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  • 1251. Wikström, Patrik
    System dynamics modelling for organizational learning1994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1252. Wikström, Patrik
    The behaviour of a cultural industry in crisis2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1253.
    Wikström, Patrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The enemy of music: Modelling the behaviour of a cultural industry in crisis2005In: JMM - The International Journal on Media Management, ISSN 1424-1277, E-ISSN 1424-1250, Vol. 7, no 1&2, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1254. Wikström, Patrik
    The renaissance of the music publisher2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1255. Wikström, Patrik
    Transformational leadership in practice: The case of Steve Jobs and Pixar animation studios2006In: Leadership in the media industry - Changing contexts, emerging challenges / [ed] Lucy Küng, Jönköping: Jönköping International Business School , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1256. Wikström, Patrik
    et al.
    Burnett, Robert
    Same sounds, different wrapping2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1257.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Language and Literature in Education (from 2013).
    (en-)acting out: Twitter's affordances for animating reported speechManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 1258.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    I tweet like I talk: Aspects of speech and writing on Twitter2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates linguistic and metalinguistic practices in everyday Twitter discourse in relation to aspects of speech and writing. The overarching aim is to investigate how the spoken–written interface is reconfigured in the digital writing spaces of social media.

    The dissertation comprises four empirical case studies and six chapters. The first study investigates communicative functions of hashtags in a speech act pragmatic framework, focalizing tagging practices that not only mark topics or organize hypertextual interaction, but rather have more specific locally meaningful functions. Two studies investigate reported speech in tweets, focusing on quotatives typically associated with informal conversational interaction (e.g., BE like). The studies identify strategies by which Twitter users animate (Tannen, 2007) speech reports. Further, one of the studies explores how such animating practices are afforded (Hutchby, 2001). Lexically, orthographically, and with images, but primarily through typography, users make voice, gesture, and stance present in their tweets, digitally re-embodying the rich nonverbal expressivity of animation in talk. Finally, a study investigates notions of talk-like tweeting from an emic perspective, showing users' negotiations of how tweets can and should correspond to speech in relation to social identity, linguistic competence, and personal authenticity.

    Six chapters situate and synthesize the case studies in an expanded theoretical framework. Together, the studies show how Twitter's speech–writing hybridity extends beyond a mix of linguistic features, and challenges a traditional idea of writing as a mere representation of speech. Talk-like tweeting remediates (Bolter & Grusin, 2000) presence and embodiment, forgoing the abstraction of phonetic print literacy for nonverbal expressivity and an embodied written surface. Twitter talk is shown not simply to substitute literacy norms for oral norms, but to complicate and reconfigure these norms. Talk-like tweeting makes manifest an ongoing cultural renegotiation of the meanings of speech and writing in the era of digital social media.

  • 1259.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    & she was like "O_O": Animation of reported speech on Twitter2014In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 83-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study relates discourse-pragmatic aspects of the use of the quotatives say, be like, be all, and go to the question of the supposed or actual spoken-likeness of written computer-mediated communication (CMC). 1,800 tokens of reported speech, collected from Twitter, were analyzed in a “constructed dialogue” framework (Tannen, 2007). The results show that users of Twitter employ various CMC devices to animate and modally enrich reported speech, especially in speech reports with be like, be all, and go. They perform a style of communication that is reminiscent of conversational speech, even while having qualities that seem to belong uniquely to CMC.

  • 1260.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    #srynotfunny: Communicative functions of hashtags on Twitter2014In: SKY Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 1456-8438, E-ISSN 1796-279X, Vol. 27, p. 127-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates various communicative functions served by hashtags in written communication on Twitter from a linguistic pragmatic perspective. A tweet containing a hashtag links to, and is integrated into, a timeline of other tweets containing the same hashtag. Thus, hashtags are by default categorizing or organizing; a user of Twitter may add the tag #food to their tweet to integrate it into a general conversation about this topic. However, this study demonstrates that hashtags are also used creatively to perform other communicative functions. In the data presented, hashtags are employed as complexly multifunctional linguistic devices for, among other things, structuring information, playing games, and engaging in reflexive meta-commentary. Notably, while pragmatic methodology is typically applied to speech, this study indicates that a traditional speech acts framework may be profitably applied to written communication in new media.

  • 1261.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    Twitter's affordances for animation of reported speech2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1262.
    Wikström, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies.
    When I need/want to: Normativity, identity, and form in user construals of 'talk-like' tweeting2016In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 14, p. 54-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is on how Twitter users construe talk-like tweeting in metalinguistic utterances. In a material of tweets containing or responding to explicit comparisons of tweeting to talking (N=520), a broad range of construals are identified, showing Twitter users associating talk-likeness with, e.g., notions of the textual representation of voice, of grammatical (in-)correctness, of accurately reflecting one׳s ‘real-life’ identity, and of regional or social variation in language use. These associations frequently serve normative functions, enforcing or contesting linguistic and discursive norms in both serious and playful ways. The findings offer a novel perspective on the oft-debated orality of computer-mediated discourse, providing a window on how a process of enregisterment (Agha, 2007) is instantiated and how language norms are actively negotiated by participants in everyday online language use on Twitter.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-12-01 09:00
  • 1263.
    Wildt, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Lindborg, Nelly
    Karlstad University.
    Står monstret bakom mig?: En kvalitativ undersökning av skräck i Virtual Reality2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual Reality has existed in different forms since around 80 years ago, but in its current form it has a more significant place on the current market. With this change, more research on how VR works and how humans are affected by it is needed to be able to develop products for this growing medium. The research today is lacking, so to expand the understanding of VR and specifically VR as a console for games, this qualitative study has researched how elements of fear are experienced in a VR-environment. The study also studied what can affect “immersion”, depth in the environment, as well as if previous experience can affect experiences in a VR-environment. These questions were analyzed based on two game tests that were made on the VR-console HTC Vive. The first test focused on controls and “immersion” to see how intuitive and easily understood the console is. The second test examined horror elements in VR and what kinds of elements could contribute to a more effective and intense horror experience.

    A total of 16 people between the ages of 19-26 participated in the game tests. The participants were students at Karlstad University, or had previously been so. The participants were divided in different kinds of groups depending on previous experiences in digital games (the first test) and horror (the second test).

    With the help of observation of the video recordings and the interviews the collected data could be divided into themes. The themes used to analyze the data were controls, disorientation/discomfort, “immersion” and horror elements. The results showed that HTC Vive have good qualifications for “immersion”. Though with a few problematic factors, the equipment for example, which disturbed the experience. Despite this, the console created a strong feeling of “immersion” as the participants experienced themselves to be present in the VR-environment because of factors such as background noise and a natural point-of-view of the VR-environment through the headset. The biggest contributor for “immersion” was that the environment needed to have a natural and believable behavior, acting the way the user expects it to. This kind of presence contributed positively to the horror experience as the participants seemed to believe themselves to be threatened by the horror elements as if it was directed at them personally and not just a character in a game.  

    In the subject of differences between the groups in experience there not a lot of substantial differences. A small difference could be found regarding how the controls were handled between the different groups of game experience. The participants with previous experience seemed to bring expectations about how the controls should work.

    The study had, because of its qualitative nature, no possibility to receive generalizable results. But the study did open up for questions for future research related to VR-games and their users, as well as VR-consoles.

  • 1264.
    Wilkins, Karin
    et al.
    University of Texas at Austin.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The privatization of development through global communication industries:Living Proof?2013In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 165-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development is meant to alleviate problems in the interests of the public good, yet thegrowing dominance of private donors problematizes this conceptualization. Workingthrough a political-economic analysis of development, we see global communications asan industry that channels wealth from citizens into the hands of few corporate moguls,who then have the resources to assert their agendas in a global development context.We begin by conceptualizing development and social change within communicationstudies, paying attention to the privatization of aid within global capitalism. Next,we contextualize our case study, describing the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundationand ONE, promoted by Bono, as the funding and management settings of the LivingProof campaign. We analyze the initiative’s construction of development problems,its articulation of how communication is expected to work toward social change, andits conceptualizations of success. The dominant theme of Living Proof program is that“real people” have achieved development success, which can be shared as “proof” withwebsite consumers. We conclude by considering how such a framing serves the agenda of privatized development within a neoliberal project.

  • 1265. Williams, Kelsey
    The Role of Social Media & The Egyptian Uprisings2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1266.
    Winter, Niclas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Klasson, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Sjukvårdens kommunikativa kulturkrock: En kvantitativ studie om uppfattad organisationskultur inom slutenvården i Värmlands läns landsting2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational culture is somewhat hard to define and a complex matter that nevertheless has an important role. The current healthcare is challenged by a tug of war between different cultures for its hierarchical structure, which today needs an external and economic turn of mind and still work for a worthy meeting with the patient. Simultaneously it exists a stressful situation for the health professionals in terms of staff shortage while the management has a constraint from politicians and tight budgets. The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate whether the perception of an organizational culture within Värmlands Council may differ depending on individual’s hierarchical positions. The purpose also includes identifying and analysing the communicative factors that contribute to the different perceptions. The main question of the study is “To what extent does an employee’s hierarchical position affect the perception of an organizational culture?” followed by “What is the relationship between the internal communication and the current perceptions?”

    The analytical framework of the study is based on previous research and within the industry well-established theories, including the Competing Values Framework, which the study uses to define the different cultures within the organization through its dimensions and clusters. To answer the study’s questions a survey has been applied that was sent to the whole population, which however, received a lack of response rate. The results indicate that a distinct hierarchical culture is perceived within the organization, alongside desires to direct it towards a more family-oriented culture while maintaining the hierarchical structures. The managers considered their leadership to be characterized by helpfulness and encouragement for participation, however it was not perceived in such way by anyone else within the organization. This is most likely due to the one-way communication that goes through a hierarchical communication model within the organization.

  • 1267.
    Wivhammar, Helen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Nilsson, Jimmie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Objektivitet i politisk journalistik: En studie i mediekommunikation2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     

    Mona Sahlin's dishwasher decides the election!

     

    Maybe. How journalism portraits politics is at least not fully objective with focus on societal matters. There is also a change over time indicating an up-going trend of less objective journalism. Other results of this case study indicates that politicians are more inclined to participate in journalism than before and that politics presented as scandal is increasing.

    The aim of this study is to investigate objectivity in political journalism over time. Using the quantitative content-analyses the study encoded 600 journalistic articles subjecting politics in the Swedish society. These articles were chosen from Swedish newspapers, Dagens Nyheter and Aftonbladet, both paper editions only excluding web editions. Theories supporting the study are the framing-theory, the knowledge-theory and other theories describing how objectivity changes over time.

    Objectivity has been debated in journalism and has founded different perspectives on how professional journalism can be obtained. This has historically changed the practice of journalism and the study assumes from this phenomenon. Citizens are dependent on journalism for information on things that does not belong in their everyday life. Politics is such a subject that needs to be reported on and that's why this study investigates objectivity in political journalism. 

    The result concludes extreme choices of subject in political journalism, where about 50 % of the articles encoded portrayed the everyday chores or statements of politicians. This is indicating an up-going trend of less objective journalism and is supported by other less extreme results of the study.

  • 1268. Wåger, Jonny
    Syns man inte - finns man inte: En kvalitativ studie om självpresentation på Facebook2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1269.
    Zacarias, Orlando P.
    et al.
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Wamala Larsson, CarolineKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centrum för genusforskning.
    Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on M4D Mobile Communication Technology for Development: M4D 2016, General Tracks2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 1270. Zandbergs, Simon
    Surfing the Shortwaves: A rhetorical comparison of articles of the Syrian Civil War from Voice of America and Sputnik News, May 20172017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to compare content on the websites of Voice of America and Sputnik News. This includes comparing the website content in general, including categories and non-news content available on the websites apart from articles. A selected number of articles were also analysed for an in-depth study and comparison between the two websites. The differences between the websites was studied by examining differences in how the same topic was treated differently on each website. In addition, the strategies used by both websites to attract visitors were identified. This was then compared with historical research done on the shortwave radio stations that are the precursors to these websites.

                          The study is a rhetorical analysis of five articles from Voice of America, and five articles from Sputnik News. All articles analysed are about the Syrian Civil War. This, together with the non-news content is then compared, both between the two websites, but also with earlier research in order to see if the strategy has changed through history. The propaganda models of Persuasion, Information and Goodwill are key to these studies.

                          The analysis revealed that the difference in usage of rhetoric and “propaganda models” were fairly similar between the two websites. There were however certain differences, such as Sputnik News had more Entertainment, while Voice of America contained more educational content. There were also differences in which languages, and thus, what parts of the world the websites has as their target audiences. One big difference was in the length of the articles.

     

    Keywords: Propaganda, Shortwave Radio, Voice of America, Sputnik News, Rhetorical analysis

  • 1271. Zandbergs, Simon
    SVT:s nya digitala äventyr: En studie om digitaliseringens och kommersialiseringens påverkan på PublicService med innehållet på SVT Nyheters Facebook-sida som exempel2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay’s aim is to investigate how the news reporting of Swedish Public Service broadcaster SVT looks on Facebook and to see if the use of it has led to a commercialisation, as well as to give an example on how SVT have acted against two challenges, the commercialisation and digitalisation of media. By highlighting the differences and similarities between the Facebook pages of SVT Nyheter and TV4 Nyheterna, you should be able to see if SVT is fulfilling the promises of Public Service. The essay is based on a hypothesis that a commercialisation have happened of Public Service, with a sub-hypothesis that SVT have been forced to adapt to the new commercial and digitalised market.This will be done through a usage of a quantitative content analysis where a number of posts on the Facebook pages of SVT Nyheter and TV4 Nyheterna are analysed. Three synthetic weeks from every year between 2013 and 2015 will be present. The essay is based on theories around Public Service, digitalisation, commercialisation (including tabloidisation), Soft News and personalisation. These theories and the previous research are important to be able to understand the final result in the best way possible. This will be the reference point for this essay, and it is through comparison to earlier research and theories you should be able to see if a commercialisation has happened or not.After the analysis of the posts you could see that SVT Nyheter focused more on investigating news, and less on Soft News and celebrities than TV4 Nyheterna did, while personification was exactly the same on both pages. Some smaller differences in the news categories existed, where SVT Nyheter focused more on local news and science, while TV4 Nyheterna focused more on entertainment, foreign events and maybe somewhat surprising, politics. Despite this the differences were not radical in any category. TV4 Nyheterna seems somewhat less serious, while a commercialisation does not seem to have happened of SVT.

  • 1272.
    Äleklint, Therése
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Wenngren, Petronella
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Tidskriften och bloggen: En kvalitativ studie om bloggens funktion för tidskriften Elle 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 1273.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    7B har ingen webbtidning2005Book (Refereed)
  • 1274.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT.
    7B har ingen webbtidning: Möjligheter och problem med att använda Internet för publicistiska arbetssätt i grundskola och gymnasium2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     Åkerlund, Dan (2005) Class 7B has no Web-magazine - possibilities and problems in allowing school children to publish school-related materials on the Internet, in terms of a practical, communicative and educational approach.

    The primary purpose of this study, is to shed light on the reasons why so few primary and secondary schools take advantage of the possibilities in using the Internet to publish pupils own texts, photos, films, radio programs et. al. Today, there are only around 50 active Swedish public school magazines on the Internet, produced by students in Swedish schools. By contrast, 80% of all Swedish young people between the ages of 12 and 24 have their own login on LunarStorm, an Internet community where mainly young people publish texts and images and communicate with one other in a variety of ways, ie. mail, chat rooms and guestbook's. The paradox is obvious; young people are highly motivated to publish and communicate in this way, yet the school system does not seem to take advantage of this opportunity toward pedagogical ends. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to map out the advantages and disadvantages for a single class, an entire school, or the learning process as a whole, of using a publishing approach in education, in debate and theory, law and regulations and trough interviews.

    One of the hypotheses was that the causal connection behind the lack of publishing approach in the school system, probably have many different reasons. Therefore a method named EPISTLE, was used. The method is developed to look at a phenomenon from different angles to find not only one, but many different explanations, advantages and disadvantages, when studying technical implementations in a modern society. This leads to discussions of many theories, including theories about motivation, the public space and the public sphere, how innovations are spread and different pedagogical theories. Included in this study, there is also a section containing facts about laws and regulations according to publishing and the school system in Sweden.

    The study results in a long list of possibilities and problems. On the positive side, we already have good general computer skills among the teachers and an Internet connection in nearly every Swedish (or Scandinavian) school. Those teachers, who have tried a publishing approach, always seem to be highly motivated and enthusiastic and do not see any backsides of the concept. On the more negative side, we can find lack of technical support, fear of breaking the law, fear of conflict with parents and school staff and a wide-spread lack of knowledge in how to publish; booth in terms of content and technique.

  • 1275.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Den vidgade yttrandefriheten1989Report (Other academic)
  • 1276.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Eleven som journalist - Publicistiskt arbetssätt2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1277.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Internet publishing as a didactic method2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1278.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Publicistiska arbetssätt i skolan2008Book (Refereed)
  • 1279.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Pupils motivation to net publishing2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1280.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Texter från klassrummet och ut på nätet2008In: Svenskläraren nr 2 - 2008Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1281.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Wiping out the White board in China2010In: Abstracts: Active Citizenship : NERA's 38th Congress, Malmö: Malmö Högskola , 2010, p. 68-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To have class room lessons in mathematics over the Internet in Göteborg and Shanghai at the same time.Online classrooms and distance education have been developed and discussed a lot during the last ten years; i.e. online lectures from one teacher to a group of distance students. But connecting two classrooms with each other on a regular basis through video conferencing and programs like Skype, are more of an exception. The question is why. After all, this technique has been around for a while; it is easy and works rather well even over rather poor conditions.A teacher in mathematics in Göteborg and her high school class has on a monthly basis a couple of lessons together with a high school class on the same level in Shanghai in China and she has taken the Skype technique a bit further. Today she works with a SmartBoard solution, where these electronic whiteboards are simultaneously updated, in China and in Sweden, together with sound and video connection with Skype and text messages on MSN. Between the lessons the students keep in touch with each other through MSN and e-mail.This poster will describe one of these events with photos together with interviews with students and teachers; hopefully on both ends. One part of the poster will conclude pros and cons, possibilities and problems and ask questions about what other advantages such a cooperation between class rooms can have apart from a deeper mathematical knowledge.

  • 1282.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Yttrandefrihet - för alla?1993In: Om medieverkstäder, lokal-TV och annat / [ed] K. Stigbrand, 1993Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1283.
    Åkerlund, Dan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Buskqvist, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Learning design when the classroom goes online2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract

    The Internet is increasingly being used by educators and educational institutions not only for information seeking, but also for communication and publishing students work. This paper explores how this can affect the learning situation and how we can understand the difference between an assignment carried out by a student and which is handed over directly, and only, to the teacher, compared to something that will be published and public on the net.

    The Learning Design Sequence developed by Selander (2008) has been used as an analytical tool when analyzing 5 examples from schools using web 2.0. Not having the teacher as the only addressee for a school assignment changes the value of the work and opens up for further development of knowledge, and we argue that the Selander model in some cases can be extended, when the classroom goes on line.

  • 1284.
    Åström, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Bråth, Rikki
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Organisationsstruktur och internkommunikation efter en omorganisation: En fallstudie om Karlstads universitet2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is a case study which investigated the perceived consequences of the organizational change that was implemented in January 2013 at Karlstad University. The study aimed to explore the experiences of the employees concerning the changes in organizational structure and internal communication. This was done through a set of eight individual standardized qualitative interviews with members from different departments. A lot of effort and thought was given to the ethical implications and to create a comfortable and open climate during the actual interviews to ensure that the respondents felt free to speak openly and honestly about their personal opinions and experiences.

    It is evident that the overall vision was ambitious; aiming to create a more effective organization through cutting off excessive administrative personnel and streamlining decision paths. However according to the opinions of the respondents it was clear that the result was far from the desired goal. Essentially, efficiency was only achieved at the top level. Previous administrative tasks have been moved to new members and a major uncertainty has arisen. A critical reason for the failure was the lack of communication during the organizational change, which created lots of antagonism from the employees. The management was unsuccessful in making the members feel involved in the decision making, and a lack of transparency was apparent. The hopes of a transparent organization were then high after the change, but proved to turn out quite the contrary. Decision referrals have failed to reach the employees until after the final decision has been made. The decision paths are not considered to be more effective amongst the departments and a massive dissatisfaction has emerged since employees no longer can make their own decision on matters that involve them. This involves for example shaping their own syllabi, something which they were fully capable and successful in doing before the change. A massive micromanagement has thus been created, and it is not deemed adapted to the organization as a whole. This has created an impression amongst the members that they are no longer trusted or considered competent. The merging of departments has not been successful either. Some combinations are not considered logical and the desire to break new grounds has not been achieved. The old department groups instead appear to have grown stronger, and not the cooperation in-between them, not even within the newly combined departments. One reason for this may be that the idea and hope of increasing cooperation across department borders was a desire from the management, and not the departments themselves. Thus, there is uncertainty both in the current leadership structure and internal communication. The members are lacking proper instructions on how communication should pass both up and down. Therefore they desire more distinct guidelines and an explicit division of responsibilities. The conclusion is therefore unambiguous; improved effectiveness has only been achieved in the top layers of the organization, and not facilitated work or improved the situation of the employees. This consequence is pitiful at an organization such as a university with concurrent research, which definitely possesses the knowledge and competences within both organizational structures and internal communication. Conclusively, they have not managed in successfully converting their internal assets from theory to action.

    Key words: internal communication, organizational change, organizational structure

  • 1285.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Alias2009In: The Essential Cult Television Reader / [ed] David Lavery, Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky , 2009, p. 22-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1286.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, England.
    Alternate Reality Games and Convergence Culture: The Case of Alias2007In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 445-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) are a form of internet-based mystery game in which participants are immersed in a fictional                     world and engage in collective problem-solving. This article studies three ARGs connected to the TV series Alias (ABC, 2001—6), two of them launched by the network ABC as part of the marketing of the TV series, the third produced by fans.                     Previous research on ARGs has not sufficiently problematized the fact that many ARGs are marketing tools. While ARGs can be                     analysed as part of a wider context of convergence culture and fan culture, such an analysis must take into account the underlying                     commercial logic of popular culture production. Despite the differences found between industry-produced and fan-produced ARGs,                     they still share a framework of consumption that conforms to corporate goals of marketing and brand-building as well as fan                     audiences' goals of pleasurable interaction with fictional worlds

  • 1287.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Anything you can do, I can do better?: Professional journalists vs. citizen journalistsin six European countries2013In: International Communication Gazette, ISSN 1748-0485, E-ISSN 1748-0493, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on 63 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with professional journalists across career stages and across media in six European countries (UK, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Poland and Sweden), and is concerned with how journalists answer the question: How is what you do different from what citizen journalists do? Based on existing literature on journalistic authority and the professional project, three areas where claims to professional legitimacy and distinction from amateurs are identified: expertise, duty and autonomy. The interview data show that while claims based on expertise and duty are common when professional journalists want to demarcate the boundary between them and citizen journalism, claims based on direct reference to autonomy are non-existent. However, claims based indirectly on reference to autonomy, but institutional or collective rather than individual autonomy, are common. Indeed the key result of this study is that legitimacy claims based on the collective nature of the journalistic endeavour are very common, in contrast to earlier constructions of journalistic professionalism, which emphasized individualism and individual autonomy.

  • 1288.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Clientelism, Elites and the Media in Central and Eastern Europe2012In: The International Journal of Press/Politics, ISSN 1940-1612, E-ISSN 1940-1620, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 497-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that the traditional political science definition of clientelism is insufficient for explaining how the media fit in with clientelistic systems in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). It is suggested that a broader understanding of clientelism, looking in particular at how media are used as elite-to-elite communication tools as well as elite-to-mass communication tools, better explains the place of the media in the clientelistic systems of the CEE nations. Empirically, it is based on a set of 272 elite and expert interviews conducted across ten CEE countries (Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia) in 2010 and 2011. The article presents some general findings on the nature and character of the linkages between political elites and the media, and the extent to which such linkages can be considered clientelistic. Then follows a discussion of specific practices of media instrumentalization, charting the many ways in which the media can function as a resource in conflicts and negotiations between clientelistic elite networks, directly as well as indirectly. Particular attention is given to the phenomena of advertorials and kompromat.

  • 1289.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Comparative Journalism Research: an Overview2012In: Sociology Compass, ISSN 1751-9020, E-ISSN 1751-9020, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 769-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This overview focuses on the most common type of comparative journalism research, which is cross-national comparative research. The overview presents a typology for different types of comparative journalism research, based on whether the research interest is in journalism as an activity or as a product; and, in the case of journalism as an activity, whether the interest is in the system level, the organizational level, or the individual level of journalism. The overview finds that the analysis of journalism on the individual level and of journalism as a product are the most common types of comparative research, whereas comparative analysis of journalism on the organizational level is much under-studied.

  • 1290.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Det journalistiska arbetets förändring2015In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Michael Karlsson & Jesper Strömbäck, Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 497-513Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1291.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Epistemologies and Professional Roles2017In: Journalistic Role Performance: Concepts, Contexts, and Methods / [ed] Claudia Mellado, Lea Hellmueller & Wolfgang Donsbach, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1292.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    University of Oxford faculty Politics and Int Relations.
    Introduction: Questioning European Journalism2009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 2-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that previous research on European journalism (widely defined) to a large extent tells a story of failure. Journalism is characterised as having “failed Europe” in three ways: through failure of representation, failure of production and failure of participation. However, this image of media failure rests on certain descriptive and normative assumptions about Europe and about journalism—assumptions that are sometimes explicit but more often implicit. This article suggests some new ways of questioning these assumptions in order to move research on European journalism forward.

  • 1293.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Journalism and Change2018In: Journalism / [ed] Tim P Vos, Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2018, p. 555-574Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1294.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Journalism as institution and work in Europe, circa 1860: A comparative history of journalism2013In: Media History, ISSN 1368-8804, E-ISSN 1469-9729, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 393-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a comparative historical analysis of the relationship between journalism as institution (i.e., a particular set of organizations in society) and journalism as work (i.e., an activity practiced by individuals) in four European countries: Britain, Sweden, Germany, and Estonia. The analysis compares the institutional context of journalistic work in these four countries around 1860, focusing in particular on the organization of journalistic labor at the national newspaper of record. The historical comparison reveals how exceptional the British case is. The study finds that British journalism circa 1860 exhibited a high division of labor, high labor specialization, and was increasingly focused on news gathering and production. Swedish and German journalism exhibited an emerging division of labor and labor specialization, and was focused on political debate (rather than news gathering and production). Estonian journalism exhibited hardly any division of labor or labor specialization, and was focused on raising national awareness.

  • 1295.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Journalists, PR Professionals and the Practice of Paid News in Central and Eastern Europe: An Overview2016In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 5-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1296.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Journalists thinking about precarity: Making sense of the "new normal"2018In: # ISOJ Journal, ISSN 2328-0700, E-ISSN 2328-0662, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the effects of precarity on thinking about professionalism and professional identity among journalists, based on a re-analysis of three different datasets of semi-structured in-depth interviews (gathered in 2008-09, 2010-12 and 2017, respectively) with journalists (n = 63, 55 and 11, respectively) across 14 European countries. The study shows that journalists in this cross-national sample are “primed” for precarity; i.e. they largely accept precarity as natural part of journalism because precarity is in line with key professional norms such as norms of entrepreneurship and meritocracy.

  • 1297.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Newsworkers: A Comparative European Perspective2016Book (Other academic)
  • 1298.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Reassessing journalism as a profession2010In: The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism / [ed] Stuart Allan, Abingdon: Routledge, 2010, 2, p. 568-577Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1299.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Review of Boguslawa Dobek-Ostrowska & Gunnar Nygren (eds.) Journalism in Change: Journalistic Culture in Poland, Russia and Sweden2016In: Central European Journal of Communication, ISSN 1899-5101, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 137-140Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 1300.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Technology and journalism-as-labour: historical perspectives2010In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological determinism is common among journalists when reflecting on changes in their profession; several studies show that journalists ascribe great power and independent agency to technology. There are at least two reasons for the persistence of technological determinism as an explanatory factor among journalists vis-a-vis their own work: first, technology is a highly integrated and therefore very tangible part of the everyday working life of journalists; and second, the technological paradigm for explaining change in journalism has deep historical roots. It is argued that analysing journalism as labour presents a way to address both the integration of technology in the everyday working practices of journalists, and the history of the inter-relations between journalism and technology. It is further argued that journalism studies as a field has not paid much attention to journalism as labour. This article is concerned with the second part of this programme for research, i.e. the historical analysis of journalism as labour. The framework of analysis is based on labour process theory, focusing on four themes in the history of journalism: (1) the importance of the separation of conception and execution of labour; (2) the increased differentiation of the labour process; (3) the use of technology to increase productivity; and (4) the deskilling of labour.

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