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  • 101.
    Buskqvist, Ulf
    Örebro universitet.
    Webbjournalistik på SVT och TV4: journalistik och nyheter i förändring2002Report (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Buskqvist, Ulf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Ekström, Mats
    Nyheter på nätet: organisering, arbetsformer och teknik2001Report (Other academic)
  • 103. Bylinovich, Sofya
    Personal change through agency in internet use: development of self-efficacy towards online information search2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 104.
    Bäcke, Maria
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Make-Believe and Make-Belief in Second Life Role-Playing Communities2012In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This feature article applies the concepts of ‘make-believe’ and ‘make-belief’ formulated by performance theorist, Richard Schechner, in a study of two role-play communities, Midian City and Gor in the online 3D environment Second Life. With make-believe fantasy role-play at their core, members of the two communities negotiate the social and political norms, the goals of the com- munity and as well as the boundaries of the virtual role-play. The article explores the innovative forms of interaction at play in these negotiation processes, using (cyber)ethnographic methods and the analysis of various textual sources, Goffman’s theories of social performance as well as various types of performance discussed by Schechner and Auslander. The innovative forms of interaction are analysed in the light of the new technology and as performances and make-belief strategies directed towards realizing performative utopias, towards influencing the direction in which leaders and residents of this digital context want the role-play to develop, and towards shaping the emer- gent social and cultural rules and the political framework of the role-play. 

  • 105.
    Bäcke, Maria
    Blekinge Tekniska högskola .
    Power Games: Rules and Roles in Second Life2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how the members of four different role-playing communities on the online platform Second Life perform social as well as dramatic roles within their community. The trajectories of power influencing these roles are my main focus. Theoretically I am relying primarily on performance scholar Richard Schechner, sociologist, Erving Goffman, and post-structuralists Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Felìx Guattari. My methodological stance has its origin primarily within literature studies using text analysis as my preferred method, but I also draw on the (cyber)ethnographical works of T.L. Taylor, Celia Pearce, and Mikael Jakobsson. In this dissertation my focus is on the relationship of the role-player to their chosen role especially in terms of the boundary between being in character, and as such removed from "reality," and the popping out of character, which instead highlights the negotiations of the social, sometimes make-belief, roles. Destabilising and problematising the dichotomy between the notion of the online as virtual and the offline as real, as well as the idea that everything is "real" regardless of context, my aim is to understand role-play in a digital realm in a new way, in which two modes of performance, dramatic and social, take place in a digital context online.

  • 106.
    Caridà, A.
    et al.
    University ‘Magna Græcia’ of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Colurcio, M.
    University ‘Magna Græcia’ of Catanzaro, Italy.
    Conceptualizing resource integration as an embedded process: Matching, resourcing and valuing2018In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong linkage between the creation of value and the actors’ resource-integrating efforts forces academics and practitioners to understand how value stems from resource integration (RI). This article analyses RI as an embedded process within the wider process of interactive value formation. The study is conceptual in nature and adopts a qualitative research approach and an empirical contextualization strategy. It provides a granular perspective on RI and proposes a framework that depicts RI as a process that shapes and results from a complex service context through a sequence of three phases: matching, resourcing and valuing. The article, particularly the suggested new framework, contributes to the extant literature on RI in service research; it reconceptualizes RI as process per se that is embedded in actors’ value co-creation efforts and offers the opportunity to reflect on this process as a fundamental enabler in value-creating service ecosystems.

  • 107.
    Cecilia, Burström
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Agnes, Hellstrand
    Karlstad University.
    Vargen i ett polariserat Sverige: En kritisk diskursanalys av 2015års vargjakt i lokal och rikstäckande press2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyze the discourse about wolf hunting in both local and nationwide newsmedia and whether the reporting was framed in a way that affect the relationship between the urban and rural. The following questions were asked: 1. How do the newspapers represent the hunt, the wolf and other main figures? 2. Does the discourse maintain or challenge traditional relations of power that affect the relationship between the urban and rural? 3. With question 1 and 2 in mind; Are there differences, and if so what are they, in the local and nationwide newsmedia? In order to answer these questions a qualitative content analysis of 20 articles about wolf hunting was performed. The articles were from the local newspaper Värmlands Folkblad and the nationwide newspaper Dagens Nyheter. The analysis was based on Fairclough’s theory and method critical discourse analysis and in addition the theories framing and representation was applied for further depth and understanding. The result showed that voices were put in contrast to each other with conjunctions such as “but”, “in spite of” and “however”. Thus the newspapers framed the issue as a conflict. This conflict also manifested itself in various presuppositions. The study conclude that the hunt was represented as controversial and questioned by animal- and environmental organizations as well as the UN. The representation of the wolf was full of contradictions, such as being an endangered species/not being an endangered species, it should be feared/should not be feared and there are too many wolves in Sweden/there are too few wolves in Sweden. The main interest groups hunters and livestock owners were represented as competent (the hunters) and disadvantaged (the livestock owners). Other groups, who previous research mean feel overlooked, are represented in the newspapers but not in a way which challenge traditional relations of power. Lastly, the main differences in the local and nationwide newsmedia was how much influence the different voices had in the articles. In Värmlands Folkblad’s atricles the hunters were the prominent voice whereas in Dagens Nyheter’s articles hunters were neglected. However, scientists were one of the most salient voices in Dagens Nyheter’s but were absent in Värmlands Folkblad’s articles. Thus a difference could be found in who were given the opportunity to comment the issue.

  • 108.
    Cever, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Huuhka, Tiina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    #Godaremat: En studie om hur en reklamkampanj för ett ekologiskt varumärke kan utformas2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med uppsatsen har varit att fördjupa oss i hur teori, metod och beprövad erfarenhet kan användas vid utformandet av en reklamkampanj. Vi har använt de kunskaper vi fick till att sammanställa en reklamkampanj åt uppdragsgivaren Zest som är en ekologisk matbar i Karlstad. Målet med kampanjen var att visa upp deras unika utbud av mat. För att vi skulle kunna utforma en kampanj som var både visuellt attraktiv och kunde nå ut till tänkbara kunder på bästa sätt grundades kampanjen i både teori om grafisk formgivning och dess principer. De principer vi använde inom grafisk formgivning var layout, bilder och bildkomposition samt typografi. Grafisk formgivning har hämtat många av sina principer från estetiken och därför använde vi oss även av estetiken som grund. Utöver dessa har vi använt oss av teorier om varumärke och identitet då uppdragsgivaren är väldigt måna om sitt varumärke och vill kontinuerligt jobba för att utveckla och göra det starkare. För att ha en teoretisk grund till budskapet i kampanjbilderna har vi även använt studerat hur man skriver för reklam. Vi har även studerat kommunikationskanaler och hur vi bör använda dessa för att nå ut till målgruppen. Utöver teorin och erfarenheter, grundas valet av kommunikationskanal samt budskapet i kampanjen på den empiriska undersökningen som utfördes i samband med projektet. Vi utförde en kvantitativ målgruppsundersökning i form av enkät med huvudsyfte att undersöka vad målgruppen har för matpreferenser samt vad som får dem att besöka en restaurang. Målgruppsundersökningen visade att målgruppen inte följer någon specifik kosthållning men tycker att ekologisk, fairtrade och närodlad/nyproducerad mat är viktig när de besöker en restaurang. Tillsammans med målgruppsundersökningens resultat och teorierna kunde vi utforma kampanjbilder som kan locka till sig kunder från dem närliggande platserna och samtidigt visa upp Zests unika utbud. 

  • 109.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Book Review: Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the “Heart of Darkness” to “Africa Rising” by Mel Bunce, Suzanne Franks, and Chris Paterson2018In: Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, ISSN 1077-6990, E-ISSN 2161-430X, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 534-536Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Constructive or destructive?: The effect of bloggers' criticism on journalists in Kenya2015In: The Future of Journalism 2015: Risks, Threats and Opportunities: Abstracts / [ed] Stuart Allan, Cardiff: Taylor & Francis, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Widely available media information technologies have spawned an unprecedented growth of lively debates on journalistic performance today. Indeed Web 2.0 technologies like blogs have attracted a huge participation of citizens to engage inscrutiny of content and operations of the traditional media. As a result, journalists and media organisations are now daily targets of a barrage of criticism—including insults—over poor quality of journalism. At the same time, traditional accountability instruments like the press councils are increasingly losing their significance as focus shifts to reforms on traditional media regulation as seen in the UK’s Leveson inquiry of 2011-2012. It is perhaps the reason there has been a growing body of research on participatory media regulation—greater involvement of citizens in traditional media accountability (see for instance, Fengler et al, 2014 on the EU-funded MediaAcT project). However, empirical studies on the new phenomenon—participatory media accountability—have so far been few and limited to the West. Additionally, researchers are surprisingly already celebrating the possibility of having a greater role for citizens in media accountability although among journalists this participation is still being treated with scepticism, according to Fengler et al. This study focuses on the effect of participatory media accountability through criticism by bloggers commenting on journalists’ performance in Kenya. It will involve interviews with newspaper journalists in Kenya with the aim of establishing if criticism on high-trafficblogs run by Kenyans affect their performance positively or negatively.

  • 111.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Criticism that matters: Journalists perspectives of ‘quality’ media critique2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 112. Cheruiyot, David
    Cultural capital and homeland media consumption: The case of Somali immigrants in Sweden2016In: IAMCR 2016: Diaspora and Media Working Group, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study is to interrogate the motives for the consumption of homeland media by immigrants. The special focus is to investigate whether cultural capital (Bourdieu, 1984) drives the consumption of homeland media by Somali immigrants living in Sweden. Every year more and more refugees from war-torn Somalia settle in Sweden, where they have become the largest community of Africans in Sweden. However, in settling in the Nordic country, the immigrants have had to grapple with an urge to maintain their identity as they face challenges such as integration and discrimination (Kleist, 2008). Even in their attempt to deal with new challenges, by integrating into the Swedish society by learning the Swedish culture and language, they have maintained the ‘old ties’ to their homeland in Somalia (Hiller & Franza, 2004) through the consumption of homeland media channels such as Radio Shabelle (via the internet) and Universal TV (satellite network).

    It is the ‘old ties’ to the homeland by immigrants that has been a subject of substantial research in migration studies (see for instance, Hiller & Franza, 2004). The studies have focused on various dynamics such as everyday life, construction and sustenance of identity, acculturation as well as media use.  Additionally, as an interesting area in audience research, studies into media consumption have attempted to throw light into how migrant communities satisfy their communication needs mostly based on the standard theory of uses and gratifications (Scherer, 2008). Consequently, the spotlight has been fixed on ethnic or ‘diasporic media’ (Georgiou, 2006) and how it sustains identity and culture (see Longhurst, 2007; Morley, 2007; Sinclair & Cunningham, 2000).

    However, there has been little research on consumption of homeland media and particular motives that drive individual immigrants to engage in this practice. This study appreciates the significance of the vast research on culture and identity in diasporic studies but moves further to focus on the individual immigrant in the social space and the benefit(s) derived from this specific media consumption practice. This study therefore investigates the nature of the relationship between homeland media consumption by Somali immigrants in Sweden and Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of cultural capital, based on interviews with immigrants aged between 21 and 40 years in Sweden.

  • 113.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Do bloggers who criticize the press ultimately matter?: (Re)defining media accountability in the age of citizen participation2017In: Comunicació. Revista de Recerca i d'Anàlisi, ISSN 2014-0304, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 107-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bloggers criticizing the traditional media over poor quality journalism are being touted as potentially influential instruments of media accountability. This paper questions whether in retrospect the old order of media accountability still has relevance in an increasingly networked media environment. The aim of the paper is to suggest a framework for understanding how bloggers criticizing the traditional journalism practice can be examined in a study on media accountability in the digital era. The essay interrogates the concept of media accountability and the significance of bloggers’ criticism on journalism practice.

  • 114.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Here come the critics: Journalistic discourse in Kenya and South Africa2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Media criticism in the African journalistic culture: An inventory of media accountability practices in Kenya2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Media-critical bloggers: Towards a framework for understanding participatory media accountability2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 117. Cheruiyot, David
    Online citizen criticism and media accountability: A comparative study of Kenya and South Africa2016In: Communicating with Power: 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary research question for this project is: What are the implications of the growing online citizen criticism of journalistic performance on media accountability as understood in journalism studies today?Recent studies show that the influence of traditional media regulatory frameworks, such as the press councils, is increasingly waning and their effectiveness in regulation of journalism performance is being questioned (see Fengler et al 2014; Leveson 2012). In fact, MediaAcT1 (Media Accountability and Transparency) research, recommend that citizens who criticise the traditional media should be integrated into media accountability processes (Fengler et al). Indeed, citizens on social media and blogs often elicit interesting debates on journalistic performance by pointing out errors in traditional media content or even unethical practices of journalists. It is the reason the discourse on media accountability studies today focuses on the question whether citizens could become effective ‘watchers of the watchdog’ through legitimate criticism of the journalism profession. Even so, although journalists seem to be aware and keep track of media criticism online (Pole & Rehkopf 2012; Joseph 2011), there is still little understanding on whether issues raised by citizens are legitimate and pertinent to the journalism practice. But even with the exploratory work of MediaAcT—that expanded Hallin and Mancini's (2004) conception of media systems—there are still few studies that have examined the viability of citizen criticism online as a potential media accountability mechanism as well as its impact on journalism performance. The specific question whether media criticism has a transformative value on journalism practice is still widely unresearched, especially in journalistic cultures beyond the connected West yet there are claims that “the effects are already visible” in news media (Powell & Jempson 2014, 126). This project therefore will examine the influence of citizen criticism online on journalism performance. The research will focus on newspaper journalists as well as critical content on blogs and social media in order to evaluate media criticism as a potential media accountability mechanism in Kenya and South Africa. The conceptual framework that lays a basis for this study is participatory media accountability (as conceptualised in the seminal work of Bertrand, 2000) and media criticism (see for example Carey 1974; Marzolf 1991; Wyatt 2007). This methodological focus for this comparative study will be based on mixed methods. The project will employ a content analysis of media-critical content on blogs and Twitter whose criticism is focused on the mainstream newspapers in Kenya and South Africa. The outcome from the content analysis will be the basis for semi-structured interviews with 30 journalists in each of the two countries.

  • 118.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Participatory media accountability: Evaluating the relevance of bloggers’ criticism on journalism practice2015In: NordMedia 2015: Media Presence - Media Modernities, Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Popular Criticism That Matters: Journalists’ perspectives of “quality” media critique2018In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular criticism of legacy news media is argued to have the capacity to influence journalistic practice and subsequently keep journalists accountable. Scholars give prescriptions of the kinds of criticisms journalists need, if they are to be kept accountable to journalistic norms and values, but this has not been matched with perspectives of journalists. Following in-depth interviews with 24 practising journalists in Kenya and South Africa, the study found that although journalists treat fairness, facts and positiveness as “good” attributes of media critique, they are more inclined towards criticisms that show an understanding of news processes.

  • 120.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    #SomeoneTellCNN: Media accountability from the perspective of Kenyans on Twitter2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The 7th Mass Medium: An Exploration into the Role of Mobile Media in Development2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 122.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The ‘media arm’ of a global court: Cosmopolitanism and the International Criminal Court’s TV series on Kenya’s trials2015In: Geomedia 2016: Spaces and mobilities in mediatized worlds, Karlstad: Karlstad university , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a global body with a mission to deliver justice to humanity, the International Criminal Court (ICC) inspires an interesting discourse in cosmopolitanism studies. Arguably, it is the ICC that puts to effective practice moral cosmopolitanism (Pierik and Werner, 2010). Indeed, when the global court produces a TV series targeting local populations in Sub-Saharan Africa, it interestingly shifts the spotlight to an area that has taken an overtheoritical nature over the years—the relationship between the media and cosmopolitanism. Potentially illuminating empirical studies in this area have been few, Western-centric and limited to the paradigm of the reception of distant suffering. This paper empirically examines the influence of media texts on audiences. Inspired specifically by Ask the Court—a TV programme on YouTube on the trial of Kenya’s president, his deputy and a journalist over electoral violence in 2007-2008—this exploratory study questions whether the Hague-based court has a role in “cosmopolitanization” (Beck, 2006). Indeed, the questions guiding this research are: What are the manifestations of cosmopolitanism in the programme? Does the programme influence the audience to have a ‘cosmopolitan awareness’ of global justice? The results of the study are based on a textual analysis of a selection of Ask the Court episodes and a subsequent survey of a cross-section of audiences of the programme in Kenya.

  • 123.
    Cheruiyot, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The role of mobile media in development: The case of Kenya2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Extract. Inject. Repeat.: Expanding journalistic practice through civic technologies and data journalism2018In: Nordic Data Journalism Conference (NODA18): “The second wave of data journalism research”, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Extract. Inject. Repeat.: Expanding journalistic practice through civic technologies and data journalism2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Baack, Stefan
    Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.
    Fact-checking and journalism discourse: The perceived influence of data-driven non-profits in Africa2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Uppal, Charu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    New Pan-Africanism?: Expressions of African identity on Twitter2016In: Gender & change : challenges for Africa: Nordic Africa Days 2016, Uppsala 23-24 September, Uppsala: The Nordic Africa Institute , 2016, , p. 144p. 56-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will interrogate the question whether a collective identity of a new Pan-Africanism is emerging through social media in Africa. The study focuses on the use of the hashtag IfAfricaWasABar by Twitter users across the continent in July 2015. It will entail a qualitative content analysis of tweets that were accompanied by #IfAfricaWasABar to analyse the issues raised by African Twitter users as regards their identity. #IfAfricaWasABar was started by Motswana author Siyanda Mohutsiwa and was trending for several weeks in different countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The hashtag called upon Twitter users across Africa to satirize the Western media narrative of Africa as a country by coming up with hilarious lines that imagine the continent as a bar, which has interesting characters who in real life would define the continent's culture, politics and social life.

    Studies of Twitter use for expression of identity in Africa are few although there has been a marked increase of citizen participation on this social media platform (Portland Communications, 2012). Twitter has indeed turned into an interesting platform for deliberation and daily conversations among citizens. Such kinds of citizen engagement are turning out to offer an interesting forum for jokes as well as serious social and political discussion for discourses that appeal to citizens across the continent, who are both online and offline. In fact, in their recent study on the use of Twitter by Kenyans, Tully and Ekdale (2014) conclude that 'playful engagement' on Twitter is spurring significant deliberation as users "infuse developmental agendas in their comments, actions and interactions" (p.68).

    The article will argue that more than offering a platform for deliberation, Twitter as a new media technology in Africa is enabling African citizens to recreate an African identity in the global space. It will seek to revive the old debate on Pan-Africanism and its expressions on media space, which has so far been overshadowed a process of globalization. It will further trace and discuss the discourses in the nexus of Pan-Africanism, identity as well use of Twitter in Africa. The article will pose the question whether through Twitter, a "New Pan-Africanism" is emerging, where ordinary citizens rather than elites determine how Pan-Africanism should be defined and expressed on global space.        

  • 128.
    Cheruiyot, David
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Uppal, Charu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Pan-Africanism as a laughing matter: (Funny) Expressions of African identity on Twitter2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pan-Africanism, a concept that attempts to capture the essence of being an African, needs to be reconsidered in the age of interactive social media. In this chapter, we look at how Twitter users negotiate the question of African identity through humourous hashtag-driven conversations. We specifically interrogate the question whether a new kind of Pan-Africanism is emerging on Africa’s Twitterverse through the use of a popular hashtag in 2015, #IfAfricaWasABar. In our analysis of tweets linked to #IfAfricaWasABar, we conclude that Twitter provides temporary solidarity by engaging users in humorous exchanges about socio-cultural, political and economic issues that define the African continental condition today. 

  • 129.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    ABBA 1974: The Birth of Swedish Modernity?2007In: Media Res: A Media Commons ProjectArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Art, Dissent and the Moorean Dilemma2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 131.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Born in the USA Turns 252009In: Le Monde Diplomatique, ISSN 1695-758X, no marchArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 132.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Brave New Films: Using Documentary and the Internet as Tools for Political Organization2009In: Documentary Films Redefining the Genre, Ahmedabad, India: ICFAI University Press , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Breaking the News: Concentration of Ownership, Attack on Unions and Government Regulation in Turkey2007In: Global Media & Communication 3(2)Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Breaking the News: Concentration of Ownership, the Fall of Unions and Government Legislation in Turkey2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Context and the developed world: Newspaper coverage of crisis in Scotland and Belgium1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Defending, Representing or Branding? Gringo Magazine and Swedish Multiculturalism2008In: Shifting Landscapes: Film and Media in European Context / [ed] M. Christensen & N. Erdogan, Cambridge: UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishers , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Democratizing Film? Folkets Bio, FilmCentrum and Swedish Cinema after 19682008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Documentary Films After 9/112009In: Studies in Documentary Film, ISSN 1750-3280, E-ISSN 1750-3299, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 197-198Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    European Media after Re-regulation2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Fahrenheit 9/11 Üzerine Düşünceler2005In: Seyir: Sinema Dergisi (Turkish language publication), Vol. 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    For Many, British is Better2004In: British Journalism Review (2004) 15(3)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    God Save Us From The Islam Clichés2006In: British Journalism Review (2006), 17(1)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Hey Man, Nice Shot: Setting the Iraq War to Music on YouTube2009In: The YouTube Reader / [ed] P. Snickars & P. Vonderau, London: Wallflower Press / National Library of Sweden , 2009, p. 204-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Iran: Networked Dissent2009In: Le Monde DiplomatiqueArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 145.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Islam in the Media: Cartoons and Context2006In: Screen Education (Issue 41)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Journalists and Jesters2009In: British Journalism Review, ISSN 0956-4748, E-ISSN 1741-2668, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 7-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Lack of Resources or Love of Infotainment? Factors Affecting Story Selection in Local Television News in Sweden2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Licking the Hand that Feeds You: CNN's 'Reliable Sources' and the Co-Opting of Media Critique2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Life or Death for Public Service Broadcasting? Pascal's Wager for a 21st Century Europe1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Christensen, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Media Ethics, Policy and Research: The Need for an Academic-Professional Nexus2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1234567 101 - 150 of 1315
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