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  • 1. Gregersdotter, Katarina
    et al.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Anthropomorphism and the Representation of Animals as Adversaries2015In: Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History and Criticism, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 206-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In his 1977 essay ‘Why Look at Animals?’ John Berger writes about the place of animals in the visual cultures of modernity and postmodernity. The actual animal has all but disappeared from human life in modernity, Berger points out. Numerous species that used to be close to us humans, including animals that are still bred for their meat and hide, have been Largely removed from the lives of the vast majority of the population of the Western world. Few people ever have to think about the animal that the meat they eat once was. The animals that people do encounter are usually not ‘wild’ animals who behave as such: pets are seen as family members and zoo animals are domesticated and some are trained to perform tricks. However, while we have all but rid the urban and suburban West of animals, we have filled the resulting void with signs that remind us of their absence — though the wild animals themselves are gone, images of animals that invade human culture proliferate. The visual aspect of human-animal relations, in other words, did not disappear with the animal, but has lived on in forms ranging from anthropomorphic renderings of animals in Beatrix Potter’s books and numerous Disney cartoons to displays of live animals at aquariums and zoos — and, of course, animal and nature films. Urban Western modernity thus seems almost to dissolve the animal ‘into pure spectral-ity’ (Burt, 2002, pp. 26–7). The animal in (post)modern visual culture is a ghostly presence that the actual wild animal leaves behind.

  • 2.
    Gregersdotter, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet.
    Made Men and Constructed Masculinities: Viewing the father-son relationship in The Sopranos2012In: Masculinity/Femininity: Re-framing a Fragmented debate / [ed] Ambrogia Cereda, Jon Ross, Inter-Disciplinary Press , 2012, p. 29-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gregersdotter, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Höglund, Johan
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Introduction2015In: Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History and Criticism, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction to this volume is intended as a tool for future study of Animal Horror Cinema. It first defines this type of Cinema as films that describe how a particular animal or an animal species commit a transgression against humanity and then recounts the punishment the animal must suffer as a consequence. The introductory chapter then discusses how Animal Horror Cinema both cements and complicates the basic conceptual separation of the human and non-human animal and how it raises crucial questions concerning human and animal ethics and the Anthropocene; the present era when humanity itself has become a destructive geological force. This chapter also discusses how the study of Animal Horror Cinema frequently explores matters of colonialism and postcolonialism, and how the genre interrogates gender and sexuality through the animal.

  • 4.
    Harris, Ashleigh
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Uppsala universitet.
    African Street Literature: A Method for Emergent Form Beyond World Literature2020In: Research in African Literatures, ISSN 0034-5210, E-ISSN 1527-2044, Vol. 51, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linnéuniversitetet; University of York, UK.
    A personal quest: Travel writing as self-exploration in Eddy L. Harris’s Native Stranger: A Blackamerican’s Journey into the Heart of Africa2018In: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, ISSN 0021-9894, E-ISSN 1741-6442, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 363-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Native Stranger: A Blackamerican’s Journey into the Heart of Africa (1992), Eddy L. Harris explores what it means to be the person he is. What, if anything, connects him to Africa? What is the relation between the person he knows himself to be, and the person others see? Searching for answers to his questions, he finds himself caught between his attempts to remain open to new ways of seeing and understanding the world, on the one hand, and succumbing to the pressures of monolithic narratives about African otherness, race, belonging, roots and the past, on the other hand. This tension gives rise to an ambiguity and a number of contradictions which make the text fold back on itself. His literary project therefore ultimately serves to raise questions not only about his own identity and place in the world, but also about the conditions of writing about the self. Central among the contradictions that permeate the text is a doubling of epistemological perspectives, which can be described as an effect of what W. E. B. Dubois famously termed double-consciousness. While Harris is able to use the contradictions that arise from his writing to explore and represent the complexity of the questions that are foregrounded in his text, he is unable to answer them. His project is in other words a kind of failure, but as this article argues, this failure is the price that Harris pays to access the full complexity of selfhood, beyond political and social narratives about collective identity and how the present is shaped by the past.

  • 6.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linnéuniversitetet; Uppsala universitet.
    African Alterity and Metaphoricity in John Slaughter’s Brother in the Bush2018In: Alterity Studies and World Literature, E-ISSN 2209-2412, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 49-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies alterity in John Slaughter’s travelogue Brother in the Bush: An African American’s Search for Self in East Africa (2005). The book chronicles the author’s travels in Africa in the wake of a life-altering experience that makes him want to change the way he lives and sees the world. He therefore travels to Africa in order to search for a new self and a view of the world free from the materialist greed, insularity and artificiality of life in the West. However, Slaughter’s Africa is, more than an actual geographical space, a well of metaphors and images that he uses to discuss the alienation of middleclass life in the West. These metaphors and images are meaningful primarily from the point of view of the life that he wants to leave behind, and the alterity of Africa therefore adds few ‘new’ insights and adds little to his process of inner change.

  • 7.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet.
    Barnbiblioteket Sagas Selim och Kalulu: Afrika som sagoland och civilisering som metafor för mognad2010In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Belgien glömmer, minns och glömmer kolonialismen2012In: Glänta, ISSN 1104-5205, Vol. 4, p. 88-97Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    "Can’t seem to live without it somehow": An interview with Eddy Harris2014In: Studies in Travel Writing, ISSN 1364-5145, E-ISSN 1755-7550, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 279-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his books about Paris and Harlem and his travelogues about journeys in Africa and the American South, African-American author Eddy L. Harris explores what it means to be Black in the present moment in history. In this interview, he talks to Nicklas Hållén about his need to travel, the craft of travel writing and his plans for a movie project about a journey down the Mississippi River. The conversation revolves particularly around his travelogue Native Stranger: A Blackamerican’s Journey into the Heart of Africa (1992) and the way in which identity conditions (and does not condition) travel and travel writing, and the functions that travel writing may have for the author as well as reader. The interview was conducted in the summer of 2013 at a café in the village of Pranzac in the Charente department of France, where Harris currently lives and works.

  • 10. Hållén, Nicklas
    Manoeuvring through the traffic jam: A Conversation with Magnus Okeke about OkadaBooks and digital Publishing in Nigeria2018In: English Studies in Africa, ISSN 0013-8398, E-ISSN 1943-8117, English Studies in Africa, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 86-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OkadaBooks is an Android application and online platform for publishing and reading books electronically. It was founded by author and engineer Okechukwu Ofili and won mobile service provider MTN Nigeria’s App of the Year Award (2013) in the category Best Overall App’ (Osuagwu). At the time of writing, OkadaBooks offer their users more than 200 000 titles which have been downloaded more than one million times. OkadaBooks content ranges from novels and poetry to contemporary African comics, self-help literature and children’s literature. The newer material is to a large extent written by non-established writers who use the app as a way to reach readers rather than to earn money by letting the reader access their texts for free. Other writers’ books can be purchased through the app using a variety of payment methods. This interview with Magnus Okeke was done via email in September 2018, five years after the launch of OkadaBooks. Okeke became OkadaBooks’s first employee at the end of 2014. He leads what he calls a proactive customer support team’ who assist customers via phone, email, playstore and other channels. Okeke has studied computer science at Yaba College of Technology in Lagos, Nigeria, and is currently studying to become a product manager.

  • 11.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Umeå university.
    OkadaBooks and the Poetics of Uplift2018In: English Studies in Africa, ISSN 0013-8398, E-ISSN 1943-8117, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 36-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies collections of inspirational poetry published on the Nigerian online platform and app, OkadaBooks. OkadaBooks lets users upload and access ebooks for free or at a low cost. Nigerian inspirational poetry can be seen as a hybrid poetic form that borrows from motivational speaking, self-help and religious pamphlet literature. The collections are marketed to readers as works of literature that through their literary qualities and poetic language can inspire the reader to create a better future for him- or herself. The main argument in the article is that the poetic and rhetorical devices that are used in this literature, which I propose to call the poetics of uplift, can be read as instrumental in the commodification of the text. The poets foreground the relevance and value of their texts through the different ways in which they promulgate a view of poetic language as having the power to change people’s futures for the better. The article looks specifically at how poets use literary devices such as the use of the pronoun you’ and the imperative grammatical mode to speak directly to the reader and further considers how these poems explicitly celebrate language and the very concept of poetry.

  • 12.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    "Okay, I am going to try this now.": An Interview with Caryl Phillips about The Atlantic Sound and The European Tribe2014In: Journeys, ISSN 1465-2609, E-ISSN 1752-2358, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    University of York, UK.
    Review of Stacy Burton’s Travel Narrative and the Ends of Modernity2014In: Journeys, ISSN 1465-2609, E-ISSN 1752-2358, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 104-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    [Review] The Postcolonial Low Countries: Literature, Colonialism, Multiculturalism2013In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 444-446Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Uppsala universitet.
    Travel Writing and the Representation of Concurrent Worlds: Caryl Phillips’ The Atlantic Sound and Noo Saro–Wiwa’s Looking for Transwonderland2017In: Concurrent Imaginaries, Postcolonial Worlds: Toward Revised Histories / [ed] Diana Brydon, Peter Forsgren, Gunlög Fur, Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 59-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet.
    Travelling Objects: Modernity and Materiality in British Colonial Travel Literature about Africa2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the functions of objects in a selection of British colonial travel accounts about Africa. The works discussed were published between 1863 and 1908 and include travelogues by John Hanning Speke, Verney Lovett Cameron, Henry Morton Stanley, Mary Henrietta Kingsley, Ewart Scott Grogan, Mary Hall and Constance Larymore. The author argues that objects are deeply involved in the construction of pre-modern and modern spheres that the travelling subject moves between. The objects in the travel accounts are studied in relation to a contextual background of Victorian commodity and object culture, epitomised by the 1851 Great Exhibition and the birth of the modern anthropological museum. The four analysis chapters investigate the roles of objects in ethnographical and geographical writing, in ideological discussions about the transformative powers of colonial trade, and in narratives about the arrival of the book in the colonial periphery. As the analysis shows, however, objects tend not to behave as they are expected to do. Instead of marking temporal differences, descriptions of objects are typically unstable and riddled with contradictions and foreground the ambivalence that characterises colonial literature.

  • 17. Hållén, Nicklas
    Willy Kyrklunds Till Tabbas2012In: Samlaren: tidskrift för svensk litteraturvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-6133, E-ISSN 2002-3871, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 265-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Till Tabbas (To Tabas, 1959) is Finnish-Swedish author Willy Kyrklund’s (1921-2009) account of a journey through Iran in the 1950s. While ostensibly the object of Kyrklund’s text is modern Iran and early Islamic Persia, on an ideational level To Tabbas explores existential issues that are most readily associated with certain intellectual environments in post-war Europe. In one sense, the Persian "Orient" is to Kyrklund an archive of texts and images, which he uses in a discussion about what he sees as the terms of human existence. Kyrklund discusses the terms of human existence by emphasising the perceived sameness between the modern Western subject and the Persian Muslim and the masters of Sufi poetry. He uses the concept of "man" to refer to the common ground that he imagines exists between them. However, as this essay shows, "man" as an abstract category functions as a placeholder for the post-war European male intel­lectual, desperate in his longing for a higher purpose, and certain that no such higher purpose exists. This tendency of semantic ambiguity is discussed from a postcolonial perspective in the last section of this article.

  • 18.
    Hållén, Nicklas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Linneuniversitetet.
    Remmington, Janet
    “You want people to see you in all your nuanced variety”: An Interview with Noo Saro-Wiwa2015In: Studies in Travel Writing, ISSN 1364-5145, E-ISSN 1755-7550, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 274-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Born in Nigeria in 1976, Noo Saro-Wiwa grew up in the UK. In 2008 she took a trip around the country of her birth. The journey resulted in her first book, Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria (Granta, 2012). It was selected as BBC Radio 4’s Book of the Week and the Sunday Times Travel Book of the Year in 2012. In this interview with Nicklas Hållén and Janet Remmington, Saro-Wiwa covers a range of topics and reflections, including (trans)national identities, readership and reception, the legacy of her father, Ken Saro-Wiwa, and the craft of travel writing. The interview incorporates questions and answers from two occasions: a face-to-face meeting in London in May 2014 and an audience-facing discussion at the University of York’s “African Intellectual Mobilities” colloquium in February 2015.

  • 19. Laajala, Kalle
    et al.
    Åkesson, Mattias
    Hållén, Nicklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    African Street Literature and the Future of Literary Form2019In: African research & documentation, no 134, p. 12-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text is about an ongoing research project about contemporary African literature that circulates outside the infrastructures of the global book market. The researchers involved in the project are based at Uppsala University, Sweden, and collaborate closely with librarians at the Nordic Africa Institute where a small collection of ephemeral, often self-published texts is being established. This collection is a part of the book collection at the Nordic Africa Institute’s library, but can be accessed as a sub-collection in the library catalogue. The article is co-authored by one of the researchers and two of the librarians and is organized into two main sections: one is written from the perspective of the researchers who collect and study the material. This section outlines the project, its scope, general research questions and how texts have been collected. The second part is written from the perspective of the librarians, presents some of the possibilities and challenges involved in cataloguing the material and the ways in which it differs from the rest of the library collection.

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