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  • 401.
    Sandberg, Marie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Klättringssubstratets effekt på ålyngels beteende vid uppströmspassage2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Because populations have declined drastically, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is now regarded as critically endangered, and there is a need for increased recruitment and remedial measures to improve passage in regulated rivers. One way to improve passage is to identify the most suitable type of climbing substrate, so that more juvenile eels will be able to pass river barriers and reach rearing grounds,where they eventually mature and become silver eels. The purpose of this study was to test how different climbing substrates affect eel behavior. In the study, I analyzed video films showing juvenile eels and their choices of and climbing behavior on three different climbing substrates: EF-16, Fish Pass and enkamat. EF-16 was a black plastic substrate paved with short thick pegs in the size of 2 cm each. Fish Pass had a light base with long green plastic bristles of about 1-2 mm thickness each put together in clusters of 1 cm where as enkamat was a dark gray web looking structure similar to steel wool. The results show that most eels chose ramps with EF-16 and eels using this substrate climbed with the highest velocity. This substrate also had the highest number of successful passages. Optimizing passage efficiency may be an important factor to increase the number of juvenile eels reaching their rearing habitat in freshwater, and may thus be one step towards a recovering European eel population.

     

  • 402.
    Sandmer, Helena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Att resa hållbart på utlandssemestern - hur svårt kan det va'?: En studie om medias skildringar kring (o)hållbart semesterresande och dess potential att inverka på unga resenärers kunskaper, attityder och vanor2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of attaining sustainable travel on holidays has several dimensions. Technical and organizational challenges are found at the system level, and at an individual level we have to deal with psychological barriers. But there is one more challenge, which may be found at a societal level. It is about how sociocultural structures and actors in society can shape identity, lifestyle and norms of individuals. In this paper, the emphasis is laid on the latter, focusing on media.

    Media in the form of texts and pictures about travel can work as inspiration for many tourists, and contribute to the build-up of more or less eco-friendly lifestyles and consumer behaviors. By using content analysis of four Swedish magazines and a web survey addressed youths 18-30 years old, the following research questions are being answered: “How are texts and pictures about (un)sustainable travel described in travel- and lifestyle magazines, respectively? What potential has media in form of magazines to have an influence on young travellers’ knowledge, attitudes and habits about (un)sustainable travel on holidays?”

    The analysis shows that many texts deal with aspects like lifestyle and mobility, means of transport and environmental impact, and future technological development. These are often depicted in a way which arguable not is promoting a sustainable holiday travel. Texts about sustainable tourism and alternative ways of travelling are rare, and the survey confirms that many youths have lack of knowledge in these topics. Nevertheless, an important finding is that a majority of the respondents have positive attitudes about environment, sustainable tourism and alternative ways of travelling, and ask for more information and inspiration about it. Consequently, there are indicators that a positive trend towards sustainability may be on the way among young travellers.

    The study also indicates that media in form of magazines, is not frequently used by young travellers as a primary source of inspiration. Notwithstanding, the results of this paper are considered to be relevant, and may, together with future research, give valuable insights to how media can have an affect on, and contribute to, the attitudes and behavior of travellers with the aim of reach a more sustainable travel.

  • 403.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Conservation ecology of the thick-shelled river mussel Unio crassus : The importance of parasite-host interactions2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Unionoid mussels are globally threatened and their conservation requires species-specific knowledge on their ecology and parasite-host interaction. Unio crassus is one of Europe’s most threatened unionoid species and has a temporary obligate parasitic life stage (glochidia) on fish. A lack of suitable hosts is probably a major limitation for mussel recruitment, but host species composition, suitability and availability in time and space have yet to be fully explored. This thesis examines different aspects of the host fish species, including their composition, suitability and ecological importance, in relation to U. crassus, using both field and laboratory studies. The effects of mussel and host density on mussel reproductive potential were considered, as were aspects of evolutionary adaptations between mussels and fish and how climate change may affect their interaction.

    The results show that U. crassus is a host generalist, parasitizing a variety of fish species. Host suitability and density, which varied among fish species and rivers, affected the level of glochidia encapsulation, hence mussel reproductive potential, more so than the density of mussels taking part in reproduction. Ecologically important hosts included both highly suitable primary hosts, and less suitable hosts that were highly abundant. Whether or not U. crassus has specific adaptations to its hosts to enhance juvenile transformation remains unclear. No distinct pattern of local adaptation was found, nor was there an effect of host fish presence on the timing of glochidia release by adult mussels. Instead, temperature played a major role, with results suggesting that changes in spring water temperature regimes can cause temporal and spatial mismatches in the mussel-host interaction. This thesis indicates that investigations of local mussel-host interactions help in identifying mechanisms important for unionoid conservation management and prioritization.

  • 404.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Department of Biology – Aquatic Ecology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Höjesjö, Johan
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Österling, E. Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Manuscript: Local adaptation studies and conservation: parasite-host interactions between freshwater mussels and fishManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 405.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Department of Biology – Aquatic Ecology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Österling, E. Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Manuscript: Spring temperature-dependent reproduction in the parasitic freshwater mussel Unio crassusManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 406.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lunds universitet.
    Höjesjö, J.
    Göteborgs universiet.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of mussel and host fish density on reproduction potential of a threatened unionoid mussel: Prioritization of conservation locations in management trade-offs2018In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management decisions in conservation of threatened species require trading off social needs against biodiversity values, including the prioritization of conservation locations, i.e. where conservation efforts should take place. To improve conservation decisions for the thick-shelled river mussel, Unio crassus, a highly threatened temporary parasite on fish, we performed a field study on how mussel and host fish density (European bullhead, Cottus gobio, and common minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus) affect reproduction potential of the mussel at different sites along a river. We assumed that the proportions of gravid mussels would be higher at high mussel density, and result in enhanced glochidia (mussel larvae) encapsulation rates on fish. We also expected the highest ‘glochidia density’—a proxy for the potential number of recruits per stream area, assessed by multiplying glochidia encapsulation rates on fish by fish density, to occur at high mussel density sites. Such river sites, producing many offspring and conveying important conservation values, may thus be prioritized. However, contrary to our assumptions, higher glochidia density and higher proportions of gravid mussels occurred at lower density mussel sites. We also found that P. phoxinus had higher glochidia encapsulation rates than C. gobio, possibly related to species-specific behavioural and life-history traits. Even so, glochidia density was similar for both fish species, reflecting comparable ecological functions in hosts. The results of this study suggest that mussel and host fish densities should be considered along with glochidia density in conservation prioritization and management trade-offs.

  • 407.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Höjesjö, Johan
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Local adaptation studies and conservation: Parasite–host interactions between the endangered freshwater mussel Unio crassus and its host fish2017In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 27, p. 1261-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1.Parasite–host interactions can involve strong reciprocal selection pressure, and may lead to locally adapted specializations. The highly threatened unionoid mussels are temporary parasites on fish, but local adaptation has not yet been investigated for many species. 2.Patterns of local adaptation of one of Europe's most threatened unionoids, the thick‐shelled river mussel (Unio crassus) were investigated. Eurasian minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus) from two rivers (separate drainage areas) were cross‐infested in the laboratory with sympatric and allopatric mussel larvae, while bullheads (Cottus gobio), inhabiting only one of the rivers, were infested with sympatric or allopatric mussel larvae. Larval encystment, juvenile mussel excystment and survival were measured. 3.For one river, but not the other, juvenile excystment from P. phoxinus was highest when infested with sympatric mussels. The opposite pattern was found for C. gobio in this river, where juvenile excystment and post‐parasitic juvenile survival from allopatric C. gobio were highest. The results thus cannot confirm local adaptation of U. crassus to P. phoxinus in the study rivers, as excystment was not consistently higher in all sympatric mussel–host combinations, whereas there were potential maladaptive signs of U. crassus in relation to C. gobio. There was no loss of encysted larvae 3 days after infestation until juvenile excystment. Most juveniles were excysted between 17 and 29 days after infestation, and the numbers of excysted juveniles increased with fish size. 4.The results have implications for parasite–host ecology and conservation management with regard to unionoid propagation and re‐introduction. This includes the need to (1) test suitability and adaptation patterns between U. crassus and multiple host fish species, (2) evaluate the suitability of certain unionoids and host fish strains after more than 3 days, and (3) determine whether large fish produce more juvenile mussels than smaller fish

  • 408.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Evaluating temperature- and host-dependent reproduction in the parasitic freshwater mussel Unio crassus2017In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 810, no 1, p. 283-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptation to temperature regimes and host presence may enhance fitness in parasites. In an experimental study, we evaluated the timing of glochidia release by Unio crassus subjected to three spring water temperature regimes in the presence and absence of the host fish Cottus gobio. The timing of glochidia release was delayed at (i) constantly low temperatures (<10°C), in contrast to earlier and pronounced releases at (ii) natural temperature increases that level off at intermediate temperatures (10–15°C), and (iii) higher-than-normal temperatures (10–20°C). Mussels from treatment (i) that had not released glochidia during the experiment did so soon after being moved to the temperature in (ii), indicating a temperature threshold for glochidia release. Neither host fish presence nor the combined effect of temperature and host fish presence significantly affected the timing of glochidia release. The treatment with natural spring water temperatures indicated possible fitness benefits for U. crassus through combined effects of high intensities of glochidia releases and high survival of released glochidia. The furthered understanding of climate change effects on mussel and host phenology in seasonal environments, potentially inducing temporal mismatches of glochidia release to host availability, is key to mussel conservation

  • 409.
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Wengström, Niklas
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden;Swedish Anglers Association, Sweden .
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Department of Biology – Aquatic Ecology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Eldenäs, Pia
    Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics – Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Höjesjö, Johan
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Ivan
    County Administrative Board of Skåne, Sweden.
    Österling, E. Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Host-Fish Composition And Glochidia Encapsulation For The Endangered Thick-Shelled River Mussel Unio CrassusManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 410.
    Schyllander, Jan
    et al.
    Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB).
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Skador – förekomst, statistik och bestämningsfaktorer2015In: Personsäkerhet – teori och praktik / [ed] Per Nilsen, Karlstad: Myndigheten för Samhällsskydd och Beredskap (MSB) , 2015, p. 47-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 411. Segerström, Ulf
    et al.
    Emanuelsson, Marie
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Bergsbruk och svedjebruk: Strategi eller anpassning i medeltidens Bergslag?2002In: Periferins landskap. Historiska spår och nutida blickfält i svensk glesbygd / [ed] Johansson, Ella, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 412.
    Shafer, Aaron B. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wolf, Jochen B. W.
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Alves, Paulo C.
    Univ Porto, Fac Ciencias, CIBIO InBIO, P-4485661 Oporto, Portugal..
    Bergstrom, Linnea
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bruford, Michael W.
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Biosci, Cardiff CF10 3AX, S Glam, Wales..
    Brannstrom, Ioana
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Colling, Guy
    Musee Natl Hist Nat Luxembourg, L-2160 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Meester, Luc
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium..
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fawcett, Katie D.
    Univ Groningen, Behav Ecol & Selforg, NL-9712 Groningen, Netherlands..
    Fior, Simone
    ETH, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad
    Univ Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Hill, Jason A.
    Univ Stockholm, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hoezel, A. Rus
    Univ Durham, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Hoglund, Jacob
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jensen, Evelyn L.
    Univ British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada..
    Krause, Johannes
    Univ Tubingen, D-72070 Tubingen, Germany..
    Kristensen, Torsten N.
    Aalborg Univ, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark..
    Kruetzen, Michael
    Univ Zurich, Anthropol Inst & Museum, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    McKay, John K.
    Colorado State Univ, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA..
    Norman, Anita J.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Ogden, Rob
    Royal Zool Soc Scotland, WildGenes Lab, Edinburgh EH12 6TS, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Ouborg, N. Joop
    Radboud Univ Nijmegan, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Popovic, Danijela
    Univ Warsaw, Ctr New Technol, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland..
    Primmer, Craig R.
    Univ Turku, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Reed, Floyd A.
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Roumet, Marie
    ETH, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Salmona, Jordi
    Inst Gulbenkian Ciencias, Populat & Conservat Genet Grp, P-2780156 Oeiras, Portugal..
    Schenekar, Tamara
    Karl Franzens Univ Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria..
    Schwartz, Michael K.
    USDA, Forest Serv, Rocky Mt Res Stn, Ft Collins, CO USA..
    Segelbacher, Gernot
    Univ Freiburg, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany..
    Senn, Helen
    Royal Zool Soc Scotland, WildGenes Lab, Edinburgh EH12 6TS, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Thaulow, Jens
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, N-0349 Oslo, Norway..
    Valtonen, Mia
    Univ Eastern Finland, Joensuu 80101, Finland..
    Veale, Andrew
    Univ British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada..
    Vergeer, Philippine
    Wageningen Univ, NL-6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Vijay, Nagarjun
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Vila, Caries
    Conservat & Evolutionary Genet Grp, Estac Biol Donana, Almonte 41092, Spain..
    Weissensteiner, Matthias
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wennerstrom, Lovisa
    Univ Stockholm, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Univ Stockholm, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zielinski, Piotr
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
    Genomics and the challenging translation into conservation practice2015In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 78-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global loss of biodiversity continues at an alarming rate. Genomic approaches have been suggested as a promising tool for conservation practice as scaling up to genome-wide data can improve traditional conservation genetic inferences and provide qualitatively novel insights. However, the generation of genomic data and subsequent analyses and interpretations remain challenging and largely confined to academic research in ecology and evolution. This generates a gap between basic research and applicable solutions for conservation managers faced with multifaceted problems. Before the real-world conservation potential of genomic research can be realized, we suggest that current infrastructures need to be modified, methods must mature, analytical pipelines need to be developed, and successful case studies must be disseminated to practitioners.

  • 413.
    Shafer, Aaron B. A.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wolf, Jochen B. W.
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Alves, Paulo C.
    Univ Porto, Ctr Invest Biodiversidade & Recursos Genet, P-4485661 Oporto, Portugal.;Fac Ciencias, P-4485661 Oporto, Portugal..
    Bergstrom, Linnea
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Colling, Guy
    Musee Natl Hist Nat Luxembourg, Populat Biol, L-2160 Luxembourg, Luxembourg..
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Bioinformat & Genet, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Meester, Luc
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Ekblom, Robert
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fior, Simone
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Integrat Biol, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad
    Univ Guelph, Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Hoezel, A. Rus
    Univ Durham, Biol & Biomed Sci, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Hoglund, Jacob
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jensen, Evelyn L.
    Univ British Columbia Okanagan, Biol, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada..
    Kruetzen, Michael
    Univ Zurich, Anthropol Inst & Museum, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Norman, Anita J.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Ouborg, N. Joop
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Expt Plant Ecol, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Piccolo, John J.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Primmer, Craig R.
    Univ Turku, Biol, Turku 20014, Finland..
    Reed, Floyd A.
    Univ Hawaii Manoa, Biol, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Roumet, Marie
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Integrat Biol, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Salmona, Jordi
    Inst Gulbenkian Ciencias, Populat & Conservat Genet Grp, P-2780156 Oeiras, Portugal..
    Schwartz, Michael K.
    USDA, Forest Serv, Rocky Mt Res Stn, Missoula, MT 59801 USA..
    Segelbacher, Gernot
    Univ Freiburg, Wildlife Ecol & Management, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany..
    Thaulow, Jens
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Freshwater Biol, N-0349 Oslo, Norway..
    Valtonen, Mia
    Univ Eastern Finland, Biol, Joensuu 80101, Finland..
    Vergeer, Philippine
    Wageningen Univ, Nat Conservat & Plant Ecol, NL-6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Weissensteiner, Matthias
    Uppsala Univ, Ecol & Genet, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm Univ, Zool, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vila, Carlese
    Estn Biol Donana, Conservat & Evolutionary Genet Grp, Seville 41092, Spain..
    Zielinski, Piotr
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Environm Sci, PL-30387 Krakow, Poland..
    Genomics in Conservation: Case Studies and Bridging the Gap between Data and Application Reply2016In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 83-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 414.
    Sjöstrand, Björn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Barbier, Christophe
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Influence on sheet dewatering by structural differences in forming fabrics2016In: Paper Conference and Trade Show (PaperCon 2016): Proceedings of a meeting held 15-18 May 2016, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA., TAPPI Press, 2016, p. 767-776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forming fabrics for paper manufacturing are designed with great care to enhance both process and products and are accountable for a lot of the performance of paper machines in the forming section, both with regards to energy and quality aspects. Different approaches to the design of the weave pattern and the choice of yarn materials and diameters have given the market different fabric structures. Fabric parameters that have been shown to cause differences in dewatering are caliper, void volume and permeability. To understand how the structure of the forming fabrics affects sheet dewatering selected fabrics have been tested experimentally, with dewatering equipment that simulates vacuum dewatering.

    Dryness of the paper sheet was determined after dewatering and the air volume sucked through sheet and fabric was calculated. The fabrics that were chosen had similar values for all the known parameters previously shown to affect dewatering but had different structures that are defined by the open area (%) in the paper side and the wear side. Tests were performed with three fabric structures and 80 g/m2 softwood sheets. The sheets were made of both unbeaten and highly beaten pulp, and two vacuum levels were used during trials.

    The results show that the fabric structure influences the sheet dewatering rate even if the caliper, void volume and permeability are the same. The air volume sucked through the structure of sheet and wire during the dewatering increased linearly with dwell time indicating that a constant air volume was reached. No significant differences were observed between the different fabrics in terms of the air volume at steady state. The conclusions are that the structure of forming fabrics affects the dewatering rate at certain conditions even with constant air volume and outgoing dryness. This is believed to be connected to (i) the fibers’ penetration of the fabric’s surface during the dewatering process or to (ii) the different resistances to in-plane and thickness- direction flow of the fabrics or to a combination of (i) and (ii). Studies of surface topography are used to explain the phenomenon and numerical simulations will be made in a later study to further evaluate this. 

  • 415.
    Sjöstrand, Björn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Energy, Environmental and Building Technology.
    Barbier, Christophe
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Modeling of forming fabric structure influence on vacuum box dewateringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 416. Skoglund, Peter
    et al.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Discourses of nature conservation and heritage management in the past, present and future:: Discussing heritage and sustainable development from Swedish experiences2010In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 368-385Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 417.
    Skov, Christian
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Hansen, Joan H.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Baktoft, Henrik
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Brodersen, Jakob
    EAWAG Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland; Institute of Ecology and EvolutionUniversity of Bern, Switzerland.
    Brönmark, Christer
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hulthén, Kaj
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Chapman, Ben B.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lund University, Sweden.
    Biomanipulating streams: a supplementary tool in lake restoration2019In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 829, no 1, p. 205-2016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Removal of cyprinid fish is a widely used biomanipulation tool to transform turbid shallow eutrophic lakes in north temperate regions into a clear water state. We here evaluate the removal of cyprinids from streams as a supplement to lake fishing. Since cyprinids often aggregate in high densities in lake inlet/outlet streams during winter migration, removal of fish in this space-confined habitat may be cost-efficient as compared to fish removal in the lake habitat. In two consecutive years, we annually removed up to 35% of the dominant cyprinids from an inlet stream to a lake and argue that this could easily be increased with a more targeted fishing effort. Concurrently, we monitored species- and length-specific variation in migration propensity, to explore how this relates to efficient fish removal. Smaller planktivores generally had a much higher migratory propensity than larger benthivores. Hence, stream fishing specifically targets species and size groups that are less efficiently controlled with traditional lake fishing methods. As a rule of thumb, stream fishing is most efficient when water temperature is 2–6°C. Prior to implementing fish removals from streams, the potential evolutionary consequences of the targeted removal of migratory phenotypes should be considered. 

  • 418.
    Skov, Christian
    et al.
    DTU AQUA, Danmark.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Biology and ecology of pike2018Book (Refereed)
  • 419.
    Smith, Mike, U.
    et al.
    Mercer University Scool of Medicine.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Mendel in the Modern classroom2015In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 24, no 1-2, p. 151-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical controversies that have relevance to modern curricular design, such as Fisher’s (1936/2008) claim that Mendel’s data were too good to be true. We also address questions about Mendel’s status as the father of genetics as well as questions about the sequencing of Mendel’s work in genetics instruction in relation to modern molecular genetics and evolution. Next, we present a systematic set of examples of research-based approaches to the use of Mendel in the modern classroom along with criticisms of these designs and questions about the historical accuracy of the story of Mendel as presented in the typical classroom. Finally, we identify gaps in our understanding in need of further study and present a selected set of resources that, along with the references cited, should be valuable to science educators interested in further study of the story of Mendel.

  • 420.
    Solveig, Struksnes
    et al.
    Gjovik Univ Coll, Gjovik, Norway..
    Margareta, Bachrach-Lindstrom
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Hall Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Division for Health and Caring Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Randi, Slaasletten
    Gjovik Univ Coll, Gjovik, Norway..
    Inger, Johansson
    Gjovik Univ Coll, Gjovik, Norway..
    The nursing staff's experiences and reactions when older people with dementia fall in nursing homes2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no Suppl., p. 26-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 421. Speed, James
    et al.
    Austrheim, Gunnar
    Birks, John
    Johnson, Sally
    Kvamme, Mons
    Nagy, Laszlo
    Sjögren, Per
    Skar, Birgitte
    Stone, Duncan
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Thompson, Des
    Natural and cultural heritage in mountainlandscapes: towards an integrated valuation2012In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem services & management, ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 313-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mountain areas of Europe have been managed by humans for a long time, leading to a prevalence of semi-natural habitats in mountain landscapes today. These landscapes contain both natural and cultural heritage; however, natural and cultural heritage are rarely considered together when valuing landscapes and developing management plans in protected areas. Here we present a case study of seven protected areas in the mountains of Great Britain and Norway. We take a long-term perspective on landscape and land-use change and propose an integrated model of landscape valuation on the basis of combined natural and cultural heritage. Our model plots indicators of natural and cultural heritage along a gradient of land-use intensity, allowing simultaneous assessment and highlighting how valuation depends on what type of heritage is considered. We show that while contemporary land-use changes follow similar trajectories in Norway and Britain, different land-use histories mean that the loss of heritage differs between the regions. The model presented here thus allows for the consolidation of valuation based on both cultural and natural heritage in landscapes

  • 422.
    Stein, F.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Univ Potsdam, Inst Earth & Environm Sci, Potsdam, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Landscape Ecol, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany;Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Environm Syst Anal, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany..
    Doering-Arjes, P.
    Humboldt Univ, Fac Life Sci, Lab Integrat Fisheries Management, D-10099 Berlin, Germany..
    Fladung, E.
    Inst Inland Fisheries Potsdam Sacrow, Potsdam, Germany..
    Braemick, U.
    Inst Inland Fisheries Potsdam Sacrow, Potsdam, Germany..
    Bendall, B.
    Rivers Trust, Rain Charm House,Kyl Cober Parc, Callington, Cornwall, England..
    Schroeder, B.
    Tech Univ Munich, Landscape Ecol, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany.;Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Environm Syst Anal, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany.;Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res, Berlin, Germany..
    Downstream Migration of the European Eel (Anguilla Anguilla) in the Elbe River, Germany: Movement Patterns and the Potential Impact of Environmental Factors2016In: Rivers Research and Applications: an international journal devoted to river research and management, ISSN 1535-1459, E-ISSN 1535-1467, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 666-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recruitment of European eels (Anguilla anguilla) has declined to the extent that they have been added to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Therefore, it is critical to ensure that eels complete their outward river migration in order to contribute to the available spawning stock. We conducted a 4-year (2007-2011) telemetry study to understand the migratory behaviour and potential impact of environmental factors on the eel during this critical life stage. Out of 399 female eels tagged with acoustic transmitters, only 28% demonstrated clear downstream migratory behaviour. Fifty-five percent were detected exhibiting no downstream migration behaviour and 17% were not detected at any monitoring station. Movement patterns of downstream-migrating (silver) eels were characterized by nocturnal activity and seasonal migration, with distinct peaks in autumn and spring. Migration was often discontinuous and exhibited phases of active locomotion and expanded stopovers. The most important determinants of movement activity were water temperature, cumulative precipitation and moonlight, although the significance varied by season and location in the river basin. Our results evidence a discontinuous, stepwise migration over an extended period. Furthermore, our findings indicate that migration success depends on holding duration prior to tagging and environmental predictors with varying importance depending on the season, as well as the locations of capture, tagging and release.

  • 423.
    Strömgren, Mattias
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency.
    Bergqvist, Anders
    The Swedish Fire Protection Association, Stockholm.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    Institute for Risk Management and Safety Analysis, Stockholm.
    A process-oriented evaluation of nine accident investigation methods2015In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of methods for accident investigation have been published. They focus on different aspects and provide support in various respects to the entire investigation process. Previous research has examined strengths and weaknesses of methods in analytical terms, but few or none so far have studied their capability to support the accident investigation process. During a number of training courses on advanced accident investigation methodology, held annually at Karlstad University since 2003, systematic tests of nine accident investigation methods were performed. The methods' process supporting properties were qualitatively evaluated against a general model of the investigation process. The results show that none of the methods provide strong support for all steps of the investigation process. A few methods, including STEP and Deviation analysis, however, provide a relatively strong support for certain key elements of the process. Most methods are supportive to the analysis phase, but less supportive to the planning and concluding phases. This in turn implies that several methods should be termed accident analysis methods rather than accident investigation methods. The results also point to differences in analytical principles and output formats, which also affect their usefulness.

  • 424.
    Strömgren, Mattias
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    Bergqvist, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Säkerhetsutredningar av bränder: Fallstudie av en brand i en villa2013Report (Other academic)
  • 425.
    Stålhammar, M
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Fränstam, T
    Lindström, J
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Höjesjö, J
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Arlinghaus, R
    Nilsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Lund University.
    Effects of lure type, fish size and water temperature on hooking location and bleeding in northern pike (Esox lucius) angled in the Baltic sea2014In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 157, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 426.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Achieving sustainable lifestyles?: Socio-cultural dispositions, collective action and material culture as problems and possibilities2012In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 369-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the everyday life of ordinary households, their behaviour and responsibility with regard to environmental and sustainability issues. Previous research has shown that there is a gap between what households perceive as ideologically correct behaviour and what they actually do. It is argued here that socio-cultural dispositions, material culture and collective action need to be included in future strategies for creating more sustainable lifestyles. The investigation is based on a study of families participating in a year-long project in which the families learned to live in a more environmentally friendly way. In the study of the families, material culture interacted with routines, family relations and citizenship in a reproducing manner. The lifestyle changes were gender-biased, with the women as driving forces but also bearing most of the extra workload. From early life experiences, garbage sorting stood out as an especially powerful tool for a change towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 427.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Adel och bönder-: några tankar om identitet och ståndsindelning2011In: Arkæologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 24, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 428.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Arbetslöshetens arkeologi?2007In: Modernitet och arkeologi. Artiklar från VIII Nordic TAG i Lund 2005 / [ed] Ersgård, lars, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 429.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Before world-system?: The peasant-artisan and the market2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 430.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Consuming nature - producing heritage: Aspects on conservation, economical growth and community participation in a forested, sparsely populated area in Sweden2009In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 540-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 431.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Cultural heritage of the forest and cultural heritage in the forest2006In: / [ed] Ministerial conference on the protection of forests in Europe, Warsawa, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 432.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Dagligt liv på borg och gård under medeltiden i Värmland2003In: Vad är värmländskt? Mångvetenskapliga studier i den regionala identiteten / [ed] Nordmark, dag, Karlstad University Press, 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 433.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Expanding the household1998In: Lund archeological review, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 434.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Finnish forest archaeology. Ethnicity in the material2014In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 225-227Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 435.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Forest peasants. Their production and exchange1997In: Visions of the past. Trends and traditions in Swedish medieval archaeology / [ed] Andersson, Hans; Carelli, Peter & Ersgård, Lars, Stockholm: Almkvist Wiksell International , 1997Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 436.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gender and spatial patterns in the Scandinavian farmstead and outland2005In: / [ed] Holm, Ingunn; Innselset, Sonja & Öye, Ingvild, Bergen: UBAS International, Universitetet i Bergen , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 437.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Heritage and development outside the metropolis: Discussing issues of attractiveness, growth, participation and sustainable development2015In: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 2044-1266, E-ISSN 2044-1274, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the contribution of heritage and participation to sustainable development in a postindustrial context. Special attention is paid to the problematic fields of attractiveness, growth and participation. New ways of working this field are called for. Design/methodology/approach – The study relies on retrospectiveparticipatory observation, citizen participation and document analysis. Findings – There is a complex relationship between experts and citizens/participants, and heritage and history are considered to be domains of experts. Therefore heritage projects have problems surviving the exodus of experts. Heritage is not perceived as asset for building new businesses by most citizens, but as values “out there”. Heritage may function as a meeting place, attracting different groups of people, but there are complex mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion. A model and a method are put forward for uniting experts and citizens, and driving the integration of heritage in other sectors of society to create innovative sustainability processes. Research limitations/implications – A single case study, taking place under special conditions. However, both the results and the context correspond well with similar studies. Practical implications – Furthering of integration of heritage management and antiquarian actions in other societal sectors. Social implications – More stable networks of citizens/stakeholders and antiquarians. Originality/value – A fairly large project involving a multitude of stakeholders and societal interests.

  • 438.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Heritage at risk: The devastating effects of mechanized forestry on local heritage2014In: Via Spatiosa. : Festschrift to Ragnar Andersson on his 67th birthday. / [ed] Moniruzzaman, S., Nilsson, F. & Svensson, E., Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2014, p. 81-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 439.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Historisk arkeologi i skogen2009In: Triangulering. Historisk arkeologi vidgar fälten / [ed] Mats Mogren, Mats Roslund, Barbro Sundnér &Jes Wienberg, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2009, p. 243-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 440.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Innovations in the rural edge.: Inventions and smart organisations in the Scandinavian outlan use2015In: Towns and Villages in Medieval Rus.: Archaeology, history, culture : to mark the 60th birthday of the Academician Nikolai Makarov / [ed] Gaidukov, P. G. et al., Moscow: Russian Academy of Sciences, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 441.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Introduction (Part II)2009In: Liminal landscapes: Beyond the concepts of ’marginality’ and ’periphery’ / [ed] Ingunn Holm, Kathrine Stene, Eva Svensson, Oslo: Unipub forlag, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 442.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Iscensättning av utmarksbruk – en innovationshistoria2016In: Mellan slott och slag. : Vänbok till Anders Ödman / [ed] Gustin, I., Hansson, M., Roslund, M. & Wienberg, J., Lund: Lund University Open Access, 2016, p. 267-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 443.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Järnframställning i norra Värmland: Med rapporter över järnframställningslokalerna:fornlämning 135. Södra Finnskoga socken, Värmlands länfornlämning 224. Norra Finnskoga socken, Värmlands länfornlämning 308. Dalby socken, Värmlands länfornlämning 135. Dalby socken, Värmlands län1995Report (Other academic)
  • 444.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Kulturarv, natur och hållbar utveckling i en nordvärmländsk glesbygd2013In: Mångvetenskapliga möten för ett breddat kulturmiljöarbete: Riksantikvarieämbetets FoU-verksamhet 2006-2010/11 / [ed] Marie Holmström, Riksantikvarieämbetet, 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 445.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Kulturarv, natur och utveckling: Problem och möjligheter i skoglig glesbygd2010Book (Refereed)
  • 446.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Kulturbygden som blev vildmark2011In: Klarälven / [ed] Ibsen, H., Nyberg, L. & Svensson, E., Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 447.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Landscape beyond tradition. Historical Archaeology of northwestern Scania2010In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 77-78Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 448.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Life in the bailiff's castle of Edsholm1995In: Thirteen essays on medieval artefacts / [ed] Ersgård, Lars, Lund: Meddelanden från Lunds universitets historiska museum , 1995Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 449.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Marginality in our hearts: Consuming the exotics of poverty and hard work2009In: / [ed] Jan Klapste & Petr Sommer, Turhout: Brepols , 2009, no Ruralia VIIConference paper (Refereed)
  • 450.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Outland use in northern Värmland: Landscape, local society and households1998In: / [ed] Andersson, Hans; Ersgård, Lars & Svensson, Eva, Stockholm: Almkvist Wiksell International , 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
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