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  • 1.
    Berglund, Teresa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang-Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Investigating Swedish upper secondary students’ integrated understanding of sustainable development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berglund, Teresa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang-Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    The implementation of education for sustainable development in Sweden: Investigating the sustainability consciousness among upper secondary students2014In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, Vol. 32, no 3, 318-339 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sustainable development (SD) is a complex idea, based on environmental, economic and social dimensions. In line with SD, education for sustainable development (ESD) is an approach to teaching that combines cognitive and affective domains and aims to build empowerment abilities.

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to investigate effects of the implementation of ESD in Sweden, in terms of developing students’ sustainability consciousness (SC). Two groups of students were included: one was from schools with a profile of ESD and the other one was from comparable schools without explicit ESD-profile.

    Sample: A total of 638 students from upper secondary schools (grade 12) in science-related or social science-related programs participated in the study.

    Design and methods: A procedure was created for the selection of schools considered to be the most active in using an ESD approach as well as comparable schools with no explicit ESD approach. During spring 2013, the students responded to a questionnaire based on sustainability knowingness, attitudes and behaviors within the environmental, economic and social dimensions of SD that together constitute the concept of SC. Data were analyzed using SPSS software.

    Results: The results indicate that there are significant differences in SC between students from schools that teach with an ESD approach compared to students from regular schools. Furthermore, a significant difference between the two groups of students was found in the underlying economic dimension of SC. No significant differences were found in the environmental and social dimensions of SC.

    Conclusions: Although the results show that ESD-profiled schools have effect on students' SC, the effects are relatively small. Therefore, the effects and nature of the implementation of ESD are discussed.

  • 3.
    Bergqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Drechsler, Michal
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Upper Secondary Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models2016In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 2, 298-318 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  • 4.
    Bergqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Drechsler, Michal
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    De Jong, Onno
    Utrecht University, Netherlands .
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Representations of chemical bonding models in school textbooks: Help or hindrance for understanding?2013In: Chemistry education, ISSN 1109-4028, Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1109-4028, Vol. 14, 589-606 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models play an important and central role in science as well as in science education. Chemical bonding is one of the most important topics at upper secondary school chemistry, and this topic is dominated by the use of models. In the past decade, research has shown that chemical bonding is a topic that students find difficult, and therefore, a wide range of alternative conceptions are developed by students. This study focuses on analyzing the models of chemical bonding in chemistry textbooks at upper secondary level and aims to investigate the content of chemical bonding presented in chemistry textbooks with respect to students’ learning difficulties (alternative conceptions and difficulties in understanding). Chapters concerning chemical bonding in five chemistry textbooks at upper secondary level in Sweden were analyzed. The results showed that the models of chemical bonding represented in the school textbooks might cause students’ alternative conceptions and difficulties in understanding chemical bonding, which matched the findings found by other recent studies. Implications for textbooks’ authors and teachers are addressed.

  • 5.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu Nu
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Stockholm University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Germany.
    Alexandersson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Learning about flood risk: Comparing the Web-based and physical flood-walk learning environments2015In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous of sustainable development related challenges are emerging today, e.g. flooding problems. Our group has developed ’the flood walk’ project since 2010 to convey flood risk knowledge in an authentic context. Considering the limitation of time and space to educate people the flood risk knowledge, we tried to transform the physical flood walk field trip into a Web-based virtual trip. In this study, we aim to examine whether the Web-based flood-walk environment can help participants to achieve the same learning outcome as its authentic counterpart. A total of 65 upper secondary school pupils participated in this study. The results illustrate that a physical experience is irreplaceable, and the importance of providing physical experiences for learners in both formal and informal education needs to be emphasised.

  • 6.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    How does background affect attitudes to technico-scientific issues in Taiwan?2011In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 20, no 6, 722-732 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Post it! - A cross-disciplinary approach to teach socioscientific issues2011In: Teaching Science, ISSN 1449-6313, Vol. 5, no 3, 25-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    SEE-SEP: From a separate to a holistic view on socio-scientific issues2010In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 11, no 1, Article 2- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The trend of socioscientific issues (SSIs) has been emergent in the science- and technology-dominated society of today. Accordingly, during the past 20 years, students’ skills of argumentation and informal reasoning about SSIs have achieved greater emphasis and profile in school education. Based upon the importance of SSIs, more and more researchers have investigated how students reason and make arguments about SSIs, and also explored the dimensions influencing students’ arguments and also involved in the various SSIs. This article has a threefold purpose. Firstly, we want to address the different roles of SSIs in science education nowadays, and secondly, after reviewing the divergent dimensions involved in SSIs from previous literature, we want to provide a holistic view to represent the essence of SSIs via the SEE-SEP model (connecting six subject areas of Sociology/culture, Environment, Economy, Science, Ethics/morality and Policy with three aspects of value, personal experience and knowledge) developed here. Thirdly, to support the SEE-SEP model, examples extracted from former studies are presented. The implications for research and for school science education are discussed.

  • 9.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang, Chun-Yen
    NTNU.
    Tseng, Y-H
    NTNU.
    Cultural comparison of scientific literacy in media (SLiM) – From the perspective of biology subject2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang, C-Y
    NTNU.
    Comparing Swedish senior high and undergraduate students’ scientific literacy in media (SLiM) regarding biological terms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Externalizing students' mental models through concept maps2007In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, Vol. 41, no 3, 107-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Implementing “Science Across the World” in a Resource-Based Learning Activity regarding Sustainable Development Issues2007In: Science Education International, ISSN 1022-6117, Vol. 18, no 4, 245-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The rapid development of science and technology has become a global issue in modern society, since it will not only bring conveniences into peoples lives but it may also cause extensive environmental damage to the planet earth. Therefore, it is important to propagate the notion of Science Technology and Society (STS) and the awareness of sustainable development. The purpose of this study was to implement a Science across the World (SAW) activity in a resource-based environment regarding two sustainable issues, global warming and renewable energy, and to investigate students responses to this SAW activity. Seventy-eight non-science major freshmen participated in the study. The results from participants questionnaires indicated that students felt most interested in exploring ideas locally via Internet, and exchanging information with students from other countries globally. Through this activity, students also presented the positive results of the acquisition of knowledge, and they felt that their inquiry abilities got improved. Implication of STS teaching on students learning and attitudes are discussed. KEY WORDS: Resource-based learning, science across the world, STS, sustainable development.

  • 13.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Investigate creative problem solving from the cases of patents2003In: Business Education Quarterly, Vol. 90, 48-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Investigating Taiwanese 9th-graders’ scientific literacy via authentic assessment2008In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 9, no 1, article 15- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to introduce Taiwanese last curriculum standards and the development of authentic assessment to investigate 9th-graders’ scientific literacy in Taiwan. From this study, it was revealed that authentic assessment provided another possibility to evaluate students’ scientific cognition better than the traditional achievement tests. Besides, the hands-on activity developed by this study offered an opportunity to make students enjoy the examination more and showed a higher consistency with lower-achievement students’ performance on the national entrance exam. The discussion and implementation are presented.

  • 15.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Teaching argumentation through the visual models in a resource-based learning environment2007In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 8, no 1, article 5- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific literacy is the ultimate goal in science education world-wide; especially in this modern society of science and technology. How to help individuals to make good judgments and promote their skills of argumentation becomes an important issue. Meanwhile, in the Information Age, visual image is an important medium for conveying information. The purpose of this study is to teach argumentation through visual models in a non-science major class and to investigate which visual models of argumentation students like to choose for constructing their arguments concerning genetically modified food in a resource-based learning environment. The results revealed that most of the participants chose Lakatos’ scientific research programmes as the model to construct their arguments most, and there were three kinds of reasons participants provided about why they chose this model. In addition, the questions concerning genetically modified food that students felt interested to explore were also investigated. The implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 16.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    The investigation of the current Taiwanese senior high school students’ attitudes towards the vocation for science2005In: Taiwan Education Review, Vol. 636, 33-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    The learning effect of modelling ability instruction2008In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 9, no 2, 3- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve the goal of scientific literacy, besides conveying science and technology concepts, cultivating students' modeling ability has become important. However, in-service teachers face the difficulty that their teaching load increases while they are still bound by limited teaching hours. Teachers may know of modeling ability, life related content and hands-on activities which are all important and beneficial for science learning; however, they very often find it is hard to engage all these methods into their limited teaching hours. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop an efficient method of instruction based upon the frameworks of cognitive apprenticeship and modeling ability to promote students' modeling ability and scientific concept regarding battery. A topic oriented instructional design has been adopted to develop a four-lesson instruction (200 minutes in total). There were 149 non-science majors from three classes invited to participate in this study. They were randomly assigned different instructions, and students' performances were evaluated by three kinds of tests: the general modeling ability test, concept tests and context-based modeling tests. The results indicate cognitive apprenticeship and modeling ability instruction could significantly improve students' modeling ability and also enhance their learning regarding the concept of the battery. However, it is remarkable to point out that, "modeling ability instruction" and the "video lab" provided in this study play the crucial roles. The implication of this study is also discussed.

  • 18.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    To reflect educational learning via researches in cognitive science: In the case of reasoning2004In: Research and Development in Science Education Quarterly, Vol. 34, 29-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Using authentic assessment to investigate modeling ability2008In: Science Education Monthly, Vol. 308, 2-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Chiu, M. H.
    National Taiwan Normal University.
    Lakatos' scientific research programmes as a framework for analysing informal argumentation about socioscientific issues2008In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 30, no 13, 1753-1773 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore how Lakatos' scientific research programmes might serve as a theoretical framework for representing and evaluating informal argumentation about socio-scientific issues. Seventy undergraduate science and non-science majors were asked to make written arguments about four socio-scientific issues. Our analysis showed that the science majors' informal arguments were significantly better than the non-science majors' arguments. In terms of the resources for supporting reasons, we find that personal experience and scientific belief are the two categories that are generated most often in both groups of the participants. Besides, science majors made significantly greater use of analogies, while non-science majors made significantly greater use of authority. In addition, both science majors and non-science majors had a harder time changing their arguments after participating in a group discussion. In the study of argumentation in science, scholars have often used Toulmin's framework of data, warrant, backing, qualifiers, claims, and rebuttal. Our work demonstrates that Lakatos' work is also a viable perspective, especially when warrant and backing are difficult to discern, and when students' arguments are resistant to change. Our use of Lakatos' framework highlights how the 'hard core' of students' arguments about socio-scientific issues does, indeed, seem to be protected by a 'protective belt' and, thus, is difficult to alter. From these insights, we make specific implications for further research and teaching.

  • 21.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Chiu, Mei-Hung
    National Taiwan Normal University.
    The development of authentic assessments to investigate ninth graders' scientific literacy: in the case of scientific cognition concerning the concepts of chemistry and physics2005In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 3, no 1, 117-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific literacy and authenticity have gained a lot of attention in the past few decades worldwide. The goal of the study was to develop various authentic assessments to investigate students scientific literacy for corresponding to the new curriculum reform of Taiwan in 1997. In the process, whether ninth graders were able to apply school knowledge in real-life problems was also investigated. Over the course of our two-year study, we developed authentic assessments to investigate a stratified random sampling of 1,503 ninth graders levels of scientific literacy, including scientific cognition, process skills, application of science, habits of mind, nature of science, and attitude towards science. The purpose of this article is to discuss three different formats of authentic assessments: multiple-choice, open-ended, and hands-on test items, which we developed to investigate scientific cognition. To validate the three formats of authentic assessments, students performance on these three assessments were compared with the science section of Taiwans Academic Attainment Testing (STAAT), and the values of Pearson correlation coefficient were all at the significant level, ranging from 0.205 to 0.660 (p<0.01). We found that our three authentic assessments were better in evaluating students authentic abilities in science than standardized tests (such as STAAT). Further authentic assessments, particularly the hands-on activity, benefited low-achieving students. Concerning the common themes tested in the authentic assessments, students performed better in a multiple-choice test than an open-ended test on electricity and heat and temperature. In addition, two themes of chemical reactions and reactions of acid and base with indicators were performed best in a hands-on test than in the other two tests. In this article, we provide evidence that authentic assessments could be developed in different formats to investigate students scientific cognition as part of the national test. Of these formats, the multiple-choice, open-ended, and hands-on test items are all shown to be sensitive in their evaluation of students cognition in science.

  • 22.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Lin, C. H.
    National Yang-Ming University, Shih-Pai, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Lin, A.
    National Yang-Ming University, Shih-Pai, Taipei, Taiwan.
    An acidic amino acid cluster regulates the nucleolar localization and ribosome assembly of human ribosomal protein L222000In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 484, no 1, 22-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The control of human ribosomal protein L22 (rpL22) to enter into the nucleolus and its ability to be assembled into the ribosome is regulated by its sequence. The nuclear import of rpL22 depends on a classical nuclear localization signal of four lysines at positions 13-16. RpL22 normally enters the nucleolus via a compulsory sequence of KKYLKK (I-domain, positions 88-93). An acidic residue cluster at the C-terminal end (C-domain) plays a nuclear retention role. The retention is concealed by the N-domain (positions 1-9) which weakly interacts with the C-domain as demonstrated in the yeast two-hybrid system. Once it reaches the nucleolus, the question of whether rpL22 is assembled into the ribosome depends upon the presence of the N-domain. This suggests that the N-domain, on dissociation from its interaction with the C-domain, binds to a specific region of the 28S rRNA for ribosome assembly.

  • 23.
    Chang, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier.
    Yeung, Yau-Yuen
    Hong Kong Institute of Education.
    Cheng, May Hung
    Hong Kong Institute of Education.
    Ninth graders’ learning interests, life experiences and attitudes towards science & technology2009In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 18, no 5, 447-457 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ learning interests and attitudes toward science have both been studied for decades. However, the connection between them with students’ life experiences about science and technology has not been addressed much. The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ learning interests and life experiences about science and technology, and also their attitudes toward technology. A total of 942 urban ninth graders in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A Likert scale questionnaire, which was developed from an international project, ROSE, was adapted to collect students’ ideas. The results indicated that boys showed higher learning interests in sustainability issues and scientific topics than girls. However, girls recalled more life experiences about science and technology in life than boys. The data also presented high values of Pearson correlation about learning interests and life experiences related to science and technology, and in the perspective on attitudes towards technology. Ways to promote girls’ learning interests about science and technology and the implications of teaching and research are discussed as well.

  • 24.
    Chang-Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Research in Science Education: A Comparison between Sweden and Taiwan2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Investigating students’ use of knowledge, value and personal experiences (KVP) in relation to the different attributes of socioscientific issues2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Höglund, Hans-Olof
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Upper secondary students’ use of scientific knowledge in arguing socioscientific issues2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Swedish National Graduate School in Science, Technology and Mathematics Education Research, Linköping Univeristy .
    Höglund, Hans-Olof
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Using the SEE-SEP model to analyse upper secondary students' use of supporting reasons in arguing socioscientific issues2012In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 21, no 3, 342-352 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve the goal of scientific literacy, the skills of argumentation have been emphasized in science education during the past decades. But the extent to which students can apply scientific knowledge to their argumentation is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse 80 Swedish upper secondary students' informal argumentation on four socioscientific issues (SSIs) to explore students' use of supporting reasons and to what extent students used scientific knowledge in their arguments. Eighty upper secondary students were asked to express their opinions on one SSI topic they chose through written reports. The four SSIs in this study include global warming, genetically modified organisms (GMO), nuclear power, and consumption. To analyse students' supporting reasons from a holistic view, we used the SEE-SEP model, which links the six subject areas of sociology/culture (So), environment (En), economy (Ec), science (Sc), ethics/morality (Et) and policy (Po) connecting with three aspects, and (KVP). The results showed that students used value to a greater extent (67%) than they did scientific knowledge (27%) for all four SSI topics. According to the SEE-SEP model, the distribution of supporting reasons generated by students differed among the SSI topics. Also, some alternative concepts were disclosed in students' arguments. The implications for research and education are discussed.

  • 28.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Zeidler, Dana
    University of South Florida, USA.
    The Relationship of Discipline Background to Upper Secondary Students´ Argumentation on Socioscientific Issues2014In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 44, no 4, 581-601 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics)-driven society, socioscientific issues (SSI) have become a focus globally and SSI research has grown into an important area of study in science education. Since students attending the social and science programs have a different focus in their studies and research has shown that students attending a science program are less familiar with argumentation practice, we make a comparison of the supporting reasons social science and science majors use in arguing different SSI with the goal to provide important information for pedagogical decisions about curriculum and instruction. As an analytical framework, a model termed SEE-SEP covering three aspects (of knowledge, value, and experiences) and six subject areas (of sociology/culture, economy, environment/ecology, science, ethics/morality, and policy) was adopted to analyze students’ justifications. A total of 208 upper secondary students (105 social science majors and 103 science majors) from Sweden were invited to justify and expound their arguments on four SSI including global warming, genetically modified organisms (GMO), nuclear power, and consumer consumption. The results showed that the social science majors generated more justifications than the science majors, the aspect of value was used most in students’ argumentation regardless of students’ discipline background, and justifications from the subject area of science were most often presented in nuclear power and GMO issues. We conclude by arguing that engaging teachers from different subjects to cooperate when teaching argumentation on SSI could be of great value and provide students from both social science and science programs the best possible conditions in which to develop argumentation skills.

  • 29.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    A cross-disciplinary approach to teaching socioscientific issues: A study of the co-operation between language and science teachers teaching about global warming2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To combine the teaching of scientific concepts with the challenging problems of socioscientific issues (SSI) has been shown to be effective on engaging students in discussions and in developing students’ skills in decision-making and critical thinking. Research has revealed that teaching SSI in science education is a challenging task for science teachers alone suggesting a co-operation with teachers of the humanities, proposing that these teachers might be better at managing debates and other pedagogical methods related to a SSI driven instruction. However, to our knowledge no one has yet investigated the outcomes of a co-operation between language teachers, who regularly in their courses teach topics like argumentation, debate and how to write an argumentative text, and science teachers. Hence, the aim of our study is to investigate how the co-operation of teachers from different disciplines (language and science teachers) can contribute to upper secondary school students’ argumentation skills about global warming. A total of ten teachers from the subjects of Swedish (mother tongue), English, biology, physics and chemistry will participate in this study together with two classes of science major students in their first year of upper secondary school, which they teach. Data will be collected from both the teachers by interviews at the end of the teaching sequence and from students making a pre- and post-test of written argumentation about global warming, as well as interviews. Since this study is an ongoing project, we are still collecting data. We foresee that we will find that the teachers as well as the students can provide us with insights on how they perceive a cross-disciplinary teaching with focus on SSI, and also that we will be able to follow some progression in students argumentation through the pre- and post-test. Our findings on the learning outcome and how teachers and students perceive a cross-disciplinary teachers’ cooperation on SSI will be presented at the ERIDOB-conference. We believe that the results from our study will provide valuable insights on how to develop future SSI-teaching by using a cross-disciplinary approach and how the involvement of language teachers may be of help to the science teachers in doing this.

  • 30.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Science and language teachers' assessment of upper secondary students' socioscientific argumentation2016In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and policy-makers have recognized the importance of including and promoting socioscientific argumentation in science education worldwide. The Swedish curriculum focuses more than ever on socioscientific issues (SSI) as well. However, teaching socioscientific argumentation is not an easy task for science teachers and one of the more distinguished difficulties is the assessment of students’ performance. In this study, we investigate and compare how science and Swedish language teachers, participating in an SSI-driven project, assessed students’ written argumentation about global warming. Swedish language teachers have a long history of teaching and assessing argumentation and therefore it was of interest to identify possible gaps between the two groups of teachers’ assessment practices. The results showed that the science teachers focused on students’ content knowledge within their subjects, whereas the Swedish language teachers included students’ abilities to select and use content knowledge from reliable reference resources, the structure of the argumentation and the form of language used. Since the Swedish language teachers’ assessment correlated more with previous research about quality in socioscientific argumentation, we suggest that a closer co-operation between the two groups could be beneficial in terms of enhancing the quality of assessment. Moreover, SSI teaching and learning as well as assessment of socioscientific argumentation ought to be included in teacher training programs for both pre- and in-service science teachers.

  • 31.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Science and Swedish language teachers’ assessment of upper secondary students’ socioscientific argumentation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish curricula, as well as researchers and policy makers worldwide, have recognized the importance of promoting and including sociscientific argumentation in science education to promote scientific literacy. However, to teach socioscientific argumentation in not an easy task for science teachers and among the difficulties is the assessment practice. In this small-scale qualitative study, we have, investigated and compared how science and Swedish language teachers, participating in a SSI-driven project, assess students’ written argumentation about Global warming. The Swedish language teachers have a long tradition of teaching and assessing argumentation and therefore it is of interest to identify possible gaps between these two groups. The results indicate that the science teachers focus on students’ ability to reproduce content knowledge within their respective subject that they have been teaching. The Swedish language teachers include students’ abilities to select and use content knowledge from trustable reference resources, in addition to the structure of the argumentation and the form of the language used. In fact, the Swedish language teachers’ assessment correlates more to previous research about quality in socioscientific argumentation and we suggest that a closer co-operation between these two groups can be beneficial to enhance the quality of assessing students’ socioscientific argumentation.

  • 32.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    A Framework for Teachers’ Assessment of Socio-scientific Argumentation: An example using the GMO issue2014In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, E-ISSN 2157-6009, no 2, 204-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-scientific issues (SSI) have proven to be suitable contexts for students to actively reflect on and argue about complex social issues related to science. Research has indicated that explicitly teaching SSI argumentation is a good way to help students develop their argumentation skills and make them aware of the complexity of SSI. However, assessing the quality of students’ arguments on SSI is evidently difficult for many teachers. This article aims to facilitate teachers’ assessment of the quality of students’ arguments on SSI by introducing a new assessment framework that represents a low degree of complexity and exemplifying it by applying it to students’ written SSI argumentation concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO). The new assessment framework considers both the quality indicators presented in the research literature and curricular guidelines for the science courses in Swedish secondary and upper secondary school. The framework focuses on both the content and the structure that can be revealed in students’ SSI argumentation and is meant to function as a tool for identifying quality indicators that could serve as the basis for grading.

  • 33.
    Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Developing a continuous professional development to enhance inquiry-based science teaching.2014In: Enhancing Inquiry-based Science Professional Development in Europe: PROFILES Project and other Projects funded by the European Commission / [ed] Bolte, C., & Rauch, F, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, based on PROFILES, a continuous professional development (CPD) program developed in Karlstad Sweden is presented. A main strategy was to incorporate the elements of (1) the existing laboratory teaching tradition and (2) the teachers’ group reflections on inquiry-based science teaching mentioned in Swedish curriculum (Lgr 11), besides offering possibilities to use new equipment and using PROFILES three-step teaching module as teaching support. This was to facilitate the teachers’ negotiation process between the key ideas of laboratory work existing in the Swedish teaching tradition/teaching practice and of laboratory inquiry-based teaching discussed in the international literature. The CPD program demonstrated the co-constructing process among the in-service science teachers and the CPD provider. The participants were 15 lower secondary teachers and the program lasted for forty hours distributed on the total of six workshops.

  • 34.
    Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Matching Inquiry- and Context-based Science Education to Swedish Curricula.2012In: Inquiry-based Science Education in Europe: Reflections from the PROFILES Project / [ed] Bolte, C., Holbrook, J., Rauch, F., 2012, 179-182 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Drechsler, Michal
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Exploring the negotiation of the meaning of laboratory work in a continuous professional development program for lower secondary teachers2016In: The Electronic Journal of Science Education, ISSN 1087-3430, Vol. 20, no 8, 28-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Drechsler, Michal
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Negotiating the meaning of laboratory work work adressing inquiry-based science teaching2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore teachers’ negotiation process between the key ideas of laboratory work existing in the Swedish teaching tradition and of inquiry-based science teaching discussed in the international literature. The participants were 15 lower secondary teachers who joined an in-service teacher training program. Two times of group reflections were audio recorded and one focused group interview were collected as data resources. The preliminary result, based on two groups of six teachers, indicated that the negotiation process turned out very differently in different groups dependent on how the participant challenged themselves and negotiated with each other. The reflections concerning the awareness of different purposes on doing laboratory work for science teaching and learning were successful reached in one of the groups, while limited for the other one, , even though they were developing similar teaching activities during the program. The implication to inquiry-based science teaching for teacher training is presented.

  • 37.
    Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholms universitet.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Stockholms universitet.
    När läroplan och tradition möts: hur högstadielärare bemöter yttre förväntningar på undersökande arbete i naturämnesundervisningen2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 1, 88-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current Swedish curricula for compulsory school (Lgr11) emphasize inquiry-based science teaching to develop pupils’ critical thinking while the Swedish laboratory teaching tradition emphasize laboratory work to gain students conceptual understanding. The aim of this study is to illuminate how a group of teachers within the Swedish teaching tradition, based on the prevailing condition, met the external expectations of involving pupils in inquiry-based science teaching. During a teacher professional development program, the entire group of lower secondary science teachers within a school district, twelve in total, participated in group reflections about own inquiry activities. The results indicated that teachers, despite shortage of activates, wanted to involve pupils in inquiry-based science teaching to meet the curricula’s’ and national tests’ request for such activities. The teachers did this through hybridization, in which the teachers opened up and transformed existing laboratory activities; and by imitation, in which they imitated how investigative inquiry is carried out on national tests. Inquiry-based science teaching, as it emerges in this study, possessed several characteristics might limiting the potential for pupils to develop an understanding functional for critical thinking in private- and public lives. 

  • 38.
    Olsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Chang-Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Young people and their integrated understanding of sustainable development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate young peoples’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors as well as their integrated understanding of sustainable development (SD). Comparisons will be made between two groups of Swedish primary (6th graders) and secondary (9th graders) pupils. A common description of SD often includes the interrelationship between the environmental, economic and social dimensions. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is described as a framework in teaching that will incorporate all three of these dimensions. To integrate the different dimensions in everyday-life and decision making for a sustainable future requires new ways of thinking, valuing and acting. Hence, the integrated understanding of SD in terms of knowledge, also have to be reflected in pupils’ attitudes and behavior, which is investigated in this study. The research design is based on a quantitative approach using a survey instrument consisting of items with Likert-type scales. The survey instrument is developed by considering the dimensions of SD as they are described by UNESCO. During spring 2013, data will be gathered from pupils in the 6th-grade level (n=1000) and 9th-grade level (n=1000). Half of the pupils in each grade are from schools having supporting structures that help them in the ESD approach and the other half are from regular schools without an explicit ESD approach. At the time of ESERA conference the data analyzes will be completed and preliminary results can be presented. For analysis one way ANOVA and T-test will be used.  We will highlight whether there are differences between primary and secondary pupils’ knowledge, attitudes and behavior in the dimensions of SD or not, and secondly whether there are differences between primary and secondary school pupils’ recognition of the three dimensions as part of SD. Implications for the implementation of ESD will be discussed.

  • 39.
    Olsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Shu-Nu, Chang-Rundgren
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Investigating young peoples’ integrated understanding of sustainable development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A usual description of sustainable development (SD) often comprehends the interrelationship between the environmental, economic and social dimensions. According to international guidelines, such as UNESCO, a holistic perspective of the concept of SD should be used in education integrating environmental, economic and social dimensions. Within research there is a broad agreement to view cognitive and affective domains as equally important to successfully implement education for sustainable development (ESD). This study aims to investigate young peoples´ integrated understanding of the environmental, economic and social dimensions of SD in terms of knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Two comparisons will be done. Firstly there is a cross level comparison between pupils in 6th and 9th grade and secondly a comparison between two groups of pupils, where one group is taught according to an ESD approach in their schools and the other group is not (e.g. green-flag certified Eco schools or regular schools). The research design is based on a quantitative approach using a questionnaire consisting of items with Likert-type scales. The questionnaire is developed by considering the dimensions of SD and the aspects of knowledge attitudes and behavior. A pilot study was conducted in December 2012 to test the validity of the questionnaire. During spring 2013 the questionnaire will be distributed to pupils at 6th-grade level (n=1000) and 9th-grade level (n=1000). Half of the pupils in the sample are from ESD certificated schools and the other half from regular schools. During the NOFA-conference we hope to present some preliminary results related to the research aims and to discuss the implications these might have to ESD in Sweden.

  • 40.
    Olsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Shu-Nu, Chang-Rundgren
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    The effect of implementation of education for sustainable development in Swedish compulsory schools: Assesing pupils' sustainability consciousness2016In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 22, no 2, 176-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, numerous schools in Sweden have implemented education for sustainable development (ESD) as an explicit guiding approach in teaching. In this paper, we investigate the effect of this approach in comparison with that of pupils taught in ordinary schools. Accordingly, we introduce the concept of sustainability consciousness to represent the holistic view of sustainability. Within the concept of sustainability consciousness, we combine and investigate the environmental, economic, and social dimensions of sustainable development in terms of sustainability knowingness, attitudes, and behavior. A Likert-scale questionnaire with 50 items was developed to evaluate pupils’ sustainability consciousness through a nationwide study in Sweden. A total of 1773 pupils from the 6th and 9th grades participated. The results indicated that the ESD profile schools had a small positive effect on the pupils’ sustainability consciousness, while in grade 9 the effect was negative. The implications for further ESD implementation are discussed.

  • 41.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang, C-Y
    NTNU.
    Are you SLiM from a biological perspective? -- Evaluating scientific literacy in media regarding biological terms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköpings universitet, Visuell informationsteknologi och applikationer.
    Students’ conceptions of water transport2010In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, Vol. 44, no 3, 129-135 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the diffusion of water into and out of the cell through osmosis is fundamental to the learning and teaching of biology. Although the movement of water into (and out of) the cell is typically thought of as occurring directly across the lipid bilayer, the major proportion of osmosis actually occurs via specialized transmembranal water-channels called aquaporins. The objective of this study was to investigate students’ prior knowledge of water transport from Taiwan and Sweden by three individual studies. A questionnaire with open-ended question and question using a Likert scale was used at upper secondary level and an open-ended questionnaire was developed to let university students draw and write down their ideas. The results generated from three individual studies including an initial study conducted with 118 Swedish upper secondary biology students, and the other two studies implemented in Taiwan with 101 non-science majors and in Sweden with 37 science majors enrolled in a third-year biochemistry course. The results from the initial study indicated that 50% of respondents to a questionnaire on diffusion seemed to be oblivious of the fact that water is transported through the cell membrane through specialised channels. The Taiwanese data showed that the non-science majors explained water transport mainly as a phenomenon occurring at a cellular level. Furthermore, the majority of the students showed no awareness of specialised water channels and seemed to think that water molecules can diffuse directly into (and out) of the cell membrane. From the Swedish students’ responses, surprisingly, one third of these “expert” students did not provide explanations of water transport that involved specialised water channels. In addition, a larger proportion of the students (41%) used explanations on a molecular level than the Taiwanese students, but the majority (54%) still based their explanations on cellular level descriptions of the process. The preliminary findings of the study presented here indicate that the majority of the students in this study thought that water penetrates the bilayer directly. Our results indicate that teaching the topic of diffusion is often not up to date with the current world-view of science.

  • 43.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Tseng, Yuen-Hsien
    National Taiwan Normal University.
    Chang, Chun-Yen
    National Taiwan Normal University.
    Difficult biological concepts in media coverage2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of citizens to be able to understand and critically read and discuss the scientific reports presented in media is of inc creasing importance in science education. The SLiM (Scientific Literacy in Media) approach, on which this study is based, gives a possibility to measure scientific literacy based on the most commonly appearing scientific terms in news media. This study analyzed the 22 biology items from the prior SLiM study and identified the most difficult biology concepts for Taiwanese (N=619) and Swedish (N=117) non-science majors from university and upper secondary levels. The correct rate (%) of each item was analyzed to present students’ performances on each item. From the results, in general, it was found that Taiwanese students performed better than Swedish students at both university and upper secondary levels. However, Swedish university students were a bit better than the Taiwanese in definition-based (DB) items. Looking at the individual country, both Swedish and Taiwanese students’ performances on context-based (CB) items were better than DB items with significant difference (p<.01). Among the four items that were found difficult for both Swedish and Taiwanese students, two relates to biotechnology, and the other two are about function of enzymes and cell biology.

  • 44.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Tseng, Yuen-Hsien
    National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei.
    Lin, Pei-Ling
    National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei.
    Chang, Chun-Yen
    National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei.
    Are you SLiM? Developing an instrument for civic scientific literacy measurement(SLiM) based on media coverage2012In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 21, no 6, 759-773 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to develop an instrument to assess civic scientific literacy in media (SLiM). A total of 50 multiple-choice items were developed based on the 95 most common scientific terms appearing in media covering the subjects of biology (45.26%, 22 items), earth science (37.90%, 19 items), physics (11.58%, 6 items) and chemistry (5.26%, 3 items) in Taiwan. A total of 1034 students from three distinct groups (7th graders, 10th graders and undergraduates) were invited to participate in this study. The reliability of this instrument was 0.86 (KR20). The average difficulty of the SLiM ranged from 0.19 to 0.91, and the discrimination power is 0.1 to 0.59. According to participants’ performances on SLiM, it was revealed that 10th graders (Mean = 37.3±4.2) performed better than undergraduates (Mean = 33.0±5.5) and 7th graders (Mean = 26.7±8.3) with significant differences (p< .05).

  • 45.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    The fact-value intertwinement: Investigating upper secondary students’ decision-making concerning socioscientific issuesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore students’ argumentation and decision-making relating to an authentic socioscientific issue (SSI) – the problem of environmental toxins in fish from the Baltic Sea. An instructional exercise module was designed to develop students’ ability to argue about complex multi-disciplinary issues. Seven science majors in the final year of their upper secondary studies participated in the this studyinstructional exercise. Their argumentation and decision making processes were followed closely and data were collected during multiple stages of the instructional moduleexercise: group discussions were tapedaudio recorded, the participants wrote reports on their decision making and submitted them for analysis, and post-exercise interviews were conducted with individual students. The analysis focused on the skills of evaluation demonstrated by the students during the exercise and the relationships between the values, knowledge and experiences that they used in their argumentation. Even though all of the students had access to the same information and agreed on the factual aspects of the issue, they came to different decisions. All of the students took counter-arguments and the limitations of their claims into account, and were able to extend their claims where appropriate. However, their decisions differed depending on their background values, knowledge and experiences (i.e. their intellectual baggage).

  • 46.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Stockholm University, Dept Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Investigating the Intertwinement of Knowledge, Value, and Experience of Upper Secondary Students' Argumentation Concerning Socioscientific Issues2016In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 25, no 9-10, 1049-1071 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore students' argumentation and decision-making relating to an authentic socioscientific issue (SSI)-the problem of environmental toxins in fish from the Baltic Sea. A multi-disciplinary instructional module, designed in order to develop students' skills to argue about complex SSI, was successfully tested. Seven science majors in the final year of their upper secondary studies participated in this study. Their argumentation and decision-making processes were followed closely, and data were collected during multiple stages of the instructional module: group discussions were audio recorded, the participants wrote reports on their decision making, and postexercise interviews were conducted with individual students. The analysis focused on the skill of evaluation demonstrated by the students during the exercise and the relationships between the knowledge, values, and experiences that they used in their argumentation. Even though all of the students had access to the same information and agreed on the factual aspects of the issue, they came to different decisions. All of the students took counter-arguments and the limitations of their claims into account and were able to extend their claims where appropriate. However, their decisions differed depending on their background knowledge, values, and experiences (i.e., their intellectual baggage). The implication to SSI teaching and learning is discussed.

  • 47.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ MND, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hirsch, Richard
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Culture & Commun, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Ctr Sci Math & Engn Educ Res SMEER, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Chem & Biomed Sci, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linkoping Univ, ITN, Dept Sci & Technol, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Students' Communicative Resources in Relation to Their Conceptual Understanding: The Role of Non-Conventionalized Expressions in Making Sense of Visualizations of Protein Function2012In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 42, no 5, 891-913 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how students explain their conceptual understanding of protein function using visualizations. Thirteen upper secondary students, four tertiary students (studying chemical biology), and two experts were interviewed in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were structured around 2D illustrations of proteins and an animated representation of water transport through a channel in the cell membrane. In the analysis of the transcripts, a score, based on the SOLO-taxonomy, was given to each student to indicate the conceptual depth achieved in their explanations. The use of scientific terms and non-conventionalized expressions in the students' explanations were investigated based upon a semiotic approach. The results indicated that there was a positive relationship between use of scientific terms and level of education. However, there was no correlation between students' use of scientific terms and conceptual depth. In the interviews, we found that non-conventionalized expressions were used by several participants to express conceptual understanding and played a role in making sense of the visualizations of protein function. Interestingly, also the experts made use of non-conventionalized expressions. The results of our study imply that more attention should be drawn to students' use of scientific and non-conventionalized terms in relation to their conceptual understanding.

  • 48.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Hirsch, Richard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för kultur och kommunikation.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköpings universitet, Visuell informationsteknologi och applikationer.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Help-words – a Creative Way of Making Sense of visualizations in molecular life science2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When confronted with the representations and terms of science, students make meaning using the knowledge and language they possess. They make frequent use of conventional expressions, but they also use words that seemingly have no conventional meaning, here labelled help-words. This study explores the verbal resources upper secondary students use to make meaning of molecular life science. The paper gives a description of the phenomenon of non-conventionalised expressions, help-words, based on a study of 20 upper secondary students. The results indicate that help-words are meaningful in learning situations, especially in abstract disciplines such as molecular life science.

  • 49.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Hirsch, Richard
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköpings universitet, Visuell informationsteknologi och applikationer.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Linköpings universitet, Lärande, Estetik, Naturvetenskap (LEN).
    Students’ Use of Terms and Conceptual Understanding inMaking Meaning of Visualizations of Protein Function2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular life science has become one of the fastest-growing fields regarding scientific and technical innovation. Images, diagrams and other forms of visualizations are playing increasingly important roles in molecular life science research, teaching and learning. This study examines how upper secondary students interpret visualizations of protein function. Thirteen upper secondary students and four tertiary students (majoring in biochemistry) were interviewed in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were structured around two 2D illustrations of proteins and an animated representation of water molecules being transported through a channel in the cell membrane. In the analysis of the transcripts, a score, based on the SOLO-taxonomy, was developed to evaluate the depth of students’ conceptual understanding. Furthermore, the relative use of scientific terms, metaphors, deictic and non-conventionalized expressions in the students’ explanations was also disclosed. The results indicate that the beginner students frequently use metaphors which came from their school education or created by themselves, i.e. spontaneous metaphors. Students also make use of non-conventionalized expressions that seemingly have no meaning in relation to scientific concepts and processes. The results from this study indicated that there was no simple positive correlation between use of scientific terms and the depth of conceptual understanding. Interestingly, in the interviews, non-conventionalized expressions were used to express conceptual understanding and they play a role in the meaning-making of the students. Moreover, the results revealed that difficulties in science education may to a large degree be connected to the potential problems concerning communicating the precise and general nature of scientific terms.

  • 50.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Dept Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Math & Sci Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    What are we aiming for?: A Delphi study on the development of civic scientific literacy in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 2, 224-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the EU FP 7 project, PROFILES, this article presents our findings from a three-round Delphi study conducted in Sweden that aimed at establishing a consensus on how science education should be developed for citizens to enhance civic scientific literacy. A total of 100 stakeholders (9th graders, school teachers, scientists, and science education researchers) were involved in our Delphi study in 2012-2013. The results revealed that there were some highly ranked consensus ideas: environmental issues, inquiry skills, motivation/interest, and holistic comprehension. The conclusions of our research imply the importance of involving different stakeholders in the educational reconstruction process; we suggest that schoolteachers in particular should play a vital role.

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