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  • 301.
    Jaldell, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Ryen, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Sund, Björn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Are national injury prevention and research efforts matching the distribution of injuries across sectors?2015In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 21, no e1, p. e113-e115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, 88% of all unintentional injury fatalities occurred in home and leisure environments in Sweden, while transportation fatalities accounted for 10% and work/school injuries for 2%. The corresponding proportions among non-fatal injuries were 75, 12 and 13%, respectively. However, 83% of the national governmental expenditure on unintentional injury prevention in 2011 was allocated to transportation safety, 7% to home and leisure, and 10% to the work sector including schools. Likewise, around 85% of the governmental research budget aimed for unintentional injury research was allocated to the transportation sector, 9% to home and leisure environments, and 6% to the work and school sector. Our results reveal a striking lack of correspondence between problem profile and governmental countermeasures.

  • 302.
    Jansson, Jimmy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Förekomsten av systematiskt säkerhetsarbete och riskhantering i skolan: En studie av respektive utbildningsplaner för lärare och rektorer2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Abstract

    The Swedish school is the biggest place of work in the country. Statistics about the Swedish school shows that both students and teachers work in an environment who has elements of violations, threats and violence, and study environments where many students do not feel they have a study environment during class. The purpose with this study has been to investigate if teachers and principals is given the right conditions in their respective educations to pursue their professional profession to achieve the objectives of the goals with the systematic safety and work environment of the school's safety concerns. The study has been designed as an investigation about respective educations syllabus and has been examined by the presence about systematic safety and knowledge about work environment law in respective courses. The examination about respective educations syllabus has been done by a qualitative content analysis. The result of the study is that the teacher education has content of systematic safety in the theme safety. To this theme can categories communication/conflict management, leadership and law linked. The result shows also that the principal education also has content on systematic safety by the theme safety. To this theme can categories law and communication/conflict management linked. The result of the study shows that the education of teachers and principals don’t give the right tools to face the risks about safety and work environment that is found in everyday school life. The result shows that it is a need to correcting respective education with more contents about systematic safety and work environment.

  • 303.
    Jelk, Caroline
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Skillnader i inomartsvariation i morfologiska karaktärer av Empetrum hermaphroditum mellan habitat2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on data of a previous study investigating whether snow depth affects average growth and reproduction of Empetrum hermaphroditum over a latitudinal and climatic gradient (Bienau et al. 2014). I tested the effects region and snow depth on intraspecific variation of growth-related variables instead, to clarify whether the species has the potential to cope with changes in snow depth and increased growing season in the future. Earlier research results led to the hypothesis that intraspecific variation depends on resources in the habitat and raises the question of whether there is higher variation in Empetrum in favorable habitats such as birch forests and habitats with deep snow cover than in adverse habitats such as those with a shallow snow cover. My analyses suggest that there were significant differences in variability between habitats in some morphological characters. However, not all of these characters follow the expected pattern that the favorable habitats would have a greater variety. Overall, significant differences were found in variation in the length of the main and the lateral shoots, leaf vitality on the main shoots and the dry weight of the stem. These results imply that the above hypothesis is correct for some growth-related variables. 

  • 304.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedung, Inge
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Cross-sectorial and holistic management approaches in societal risk and safety management: A review of the content in Swedish action programmes for civil protection against accidents2013In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Data och lärande efter katastrofer2016In: Katastrofriskreducering: Perspektiv, praktik, potential / [ed] Susanne Baez Ullberg & Per Becker, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1:1, p. 343-364Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 306. Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Haas, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Troglio, Elisabetta
    Gumà Altés, Rosa
    Lundh, Christian
    TOWN: Small and medium sized towns in their functional territorial context2013Report (Other academic)
  • 307.
    Johansson, Patricia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Evertebraters kolonisation på fin ved i semi-naturliga bäckar2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Wood can be added to streams to create microhabitats that provide macroinvertebrates with an opportunity for re-colonization by making the stream more heterogeneous. I examined colonization on wood substrate by macroinvertebrates in semi-natural streams in northern Finland during a three month period. Each of the streams was divided in three sections A, B and C, half of which were provided with wood. The focus has been on whether the density of macroinvertebrates changes with time, along an upstream-downstream direction in the streams, or in streams with two wood sections if macroinvertebrates will colonize the first section with wood that they come in contact with (upstream section) or if they continue downstream to the second section with wood. Wood from Salix sp. was placed in nine of the 18 enclosures during mid-June. Samples of wood were removed from the streams on three different occasions from August to October 2014. A total of 32 taxa were identified from the wood and assigned to functional feeding groups: shredders, scrapers, active filter feeders, passive filter feeders, collectors, miners, piercers and predators. The results showed that collectors, miners and piercers increased in density during the month of October and the abundance of scrapers was higher in the upstream location than in the downstream location. Total number of macroinvertebrates, collectors, passive filter feeders and predators had a higher colonization on the first substrate they came into contact with.

  • 308.
    Johansson, Tobias
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Stoppa det svindlande överflödet: En kvalitativ studie om olika aktörers möjligheter att reducera matsvinn2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    En tredjedel av all mat som produceras i världen blir till svinn. Problemet är uppmärksammat av FN och en konkret målsättning för att reducera matsvinnet finns uttryckt i FNs Globala mål för Hållbar Utveckling, mål 12.3. Matsvinn är ett slöseri med resurser som leder till stora påfrestningar på den naturliga miljön och sker samtidigt som människor i vissa delar av världen fortfarande lider av undernäring. Denna studie undersöker vilka policyer som används av svenska aktörer för att reducera matsvinnet, samt hur de resonerar kring lösningar på matsvinnsproblematiken. Två aktörer som dagligen arbetar med att reducera matsvinn, skolmatsbespisningen och dagligvaruhandeln, undersöks i denna studie genom två kvalitativa intervjuer. Resultatet visar att båda aktörerna använder sig av framgångsrika policyer för att reducera matsvinn, men även att det finns hinder i form av målkonflikter som uppstår från svinndrivande formuleringar i lagstiftning som behandlar livsmedel. 

  • 309.
    Jones, Douglas A.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Univ Otago, Dept Zool, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand..
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Food availability in spring affects smolting in brown trout (Salmo trutta)2015In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 1694-1699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior to out-migration, salmonid fish typically undergo physiological and morphological changes-a process known as smolting. This study indicates that smolting in brown trout (Salmo trutta) is affected by feeding conditions in spring immediately prior to out-migration. This conclusion was reached after experimentally testing the effect of seasonal variation in food availability on smolt status in the spring. A migratory strain of trout was administered either high or low food rations in the autumn, winter, or spring prior to release in the spring. While fish growth or condition could be affected in any season, it was spring rationing that reduced growth and growth-related variables and that caused increased smolting. Our result supports the idea that smoltification and the decision to migrate is affected by spring food availability regardless of conditions in the previous autumn or winter.

  • 310.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Dödsbränder i Sverige: En analys av datakvalitet, orsaker och riskmönster2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, more than 100 people die in fires every year and there is a societal goal of decreasing the risk of fire-related deaths. A goal-orientated prevention approach needs to be credibly underpinned with an understanding of the extent of the problem, its causes and risk factors, aspects that have largely been missing in Sweden. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to analyze fatal fires and fatalities in Sweden from an epidemiological perspective. The historical trends show that the risk of dying due to fire has decreased by more than 50% over the last 60 years in Sweden, with the largest decline being seen amongst children. In Sweden today, the risk of young children dying in a fire is very low. However, the risk of dying in fires has not declined to the same extent among elderly. In light of the aging Swedish population, older people must therefore be a priority in future fire protection. To investigate fire fatalities, data from three different national registers were combined. By combining the three sources, it was clear that the present routine statistics systematically underestimate the true situation. In-depth analysis regarding residential fires show that men and elderly are particularly at risk, as well as people living alone, as well as those on low income, social security benefits and health-related early-retirement benefits. The most common cause of fire was smoking and the presence of alcohol among the victims was very common. When combined, the extensive material can be simplified and described by well-defined clusters that each can be meet with relevant preventive efforts. Crucially, however, it is clear that mortality in residential fires is essentially a social problem and improving the protection of the most vulnerable people in society needs to be ascertained through sustained and holistic strategies, consisting of both social and technical measures. To establish and facilitate this, a cross-sectoral approach within municipalities and central government is needed.

  • 311.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Huss, Fredrik
    Burn Center, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The state of the residential fire fatality problem in Sweden: Epidemiology, risk factors, and event typologies2017In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 62, p. 89-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Residential fires represent the largest category of fatal fires in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatal residential fires in Sweden and to identify clusters of events.

    Method

    Data was collected from a database that combines information on fatal fires with data from forensic examinations and the Swedish Cause of Death-register. Mortality rates were calculated for different strata using population statistics and rescue service turnout reports. Cluster analysis was performed using multiple correspondence analysis with agglomerative hierarchical clustering.

    Results

    Male sex, old age, smoking, and alcohol were identified as risk factors, and the most common primary injury diagnosis was exposure to toxic gases. Compared to non-fatal fires, fatal residential fires more often originated in the bedroom, were more often caused by smoking, and were more likely to occur at night. Six clusters were identified. The first two clusters were both smoking-related, but were separated into (1) fatalities that often involved elderly people, usually female, whose clothes were ignited (17% of the sample), (2) middle-aged (45–64 years old), (often) intoxicated men, where the fire usually originated in furniture (30%). Other clusters that were identified in the analysis were related to (3) fires caused by technical fault, started in electrical installations in single houses (13%), (4) cooking appliances left on (8%), (5) events with unknown cause, room and object of origin (25%), and (6) deliberately set fires (7%).

    Conclusions

    Fatal residential fires were unevenly distributed in the Swedish population. To further reduce the incidence of fire mortality, specialized prevention efforts that focus on the different needs of each cluster are required.

    Practical applications

    Cooperation between various societal functions, e.g. rescue services, elderly care, psychiatric clinics and other social services, with an application of both human and technological interventions, should reduce residential fire mortality in Sweden.

  • 312.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Lundqvist, Marie
    Gell, Thomas
    MSB.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Identifying schools at risk of fire-setting2017In: Security Journal, ISSN 0955-1662, E-ISSN 1743-4645, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Jonsson, Simon
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Identifiering av lek- och övervintringsområden för lax (Salmo salar) och öring (Salmo trutta) i Klarälven2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 314.
    Jordan, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
    Gray, Steven
    Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Zellner, Moira
    Department of Urban Planning and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Glynn, Pierre D.
    Water Mission Area, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA.
    Voinov, Alexey
    Faculty of Engineering and IT, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, New South Wales, Australia.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Sterling, Eleanor J.
    Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, USA.
    Leong, Kirsten
    NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.
    Olabisi, Laura Schmitt
    Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Hubacek, Klaus
    Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA , Department of Environmental Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic & International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Bommel, Pierre
    Green Research Unit, CIRAD, Montpellier, France & CIEDA, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica.
    BenDor, Todd K.
    Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Jetter, Antonie J.
    Department of Engineering and Technology Management, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Laursen, Bethany
    Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA & Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Singer, Alison
    Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
    Giabbanelli, Philippe J.
    Computer Science Department, Furman University, Greenville, SC, USA.
    Kolagani, Nagesh
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIIT Chittoor, Sri City, India.
    Carrera, Laura Basco
    Unit Water Resource and Delta Management, Deltares, MH Delft, The Netherlands.
    Jenni, Karen
    Science and Decisions Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO, USA.
    Prell, Christina
    Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.
    Twelve Questions for the Participatory Modeling Community2018In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1046-1057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory modeling engages the implicit and explicit knowledge of stakeholders to create formalized and shared representations of reality and has evolved into a field of study as well as a practice. Participatory modeling researchers and practitioners who focus specifically on environmental resources met at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) in Annapolis, Maryland, over the course of 2 years to discuss the state of the field and future directions for participatory modeling. What follows is a description of 12 overarching groups of questions that could guide future inquiry.

  • 315.
    Julia Piovan, Maria
    et al.
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Argentina.; Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Germany..
    Pratolongo, Paula
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Argentina.; Univ Nacl Sur, Argentina.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Univ Kiel, Germany.
    Loydi, Alejandro
    Univ Nacl Sur, Argentina.; Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Argentina.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Germination Response to Osmotic Potential, Osmotic Agents, and Temperature of Five Halophytes Occurring along a Salinity Gradient2019In: International journal of plant sciences, ISSN 1058-5893, E-ISSN 1537-5315, Vol. 180, no 4, p. 345-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise of research. Halophyte species grow where salt concentrations are high. Still, their germination may be affected by salts, either by creating an osmotic potential that prevents water uptake or by dissociating in ions that can cause different grades of toxicity. With the increase of salinized areas, it becomes important to understand the behavior of these species. Methodology. We studied how the germination of five halophyte species that occur along a salinity gradient in the Bahia Blanca coastal zone, Atriplex undulata, Cyclolepis genistoides, Allenrolfea patagonica, Sarcocornia perennis, and Heterostachys ritteriana, responds to variations in osmotic agents, osmotic potential, and temperature. Seeds were exposed to different osmotic potentials using NaCl (neutral salt), Na2CO3 (alkaline salt), and mannitol solutions in a germination chamber experiment. Germination was recorded during 42 d. Germination percentage, mean germination time, and synchrony were calculated. Pivotal results. Our experimental results showed that for the five halophyte species under study, germination was mostly driven by osmotic potentials and osmotic agents. At high osmotic potential, the germination response did not differ significantly from controls, except for Allenrolfea and Cyclolepis, which showed lower germination when treated with Na2CO3. Low osmotic potentials and Na2CO3 were detrimental to germination, reflected by lower germination percentages, higher mean germination times, and lower synchrony. Conclusions. In general, the response to the alkaline salt was more negative than that to the neutral salt or mannitol, regardless of the species. Each species showed a different response to the salts under study, and this response matched well with the distribution of species along the salinity gradient observed in the field.

  • 316.
    Kaiskog, Frida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Rörelsemönster hos öring (Salmo trutta): En jämförelse mellan vilda och odlade individer i sjön Siljan2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many populations of salmonids are threatened by fragmentation and degradation of spawning habitats. Common remedial measures are habitat restoration and stocking of hatchery fish to support degraded wild populations. Many populations of brown trout in Sweden have been extirpated. The restoration plan for the endangered brown trout in Lake Siljan started decades ago and involves releases of hatchery produced trout. A decline of the spawning run of hatchery fish has been observed. In this study, wild and hatchery fish were tagged and monitored using hydroacustic telemetry during May-October, 2018. Movement patterns were studied to detect potential differences between wild and hatchery fish during lake and spawning migration. The results showed a difference of preferred territories between the groups. The wild trout stayed in the northern part of the lake and the hatchery trout were more evenly distributed over the lake, but with a preference for the southern part of the lake. During spawning migration a larger proportion of the wild trout (44 %) moved to potential spawning habitats as compared to hatchery trout (16 %). The wild fish migrated more or less direct to the potential spawning grounds in River Österdal as compared to the hatchery fish, which showed an erratic behavior and preferred to migrate to the tributaries in Lake Siljan. Differences in movement patterns and preferred habitats in the lake can be caused by differences in behavior between the groups. This should motivate more studies of behavior of wild and hatchery trout. The time for spawning and potential spawning habitats are also important to study for future management and restoration of the wild population of brown trout in Lake Siljan.

  • 317.
    Karlsson, Simon
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Christiansson, Jonas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Granö fiskavledare2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utvinning av vattenkraft från Granö kraftstation påbörjades på slutet av 1950-talet. Ålen har sedan dess varit hindrad att passera genom kraftverket av ett finmaskigt och höglutande nät under ålens vandringssäsonger. Den alternativa vägen runt stationen har varit med spillvatten eller ner i den gamla ålkistan placerad i intagskanalen. Det är okänt hur många ålar som faktiskt vandrat ut med spillvattnet, men fångsterna i den gamla ålkistan har varit begränsade och mängder med ålar har dött på nätet. Ålen är nu akut hotad och åtgärder att mildra kraftverkens negativa inverkan på utvandrande blankål har högsta prioritet.

    Till följd av problem med igensättning av den så kallade ålspärren uppstod ett dammbrott 2010. För att öka dammsäkerheten och effektiviteten för åluppsamling designades och uppfördes en ny fiskavledare med åluppsamlingsanläggning 2011. Granö fiskavledare är unik i sitt slag då den har intagsgaller av kompositmaterial, ställbara lutningar (30-40˚), samt flyktöppningar som leder till en uppsamlingsbur. Vattnet från uppsamlingen pumpas tillbaka till intagskanalen, för att undvika onödigt spill.

    En stor del av utvärderingen bestod i märkning och spårning av blankål i anslutning till avledaren. Märkningsförsöken under 2012 och 2013 visade att endast en liten proportion av fisken hittar flyktöppningarna och kommer till uppsamlingsburen, dessutom har skador på fisken kunna relateras till avledaren och uppsamlingsburen. Totalt har 284 ålar märkts och 475 har visuellt bedömts för skador efter passage genom avledaren eller referensfisket Havbältan. Trots två dåliga ålvandringsår har majoriteten av den radiomärkta fisken ankommit till avledaren och totalt har 15 fisk återfångades. Hydrauliska mätningar i flyktöppningarna visar att vattenflödena igenom avledarsystemet är låga och andelen (vatten genom avledaren/totalflöde) är långt under rekommenderat vilket kan vara en anledning till de få återfångsterna av fisk.

  • 318.
    Kattge, Jens
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany..
    Boenisch, Gerhard
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Diaz, Sandra
    Univ Nacl Cordoba, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Inst Multidisciplinario Biol Vegetal IMBIV, Cordoba, Argentina.;Univ Nacl Cordoba, Fac Ciencias Exactas Fis & Nat, Cordoba, Argentina..
    Lavorel, Sandra
    Univ Savoie Mt Blanc, Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LECA, Grenoble, France..
    Prentice, Iain Colin
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Leadley, Paul
    Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Ecol Systemat Evolut, CNRS,AgroParisTech, Orsay, France..
    Tautenhahn, Susanne
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Zool, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Balliol Coll, Oxford, England..
    Aakala, Tuomas
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland..
    Abedi, Mehdi
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Dept Range Management, Fac Nat Resources & Marine Sci, Noor, Iran..
    Acosta, Alicia T. R.
    Univ Roma Tre, Rome, Italy..
    Adamidis, George C.
    Univ Aegean, Dept Environm, Biodivers Conservat Lab, Mitilini, Greece.;Univ Bern, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Bern, Switzerland..
    Adamson, Kairi
    Univ Tartu, Tartu Observ, Tartumaa, Estonia..
    Aiba, Masahiro
    Tohoku Univ, Grad Sch Life Sci, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan..
    Albert, Cecile H.
    Univ Avignon, Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, IRD,IMBE, Marseille, France..
    Alcantara, Julio M.
    Univ Jaen, Jaen, Spain..
    Alcazar, Carolina C.
    Inst Alexander Von Humboldt, Bogota, Colombia..
    Aleixo, Izabela
    Natl Inst Amazonian Res INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil..
    Ali, Hamada
    Suez Canal Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Bot, Ismailia, Egypt..
    Amiaud, Bernard
    Univ Lorraine, Lorraine, France..
    Ammer, Christian
    Univ Gottingen, Forest Sci, Gottingen, Germany.;Univ Gottingen, Ctr Biodivers & Sustainable Land Use, Gottingen, Germany..
    Amoroso, Mariano M.
    Univ Nacl Rio Negro, Inst Invest Recursos Nat Agroecol & Desarrollo Ru, El Bolson, Argentina.;Conicet Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina..
    Anand, Madhur
    Univ Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada..
    Anderson, Carolyn
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, Richland, WA 99352 USA.;Univ Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 USA..
    Anten, Niels
    Wageningen Univ, Ctr Crop Syst Anal, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Antos, Joseph
    Univ Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada..
    Apgaua, Deborah Mattos Guimaraes
    James Cook Univ, Coll Sci & Engn, Smithfield, Qld, Australia..
    Ashman, Tia-Lynn
    Univ Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Asmara, Degi Harja
    Univ Laval, Inst Integrat Syst Biol, Ctr Forest Res, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Asner, Gregory P.
    Arizona State Univ, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Aspinwall, Michael
    Univ North Florida, Dept Biol, Jacksonville, FL USA..
    Atkin, Owen
    Australian Natl Univ, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Energy Biol, Acton, ACT, Australia..
    Aubin, Isabelle
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Great Lakes Forestry Ctr, Sault Ste Marie, ON, Canada..
    Baastrup-Spohr, Lars
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Bahalkeh, Khadijeh
    Tarbiat Modares Univ, Dept Range Management, Fac Nat Resources & Marine Sci, Noor, Iran..
    Bahn, Michael
    Univ Innsbruck, Dept Ecol, Innsbruck, Austria..
    Baker, Timothy
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Baker, William J.
    Royal Bot Gardens Kew, Richmond, Surrey, England..
    Bakker, Jan P.
    Univ Groningen, Groningen Inst Evolutionary Life Sci GELIFES, Conservat Ecol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Baldocchi, Dennis
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Environm Sci Policy & Management, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Baltzer, Jennifer
    Wilfrid Laurier Univ, Dept Biol, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Banerjee, Arindam
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Forest Resources, St Paul, MN USA..
    Baranger, Anne
    AgroParisTech, Paris, France..
    Barlow, Jos
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster, England..
    Barneche, Diego R.
    Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Penryn, England..
    Baruch, Zdravko
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Biol Sci, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Bastianelli, Denis
    CIRAD, UMR SELMET, Montpellier, France.;Univ Montpellier, INRA, CIRAD, SELMET, Montpellier Supagro, France..
    Battles, John
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Bauerle, William
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Hort & Landscape Architecture, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA..
    Bauters, Marijn
    Univ Ghent, Dept Green Chem & Technol, Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Ghent, Dept Environm, Ghent, Belgium..
    Bazzato, Erika
    Univ Cagliari, Bot Div, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Beckmann, Michael
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Leipzig, Germany..
    Beeckman, Hans
    Royal Museum Cent Africa, Tervuren, Belgium..
    Beierkuhnlein, Carl
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Bekker, Renee
    Univ Groningen, GIA, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Belfry, Gavin
    Univ Tennessee, Dept Biol Sci, Knoxville, TN USA.;Rocky Mt Biol Labs, Crested Butte, CO USA..
    Belluau, Michael
    Univ Quebec, Dept Sci, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Beloiu, Mirela
    Univ Bayreuth, Dept Biogeog, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Benavides, Raquel
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Madrid, Spain..
    Benomar, Lahcen
    Univ Laval, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Berdugo-Lattke, Mary Lee
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Inst Ciencias Nat, Bogota, Colombia.;Fdn Nat, Bogota, Colombia..
    Berenguer, Erika
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, Oxford, England..
    Bergamin, Rodrigo
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Programa Posgrad Bot, Lab Estudos Vegetacao Campestre LEVCamp, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Bergmann, Joana
    Free Univ Berlin, Inst Biol, Berlin, Germany.;Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res BBIB, Berlin, Germany..
    Carlucci, Marcos Bergmann
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Bot, Lab Ecol Func Comunidades LABEF, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Berner, Logan
    No Arizona Univ, Sch Informat Comp & Cyber Syst, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Bernhardt-Roemermann, Markus
    Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Jena, Germany..
    Bigler, Christof
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bjorkman, Anne D.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Blackman, Chris
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, INRA, PIAF, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Blanco, Carolina
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Blonder, Benjamin
    Rocky Mt Biol Labs, Crested Butte, CO USA.;Arizona State Univ, Sch Life Sci, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Blumenthal, Dana
    USDA ARS, Rangeland Resources & Syst Res Unit, Ft Collins, CO 80522 USA..
    Bocanegra-Gonzalez, Kelly T.
    Univ Tolima, Grp Invest Biodiversidad & Dinam Ecosistemas Trop, Ibague, Colombia..
    Boeckx, Pascal
    Univ Ghent, Isotope Biosci Lab ISOFYS, Ghent, Belgium..
    Bohlman, Stephanie
    Univ Florida, Sch Forest Resources & Conservat, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Boehning-Gaese, Katrin
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Frankfurt, Germany.;Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Dept Biol Sci, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Boisvert-Marsh, Laura
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Great Lakes Forestry Ctr, Sault Ste Marie, ON, Canada..
    Bond, William
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Biol Sci, Cape Town, South Africa.;SAEON Fynbos Node, Claremont, South Africa..
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, College Pk, MD USA..
    Boom, Arnoud
    Univ Leicester, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Boonman, Coline C. F.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Environm Sci, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Bordin, Kauane
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Programa Posgrad Ecol, Lab Ecol Vegetal LEVEG, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Boughton, Elizabeth H.
    Archbold Biol Stn Buck Isl Ranch, Lake Placid, NY USA..
    Boukili, Vanessa
    Univ Connecticut, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Storrs, CT USA..
    Bowman, David M. J. S.
    Univ Tasmania, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Bravo, Sandra
    Univ Nacl Santiago del Estero, Fac Ciencias Forestales, Santiago Del Estero, Argentina..
    Brendel, Marco Richard
    Univ Hohenheim, Inst Landscape & Plant Ecol, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Broadley, Martin R.
    Univ Nottingham, Sch Geog, Nottingham, England..
    Brown, Kerry A.
    Kingston Univ, Dept Geog & Geol, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, England..
    Bruelheide, Helge
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol Geobot & Bot Garden, Halle, Germany..
    Brumnich, Federico
    Conicet Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.;Univ Nacl Litoral FICH UNL, Fac Ingn & Ciencias Hidr, Santa Fe, Argentina..
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Bruy, David
    Univ Montpellier, INRA, CNRS, AMAP,CIRAD,IRD, Montpellier, France.;Herbier Nouvelle Caledonie, IRD, AMAP, Noumea, New Caledonia..
    Buchanan, Serra W.
    Univ Toronto, Scarborough, ON, Canada..
    Bucher, Solveig Franziska
    Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Jena, Germany..
    Buchmann, Nina
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Buitenwerf, Robert
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Sect Ecoinformat & Biodivers, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Ctr Biodivers Dynam Changing World BIOCHANGE, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Bunker, Daniel E.
    New Jersey Inst Technol, Newark, NJ 07102 USA..
    Buerger, Jana
    Univ Rostock, Fac Agr & Environm Sci, Rostock, Germany..
    Burrascano, Sabina
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Rome, Italy..
    Burslem, David F. R. P.
    Univ Aberdeen, Sch Biol Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Butterfield, Bradley J.
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Byun, Chaeho
    Yonsei Univ, Sch Civil & Environm Engn, Seoul, South Korea..
    Marques, Marcia
    UFPR Fed Univ Parana, Dept Bot, SCB, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Scalon, Marina C.
    Univ Fed Parana, Ctr Politecn, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Caccianiga, Marco
    Univ Milan, Dipartimento Biosci, Milan, Italy..
    Cadotte, Marc
    Univ Toronto, Scarborough, ON, Canada..
    Cailleret, Maxime
    Aix Marseille Univ, IRSTEA Aix En Provence, UMR RECOVER, Aix En Provence, France.;Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Dept Environm Syst Sci, Zurich, Switzerland.;Swiss Fed Inst Forest Snow & Landscape Res WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland..
    Camac, James
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Excellence Bioscur Risk Anal, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Julio Camarero, Jesus
    CSIC, IPE, Zaragoza, Spain..
    Campany, Courtney
    Colgate Univ, Hamilton, NY 13346 USA..
    Campetella, Giandiego
    Univ Camerino, Sch Biosci & Vet Med, Plant Div & Ecosyst Management Unit, Camerino, Italy..
    Campos, Juan Antonio
    Univ Basque Country, UPV EHU, Dept Plant Biol & Ecol, Bilbao, Spain..
    Cano-Arboleda, Laura
    Fdn Nat, Bogota, Colombia.;Univ Nacl Colombia, Dept Geociencias & Medio Ambiente, Medellin, Colombia..
    Canullo, Roberto
    Univ Camerino, Sch Biosci & Vet Med, Plant Div & Ecosyst Management Unit, Camerino, Italy..
    Carbognani, Michele
    Univ Parma, Dept Chem Life Sci & Environm Sustainabil, Parma, Italy..
    Carvalho, Fabio
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster Environm Ctr, Lancaster, England..
    Casanoves, Fernando
    CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica..
    Castagneyrol, Bastien
    Univ Bordeaux, BIOGECO, INRAE, Cestas, France..
    Catford, Jane A.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Geog, London, England..
    Cavender-Bares, Jeannine
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, St Paul, MN 55108 USA..
    Cerabolini, Bruno E. L.
    Univ Insubria, Dept Biotechnol & Life Sci, Varese, Italy..
    Cervellini, Marco
    Univ Camerino, Sch Biosci & Vet Med, Plant Div & Ecosyst Management Unit, Camerino, Italy.;Univ Bologna, Alma Mater Studiorum, Dept Biol Geol & Environm Sci, BIGEA, Bologna, Italy..
    Chacon-Madrigal, Eduardo
    Univ Costa Rica, Escuela Biol, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Chapin, Kenneth
    Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ USA..
    Chapin, F. Stuart
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Chelli, Stefano
    Univ Camerino, Sch Biosci & Vet Med, Plant Div & Ecosyst Management Unit, Camerino, Italy..
    Chen, Si-Chong
    Royal Bot Gardens, Richmond, W Sussex, England..
    Chen, Anping
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Biol, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA..
    Cherubini, Paolo
    WSL Swiss Fed Res Inst, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.;Univ British Columbia, Fac Forestry, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Chianucci, Francesco
    CREA Res Ctr Forestry & Wood, Arezzo, Italy..
    Choat, Brendan
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Chung, Kyong-Sook
    Jungwon Univ, Goesan, Chungbuk, South Korea..
    Chytry, Milan
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Bot & Zool, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Ciccarelli, Daniela
    Univ Pisa, Dept Biol, Pisa, Italy..
    Coll, Lluis
    Univ Lleida, Dept Agr & Forest Engn EAGROF, Lleida, Spain.;CTFC AGROTECNIO, Joint Res Unit, Solsona, Spain..
    Collins, Courtney G.
    Univ Calif Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 USA..
    Conti, Luisa
    Univ Life Sci Prague, Fac Environm Sci, Prague, Czech Republic.;Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Trebon, Czech Republic..
    Coomes, David
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Plant Sci, Cambridge, England..
    Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.
    Vrije Univ, Dept Ecol Sci, Syst Ecol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Cornwell, William K.
    UNSW Sydney, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Corona, Piermaria
    CREA Res Ctr Forestry & Wood, Arezzo, Italy..
    Coyea, Marie
    Univ Laval, Fac Foresterie Geog & Geomat, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Craine, Joseph
    Jonah Ventures, Boulder, CO USA..
    Craven, Dylan
    Univ Mayor, Ctr Modelac & Monitoreo Ecosistemas, Santiago, Chile..
    Cromsigt, Joris P. G. M.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden.;Nelson Mandela Univ, Dept Zool, Ctr African Conservat Ecol, Port Elizabeth, South Africa..
    Csecserits, Aniko
    MTA Ctr Ecol Res, Tihany, Hungary..
    Cufar, Katarina
    Univ Ljubljana, Biotech Fac, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Cuntz, Matthias
    Univ Lorraine, AgroParisTech, INRAE, UMR Silva, Nancy, France..
    da Silva, Ana Carolina
    Santa Catarina State Univ, Lages, SC, Brazil..
    Dahlin, Kyla M.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Geog Environm & Spatial Sci, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Dainese, Matteo
    Eurac Res, Inst Alpine Environm, Bozen Bolzano, Italy..
    Dalke, Igor
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Komi Sci Ctr, Inst Biol, Syktyvkar, Russia..
    Dalle Fratte, Michele
    Univ Insubria, Dept Biotechnol & Life Sci, Varese, Italy..
    Dang-Le, Anh Tuan
    Danihelka, Jiri
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Bot & Zool, Brno, Czech Republic.;Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Trebon, Czech Republic..
    Dannoura, Masako
    Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Agr, Kyoto, Japan.;Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Global Environm Studies, Kyoto, Japan..
    Dawson, Samantha
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    de Beer, Arend Jacobus
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Plant & Soil Sci, Pretoria, South Africa..
    De Frutos, Angel
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Leipzig, Germany..
    De Long, Jonathan R.
    Netherlands Inst Ecol, Dept Terr Ecol, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Dechant, Benjamin
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Computat Landscape Ecol, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Computat Hydrosyst, Leipzig, Germany.;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Landscape Architecture & Rural Syst Engn, Seoul, South Korea..
    Delagrange, Sylvain
    Inst Temperate Forest Sci ISFORT, Ripon, PQ, Canada.;UQO, Dept Nat Sci, Ripon, PQ, Canada..
    Delpierre, Nicolas
    Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Ecol Systemat Evolut, CNRS,AgroParisTech, Orsay, France..
    Derroire, Geraldine
    Univ Guyane, Univ Antilles, CNRS, INRA,UMR EcoFoG,Agroparistech,Cirad, Kourou, French Guiana..
    Dias, Arildo S.
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Inst Phys Geog, Biogeog & Biodivers Lab, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Diaz-Toribio, Milton Hugo
    Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G.
    Univ Aegean, Dept Environm, Biodivers Conservat Lab, Mitilini, Greece..
    Dobrowolski, Mark
    Iluka Resources, Perth, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Doktor, Daniel
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Leipzig, Germany..
    Drevojan, Pavel
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Bot & Zool, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Dong, Ning
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Dransfield, John
    Royal Bot Gardens Kew, Richmond, Surrey, England..
    Dressler, Stefan
    Senckenberg Res Inst, Dept Bot & Mol Evolut, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Duarte, Leandro
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Ducouret, Emilie
    Univ Guyane, Univ Antilles, CNRS, INRA,UMR EcoFoG,Agroparistech,Cirad, Kourou, French Guiana..
    Dullinger, Stefan
    Univ Vienna, Dept Bot & Biodivers Res, Vienna, Austria..
    Durka, Walter
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Halle, Germany..
    Duursma, Remko
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Dymova, Olga
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Komi Sci Ctr, Inst Biol, Syktyvkar, Russia..
    E-Vojtko, Anna
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Trebon, Czech Republic.;Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Dept Bot, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic..
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Ejtehadi, Hamid
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Quantitat Plant Ecol & Biodivers Res Lab, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Elser, James
    Univ Montana, Flathead Lake Biol Stn, Polson, MT 59860 USA.;Arizona State Univ, Sch Sustainabil, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Emilio, Thaise
    Univ Campinas UNICAMP, PNPD, Programa Pos Grad Ecol, Inst Biol, Campinas, SP, Brazil..
    Engemann, Kristine
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Sect Ecoinformat & Biodivers, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Erfanian, Mohammad Bagher
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Quantitat Plant Ecol & Biodivers Res Lab, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Erfmeier, Alexandra
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Univ Kiel, Inst Ecosyst Res Geobot, Kiel, Germany..
    Esquivel-Muelbert, Adriane
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Esser, Gerd
    Justus Liebig Univ, Inst Plant Ecol, Giessen, Germany..
    Estiarte, Marc
    CSIC, Spanish Natl Res Council, Catalonia, Spain.;CREAF, Catalonia, Spain..
    Domingues, Tomas F.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Dept Biol FFCLRP, Ribeirao Preto, Brazil..
    Fagan, William F.
    Univ Maryland, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Fagundez, Jaime
    Univ A Coruna, Campus Zapateira, La Coruna, Spain..
    Falster, Daniel S.
    UNSW Sydney, Evolut & Ecol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Sydney, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Fan, Ying
    Rutgers State Univ, Piscataway, NJ USA..
    Fang, Jingyun
    Peking Univ, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Farris, Emmanuele
    Univ Sassari, Dept Chem & Pharm, Sassari, Italy..
    Fazlioglu, Fatih
    Ordu Univ, Fac Arts & Sci, Mol Biol & Genet, Ordu, Turkey..
    Feng, Yanhao
    Lanzhou Univ, Coll Pastoral Agr Sci & Technol, State Key Lab Grassland Agroecosyst, Lanzhou, Gansu, Peoples R China..
    Fernandez-Mendez, Fernando
    Univ Tolima, Grp Invest Biodiversidad & Dinam Ecosistemas Trop, Ibague, Colombia.;Univ Tolima, Ctr Forestal Trop Bajo Calima, Buenaventura, Colombia..
    Ferrara, Carlotta
    CREA Res Ctr Forestry & Wood, Arezzo, Italy..
    Ferreira, Joice
    Embrapa Amazonia Oriental, Belem, Para, Brazil..
    Fidelis, Alessandra
    Univ Estadual Paulista UNESP, Lab Vegetat Ecol, Inst Biociencias, Rio Claro, Brazil..
    Finegan, Bryan
    CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica..
    Firn, Jennifer
    Queensland Univ Technol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Flowers, Timothy J.
    Univ Sussex, Sch Life Sci, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Flynn, Dan F. B.
    Harvard Univ, Arnold Arboretum, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Fontana, Veronika
    Eurac Res, Inst Alpine Environm, Bozen Bolzano, Italy..
    Forey, Estelle
    Univ Rouen, Normandie Univ, Lab ECODIV URA, IRSTEA EA 1293,UFR ST, Mont St Aignan, France..
    Forgiarini, Cristiane
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Dept Bot, Biosci Inst, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Francois, Louis
    Univ Liege, Unit Res SPHERES, Liege, Belgium..
    Frangipani, Marcelo
    Univ Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.;Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Frank, Dorothea
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Frenette-Dussault, Cedric
    Geopole Univ Sherbrooke, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Freschet, Gregoire T.
    Paul Sabatier Univ Toulouse, CNRS, Theoret & Expt Ecol Stn, Moulis, France..
    Fry, Ellen L.
    Univ Manchester, Sch Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Fyllas, Nikolaos M.
    Univ Aegean, Dept Environm, Biodivers Conservat Lab, Mitilini, Greece..
    Mazzochini, Guilherme G.
    Univ Estadual Campinas, Inst Biol, Dept Plant Biol, Campinas, SP, Brazil..
    Gachet, Sophie
    Univ Avignon, Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, IRD,IMBE, Marseille, France..
    Gallagher, Rachael
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Ganade, Gislene
    Univ Fed Rio Grande Norte UFRN, Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Ganga, Francesca
    Univ Cagliari, Bot Div, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Garcia-Palacios, Pablo
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Dept Biol & Geol, Fis & Quim Inorgan & Analit, Mostoles, Spain..
    Gargaglione, Veronica
    Univ Nacl Patagonia Austral, Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Inst Nacl Tecnol Agropecuaria, Rio Gallegos, Argentina..
    Garnier, Eric
    Univ Montpellier 3, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE,IRD,CEFE,UMR 5175, Montpellier, France..
    Luis Garrido, Jose
    CSIC, Estn Expt Zaidin, Granada, Spain.;CSIC, Estn Biol Donana, Seville, Spain..
    Luis de Gasper, Andre
    Univ Reg Blumenau, Blumenau, SC, Brazil..
    Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo
    INIA CIFOR, Madrid, Spain..
    Gibson, David
    Southern Illinois Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Carbondale, IL 62901 USA..
    Gillison, Andrew N.
    Ctr Biodivers Management, Yungaburra, Qld, Australia..
    Giroldo, Aelton
    Inst Fed Educ Ciencia & Tecnol ceara, Crateus, Brazil..
    Glasenhardt, Mary-Claire
    Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL USA..
    Gleason, Sean
    ARS, Water Management & Syst Res Unit, USDA, Ft Collins, CO USA..
    Gliesch, Mariana
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Integrat Biol, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Goldberg, Emma
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, 318 Church St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Goeldel, Bastian
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Sect Ecoinformat & Biodivers, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Gonzalez-Akre, Erika
    Smithsonian Conservat Biol Inst, Front Royal, VA USA..
    Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L.
    CSIC, IAS, Cordoba, Spain..
    Gonzalez-Melo, Andres
    Univ Rosario, Fac Ciencias Nat & Matemat, Bogota, Colombia..
    Gonzalez-Robles, Ana
    Univ Jaen, Dept Biol Anim Biol Vegetal & Ecol, Jaen, Spain..
    Graae, Bente Jessen
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Trondheim, Norway..
    Granda, Elena
    Univ Alcala De Henares, Dept Life Sci, Alcala De Henares, Spain..
    Graves, Sarah
    Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Green, Walton A.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Organism & Evolutionary Biol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Gregor, Thomas
    Senckenberg Res Inst, Dept Bot & Mol Evolut, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Gross, Nicolas
    INRA, UCA, VetAgro Sup, UMR Ecosyst Prairial, Clermont Ferrand, France.;Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Super Ciencias Expt & Tecnol, Dept Biol & Geol, Fis & Quim Inorgan, Mostoles, Spain..
    Guerin, Greg R.
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Biol Sci, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Guenther, Angela
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Gutierrez, Alvaro G.
    Univ Chile, Fac Ciencias Agron, Dept Ciencias Ambientales & Recursos Nat Renovabl, Santiago, Chile..
    Haddock, Lillie
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, Joint Global Change Res Inst, College Pk, MD USA..
    Haines, Anna
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Hall, Jefferson
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama..
    Hambuckers, Alain
    Univ Liege, Unit Res SPHERES, Liege, Belgium..
    Han, Wenxuan
    China Agr Univ, Coll Resources & Environm Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, Urumqi, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Res Ctr Ecol & Environm Cent Asia, Urumqi, Peoples R China..
    Harrison, Sandy P.
    Univ Reading, Reading, Berks, England..
    Hattingh, Wesley
    Univ Witwatersrand, Sch Anim Plant & Environm Sci, Johannesburg, South Africa..
    Hawes, Joseph E.
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, Sch Life Sci, Appl Ecol Res Grp, Cambridge, England.;Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Fac Environm Sci & Nat Resource Management, As, Norway..
    He, Tianhua
    Curtin Univ, Sch Mol & Life Sci, Perth, WA, Australia.;Murdoch Univ, Coll Sci Hlth Engn & Educ, Murdoch, WA, Australia..
    He, Pengcheng
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Heberling, Jacob Mason
    Carnegie Museum Nat Hist, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Helm, Aveliina
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Hempel, Stefan
    Free Univ Berlin, Inst Biol, Berlin, Germany.;Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res BBIB, Berlin, Germany..
    Hentschel, Joern
    Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Herbarium Haussknecht, Jena, Germany..
    Herault, Bruno
    Univ Montpellier, Cirad, Montpellier, France.;INP HB, Inst Natl Polytehcn Felix Houphouet Boigny, Yamoussoukro, Cote Ivoire..
    Heres, Ana-Maria
    Transilvania Univ Brasov, Dept Forest Sci, Brasov, Romania.;Univ Basque Country, BC3, Sci Campus, Leioa, Spain. Goethe Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Herz, Katharina
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol Geobot & Bot Garden, Halle, Germany..
    Heuertz, Myriam
    Univ Bordeaux, BIOGECO, INRAE, Cestas, France..
    Hickler, Thomas
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Frankfurt, Germany.;Univ Jaen, Dept Biol Anim Biol Vegetal & Ecol, Jaen, Spain.;World Agroforestry ICRAF, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Hietz, Peter
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci, Inst Bot, Vienna, Austria..
    Higuchi, Pedro
    Santa Catarina State Univ, Lages, SC, Brazil..
    Hipp, Andrew L.
    Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL USA.;Field Museum, Chicago, IL USA..
    Hirons, Andrew
    Univ Ctr Myerscough, Preston, Lancs, England..
    Hock, Maria
    Univ Kiel, Inst Ecosyst Res Geobot, Kiel, Germany..
    Hogan, James Aaron
    Florida Int Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Miami, FL 33199 USA.;US DOE, Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Oak Ridge, TN USA..
    Holl, Karen
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Honnay, Olivier
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Biol, Plant Conservat & Populat Biol, Leuven, Belgium.;Div Ecol Evolut & Biodivers Conservat, Heverlee, Belgium..
    Hornstein, Daniel
    Univ Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Hou, Enqing
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Hough-Snee, Nate
    Four Peaks Environm Sci & Data Solut, Wenatchee, WA USA..
    Hovstad, Knut Anders
    Norwegian Inst Bioecon Res NIBIO, Dept Landscape & Biodivers, As, Norway..
    Ichie, Tomoaki
    Kochi Univ, Nankoku, Kochi, Japan..
    Igic, Boris
    Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL USA..
    Illa, Estela
    Univ Barcelona, Biodivers Res Inst IRBio, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Barcelona, Spain..
    Isaac, Marney
    Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Ishihara, Masae
    Kyoto Univ, Field Sci Educ & Res Ctr, Ashiu Forest Res Stn, Kyoto, Japan..
    Ivanov, Leonid
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Inst Bot Garden, Ekaterinburg, Russia.;Tyumen State Univ, Tyumen, Russia..
    Ivanova, Larissa
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Inst Bot Garden, Ekaterinburg, Russia.;Tyumen State Univ, Tyumen, Russia..
    Iversen, Colleen M.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Oak Ridge, TN USA..
    Izquierdo, Jordi
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Barcelona Sch Agr Engn, Catalonia, Spain..
    Jackson, Robert B.
    Stanford Univ, Earth Syst Sci Dept, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Jackson, Benjamin
    Univ Edinburgh, Global Acad Agr & Food Secur, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Jactel, Herve
    Univ Bordeaux, BIOGECO, INRAE, Cestas, France..
    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M.
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Dendrol, Kornik, Poland.;Poznan Univ Life Sci, Fac Forestry, Dept Game Management & Forest Protect, Poznan, Poland..
    Jandt, Ute
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Geobot & Bot Garden, Halle, Germany..
    Jansen, Steven
    Ulm Univ, Inst Systemat Bot & Ecol, Ulm, Germany..
    Jenkins, Thomas
    Univ Oxford, Dept Zool, Oxford, England.;Rocky Mt Biol Labs, Crested Butte, CO USA..
    Jentsch, Anke
    Univ Bayreuth, Dept Disturbance Ecol, BayCEER, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Jespersen, Jens Rasmus Plantener
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Frederiksberg C, Denmark..
    Jiang, Guo-Feng
    Guangxi Univ, Guangxi Key Lab Forest Ecol & Conservat, Plant Ecophysiol & Evolut Grp, Coll Forestry, Nanning, Guangxi, Peoples R China.;Guangxi Univ, State Key Lab Conservat & Utilizat Subtrop Agrobi, Nanning, Peoples R China..
    Johansen, Jesper Liengaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Terr Ecol Sect, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Johnson, David
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Jokela, Eric J.
    Univ Florida, Sch Forest Resources & Conservat, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Joly, Carlos Alfredo
    State Univ Campinas UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil..
    Jordan, Gregory J.
    Univ Tasmania, Biol Sci, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    Joseph, Grant Stuart
    Univ Venda, Sch Math & Nat Sci, Dept Zool, Thohoyandou, South Africa.;Univ Cape Town, Percy Fitzpatrick Inst African Ornithol, DST NRF Ctr Excellence, Dept Biol Sci, Rondebosch, South Africa..
    Junaedi, Decky
    Indonesian Inst Sci LIPI, Cibodas Bot Garden, Cipanas, Indonesia.;Univ Melbourne, Sch Biosci, CEBRA, Parkville, Vic, Australia..
    Junker, Robert R.
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Dept Biol, Evolutionary Ecol Plants, Marburg, Germany.;Univ Salzburg, Dept Biosci, Salzburg, Austria..
    Justes, Eric
    CIRAD, PERSYST Dept, Montpellier 5, France..
    Kabzems, Richard
    BC Minist Forest Lands Nat Resource Operat & Rura, Dawson Creek, BC, Canada..
    Kane, Jeffrey
    Humboldt State Univ, Arcata, CA 95521 USA..
    Kaplan, Zdenek
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Dept Bot, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Kattenborn, Teja
    Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Inst Geog & Geoecol, Karlsruhe, Germany..
    Kavelenova, Lyudmila
    Samara Natl Res Univ, Samara, Russia..
    Kearsley, Elizabeth
    Univ Ghent, CAVElab Computat & Appl Vegetat Ecol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Kempel, Anne
    Inst Plant Sci, Bern, Switzerland..
    Kenzo, Tanaka
    Forestry & Forest Prod Res Inst, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    Kerkhoff, Andrew
    Kenyon Coll, Gambier, OH 43022 USA..
    Khalil, Mohammed I.
    Univ Garmian, Dept Biol, Kalar, Iraq.;Southern Illinois Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Carbondale, IL 62901 USA.;Southern Illinois Univ, Ctr Ecol, Carbondale, IL 62901 USA..
    Kinlock, Nicole L.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Kissling, Wilm Daniel
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kitajima, Kaoru
    Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Agr, Kyoto, Japan.;Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.;Curtin Univ, Sch Mol & Life Sci, Perth, WA, Australia..
    Kitzberger, Thomas
    Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Inst Invest Biodiversidad & Medioambiente INIBIOM, San Carlos De Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina.;Univ Nacl Comahue, Dept Ecol, San Carlos De Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina..
    Kjoller, Rasmus
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Klein, Tamir
    Weizmann Inst Sci, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Rehovot, Israel..
    Kleyer, Michael
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Landscape Ecol Grp, Oldenburg, Germany..
    Klimesova, Jitka
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Trebon, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Klipel, Joice
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Lab Ecol Vegetal LEVEG, Programa Posgrad Ecol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Kloeppel, Brian
    Western Carolina Univ, Dept Geosci & Nat Resources, Cullowhee, NC 28723 USA..
    Klotz, Stefan
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Community Ecol, Halle, Saale, Germany..
    Knops, Johannes M. H.
    Xian Jiaotong Liverpool Univ, Hlth & Environm Sci, Suzhou, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Kohyama, Takashi
    Hokkaido Univ, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan..
    Koike, Fumito
    Yokohama Natl Univ, Grad Sch Environm & Informat Sci, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Kollmann, Johannes
    Tech Univ Munich, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany..
    Komac, Benjamin
    Inst Estudis Andorrans, St Julia De Loria, Andorra..
    Komatsu, Kimberly
    Smithsonian Environm Res Ctr, POB 28, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA..
    Koenig, Christian
    Humboldt Univ, Dept Geog, Berlin, Germany.;Univ Goettingen, Biodivers Macroecol & Biogeog, Gottingen, Germany..
    Kraft, Nathan J. B.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Kramer, Koen
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Wageningen, Netherlands.;Land Life Co, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kreft, Holger
    Univ Goettingen, Biodivers Macroecol & Biogeog, Gottingen, Germany.;Univ Goettingen, Ctr Biodivers & Sustainable Land Use CBL, Gottingen, Germany..
    Kuehn, Ingolf
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Halle, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Halle, Germany..
    Kumarathunge, Dushan
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Coconut Res Inst Sri Lanka, Plant Physiol Div, Lunuwila, Sri Lanka..
    Kuppler, Jonas
    Ulm Univ, Inst Evolutionary Ecol & Conservat Genom, Ulm, Germany..
    Kurokawa, Hiroko
    Forestry & Forest Prod Res Inst, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    Kurosawa, Yoko
    Yamagata Univ, Yamagata, Japan..
    Kuyah, Shem
    Jomo Kenyatta Univ Agr & Technol JKUAT, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Laclau, Jean-Paul
    UMR Eco&Sols, CIRAD, Montpellier, France.;Univ Montpellier, INRA, CIRAD, IRD,SupAgro,Eco&Sols, Montpellier, France..
    Lafleur, Benoit
    Univ Quebec Abitibi Temiscamingue, Inst Rech Forets, Rouyn Noranda, PQ, Canada..
    Lallai, Erik
    Univ Cagliari, Bot Div, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Lamb, Eric
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Plant Sci, Saskatoon, SK, Canada..
    Lamprecht, Andrea
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Interdisciplinary Mt Res, GLORIA Coordinat, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Integrat Biol & Biodivers Res, Vienna, Austria..
    Larkin, Daniel J.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Fisheries Wildlife & Conservat Biol, St Paul, MN 55108 USA..
    Laughlin, Daniel
    Univ Wyoming, Bot Dept, Laramie, WY 82071 USA..
    Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann
    Univ Avignon, Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, IRD,IMBE, Marseille, France..
    le Maire, Guerric
    UMR Eco&Sols, CIRAD, Montpellier, France.;Univ Montpellier, INRA, CIRAD, IRD,SupAgro,Eco&Sols, Montpellier, France..
    le Roux, Peter C.
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Plant & Soil Sci, Pretoria, South Africa..
    le Roux, Elizabeth
    Nelson Mandela Univ, Port Elizabeth, South Africa..
    Lee, Tali
    Univ Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI 54701 USA..
    Lens, Frederic
    Nat Biodivers Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Lewis, Simon L.
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.;UCL, Dept Geog, London, England..
    Lhotsky, Barbara
    Jonah Ventures, Boulder, CO USA..
    Li, Yuanzhi
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Xine
    Yangzhou Univ, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Lichstein, Jeremy W.
    Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Liebergesell, Mario
    Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany..
    Lim, Jun Ying
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lin, Yan-Shih
    Macquarie Univ, N Ryde, NSW, Australia..
    Linares, Juan Carlos
    Univ Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain..
    Liu, Chunjiang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Agr & Biol, Shanghai, Peoples R China.;Natl Forestry & Grassland Adm, Shanghai Urban Forest Ecosyst Res Stn, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Daijun
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Liu, Udayangani
    Royal Bot Gardens, Richmond, W Sussex, England..
    Livingstone, Stuart
    Univ Toronto, Scarborough, ON, Canada..
    Llusia, Joan
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain..
    Lohbeck, Madelon
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Forest Ecol & Forest Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands.;World Agroforestry ICRAF, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Lopez-Garcia, Alvaro
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Biol, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Jaen, Dept Anim Biol Plant Biol & Ecol, Jaen, Spain..
    Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog, Water Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Lososova, Zdenka
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Bot & Zool, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Louault, Frederique
    INRA, UCA, VetAgro Sup, UMR Ecosyst Prairial, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Lukacs, Balazs A.
    DRI, MTA Ctr Ecol Res, Dept Tisza River Res, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Lukes, Petr
    Global Change Res Inst AR CR, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Luo, Yunjian
    Yangzhou Univ, Sch Hort & Plant Protect, Dept Ecol, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Res Ctr Ecoenvironm Sci, State Key Lab Urban & Reg Ecol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Lussu, Michele
    Univ Cagliari, Bot Div, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Ma, Siyan
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Pereira, Camilla Maciel Rabelo
    Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Univ Quebec Trois Rivieres, Trois Rivieres, PQ, Canada..
    Mack, Michelle
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Maire, Vincent
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Makela, Annikki
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Atmospher & Earth Syst Res INAR, Helsinki, Finland..
    Makinen, Harri
    Nat Resources Inst Finland, Espoo, Finland..
    Mendes Malhado, Ana Claudia
    Univ Fed Alagoas, Maceio, AL, Brazil..
    Mallik, Azim
    Lakehead Univ, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada..
    Manning, Peter
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Manzoni, Stefano
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden.;Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Marchetti, Zuleica
    Conicet Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.;Univ Nacl Litoral FICH UNL, Fac Ingn & Ciencias Hidr, Santa Fe, Argentina..
    Marchino, Luca
    CREA Res Ctr Forestry & Wood, Arezzo, Italy..
    Marcilio-Silva, Vinicius
    Univ Fed Parana, Thunder, PR, Brazil..
    Marcon, Eric
    Univ Guyane, Univ Antilles, CNRS, INRA,UMR EcoFoG,Agroparistech,Cirad, Kourou, French Guiana..
    Marignani, Michela
    Univ Cagliari, Bot Div, Dept Life & Environm Sci, Cagliari, Italy..
    Markesteijn, Lars
    Bangor Univ, Sch Nat Sci, Bangor, Gwynedd, Wales..
    Martin, Adam
    Univ Toronto Scarborough, Dept Phys & Environm Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Martinez-Garza, Cristina
    Univ Autonoma Estado Morelos, Ctr Invest Biodiversidad & Conservac, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico..
    Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi
    CREAF, Catalonia, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain..
    Maskova, Tereza
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Mason, Kelly
    Lancaster Environm Ctr, Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lancaster, England..
    Mason, Norman
    Manaaki Whenua Landcare Res, Hamilton, New Zealand..
    Massad, Tara Joy
    Gorongosa Natl Pk, Dept Sci Serv, Beira, Sofala Province, Mozambique..
    Masse, Jacynthe
    Inst Rech Biol Vegetale, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Mayrose, Itay
    Tel Aviv Univ, George S Wise Fac Life Sci, Sch Plant Sci & Food Secur, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    McCarthy, James
    Univ Queensland, Sch Biol Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.;CSIRO, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Manaaki Whenua Landcare Res, Lincoln, New Zealand..
    McCormack, M. Luke
    Morton Arboretum, Ctr Tree Sci, Lisle, IL USA..
    McCulloh, Katherine
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bot, Madison, WI USA..
    McFadden, Ian R.
    Univ Milan, Dipartimento Biosci, Milan, Italy.;Swiss Fed Inst Forest Snow & Landscape Res WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    McGill, Brian J.
    Univ Maine, Orono, ME USA..
    McPartland, Mara Y.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Geog Environm & Soc, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Medeiros, Juliana S.
    Holden Arboretum, Kirtland, OH USA..
    Medlyn, Belinda
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Meerts, Pierre
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium..
    Mehrabi, Zia
    Univ British Columbia, Inst Resources Environm & Sustainabil, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Meir, Patrick
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Melo, Felipe P. L.
    Univ Fed Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil..
    Mencuccini, Maurizio
    ICREA, Barcelona, Spain.;CREAF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Meredieu, Celine
    UEFP, INRA, Cestas, France..
    Messier, Julie
    Univ Waterloo, Dept Biol, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Meszaros, Ilona
    Univ Debrecen, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Metsaranta, Juha
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Northern Forestry Ctr, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Michaletz, Sean T.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Bot, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Biodivers Res Ctr, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Michelaki, Chrysanthi
    Univ Aegean, Dept Environm, Biodivers Conservat Lab, Mitilini, Greece..
    Migalina, Svetlana
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Inst Bot Garden, Ekaterinburg, Russia.;Tyumen State Univ, Tyumen, Russia..
    Milla, Ruben
    Tulipan S-N, Mostoles Madrid, Spain..
    Miller, Jesse E. D.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Biol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Minden, Vanessa
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Oldenburg, Germany.;Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Biol, Brussels, Belgium..
    Ming, Ray
    Univ Illinois, Urbana, IL USA..
    Mokany, Karel
    CSIRO, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Moles, Angela T.
    UNSW Sydney, Evolut & Ecol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Sydney, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Molnar, Attila, V
    Univ Debrecen, Dept Bot, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Molofsky, Jane
    Univ Vermont, Burlington, VT USA..
    Molz, Martin
    Fundacao Zoobot Rio Grande Sul, Porto, Brazil..
    Montgomery, Rebecca A.
    Univ Minnesota, St Paul, MN USA..
    Monty, Arnaud
    Univ Liege, Gembloux Agrobio Tech Biodivers & Landscape, Liege, Belgium..
    Moravcova, Lenka
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Dept Invas Ecol, Pruhonice, Czech Republic..
    Moreno-Martinez, Alvaro
    Univ Montana, Coll Forestry & Conservat, NTSG, Missoula, MT 59812 USA..
    Moretti, Marco
    Swiss Fed Inst Forest Snow & Landscape Res WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland..
    Mori, Akira S.
    Yokohama Natl Univ, Grad Sch Environm & Informat Sci, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan..
    Mori, Shigeta
    Yamagata Univ, Yamagata, Japan..
    Morris, Dave
    Ontario Minist Nat Resources & Forestry, Ctr Northern Forest Ecosyst Res, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada..
    Morrison, Jane
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Castelldefels, Spain..
    Mucina, Ladislav
    Murdoch Univ, Harry Butler Inst, Perth, WA, Australia.;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Geog & Environm Studies, Stellenbosch, South Africa..
    Mueller, Sandra
    Univ Freiburg, Fac Biol, Geobot, Freiburg, Germany..
    Muir, Christopher D.
    Univ Hawaii, Dept Bot, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Mueller, Sandra Cristina
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Programa Posgrad Ecol, Dept Ecol, Lab Ecol Vegetal, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Munoz, Francois
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, Lab Ecol Alpine, Grenoble 9, France..
    Myers-Smith, Isla H.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Myster, Randall W.
    Oklahoma State Univ, Biol Dept, Oklahoma City, OK USA..
    Nagano, Masahiro
    Osaka City Univ, Osaka, Japan..
    Naidu, Shawna
    Univ Illinois, Urbana, IL USA..
    Narayanan, Ayyappan
    French Inst Pondicherry, Dept Ecol, Pondicherry, India..
    Natesan, Balachandran
    French Inst Pondicherry, Dept Ecol, Pondicherry, India..
    Negoita, Luka
    Charles Darwin Fdn, Charles Darwin Res Stn, Galapagos Verde 2050, Galapagos, Ecuador..
    Nelson, Andrew S.
    Univ Idaho, Forest Rangeland & Fire Sci Dept, Moscow, ID 83843 USA..
    Neuschulz, Eike Lena
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Ni, Jian
    Zhejiang Normal Univ, Coll Chem & Life Sci, Jinhua, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Niedrist, Georg
    Eurac Res, Inst Alpine Environm, Bozen Bolzano, Italy..
    Nieto, Jhon
    Inst Invest Recursos Biol Alexander von Humboldt, Bogota, Colombia.;Univ Dist Francisco Jose de Caldas, Bogota, Colombia..
    Niinemets, Ulo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Nolan, Rachael
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Nottebrock, Henning
    Univ Bayreuth, Plant Ecol, Bayreuth, Germany..
    Nouvellon, Yann
    UMR Eco&Sols, CIRAD, Montpellier, France.;Univ Montpellier, INRA, CIRAD, IRD,SupAgro,Eco&Sols, Montpellier, France..
    Novakovskiy, Alexander
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Komi Sci Ctr, Inst Biol, Syktyvkar, Russia..
    Nystuen, Kristin Odden
    NORD Univ, Fac Biosci & Aquaculture, Steinkjer, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    O'Grady, Anthony
    CSIRO Land & Water, Hobart, Tas, Australia..
    O'Hara, Kevin
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    O'Reilly-Nugent, Andrew
    Univ Canberra, Inst Appl Ecol, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Oakley, Simon
    Lancaster Environm Ctr, Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lancaster, England..
    Oberhuber, Walter
    Univ Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria..
    Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki
    Gifu Univ, River Basin Res Ctr, Gifu, Gifu, Japan..
    Oliveira, Ricardo
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Bot, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Ollerer, Kinga
    Romanian Acad, Inst Biol Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania.;MTA Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Ecol & Bot, Vacratot, Hungary..
    Olson, Mark E.
    Inst Biol, Tercer Circuito S-N,Ciudad Univ, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.;Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Coyoacan, Mexico..
    Onipchenko, Vladimir
    Moscow Lomonosov State Univ, Fac Biol, Dept Ecol & Plant Geog, Moscow, Russia..
    Onoda, Yusuke
    Kyoto Univ, Kyoto, Japan..
    Onstein, Renske E.
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany..
    Ordonez, Jenny C.
    Univ Amer, Fac Ingn Agroind, Quito, Ecuador..
    Osada, Noriyuki
    Meijo Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Ostonen, Ivika
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Ottaviani, Gianluigi
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Trebon, Czech Republic..
    Otto, Sarah
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Overbeck, Gerhard E.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Ozinga, Wim A.
    Wageningen Environm Res, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Pahl, Anna T.
    Tech Univ Munich, Restorat Ecol, Munich, Germany..
    Paine, C. E. Timothy
    Univers New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia..
    Pakeman, Robin J.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Papageorgiou, Aristotelis C.
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Dept Mol Biol & Genet, Alexandroupolis, Greece..
    Parfionova, Evgeniya
    Samara Natl Res Univ, Samara, Russia..
    Paertel, Meelis
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Patacca, Marco
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Paula, Susana
    Univ Austral Chile, Inst Ciencias Ambientales & Evolut, Valdivia, Chile..
    Paule, Juraj
    Senckenberg Res Inst, Dept Bot & Mol Evolut, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Pauli, Harald
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Interdisciplinary Mt Res, GLORIA Coordinat, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Integrat Biol & Biodivers Res, Vienna, Austria..
    Pausas, Juli G.
    CSIC, Desertificat Res Ctr CIDE, Valencia, Spain..
    Peco, Begona
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, CIBC, Dept Ecol, Madrid, Spain..
    Penuelas, Josep
    CREAF, Catalonia, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Barcelona, CSIC, Global Ecol Unit CREAF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Perea, Antonio
    Univ Jaen, Jaen, Spain..
    Luis Peri, Pablo
    INTA, Rio Gallegos, Santa Cruz, Argentina.;UNPA, CONICET, Rio Gallegos, Argentina..
    Petisco-Souza, Ana Carolina
    Univ Fed Parana, Posgrad Ecol & Conservacao, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Petraglia, Alessandro
    Univ Parma, Dept Chem Life Sci & Environm Sustainabil, Parma, Italy..
    Petritan, Any Mary
    Natl Inst Res Dev Forestry, Voluntari, Romania..
    Phillips, Oliver L.
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England..
    Pierce, Simon
    Univ Milan, Dept Agr & Environm Sci DiSAA, Milan, Italy..
    Pillar, Valerio D.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Dept Ecol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Pisek, Jan
    Univ Tartu, Tartu Observ, Tartumaa, Estonia..
    Pomogaybin, Alexandr
    Samara Univ, Samara, Russia..
    Poorter, Hendrik
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Plant Sci IBG2, Julich, Germany..
    Portsmuth, Angelika
    Tallinn Univ, Inst Ecol, Tallinn, Estonia..
    Poschlod, Peter
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Plant Sci, Ecol & Conservat Biol, Regensburg, Germany..
    Potvin, Catherine
    McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Pounds, Devon
    Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL USA..
    Powell, A. Shafer
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Div Environm Sci, POB 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Climate Change Sci Inst, Oak Ridge, TN USA..
    Power, Sally A.
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Prinzing, Andreas
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, Res Unit ECOBIO Ecosyst, Biodiversite,Evolut, Rennes, France..
    Puglielli, Giacomo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Pysek, Petr
    Czech Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Dept Invas Ecol, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Sci, Dept Ecol, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Raevel, Valerie
    Univ Montpellier, INRA, CNRS, AMAP,CIRAD,IRD, Montpellier, France.;French Inst Pondicherry, Pondicherry, India.;Univ Montpellier 3, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, CEFE,EPHE, Montpellier, France..
    Rammig, Anja
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Life Sci Weihenstephan, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany..
    Ransijn, Johannes
    Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Univ Quebec Trois Rivieres, Trois Rivieres, PQ, Canada..
    Ray, Courtenay A.
    Rocky Mt Biol Labs, Crested Butte, CO USA.;Arizona State Univ, Sch Life Sci, Tempe, AZ USA..
    Reich, Peter B.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Forest Resources, St Paul, MN USA.;Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Reichstein, Markus
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Reid, Douglas E. B.
    Ontario Minist Nat Resources & Forestry, Ctr Northern Forest Ecosyst Res, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada..
    Rejou-Mechain, Maxime
    Univ Montpellier, INRA, CNRS, AMAP,CIRAD,IRD, Montpellier, France..
    Resco de Dios, Victor
    Southwest Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Life Sci & Engn, Mianyang, Sichuan, Peoples R China.;Univ Lleida, Dept Crop & Forest Sci, Lleida, Spain.;Univ Lleida, Agrotecnio Ctr, Lleida, Spain..
    Ribeiro, Sabina
    Univ Fed Acre, Rio Branco, AC, Brazil..
    Richardson, Sarah
    Manaaki Whenua Landcare Res, Lincoln, New Zealand..
    Riibak, Kersti
    Univ Tartu, Tartu, Estonia..
    Rillig, Matthias C.
    Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res BBIB, Berlin, Germany.;Free Univ Berlin, Berlin, Germany..
    Riviera, Fiamma
    Univ Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia..
    Robert, Elisabeth M. R.
    Ctr Ecol Res & Forestry Applicat CREAF, Cerdanyola Del Valles, Spain.;Vrije Univ Brussel, Ecol & Biodivers, Brussels, Belgium.;RMCA, Lab Wood Biol & Xylarium, Tervuren, Belgium..
    Roberts, Scott
    Mississippi State Univ, Dept Forestry, Starkville, MS USA..
    Robroek, Bjorn
    Univ Southampton, Sch Biol Sci, Southampton, Hants, England.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Roddy, Adam
    Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06511 USA..
    Rodrigues, Arthur Vinicius
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Programa Posgrad Ecol, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Rogers, Alistair
    Brookhaven Natl Lab, Environm & Climate Sci Dept, Upton, NY 11973 USA..
    Rollinson, Emily
    East Stroudsburg Univ, Dept Biol Sci, East Stroudsburg, PA USA..
    Rolo, Victor
    Univ Extremadura, INDEHESA, Forest Res Grp, Plasencia, Spain..
    Roemermann, Christine
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Jena, Germany..
    Ronzhina, Dina
    Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Inst Bot Garden, Ekaterinburg, Russia.;Tyumen State Univ, Tyumen, Russia..
    Roscher, Christiane
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Physiol Divers, Leipzig, Germany..
    Rosell, Julieta A.
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Inst Ecol, Lab Nacl Ciencias Sostenibilidad, Ciudad Univ, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Rosenfield, Milena Fermina
    Univ Guelph, Sch Environm Sci, Guelph, ON, Canada..
    Rossi, Christian
    Univ Zurich, Dept Geog, Remote Sensing Labs, Zurich, Switzerland.;Swiss Fed Inst Forest Snow & Landscape Res WSL, Res Unit Community Ecol, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.;Swiss Natl Pk, Dept Res & Geoinformat, Chaste Planta Wildenberg, Zernez, Switzerland..
    Roy, David B.
    CEH, Wallingford, Oxon, England..
    Royer-Tardif, Samuel
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Rueger, Nadja
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama..
    Ruiz-Peinado, Ricardo
    CIFOR, INIA, Dept Dinam & Gest Forestal, Madrid, Spain.;Univ Valladolid, INIA, Sustainable Forest Management Res Inst, Madrid, Spain..
    Rumpf, Sabine B.
    Univ Vienna, Dept Bot & Biodivers Res, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Lausanne, Dept Ecol & Evolut, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Rusch, Graciela M.
    Norwegian Inst Nat Res, Trondheim, Norway..
    Ryo, Masahiro
    Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res BBIB, Berlin, Germany.;Free Univ Berlin, Berlin, Germany..
    Sack, Lawren
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Saldana, Angela
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Coyoacan, Mexico..
    Salgado-Negret, Beatriz
    Univ Nacl Colombia, Dept Biol, Bogota, Colombia..
    Salguero-Gomez, Roberto
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England..
    Santa-Regina, Ignacio
    CSIC, Inst Recursos Nat & Agrobiol Salamanca IRNASA, Salamanca, Spain..
    Carolina Santacruz-Garcia, Ana
    Conicet Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.;Univ Nacl Santiago del Estero, Fac Ciencias Forestales, Santiago Del Estero, Argentina..
    Santos, Joaquim
    Univ Coimbra, Dept Ciencias Vida, Ctr Funct Ecol, Coimbra, Portugal..
    Sardans, Jordi
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, CSIC, Global Ecol Unit CREAF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Schamp, Brandon
    Algoma Univ, Sault Ste Marie, ON, Canada..
    Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael
    Univ Freiburg, Fac Biol, Geobot, Freiburg, Germany..
    Schleuning, Matthias
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Schmid, Bernhard
    Univ Zurich, Dept Geog, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Schmidt, Marco
    Senckenberg Biodiversitat & Klima Forschungszentr, Frankfurt, Germany.;Palmengarten Stadt Frankfurt Main, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Schmitt, Sylvain
    Univ Bordeaux, BIOGECO, INRAE, Cestas, France..
    Schneider, Julio V.
    Senckenberg Res Inst, Dept Bot & Mol Evolut, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany.;Senckenberg Res Inst, Entomol 3, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Schowanek, Simon D.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Sect Ecoinformat & Biodivers, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Ctr Biodivers Dynam Changing World BIOCHANGE, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Schrader, Julian
    Univ Goettingen, Biodivers Macroecol & Biogeog, Gottingen, Germany..
    Schrodt, Franziska
    Univ Nottingham, Sch Geog, Nottingham, England..
    Schuldt, Bernhard
    Univ Wurzburg, Chair Ecophysiol & Vegetat Ecol, Julius von Sachs Inst Biol Sci, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Schurr, Frank
    Univ Hohenheim, Inst Landscape & Plant Ecol, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Selaya Garvizu, Galia
    Herencia, Santa Cruz, Bolivia..
    Semchenko, Marina
    Univ Manchester, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Seymour, Colleen
    South African Natl Biodivers Inst, Pretoria, South Africa..
    Sfair, Julia C.
    Univ Fed Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil..
    Sharpe, Joanne M.
    Sharplex Serv, Edgecomb, ME USA..
    Sheppard, Christine S.
    Univ Hohenheim, Inst Landscape & Plant Ecol, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Sheremetiev, Serge
    RAS, Komarov Bot Inst, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Shiodera, Satomi
    Res Inst Human & Nat, Kyoto, Japan.;Kyoto Univ, Ctr Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto, Japan..
    Shipley, Bill
    Univ Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada..
    Shovon, Tanvir Ahmed
    Univ Regina, Dept Biol, Regina, SK, Canada..
    Siebenkaes, Alrun
    Tech Univ Ilmenau, Ilmenau, Germany..
    Carlos, Sierra
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Silva, Vasco
    Univ Lisbon, Sch Agr, Ctr Appl Ecol Prof Baeta Neves CEABN, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Silva, Mateus
    Univ Fed Lavras, Dept Biol, Lavras, MG, Brazil..
    Sitzia, Tommaso
    Univ Padua, Dept Land Environm Agr & Forestry, Padua, Italy..
    Sjoman, Henrik
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Landscape Architecture Planning & Management, Alnarp, Sweden.;Gothenburg Bot Garden, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Slot, Martijn
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama..
    Smith, Nicholas G.
    Texas Tech Univ, Lubbock, TX 79409 USA..
    Sodhi, Darwin
    Univ British Columbia, Fac Forestry & Conservat Sci, Forest Sci Ctr, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Soltis, Pamela
    Univ Florida, Florida Museum Nat Hist, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Soltis, Douglas
    Univ Florida, Florida Museum Nat Hist, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Somers, Ben
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Leuven, Belgium..
    Sonnier, Gregory
    Archbold Biol Stn, Venus, FL USA..
    Sorensen, Mia Vedel
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Trondheim, Norway..
    Sosinski, Enio Egon, Jr.
    Embrapa Recursos Genet & Biotecnol, Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.
    Leiden Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Souza, Alexandre F.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Dept Ecol, Natal, RN, Brazil..
    Spasojevic, Marko
    Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Ecol Evolut & Organismal Biol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA..
    Sperandii, Marta Gaia
    Univ Roma Tre, Rome, Italy..
    Stan, Amanda B.
    No Arizona Univ, Dept Geog Planning & Recreat, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Stegen, James
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab, Richland, WA 99352 USA..
    Steinbauer, Klaus
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Austrian Acad Sci, Inst Interdisciplinary Mt Res, GLORIA Coordinat, Vienna, Austria.;Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Integrat Biol & Biodivers Res, Vienna, Austria..
    Stephan, Jorg G.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sterck, Frank
    Wageningen Univ, Forest Ecol & Forest Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Stojanovic, Dejan B.
    Univ Novi Sad, Inst Lowland Forestry & Environm, Novi Sad, Serbia..
    Strydom, Tanya
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laura Suarez, Maria
    Univ Nacl Comahue, CONICET, Inst Invest Biodiversidad & Medioambiente, San Carlos De Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentina..
    Svenning, Jens-Christian
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Sect Ecoinformat & Biodivers, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Ctr Biodivers Dynam Changing World BIOCHANGE, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Svitkova, Ivana
    Slovak Acad Sci, Plant Sci & Biodivers Ctr, Inst Bot, Bratislava, Slovakia..
    Svitok, Marek
    Tech Univ Zvolen, Fac Ecol & Environm Sci, Dept Ecol & Gen Biol, Zvolen, Slovakia.;Univ South Bohemia, Fac Sci, Dept Ecosyst Biol, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic..
    Svoboda, Miroslav
    Czech Univ Life Sci, Fac Forestry & Wood Sci, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Swaine, Emily
    Univ Aberdeen, Sch Biol Sci, Aberdeen, Scotland..
    Swenson, Nathan
    Univ Maryland, Dept Biol, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Tabarelli, Marcelo
    Univ Fed Pernambuco, Dept Bot, Recife, PE, Brazil..
    Takagi, Kentaro
    Hokkaido Univ, Teshio Expt Forest, Horonobe, Japan..
    Tappeiner, Ulrike
    Univ Innsbruck, Dept Ecol, Innsbruck, Austria.;Eurac Res, Inst Alpine Environm, Bozen Bolzano, Italy..
    Tarifa, Ruben
    CSIC, Estn Expt Zonas Aridas, Dept Ecol Func & Evolut, La Canada De San Urbano, Spain..
    Tauugourdeau, Simon
    Univ Montpellier, INRA, CIRAD, SELMET, Montpellier Supagro, France.;PZZS, SELMET, UMR, CIRAD, Dakar, Senegal..
    Tavsanoglu, Cagatay
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Biol, Ankara, Turkey..
    te Beest, Mariska
    Univ Utrecht, Copernicus Inst Sustainable Dev, Environm Sci, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Nelson Mandela Univ, Ctr African Conservat Ecol, Port Elizabeth, South Africa..
    Tedersoo, Leho
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Thiffault, Nelson
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Wood Fibre Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada..
    Thom, Dominik
    Univ Vermont, Rubenstein Sch Environm & Nat Resources, Burlington, VT USA..
    Thomas, Evert
    Biovers Int, Lima, Peru..
    Thompson, Ken
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Thornton, Peter E.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Oak Ridge, TN USA..
    Thuiller, Wilfried
    Univ Savoie Mt Blanc, Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LECA, Grenoble, France..
    Tichy, Lubomir
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Bot & Zool, Brno, Czech Republic..
    Tissue, David
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tjoelker, Mark G.
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Tng, David Yue Phin
    Sch Field Studies, Ctr Rainforest Studies, Yungaburra, Qld, Australia..
    Tobias, Joseph
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Life Sci, Silwood Pk, Ascot, Berks, England..
    Torok, Peter
    MTA DE Lendulet Funct & Restorat Ecol Res Grp, Debrecen, Hungary.;Univ Debrecen, Dept Ecol, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Tarin, Tonantzin
    Univ Delaware, Dept Soil & Plant Sci, Newark, DE USA..
    Torres-Ruiz, Jose M.
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, INRA, UMR, PIAF, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Tothmeresz, Bela
    MTA TKI Biodivers & Ecosyst Serv Res Grp, Debrecen, Hungary..
    Treurnicht, Martina
    SAEON Fynbos Node, Claremont, South Africa.;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Matieland, South Africa..
    Trivellone, Valeria
    Univ Illinois, Prairie Res Inst, Illinois Nat Hist Survey, Champaign, IL 61820 USA..
    Trolliet, Franck
    Univ Liege, SPHERES, Unit Modelling Climate & Biogeochem Cycles, UR, Liege, Belgium..
    Trotsiuk, Volodymyr
    Swiss Fed Inst Forest Snow & Landscape Res WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.;Czech Univ Life Sci, Fac Forestry & Wood Sci, Prague, Czech Republic.;Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Dept Environm Syst Sci, Inst Agr Sci, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Tsakalos, James L.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Crawley, WA, Australia..
    Tsiripidis, Ioannis
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Bot, Sch Biol, Thessaloniki, Greece..
    Tysklind, Niklas
    Univ Guyane, Univ Antilles, INRA, CIRAD,UMR,EcoFoG,Agroparistech,CNRS, Kourou, France..
    Umehara, Toru
    Osaka Nat Hist Ctr, Osaka, Japan..
    Usoltsev, Vladimir
    Ural State Forest Engn Univ, Ekaterinburg, Russia.;Russian Acad Sci, Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg, Russia..
    Vadeboncoeur, Matthew
    Univ New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA..
    Vaezi, Jamil
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Mashhad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran..
    Valladares, Fernando
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Madrid, Spain..
    Vamosi, Jana
    Univ Calgary, Dept Biol Sci, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    van Bodegom, Peter M.
    Leiden Univ, Inst Environm Sci, Leiden, Netherlands..
    van Breugel, Michiel
    Yale Univ, Coll Environm Studies, New Haven, CT USA.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Biol Sci, Singapore, Singapore.;Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Panama City, Panama..
    Van Cleemput, Elisa
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Leuven, Belgium..
    van de Weg, Martine
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    van der Merwe, Stephni
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Biol Sci, Cape Town, South Africa..
    van der Plas, Fons
    Univ Leipzig, Inst Biol, Systemat Bot & Funct Biodivers, Leipzig, Germany..
    van der Sande, Masha T.
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Wageningen Univ & Res, Forest Ecol & Forest Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands.;Florida Inst Technol, Inst Global Ecol, Melbourne, FL 32901 USA..
    van Kleunen, Mark
    Univ Konstanz, Dept Biol, Constance, Germany.;Taizhou Univ, Zhejiang Prov Key Lab Plant Evolutionary Ecol & C, Taizhou, Peoples R China..
    Van Meerbeek, Koenraad
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Leuven, Belgium..
    Vanderwel, Mark
    Univ Regina, Dept Biol, Regina, SK, Canada..
    Vanselow, Kim Andre
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Geog, Erlangen, Germany..
    Varhammar, Angelica
    Western Sydney Univ, Hawkesbury Inst Environm, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Varone, Laura
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Environm Biol, Rome, Italy..
    Vasquez Valderrama, Maribel Yesenia
    Univ Dist Francisco Jose de Caldas, Bogota, Colombia.;Univ Concepcion, Lab Invas Biol, Concepcion, Chile..
    Vassilev, Kiril
    Bulgarian Acad Sci, Inst Biodivers & Ecosyst Res, Sofia, Bulgaria..
    Vellend, Mark
    Univ Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada..
    Veneklaas, Erik J.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Crawley, WA, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Agr & Environm, Crawley, WA, Australia..
    Verbeeck, Hans
    Univ Ghent, CAVElab Computat & Appl Vegetat Ecol, Ghent, Belgium..
    Verheyen, Kris
    Univ Ghent, Forest & Nat Lab, Dept Environm, Gontrode Melle, Belgium..
    Vibrans, Alexander
    Univ Reg Blumenau, Blumenau, SC, Brazil..
    Vieira, Ima
    Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem, PA, Brazil..
    Villacis, Jaime
    Univ Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Dept Ciencias Vida, Sangolqui, Ecuador..
    Violle, Cyrille
    Univ Montpellier 3, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE,IRD,CEFE,UMR 5175, Montpellier, France..
    Vivek, Pandi
    Goa Univ, Dept Bot, Taleigao, Goa, India.;Pondicherry Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Pondicherry, India..
    Wagner, Katrin
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany..
    Waldram, Matthew
    Univ Leicester, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Leicester, Leics, England..
    Waldron, Anthony
    Univ Oxford, Edward Grey Inst, Zool Dept, Oxford, England.;Univ Cambridge, Cambridge Conservat Initiat, Dept Zool, Cambridge, England..
    Walker, Anthony P.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Div Environm Sci, POB 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Climate Change Sci Inst, Oak Ridge, TN USA..
    Waller, Martyn
    Kingston Univ, Dept Geog & Geol, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, England..
    Walther, Gabriel
    Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Inst Ecol & Evolut, Jena, Germany..
    Wang, Han
    Tsinghua Univ, Dept Earth Syst Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Earth Syst Modeling, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Feng
    Chinese Acad Forestry, Inst Desertificat Studies, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Weiqi
    Fujian Normal Univ, Inst Geog, Fuzhou, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Watkins, Harry
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Landscape Architecture, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Watkins, James
    Colgate Univ, Dept Biol, Hamilton, NY 13346 USA..
    Weber, Ulrich
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Weedon, James T.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Ecol Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wei, Liping
    Univ Quebec Abitibi Temiscamingue, Inst Rech Forets, Rouyn Noranda, PQ, Canada..
    Weigelt, Patrick
    Univ Goettingen, Biodivers Macroecol & Biogeog, Gottingen, Germany..
    Weiher, Evan
    Univ Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI 54701 USA..
    Wells, Aidan W.
    Rocky Mt Biol Labs, Crested Butte, CO USA.;Maritime & Sci Technol Acad, Miami, FL USA..
    Wellstein, Camilla
    Free Univ Bozen Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy..
    Wenk, Elizabeth
    UNSW Sydney, Evolut & Ecol Res Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;UNSW Sydney, Sch Biol Earth & Environm Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Westoby, Mark
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Westwood, Alana
    Univ Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    White, Philip John
    James Hutton Inst, Dundee, Scotland.;King Saud Univ, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Whitten, Mark
    Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL USA..
    Williams, Mathew
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Geosci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Winkler, Daniel E.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Irvine, CA USA.;US Geol Survey, Southwest Biol Sci Ctr, Moab, UT USA..
    Winter, Klaus
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama..
    Womack, Chevonne
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Plant & Soil Sci, Pretoria, South Africa..
    Wright, Ian J.
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Wright, S. Joseph
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama..
    Wright, Justin
    Duke Univ, Dept Biol, Durham, NC USA..
    Pinho, Bruno X.
    Univ Fed Pernambuco, Dept Bot, Recife, PE, Brazil..
    Ximenes, Fabiano
    NSW Dept Primary Ind, Parramatta, NSW, Australia..
    Yamada, Toshihiro
    Hiroshima Univ, Higashihiroshima, Japan..
    Yamaji, Keiko
    Univ Tsukuba, Grad Sch Life & Environm Sci, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    Yanai, Ruth
    SUNY Coll Environm Sci & Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210 USA..
    Yankov, Nikolay
    Samara Univ, Samara, Russia..
    Yguel, Benjamin
    Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, Museum Natl Hist Nat, Ctr Ecol & Sci Conservat CESCO, Paris, France..
    Zanini, Katia Janaina
    Lab Ecol Vegetal LEVEG, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Zanne, Amy E.
    George Washington Univ, Biol Sci, Washington, DC USA..
    Zeleny, David
    Natl Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Zhao, Yun-Peng
    Zhejiang Univ, Coll Life Sci, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, Jingming
    Beijing Forestry Univ, Forestry Coll, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, Ji
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Agr & Biol, Shanghai, Peoples R China.;Natl Forestry & Grassland Adm, Shanghai Urban Forest Ecosyst Res Stn, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Zieminska, Kasia
    Imperial Coll, London, England..
    Zirbel, Chad R.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, St Paul, MN 55108 USA..
    Zizka, Georg
    Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Dept Biol Sci, Frankfurt, Germany.;Senckenberg Res Inst, Dept Bot & Mol Evolut, Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Zo-Bi, Irie Casimir
    Inst Natl Polytech Felix Houphouet Boigny INP HB, Yamoussoukro, Cote Ivoire..
    Zotz, Gerhard
    Smithsonian Trop Res Inst, Balboa, Ancon, Panama.;Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Oldenburg, Germany..
    Wirth, Christian
    Max Planck Inst Biogeochem, Hans Knoll Str 10, D-07745 Jena, Germany.;German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Leipzig, Germany.;Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany..
    TRY plant trait database - enhanced coverage and open access2020In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 119-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant traits-the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants-determine how plants respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, and influence ecosystem properties and their benefits and detriments to people. Plant trait data thus represent the basis for a vast area of research spanning from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology, to biodiversity conservation, ecosystem and landscape management, restoration, biogeography and earth system modelling. Since its foundation in 2007, the TRY database of plant traits has grown continuously. It now provides unprecedented data coverage under an open access data policy and is the main plant trait database used by the research community worldwide. Increasingly, the TRY database also supports new frontiers of trait-based plant research, including the identification of data gaps and the subsequent mobilization or measurement of new data. To support this development, in this article we evaluate the extent of the trait data compiled in TRY and analyse emerging patterns of data coverage and representativeness. Best species coverage is achieved for categorical traits-almost complete coverage for 'plant growth form'. However, most traits relevant for ecology and vegetation modelling are characterized by continuous intraspecific variation and trait-environmental relationships. These traits have to be measured on individual plants in their respective environment. Despite unprecedented data coverage, we observe a humbling lack of completeness and representativeness of these continuous traits in many aspects. We, therefore, conclude that reducing data gaps and biases in the TRY database remains a key challenge and requires a coordinated approach to data mobilization and trait measurements. This can only be achieved in collaboration with other initiatives.

  • 319.
    Kilstadius, Margaretha
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Defining contagion literacy: a Delphi study2017In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 39, no 16, p. 2261-2282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the background of climate change, which enables infectious diseases to move their frontiers and the increasing global mobility, which make people more exposed to contagion, we as citizens need to relate to this new scenario. A greater number of infectious diseases may also potentially lead to an increased need to use antibiotics and anti-parasitic substances. In view of this, the aim of this study was to identify the health literacy needed in the contemporary world and specify what should be taught in compulsory school. We present the findings of a Delphi study, performed in Sweden, regarding the opinions on contagion among experts in the field. We used Nutbeam's framework of health literacy and related it to Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives in order to analyse and categorise the experts' responses, which were categorised into six main content themes: contagions, transmission routes, sexually transmitted diseases, hygiene, vaccinations and use of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. These themes were then divided into the three levels of Nutbeam's framework: functional health literacy, which is about knowledge and understanding, interactive health literacy, which is about developing personal qualities and skills that promote health, and critical health literacy, which is about social and cognitive skills related to analysis and critical reflection. The implications for communication and education are then discussed and what should be taught in compulsory school is identified.

  • 320.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Hellström, Gustav
    Umeå University.
    Fahlman, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Jonsson, Micael
    Umeå University.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå university.
    Lagesson, Annelie
    Umeå University.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Brodin, Tomas
    Umeå University.
    Drug-Induced Behavioral Changes: Using Laboratory Observations to Predict Field Observations2016In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 4, no 81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Behavioral assays constitute important research tools when assessing how fish respond to environmental change. However, it is unclear how behavioral modifications recorded in laboratory assays are expressed in natural ecosystems, a limitation that makes it difficult to evaluate the predictive power of laboratory-based measurements. In this study, we hypothesized that exposure to a benzodiazepine (i.e., oxazepam) increases boldness and activity in laboratory assays as well as in field assays—that is, laboratory results can be used to predict field results. Moreover, we expected the modified behavior to affect other important ecological measures such as habitat selection and home range. To test our hypothesis, we exposed European perch (Perca fluviatilis) to oxazepam and measured subsequent changes in behavioral trials both in laboratory assays and in a lake ecosystem populated with a predatory fish species, pike (Esox lucius). In the lake, the positions of both perch and pike were tracked every 3 min for a month using acoustic telemetry. In the laboratory assay, the oxazepam-exposed perch were bolder and more active than the non-exposed perch. In the lake assay, the oxazepam-exposed perch were also more bold and active, had a larger home range, and used pelagic habitats more than the non-exposed perch. We conclude that ecotoxicological behavioral assays are useful for predicting the effects of exposure in natural systems. However, although individual responses to exposure were similar in both the laboratory and field trials, effects were more obvious in the field study, mainly due to reduced variability in the behavioral measures from the lake. Hence, short-term behavioral assays may fail to detect all the effects expressed in natural environments. Nevertheless, our study clearly demonstrates that behavioral modifications observed in laboratory settings can be used to predict how fish perform in aquatic ecosystems.

  • 321.
    Klinger, Yves P.
    et al.
    Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Harvolk-Schöning, Sarah
    Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Hansen, Wiebke
    Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Otte, Annette
    Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Ludewig, Kristin
    Liebig University Giessen, Germany.
    Applying landscape structure analysis to assess the spatio-temporal distribution of an invasive legume in the Rhön UNESCO Biosphere Reserve2019In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 2735-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landscape composition and structure may strongly affect the spread of invasive species in landscapes. Landscape analysis provides a powerful toolset for assessing invasive species invasions over time and for planning control measures. We applied a combination of aerial mapping and landscape analysis to assess the invasion of the legume, Lupinus polyphyllus, in the Rhön UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. The Biosphere Reserve contains different types of large and well-connected grasslands threatened by lupine invasion. We assessed the changes in lupine distribution between 1998 and 2016 in a strictly protected part of the Biosphere Reserve by means of landscape structure analysis. The area invaded by L. polyphyllus doubled from 1998 to 2016. While the number of lupine stands decreased by 25%, stand size on average increased by 300%; stands also became less compact during that period. Furthermore, the degree of invasion of different grassland types changed. In 1998, all investigated grassland types were invaded to equal extents, whereas in 2016, large and well-connected mesic grasslands located close to roads were more heavily invaded than small and remote wet grasslands. Our results show that landscape composition plays an important role for the spread of lupine. Specifically, invasive stand characteristics, such as stand size, form, and connectivity, are crucial for driving the invasion of lupine. Therefore, in addition to landscape composition, invasive stand characteristics should be included in the planning of conservation measures. Overall, aerial mapping combined with landscape analysis provides a cost-effective and practical tool for landscape managers to prioritize invasive control measures.

  • 322.
    Koivisto, Jenni
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science.
    Navigating in the Midst of Uncertainties: Challenges in Disaster Risk Governance in Mozambique2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters cause heavy losses for societies and may quickly erode any development efforts. Consequently, disaster risk reduction (DRR) is an integral part of development work that should be addressed at multiple levels. Global DRR frameworks, scholars and practitioners all advocate disaster risk governance (DRG) strategies that are multi-stakeholder, polycentric and multisectoral. While various substantive knowledge gaps and questions arising from multiple risks and the crosscutting nature of DRR have been relatively well addressed, uncertainties relating to multiple DRR actors operating and collaborating at different scales have gained less attention in previous studies.

    This thesis investigates the uncertainties in DRG in Mozambique, a low-income country that regularly faces natural hazards. These hazards often cause heavy loss of life and livelihoods and economic damage. The four articles that together constitute this thesis focus on different sets of uncertainties and factors that have constrained or allowed Mozambique to take major steps in this policy area. By exploring strategic and institutional uncertainties related to stakeholder involvement, coordination and policy disputes, this thesis reveals different challenges and opportunities that affect DRR policymaking in Mozambique.

    This thesis concludes that Mozambique has managed to take important steps in DRR. However, as a consequence of the different challenges to DRR practice in Mozambique, policymaking can be short-sighted and makes slow progress, thus increasing the disconnect between theory, policies and practice. This thesis thus argues that DRG research and practice need to better take into account power-relations; coordination and capacity issues; and responsibilities and transparency across scales, both in Mozambique and elsewhere.

  • 323.
    Koivisto, Jenni
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, CNDS.
    Round and Round We Go: the effects of staff turnover on disaster risk governanceManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 324.
    Koivisto, Jenni
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, CNDS.
    Whose Voice Do We Hear?: Obstacles to multi-stakeholder and multi-level disaster risk governance in MozambiqueManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Kopnina, Helen
    et al.
    Leiden University, The Netherlands.
    Washington, Haydn
    The University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Taylor, Bron
    University of Florida, USA; Ludwig Maximillian University of Munich, Germany.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Anthropocentrism: More than just a misunderstood problem2018In: Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, ISSN 1187-7863, E-ISSN 1573-322X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropocentrism, in its original connotation in environmental ethics, is the belief that value is human-centred and that all other beings are means to human ends. Environmentally -concerned authors have argued that anthropocentrism is ethically wrong and at the root of ecological crises. Some environmental ethicists argue, however, that critics of anthropocentrism are misguided or even misanthropic. They contend: first that criticism of anthropocentrism can be counterproductive and misleading by failing to distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate human interests. Second, that humans differ greatly in their environmental impacts, and consequently, addressing human inequalities should be a precondition for environmental protection. Third, since ecosystems constitute the "life-support system" for humans, anthropocentrism can and should be a powerful motivation for environmental protection. Fourth, human self-love is not only natural but helpful as a starting point for loving others, including nonhumans. Herein we analyze such arguments, agreeing with parts of them while advancing four counter-arguments. First, redefining the term anthropocentrism seems to be an attempt to ignore behavior in which humans focus on themselves at the risk of the planet. Second, if addressing human inequalities is a precondition for environmental protection, biodiversity protection will remain out of the scope of ethical consideration for an indefinite period of time. Third, anthropocentric motivations can only make a positive contribution to the environment in situations where humans are conscious of a direct benefit to themselves. Fourth, 'self-love' alone is an inadequate basis for environmental concern and action. We also explore the question of agency, shared responsibility, and a fair attribution of blame for our environmental predicaments.

  • 326.
    Krange, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Change in the occurrence of the West European Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) in western Sweden during 1950-2010.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hedgehog populations have declined all over Europe.  Here I describe population trends in three west Swedish counties, based on questionnaire surveys and interviews conducted in 1993 and 2010. I found that people questioned in 1993 had more recently seen hedgehogs than people asked in 2010, which indicates the hedgehog population has declined.  One of reasons for this decline may be the presence of badgers, as the occurrence of hedgehogs was inversely related to the presence of badgers. There was no difference in where hedgehog sightings occurred; sightings were equally likely to occur in suburban/urban areas as in rural areas, despite previous studies in Sweden and western Europe reporting a higher occurrence in suburban/urban areas.

  • 327.
    Kullander, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Barbier, Christophe
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of furnishes for tissue manufacturing; additivesArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additives are widely used in the tissue manufacturing process to facilitate the operation of the tissue machine and to improve tissue paper properties like wet strength, softness and water absorbency. Chemical retention and drainage programs are created to enhance the runnability of the tissue machine. A raise in dryness in the wet end of the tissue machine can lead to huge savings during the manufacturing process.

    In this work, the effect of 4 different additives on vacuum dewatering, wet pressing and paper properties was evaluated. Conditions representative for tissue machines regarding vacuum levels and dwell times were chosen. Paper properties relevant for tissue, like wet strength and absorption were measured on non-creped papers. Water retention and thermoporometry were used to determine the pore structure of the fibres.

    The solids content after vacuum dewatering and wet pressing is shown to be unaffected by addition of any of the four additives used in this study. The dryness after wet pressing is however increased by addition of a PAE-resin to the stock which probably is due to crosslinking in the fibre wall. Thermoporometry shows that the PAE-resin reduces the volume of both micro- and macropores which will leave less water deposited in the fibre wall. Tensile index is increased with the PAE-resin and further increased by addition of a flocculant and a micropolymer to the stock. Wet strength is increased while absorption capacity is decreased with the PAE-resin. No further effect on the two properties can be seen with additional chemicals in the furnish.

  • 328.
    Kullander, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Barbier, Christophe
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of furnishes for tissue manufacturing; suction box dewatering and paper testing2012In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water removal on a tissue machine becomes progressively more difficult and expensive in each successive zone. A good way to reduce cost can therefore be to improve the dewatering prior to evaporative drying. This can be done by selecting proper raw materials and optimizing the treatment of the fibres in the furnish.

    In this work, four pulps beaten to different levels were studied in vacuum dewatering trials. Mixing of the pulps, common in tissue manufacturing, was also performed. To simulate the suction boxes on a tissue machine, bench-scale laboratory equipment was used. Conditions typically used on a tissue machine regarding dwell times and vacuum levels were chosen. Paper properties relevant for tissue, like wet strength and absorption were measured on non-creped papers. To obtain information about the fibre properties, fibre characterization and microscope studies were also conducted.

    Vacuum dewatering in tissue manufacturing is shown to be affected by the choice of pulp which can be explained by structural differences in the networks caused by variations in fibre properties. Beating has a strong negative impact on the solids contents reached, which is believed to be an effect of both internal and external fibrillation. These results, together with additional data from mixing and paper testing, give a better understanding of how the furnish should be prepared to reduce energy use in the process and still fulfil consumer requirements on properties.

  • 329.
    Kullander, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Barbier, Christophe
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Evaluation of furnishes for tissue manufacturing: wet pressing2012In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 947-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wet pressing is the last operation on the tissue machine in which water can be removed prior to the expensive evaporative drying of the web. An increase in dryness at this stage can lead to major savings during the manufacturing process. A higher solids content can be achieved by suitable selection of raw materials and by optimizing the treatment of the fibres in the furnish. In this work, wet pressing was evaluated with four pulps beaten to different levels in a PFI mill. Wet pressing was done in a dynamic press simulator and conditions representative of tissue machines with regard to nip pressures and dwell times were chosen. Water retention and thermoporometry were used to determine the pore structure of the fibres. Thickness measurements were made to determine the permanent deformation of the sheets after the pressure pulse.

    Wet pressing in tissue manufacturing is shown to be affected by the choice of pulp, which can be explained by differences in pore structure of the fibres and consequently differences in ability to retain water. More water available before pressing leads to more water that can be removed. Beating has a negative impact on the solids contents reached after pressing, which is believed to be an effect of both internal and external fibrillation. These effects of beating seem mainly to affect the dryness after vacuum dewatering, which is also reflected after pressing. Beating delaminates macropores in the fibre wall but has a minor effect on micropores. Both water between the fibres and water in macropores are removed during pressing. These results give knowledge of how the furnish should be prepared in order to reduce energy consumption in the process.

  • 330.
    Lafage, Denis
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Sadler, J. P.
    University of Birmingham.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Local and landscape drivers of aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidies in riparian ecosystems: A worldwide meta-analysis2019In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 1-12, article id e02697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-boundary fluxes of organisms and matter, termed “subsidies,” are now recognized to be reciprocal and of roughly equal importance for both aquatic and terrestrial systems, even if terrestrial input to aquatic ecosystems has received most attention. The magnitude of aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidies is well documented, but the drivers behind these subsidies and their utilization by terrestrial consumers are characteristically local-scale studies, limiting the inferences that can be drawn for broader geographic scales. We therefore built and analyzed a database of stable isotope data extracted from 21 studies worldwide, to identify both landscape-scale (catchment) and local-scale (100-m riparian zone) variables that may affect the diet of terrestrial predators in riparian ecosystems. Our meta-analysis revealed a greater magnitude of aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidies (>50%) than previously reported, albeit with large geographic and inter-annual variations. Moreover, we demonstrated a large effect of landscape-scale factors on aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidies, particularly anthropogenic land use and tree cover. Local human population was the only relevant factor at the local scale. We also found that studies on landscape-scale and anthropogenic land use effects on aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidies are strongly under-represented in the ecological literature, which limits the general inferences that can currently be drawn about landscape effects. We suggest that landscape-scale studies could improve our understanding of how land use and environmental change might influence future patterns of biodiversity and ecosystem function.

  • 331.
    Lafage, Denis
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Djoudi, El Aziz
    Université de Rennes, France.
    Perrin, Gwenhaël
    Université de Bretagne Occidentale, France.
    Gallet, Sèbastien
    Université de Bretagne Occidentale, France.
    Pétillon, Julien
    Université de Rennes, France.
    Responses of ground-dwelling spider assemblages to changes in vegetation from wet oligotrophic habitats of Western France2019In: Arthropod-Plant Interactions, ISSN 1872-8855, E-ISSN 1872-8847, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 653-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While many arthropod species are known to depend, directly or indirectly, on certain plant species or communities, it remains unclear to what extent vegetation shapes spider assemblages. In this study, we tested whether the activity-density, composition, and diversity of ground-dwelling spiders were driven by changes in vegetation structure. Field sampling was conducted using pitfall traps in bogs, heathlands, and grasslands of Brittany (Western France) in 2013. A total of 8576 spider individuals were identified up to the species level (for a total of 141 species), as well as all plant species in more than 300 phytosociological relevés. A generalised linear model showed that spider activity-density was negatively influenced by mean vegetation height and mean Ellenberg value for moisture. Indices of diversity (ɑ, β, and functional diversities) increased with increasing vegetation height and shrub cover. Variables driving spider composition were mean vegetation height, dwarf shrub cover, and low shrub cover (results from a redundancy analysis). Spiders, some of the most abundant arthropod predators, are thus strongly influenced by vegetation structure, including ground-dwelling species. Although later successional states are usually seen as detrimental to local biodiversity in Europe, our results suggest that allowing controlled development of the shrub layer could have a positive impact on the diversity of ground-dwelling spiders. 

  • 332.
    Laring, Oskar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    34 hektar runt Acksjön: En studie om kontraurbana migranters föredragna platser för boende i Karlstads kommun2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A main trend of demographic change – urbanisation – has a quiet companion called counter-urbanisation which is designated to the migration of groups and individuals from urban to rural areas. Counter-urbanisation is valuable for the rural culture in decline as well as for contributing to solving the arising challenges of urban areas. However, the rural area of Sweden is large and finding a place to settle might be hard. Both migrants and authorities promoting this migration may have an interest in the mapping of preferable habitats in rural areas from a counter-urbanisation perspective. Therefore, this report investigates the possibilities of procuring a method for said rural mapping. Contemporary Swedish research is consulted for specific counter-urban migrants’ choices of where to migrate. The preferred places found in the study are analysed with the geographic information system software ArcGIS. Results show a method for mapping rural areas preferred by a hypothetical statistically compiled individual can be procured.

  • 333.
    Larsson, Niclas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    En jämförelse mellan Esri CityEngine och SketchUp: En studie om geografisk flygdata och texturering av byggnader för en 3D-stadsmodell2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A map object can be visualized in the three dimensions width, height and depth. Visualization ofthree dimensions is called 3D-visualization and is often used for example to illustrate buildingsand cities. 3D-models are often used by companies and authorities in planning processes andscenarios. The aim of this study is to test the 3D-programs SketchUp and Esri CityEngine andevaluate the functions for format, texture and georeferencing in a chosen area in Köping.The international standard CityGML, decided by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), caresfor the exchange and representation of 3D-city models. CityGML is an accepted standard whichdescribes the geometry of construction objects. The features in CityGML are described indifferent levels, Level of Detail (LOD).Esri CityEngine is a 3D-modelling program which is developed for skilled users of GIS and 3Dmodelling.SketchUp is a 3D-modelling program which supports 2D-modelling as well as 3Dmodelling.The program is used for the creation and visualization of geodata.The studyarea is interesting for future buildings and were chosen by Köpings municipality. Inorder to create realistic 3D-city models access of geographic data is needed. The geographic datais for an example terrain models, orthophotos, buildings with the right LOD-level and otherinformation. The 3D-models were created in the programs.The result shows that data from low (400 meters) and high (4000 meters) flight height can beused for creating 3D-city models in Esri CityEngine and SketchUp. In SketchUp all data can beimported but it is not as good as Esri CityEngine for combining data. Using photographs is onlytimesaving when texturing few buildings but not when texturing a larger area with several ofbuildings. When texturing a larger area, predefined rules should be used in order to shorten theprocessing time.

  • 334.
    Larsson, Pia L. M.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Foraging efficiencies on drifting and benthic prey in juvenile salmonids - effect of light2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stream living salmonids are generally regarded as drift feeders that rely upon their vision when foraging. It has been shown that salmonids become nocturnal at low water temperatures, but have a low foraging efficiency as light intensity is low, due to their dependence upon vision. Shifting from drift feeding to benthic feeding, has been suggested, and analyses of gut contents during winter have shown that the diet of salmonids mainly consists of benthic invertebrates. Most experimental studies of salmonid foraging have only offered the fish drifting prey or only given the fish access to benthic prey in total darkness. Such conditions rarely occur in nature and the importance of benthic foraging to salmonids may therefore have been underestimated. In this study I conducted a stream laboratory experiment to test if low light intensity caused juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) (age 0+) to forage more on benthic than drifting prey. The salmon foraged on both drifting and benthic prey during high light but consumed only benthic prey during low light (by one of six fish). Trout foraged on both drifting and benthic prey during both high and low light, but foraging efficiency was lower during low than high light and foraging efficiency was lower for benthic prey than for drifting prey. These results indicate that both species forage more opportunistically than previously thought.

  • 335.
    Lee, Marcus
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Zhang, Huan
    Lund University, Sweden ; Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Sha, Yongcui
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hegg, Alexander
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ugge, Gustaf Ekelund
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Vinterstare, Jerker
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Skerlep, Martin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Parssinen, Varpu
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Herzog, Simon David
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bjorneras, Caroline
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gollnisch, Raphael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hu, Nan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lund University, Sweden.
    Hulthen, Kaj
    Lund University, Sweden ; North Carolina State University, USA.
    Rengefors, Karin
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Langerhans, R. Brian
    North Carolina State University, USA ; North Carolina State University, USA.
    Bronmark, Christer
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Low-latitude zooplankton pigmentation plasticity in response to multiple threats2019In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 1-10, article id 190321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crustacean copepods in high-latitude lakes frequently alter their pigmentation facultatively to defend themselves against prevailing threats, such as solar ultraviolet radiation ( UVR) and visually oriented predators. Strong seasonality in those environments promotes phenotypic plasticity. To date, no one has investigated whether low-latitude copepods, experiencing continuous stress from UVR and predation threats, exhibit similar inducible defences. We here investigated the pigmentation levels of Bahamian 'blue hole' copepods, addressing this deficit. Examining several populations varying in predation risk, we found the lowest levels of pigmentation in the population experiencing the highest predation pressure. In a laboratory experiment, we found that, in contrast with our predictions, copepods from these relatively constant environments did show some changes in pigmentation subsequent to the removal of UVR; however, exposure to water from different predation regimes induced minor and idiosyncratic pigmentation change. Our findings suggest that low-latitude zooplankton in inland environments may exhibit reduced, but non-zero, levels of phenotypic plasticity compared with their high-latitude counterparts.

  • 336.
    Lesutiene, Jurate
    et al.
    Klaipeda Univ, Marine Sci & Technol Ctr, Klaipeda, Lithuania.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Biol, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Appl Environm Sci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stankeviciene, Daiva
    Nat Res Ctr, Inst Ecol, Vilnius, Lithuania..
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry A.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Light Increases Energy Transfer Efficiency in a Boreal Stream2014In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e113675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periphyton communities of a boreal stream were exposed to different light and nutrient levels to estimate energy transfer efficiency from primary to secondary producers using labeling with inorganic C-13. In a one-day field experiment, periphyton grown in fast-flow conditions and dominated by opportunistic green algae were exposed to light levels corresponding to sub-saturating (forest shade) and saturating (open stream section) irradiances, and to N and P nutrient additions. In a two-week laboratory experiment, periphyton grown in low-flow conditions and dominated by slowly growing diatoms were incubated under two sub-saturating light and nutrient enrichment levels as well as grazed and non-grazed conditions. Light had significant positive effect on C-13 uptake by periphyton. In the field experiment, P addition had a positive effect on C-13 uptake but only at sub-saturating light levels, whereas in the laboratory experiment nutrient additions had no effect on the periphyton biomass, C-13 uptake, biovolume and community composition. In the laboratory experiment, the grazer (caddisfly) effect on periphyton biomass specific C-13 uptake and nutrient content was much stronger than the effects of light and nutrients. In particular, grazers significantly reduced periphyton biomass and increased biomass specific C-13 uptake and C: nutrient ratios. The energy transfer efficiency, estimated as a ratio between C-13 uptake by caddisfly and periphyton, was positively affected by light conditions, whereas the nutrient effect was not significant. We suggest that the observed effects on energy transfer were related to the increased diet contribution of highly palatable green algae, stimulated by higher light levels. Also, high heterotrophic microbial activity under low light levels would facilitate energy loss through respiration and decrease overall trophic transfer efficiency. These findings suggest that even a small increase in light intensity could result in community-wide effects on periphyton in boreal streams, with a subsequent increase in energy transfer and system productivity.

  • 337.
    Lexomboon, Duangjai
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Carlson, Christina
    Varmland Publ Dent Hlth, Dept Prevent Dent, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    von Bultzingslowen, Inger
    Varmland Publ Dent Hlth, Dept Prevent Dent, Karlstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Dept Oral Microbiol & Immunol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mensah, Tita
    Clin Paediat Dent, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Incidence and causes of dental trauma in children living in the county of Varmland, Sweden2016In: Dental Traumatology, ISSN 1600-4469, E-ISSN 1600-9657, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe aims of this study were to determine the incidence of injuries to permanent incisors in 2011-2013 in children aged 8-10years living in the county of Varmland, Sweden, and to compare it with the incidence rates in 1989/1990 in the county of Vastmanland, as well as to determine the cause of dental trauma in relation to time and place. MethodThe study analysed the patient records from dental visits (2011-2013) of trauma to the permanent incisors in children aged 8-10years. The incidence rates were the incidence per 1000 children at risk. Standardized incidence rates were calculated for the comparison between different years. Information about month, location where the trauma occurred as well as cause of trauma was recorded. ResultsA total of 2.2% of 21721 children aged 8-10years had experienced at least one trauma. The incidence rate in Varmland increased from 18.9 in 2011 to 21.3 in 2012 to 28.5 in 2013. The standardized incidence rate in Varmland in 2011 and 2012 was not significantly different than in Vastmanland in 1989/1990 (P>0.05), but the standardized rates in 2013 were significantly higher than in 1989/90 (P<0.001). Dental trauma occurred most often outdoors, followed by sports arenas/sports fields, and more often at school than at home. Falling and slipping was the most common cause of trauma, followed by accidents during leisure activities, playing and sports. ConclusionThe incidence rate for dental trauma has not decreased in the past 20years, and there is an indication that parents and teachers should be more aware of the risks of dental trauma at leisure times and at school as well as during sports and exercise.

  • 338. Liebiedieva, Svitlana
    et al.
    Haas, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Andersson, Jan-Olov
    Geospatial support2017In: Handbook of Disaster and Emergency Management / [ed] Amir Khorram-Manesh, Göteborg: Amir Khorram-Manesh , 2017, p. 92-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 339.
    Lin, Wamei
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Malutta, Raffaelle
    Waste heat recovery by organic rankine cycle (ORC) for moist exhaust gases from paper industry2017In: ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) , 2017, Vol. 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large potential exists in recovering waste heat from paper industry processes and machinery. If the overall energy efficiency would be increased, it could lead to significant fuel savings and greenhouse gas emission reduction. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system is a very strong candidate for converting low-grade waste heat into power. However, there is a lot of water vapor containing latent heat in the exhaust gases from the drying process in the paper industry. Thus, the aim of this research work is to increase the efficiency of the ORC system by recovering not only the sensible heat but also the latent heat from the exhaust gases in the paper drying process. In order to recover the latent heat from the moist exhaust gases, one idea of this article is to introduce a direct contact condensing unit into the ORC system. The performance of ORC system with the direct contact condensing unit was analyzed by using the CHEMCAD software. A case study was conducted based on data of the exhaust gases from a tissue production / drying machine. Latent heat will be recovered when the evaporating temperature of the ORC working fluid is lower than the dew point of the water vapor in the exhaust gases. The results showed that the available heat load was increased when the evaporating temperature was reduced. Furthermore, a performance comparison of the ORC systems with and without the direct contact condensing unit was carried out in the case study as well. The results showed that the ORC system with the direct contact condensing unit not only could recover latent heat from the water vapor in the exhaust gases but also could have a small size and small volume evaporator in the ORC system.

  • 340. Lind, Hans
    et al.
    Holmgren, Ingela
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Pinoberget. En socialhistorisk studie utifrån sentida bebyggelselämningar och obesuttna människor2000Report (Other academic)
  • 341. Lind, Hans
    et al.
    Holmgren, Ingela
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Emilsson, Stig
    Crofters, thieves and workers: The social history of the inhabitants of a group of 19th century settlement remains2003In: Lund archeological review, Vol. 8-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 342. Lind, Hans
    et al.
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Sentida bebyggelse i antikvarisk och arkeologisk verksamhet - en tematisk utvärdering2001Report (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Lind, Lovisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Hasselquist, Eliza Maher
    Sveriges Lantbruks Universitet.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Sveriges Lantbruks Universitet.
    Towards ecologically functional riparian zones: A meta-analysis to develop guidelines for protecting ecosystem functions and biodiversity in agricultural landscapes2019In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 249, p. 1-8, article id 109391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Riparian zones contribute with biodiversity and ecosystem functions of fundamental importance for regulating flow and nutrient transport in waterways. However, agricultural land-use and physical changes made to improve crop productivity and yield have resulted in modified hydrology and displaced natural vegetation. The modification to the hydrology and natural vegetation have affected the biodiversity and many ecosystem functions provided by riparian zones. Here we review the literature to provide state-of-the-art recommendations for riparian zones in agricultural landscapes. We analysed all available publications since 1984 that have quantified services provided by riparian zones and use this information to recommend minimum buffer widths. We also analysed publications that gave buffer width recommendations to sustain different groups of organisms. We found that drainage size matters for nutrient and sediment removal, but also that a 3 m wide buffer zone acts as a basic nutrient filter. However, to maintain a high floral diversity, a 24 m buffer zone is required, while a 144 m buffer is needed to preserve bird diversity. Based on the analysis, we developed the concept of “Ecologically Functional Riparian Zones” (ERZ) and provide a step-by-step framework that managers can use to balance agricultural needs and environmental protection of waterways from negative impacts. By applying ERZ in already existing agricultural areas, we can better meet small targets and move towards the long-term goal of achieving a more functional land management and better environmental status of waterways.

  • 344.
    Lindegren, Martin
    et al.
    University of California.
    Waldo, Staffan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Lund University.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Lunds universitet.
    Towards sustainable fisheries of the Öresund cod (Gadus morhua) through sub-stock-specific assessment and management recommendations,2013In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 1140-1150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management traditionally relies on stock assessments assuming discrete populations within large administrational areas. However, failing to account for sub-stock structuring may result in overestimation of the stocks' true harvest potential and unsustainable exploitation of small stock elements. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) frequently occurs in spatially segregated populations, some of which exhibit fine-scaled stock structuring within current management boundaries. Here we use the locally spawning cod stock in the Sound ("Oresund") as a case study, and perform a sub-stock-specific assessment to evaluate biological and economic effects of managing the Sound cod as a separate stock. Our results indicate that reducing exploitation pressure, particularly through technical regulations i. e. increasing gill-net mesh sizes, would not only enhance the stock age distribution, but yield long-term net benefits to the local gill-net fishery. Furthermore, our study emphasizes the need for developing sub-stock-specific management recommendations in order to ensure the maintenance of fisheries resources in general, and the persistence of sub-stock structuring in particular.

  • 345.
    Lindgren, Robin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Habitatets inverkan på förekomst av Europeisk ål (Anguilla anguilla) i svenska vattendrag2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Data över förekomst av två storleksklasser (0-150 mm och >150 mm) av Europeisk ål (Anguilla anguilla) i vattendrag på svenska västkusten hämtades från SERS (Svenskt ElfiskeRegiSter vid SLU). Dessa analyserades genom logistisk regression för att avgöra vilka olika makrohabitat-, landskaps- och hindervariabler som bäst kunde användas för att förutspå förekomst av ål. Resultatet visade att det för makrohabitatvariablerna var vattendragets bredd, vattenhastighet och vegetationsmängd som bäst förutspådde förekomst av båda storleksklasserna. För landskapsvariablerna var det avstånd till mynningen, fosforkoncentration och vattentemperatur som bäst förutspådde förekomsten av båda storleksklasserna. Därtill var även sjöprocent en viktig variabel för att förklara förekomsten av den större klassen ål. För variabler som beskriver vandringshinder var det dammar, ålyngelledare och naturlika fiskvägar som bäst förutspådde ålförekomst av båda storleksklasserna. Därtill var även avstånd till uppströms hinder viktigt för att förklara förekomsten av större ål (>150 mm). Mängden lämpliga tillväxthabitat för ålen kan därför troligtvis ökas genom åtgärder riktade mot lokalens vattendragsbredd, vattenhastighet och vegetationsmängd.

  • 346.
    Linzie, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Väneramplitud – Lönsamhet?: Kvalitativ studie av åtgärder, genomförda för att reducera risker och kostnadspåföljder av en förändrad vattenregim2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The water amplitude of the lake Vänern was lowered by a decision by the County Administrative board of Västra Götaland, this was carried out by the electric company Vattenfall AB in the year 2008. This was done to reduce the risks of severe flooding’s. The procedure was recommended by the report “Climate and vulnerability”. This will have adverse effects on the natural values around Vänern. The method used in the report was the Cost-Benefit-Analysis (CBA) method. In this valuation method, it is very difficult to value natural values according to their monetary value since the method itself lacks the procedures to do so properly. And also the investigators chose to not value these in a monetary sense because of the difficulties in doing so. This thesis questions through interviews and an extensive literature study why this came to pass, and how and why the natural values of the lake Vänern could have been valued. The possibility that the adverse effects on the natural values around the lake is diminishing is a fact not implemented in the report makes the proceeding decision to lower the water amplitude of Vänern, makes it difficult to determine the final consequences. 

  • 347.
    Lotsari, Ellisa
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland, University of Turku.
    Lind, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Kämäri, Maria
    Finnish Environment Institute, Finland.
    Impacts of hydro-climatically varying years on ice growth and decay in a subarctic river2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 2058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predicting the future changes in river ice development and impacts on seasonal sediment transport requires more in-depth examination of present river ice cover growth processes. This paper therefore investigates: (1) the impacts of hydro-climatically varying years on river ice development in a Scandinavian subarctic meandering river and (2) the accuracy of existing analytical models for predicting ice thickness growth and ice decay. Stefan's ice growth equation (version by Michel et al.) and Bilello's ice decay equation are applied to varying hydro-climatic conditions experienced in the years 2013-2019. Estimates from these equations are compared with observed field conditions such as ice thicknesses, ice clearance dates and freeze-thaw days. Overall, the equations were most accurate in the winter of 2016-2017 when the maximum mid-winter snow thickness value was high, the number of freeze-thaw days was the closest to the long-term average of northern Scandinavia, and the rate of thermal snow-melt in the subsequent spring was slow. The equations would need to be adjusted to take into account expected future changes to conditions such as shorter winters, less snow formation and increased frequency of air temperatures crossing 0 °C.

  • 348.
    Loydi, Alejandro
    et al.
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Tyskland.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gebauer, Tobias
    Univ Hamburg, Appl Plant Ecol, Bioctr Klein Flottbek.
    Ludewig, Kristin
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Tyskland.
    Otte, Annette
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Tyskland.
    Reisdorff, Christoph
    Univ Hamburg,.
    Jensen, Kai
    Univ Hamburg.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Christian Albrechts Univ Kiel.
    Opposite effects of litter and hemiparasites on a dominant grass under different water regimes and competition levels2018In: Plant Ecology, ISSN 1385-0237, E-ISSN 1573-5052, Vol. 219, no 2, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct and indirect biotic interactions may affect plant growth and development, but the magnitude of these effects may vary depending on environmental conditions. In grassland ecosystems, competition is a strong structuring force. Nonetheless, if hemiparasitic plant species are introduced the competition intensity caused by the dominant species may be affected. However, the outcome of these interactions may change between wet or dry periods. In order to study this, we performed a pot experiment with different densities of the dominant species Schedonorus arundinaceus (1, 2 or 4 individuals) under constantly moist or intermittently dry conditions. The different Schenodorus densities were crossed with presence or absence of hemiparasites (either Rhinanthus minor or R. alectorolophus). Additionally, pots remained with bare ground or received a grass litter layer (400 g m(-2)). We expected that indirect litter effects on vegetation (here Schedonorus or Rhinanthus) vary depending on soil moisture. We measured Schedonorus and Rhinanthus aboveground biomass and C stable isotope signature (delta C-13) as response variables. Overall, Schedonorus attained similar biomass under moist conditions with Rhinanthus as in pots under dry conditions without Rhinanthus. Presence of Rhinanthus also increased delta C-13 in moist pots, indicating hemiparasite-induced water stress. Litter presence increased Schedonorus biomass and reduced delta C-13, indicating improved water availability. Plants under dry conditions with litter showed similar biomass as under wet conditions without litter. Hemiparasites and litter had opposite effects: hemiparasites reduced Schedonorus biomass while litter presence facilitated grass growth. Contrary to our expectations, litter did not compensate Schedonorus biomass when Rhinanthus was present.

  • 349.
    Ludewig, K.
    et al.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Hanke, J. M.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Wuthe, B.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Otte, A.
    Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Mosner, E.
    Hochschule Geisen heim University, Geisenheim, Germany.
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Donath, T. W.
    Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Differential effect of drought regimes on the seedling performance of six floodplain grassland species2018In: Plant Biology, ISSN 1435-8603, E-ISSN 1438-8677, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 691-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of seedlings is crucial for the survival and persistence of plant populations. Although drought frequently occurs in floodplains and can cause seedling mortality, studies on the effects of drought on seedlings of floodplain grasslands are scarce. We tested the hypotheses that drought reduces aboveground biomass, total biomass, plant height, number of leaves, leaf area and specific leaf area (SLA), and increases root biomass and root-mass fraction (RMF) and that seedlings from species of wet floodplain grasslands are more affected by drought than species of dry grasslands. In a greenhouse study, we exposed seedlings of three confamilial pairs of species (Pimpinella saxifraga, Selinum carvifolia, Veronica teucrium, Veronica maritima, Sanguisorba minor, Sanguisorba officinalis) to increasing drought treatments. Within each plant family, one species is characteristic of wet and one of dry floodplain grasslands, confamilial in order to avoid phylogenetic bias of the results. In accordance with our hypotheses, drought conditions reduced aboveground biomass, total biomass, plant height, number of leaves and leaf area. Contrary to our hypotheses, drought conditions increased SLA and decreased root biomass and RMF of seedlings. Beyond the effects of the families, the results were species-specific (V. maritima being the most sensitive species) and habitat-specific. Species indicative of wet floodplain grasslands appear to be more sensitive to drought than species indicative of dry grasslands. Because of species- and habitat-specific responses to reduced water availability, future drought periods due to climate change may severely affect some species from dry and wet habitats, while others may be unaffected.

  • 350. Ludewig, Kristin
    et al.
    Donath, Tobias W.
    Zelle, Bianka
    Eckstein, Rolf Lutz
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. nstitute of Landscape Ecology and Resource Managementnstitute of Landscape Ecology and Resource Management, Giessen, Germany.
    Mosner, Eva
    Otte, Annette
    Jensen, Kai
    Effects of Reduced Summer Precipitation on Productivity and Forage Quality of Floodplain Meadows at the Elbe and the Rhine River2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0124140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floodplain meadows along rivers are semi-natural habitats and depend on regular land use. When used non-intensively, they offer suitable habitats for many plant species including rare ones. Floodplains are hydrologically dynamic ecosystems with both periods of flooding and of dry conditions. In German floodplains, dry periods may increase due to reduced summer precipitation as projected by climate change scenarios. Against this background, the question arises, how the forage quantity and quality of these meadows might change in future.

    Methods

    We report results of two field trials that investigated effects of experimentally reduced summer precipitation on hay quantity and quality of floodplain meadows at the Rhine River (2011-2012) and at two Elbe tributaries (2009-2011). We measured annual yield, the amount of hay biomass, and contents of crude protein, crude fibre, energy, fructan, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

    Results

    The annual yield decreased under precipitation reduction at the Rhine River. This was due to reduced productivity in the second cut hay at the Rhine River in which, interestingly, the contents of nitrogen and crude protein increased. The first cut at the Rhine River was unaffected by the treatments. At the Elbe tributaries, the annual yield and the hay quantity and quality of both cuts were only marginally affected by the treatments.

    Conclusion

    We conclude that the yield of floodplain meadows may become less reliable in future since the annual yield decreased under precipitation reduction at the Rhine River. However, the first and agriculturally more important cut was almost unaffected by the precipitation reduction, which is probably due to sufficient soil moisture from winter/spring. As long as future water levels of the rivers will not decrease during spring, at least the use of the hay from the first cut of floodplain meadows appears reliable under climate change.

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