition, we found that the social-science majors could provide more solutions of the SSIs and also use reasons from different subject areas in discussing the consumption issue, in contrast to science majors. The implications to SSI-research and teaching are discussed.

  • 89.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Zeidler, Dana
    University of South Florida, USA.
    The Relationship of Discipline Background to Upper Secondary Students´ Argumentation on Socioscientific Issues2014In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 581-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)-driven society, socioscientific issues (SSI) have become a focus globally and SSI research has grown into an important area of study in science education. Since students attending the social and science programs have a different focus in their studies and research has shown that students attending a science program are less familiar with argumentation practice, we make a comparison of the supporting reasons social science and science majors use in arguing different SSI with the goal to provide important information for pedagogical decisions about curriculum and instruction. As an analytical framework, a model termed SEE-SEP covering three aspects (of knowledge, value, and experiences) and six subject areas (of sociology/culture, economy, environment/ecology, science, ethics/morality, and policy) was adopted to analyze students’ justifications. A total of 208 upper secondary students (105 social science majors and 103 science majors) from Sweden were invited to justify and expound their arguments on four SSI including global warming, genetically modified organisms (GMO), nuclear power, and consumer consumption. The results showed that the social science majors generated more justifications than the science majors, the aspect of value was used most in students’ argumentation regardless of students’ discipline background, and justifications from the subject area of science were most often presented in nuclear power and GMO issues. We conclude by arguing that engaging teachers from different subjects to cooperate when teaching argumentation on SSI could be of great value and provide students from both social science and science programs the best possible conditions in which to develop argumentation skills.

  • 90.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    A cross-disciplinary approach to teaching socioscientific issues: A study of the co-operation between language and science teachers teaching about global warming2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To combine the teaching of scientific concepts with the challenging problems of socioscientific issues (SSI) has been shown to be effective on engaging students in discussions and in developing students’ skills in decision-making and critical thinking. Research has revealed that teaching SSI in science education is a challenging task for science teachers alone suggesting a co-operation with teachers of the humanities, proposing that these teachers might be better at managing debates and other pedagogical methods related to a SSI driven instruction. However, to our knowledge no one has yet investigated the outcomes of a co-operation between language teachers, who regularly in their courses teach topics like argumentation, debate and how to write an argumentative text, and science teachers. Hence, the aim of our study is to investigate how the co-operation of teachers from different disciplines (language and science teachers) can contribute to upper secondary school students’ argumentation skills about global warming. A total of ten teachers from the subjects of Swedish (mother tongue), English, biology, physics and chemistry will participate in this study together with two classes of science major students in their first year of upper secondary school, which they teach. Data will be collected from both the teachers by interviews at the end of the teaching sequence and from students making a pre- and post-test of written argumentation about global warming, as well as interviews. Since this study is an ongoing project, we are still collecting data. We foresee that we will find that the teachers as well as the students can provide us with insights on how they perceive a cross-disciplinary teaching with focus on SSI, and also that we will be able to follow some progression in students argumentation through the pre- and post-test. Our findings on the learning outcome and how teachers and students perceive a cross-disciplinary teachers’ cooperation on SSI will be presented at the ERIDOB-conference. We believe that the results from our study will provide valuable insights on how to develop future SSI-teaching by using a cross-disciplinary approach and how the involvement of language teachers may be of help to the science teachers in doing this.

  • 91.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Science and language teachers' assessment of upper secondary students' socioscientific argumentation2016In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and policy-makers have recognized the importance of including and promoting socioscientific argumentation in science education worldwide. The Swedish curriculum focuses more than ever on socioscientific issues (SSI) as well. However, teaching socioscientific argumentation is not an easy task for science teachers and one of the more distinguished difficulties is the assessment of students’ performance. In this study, we investigate and compare how science and Swedish language teachers, participating in an SSI-driven project, assessed students’ written argumentation about global warming. Swedish language teachers have a long history of teaching and assessing argumentation and therefore it was of interest to identify possible gaps between the two groups of teachers’ assessment practices. The results showed that the science teachers focused on students’ content knowledge within their subjects, whereas the Swedish language teachers included students’ abilities to select and use content knowledge from reliable reference resources, the structure of the argumentation and the form of language used. Since the Swedish language teachers’ assessment correlated more with previous research about quality in socioscientific argumentation, we suggest that a closer co-operation between the two groups could be beneficial in terms of enhancing the quality of assessment. Moreover, SSI teaching and learning as well as assessment of socioscientific argumentation ought to be included in teacher training programs for both pre- and in-service science teachers.

  • 92.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Science and Swedish language teachers’ assessment of upper secondary students’ socioscientific argumentation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish curricula, as well as researchers and policy makers worldwide, have recognized the importance of promoting and including sociscientific argumentation in science education to promote scientific literacy. However, to teach socioscientific argumentation in not an easy task for science teachers and among the difficulties is the assessment practice. In this small-scale qualitative study, we have, investigated and compared how science and Swedish language teachers, participating in a SSI-driven project, assess students’ written argumentation about Global warming. The Swedish language teachers have a long tradition of teaching and assessing argumentation and therefore it is of interest to identify possible gaps between these two groups. The results indicate that the science teachers focus on students’ ability to reproduce content knowledge within their respective subject that they have been teaching. The Swedish language teachers include students’ abilities to select and use content knowledge from trustable reference resources, in addition to the structure of the argumentation and the form of the language used. In fact, the Swedish language teachers’ assessment correlates more to previous research about quality in socioscientific argumentation and we suggest that a closer co-operation between these two groups can be beneficial to enhance the quality of assessing students’ socioscientific argumentation.

  • 93.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    A Framework for Teachers’ Assessment of Socio-scientific Argumentation: An example using the GMO issue2014In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, E-ISSN 2157-6009, no 2, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) have proven to be suitable contexts for students to actively reflect on and argue about complex social issues related to science. Research has indicated that explicitly teaching SSI argumentation is a good way to help students develop their argumentation skills and make them aware of the complexity of SSI. However, assessing the quality of students’ arguments on SSI is evidently difficult for many teachers. This article aims to facilitate teachers’ assessment of the quality of students’ arguments on SSI by introducing a new assessment framework that represents a low degree of complexity and exemplifying it by applying it to students’ written SSI argumentation concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO). The new assessment framework considers both the quality indicators presented in the research literature and curricular guidelines for the science courses in Swedish secondary and upper secondary school. The framework focuses on both the content and the structure that can be revealed in students’ SSI argumentation and is meant to function as a tool for identifying quality indicators that could serve as the basis for grading.

  • 94.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Assessing the qualities of automated content2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of new technologies has always spurred questions about changes in journalism – its content, its means of production, and its consumption. A quite recent development in the realm of digital journalism is software-generated content, i.e. automatically produced content. Companies such as Automated Insights offer services that, according to themselves “humanizes big data sets by spotting patterns, trends and key insights and describing those findings in plain English that is indistinguishable from that produced by a human writer” (Automated Insights, 2012).

    This paper seeks to investigate how readers perceive software-generated content in relation to similar content written by a journalist. This is investigated through the following empirical research questions:

    RQ1 – How is software-generated content perceived by readers, in regards to overall quality and credibility?

    RQ2 – Are the software-generated content discernable from similar content written by human journalists?

    The study utilizes an experimental methodology where respondents were subjected to different news articles that were written by a journalist or software-generated. The respondents were then asked to answer questions about how they perceived the article; its overall quality, credibility, objectiveness etc.The paper presents the results from a first small-scale study and they indicate that the software-generated content is perceived as, for example, descriptive, boring and objective, but not necessarily discernable from content written by journalists.

    The paper discusses the results of the study and its implication for journalism practice.

  • 95.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Enter the Robot Journalist: Users' perceptions of automated content2014In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of new technologies has always spurred questions about changes in journalism—its content, its means of production, and its consumption. A quite recent development in the realm of digital journalism is software-generated content, i.e. automatically produced content. This paper seeks to investigate how readers perceive software-generated content in relation to similar content written by a journalist. The study utilizes an experimental methodology where respondents were subjected to different news articles that were written either by a journalist or were software-generated. The respondents were then asked to answer questions about how they perceived the article—its overall quality, credibility, objectivity, etc. The paper presents the results from an initial small-scale study with findings suggesting that while the software-generated content is perceived as descriptive and boring, it is also considered to be objective although not necessarily discernible from content written by journalists. The paper discusses the results of the study and its implication for journalism practice.

  • 96.
    Clerwall, Christer
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Who wrote this? Users' perception of software-generated content in online news2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of new technologies has always spurred questions about changes injournalism – its content, its means of production, and its consumption. A quite recentdevelopment in the realm of digital journalism is software-generated content, i.e.automatically produced content.

    This paper seeks to investigate how readers perceive software-generated content inrelation to similar content written by (human) journalists. This is investigated through the following empirical research questions:

    RQ1 – How is software-generated content perceived by readers, in regards to overallquality and credibility?

    RQ2 – Are the software-generated content discernable from similar content written byhuman journalists?

  • 97.
    Clerwall, Christer
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Nord, Lars
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Public Trust and Journalistic Transparency: An experimental study of disclosure and participatory effects in online news2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media matter. Most citizens’ in contemporary democracies get their information about current affairs and politics through the media. Political communication studies have for long time analysed the interplay between media content and journalistic style and political attitudes and public trust in political institutions. This paper adds to this discussion by addressing another dimension: the possible impact of journalistic transparency – offered in online-journalism – on political trust.

    Methodologically, the study was based on a web-based experiment including 1,320 respondents. The treatment groups comprised the same version of an online news article with additional indicators for disclosure transparency and participatory transparency. The article covered a local political issue and politicians form both ruling and opposition political parties appeared in the text.

    The results indicate that transparency effects on political trust may be overestimated. This experimental study did not confirm any significant positive correlation between transparency and the public trust towards local politicians appearing in the news.

  • 98.
    Collander, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Nilsson, Adam
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    "...man behöver bygga hypen": En fallstudie om marknadsföring- före och efter ett evenemang2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Events as a tourism phenomenon are created to offer an experience that is something out of the ordinary. In today's society, the experience is taken advantage of and used for marketing purposes where the event itself can promote a message. There is scope for increasing visitor interest by strengthening the marketing before and after an event, thus increasing the impact of the message. The problem area of the study is examined by treating the Industrinatten event as a case study. The empirical material consists of qualitative interviews with respondents from previously conducted Industrinatten events in Malmö, Sjuhärad and Östersund. The secondary data consists of questionnaires from the previous completed events and constitutes of additional complementary material for the interview surveys. Events are often created with an underlying purpose and are today used more as a tool for promoting a site or brand, something that can be termed as event marketing. Communication a message is often used in labor market fairs, also known as MICE (Meeting, Incentives, Conventions & Events) events. The result connects respondents with various themes to highlight similarities and differences. The most effective marketing methods and strategies are then highlighted which creates the analytical part where a new model has been constructed based on respondents' responses and the theoretical framework. The conclusion of the study answers the questions and highlights the majority of methods and strategies that before and after an event has been proven effective in event marketing. The study is based on the event Industrinatten and the methods and strategies presented are adapted to the marketing of the event but is also possible to apply in other types of events. 

  • 99.
    Corinne, Lundqvist
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Linnea, Ström
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Blodigt allvar2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This student thesis examines what discourses exist within Libresse's advertising for sanitary products and if these have evolved over time. To examine this, two epochs have been selected; the first epoch covers the years 1990 to 2003 and the latter epoch covering 2014 to 2017. The purpose of this study has been to probe whether factors such as new media development and increased involvement in feminist issues can interact with the possible development of Libresse advertising. The purpose has also been to study how the taboo discourse around menstruation is managed by the company as well as if they have changed between the two epochs.

    The thesis is based on intersectionality and feminist media theory as the theoretical base. In order to answer the study's proposal, the method used was a critical discourse analysis combined with a semiotic analysis. To create a pre-understanding of the subject, the reader starts with a description of the company Libresse, to give examples of how women stereotyped, how feminism has developed over the last decades and what existing discourse there is about menstruation. This is due to a deeper insight into what previous feminist researchers said about advertising and marketing, new media and girls' potential, definition of the third wave feminism, social media and cyber-feminism.

    The study has been based on these research questions:

    - Has the discourse in Libresse’s advertising for sanitary products changed over time?

    - If so, how have these discourses changed and has the development of media and feminism have a significant role?

    The results show that a change between these epochs can be distinguished. Libresse has adapted their communication techniques to a modern society and the feminist commitment that prevails. The taboo discourse about menstruation still exists within Libresse commercials, but more subtle in the later era. The woman is made in today's commercials in a more positive and beneficial way.

    Keywords: Libresse, discourse, feminism, menstruation

  • 100.
    Dagström, Emelie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Det spelar ingen roll om du är svart eller vit. Eller?: En studie om etnicitet och kultur inom turismmarknadsföring.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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