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  • 1.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu Nu
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences. Stockholm University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Germany.
    Alexandersson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Learning about flood risk: Comparing the Web-based and physical flood-walk learning environments2015In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous of sustainable development related challenges are emerging today, e.g. flooding problems. Our group has developed ’the flood walk’ project since 2010 to convey flood risk knowledge in an authentic context. Considering the limitation of time and space to educate people the flood risk knowledge, we tried to transform the physical flood walk field trip into a Web-based virtual trip. In this study, we aim to examine whether the Web-based flood-walk environment can help participants to achieve the same learning outcome as its authentic counterpart. A total of 65 upper secondary school pupils participated in this study. The results illustrate that a physical experience is irreplaceable, and the importance of providing physical experiences for learners in both formal and informal education needs to be emphasised.

  • 2.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety. Bonn University.
    Participation in Flood risk Management: An introduction and recommendations for implementation2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving interested parties in Flood Risk Management is a crucial and challenging issue. The implementation of the European Flood Directive requires the active participation of stakeholders. But how can this be achieved successfully? This publication gives a brief overview of participation issues in Flood Risk Management in order to prepare for and to assist participatory processes. It provides a synopsis of key issues, findings of literature research and project results in (public) participation in the field of water and flood risk management. 

    The focus here is on general aspects of (public) participation. This publication describes an understanding of what participation is and gives some definitions of relevant terms. Furthermore the question “why is participation important?” is considered and reasons for and against participation and potential barriers are described. Guidelines for the key questions that should be addressed before a participation process is started are offered and different working steps are explained. Finally, some examples of methods and tools for participation are described.

    However, this short description can only give an overview and orientation of this broad field. In fact, each project and process has to be adapted to the respective situation and conditions. Nevertheless, this brochure might contribute to the participatory process in Flood Risk Management and help to involve interested parties as required by the EU Floods Directive.

  • 3.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    University of Bonn , Germany.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Coherence and inconsistency of European instruments for integrated river basin management2013In: International Journal of River Basin Management, ISSN 1571-5124, E-ISSN 1814-2060, Vol. 11, 139-152 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large rivers are particularly under pressure due to multiple uses which often have severe impacts on ecosystems, or water quality and flow. Conflicting aims and a lack of integration and cooperation in planning and management are not beneficial to sustainable management. Important elements of integrated river basin management (IRBM) include both water quality aspects and floodplain and flood risk management. On the other hand, land use and land use planning are also both of great importance for sustainable river management. However, water management and land use planning are generally treated as two distinct issues in planning procedures and decision-making processes. Even water quality and flood risk issues are often handled by different authorities. Integrated management of transnational river basins is even more complicated and difficult. In Europe, there is a range of relevant Directives such as the Water Framework Directive, Floods Directive and Habitat Directive. This paper illustrates how these legal and planning instruments influence the IRBM of large rivers. It analyses the potential synergies of the goals outlined in the directives and various related measures. Coherent but also inconsistent aspects of IRBM are identified against six different dimensions: political intention, legal, geographical, management, socio-economic and sustainability. The analysis shows potentials for synergies but also potential inconsistencies. We show that directives must be carefully coordinated to ensure coherent management and that synergies and site-specific goals, such as target areas, are important for sustainable management. Possible methodologies are described. IRBM can be considered as one possible approach towards sustainable development by coordinating different policies.

  • 4.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Coherence and inconsistency of European instruments for integrated river basin management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Room for the River projects increase the level of flood protection by enlarging theconveyance and reducing hydraulic roughness. As a consequence sediment transportcapacities are reduced as well, causing shoals and a reduced navigation channel. Thelarge number of Room for the River measures and European Framework Directive(WFD) measures, aiming at an increase of the ecological potential (e.g. sidechannels), will result in much dredging, if no structural measures are implemented.The expected amount of dredging will be too large to handle. Therefore research isexecuted to limit the dredging effort by executing mitigating measures. Old principlesof irrigation are given new attention to be applied to side channels and channelsbetween longitudinal dams and the river bank ('bank channels'). A new round ofnormalisation works may be necessary, to limit dredging activities. Boundaryconditions for river managemant are stopping autonomous bed degradation andeconomic sustainability of sets of measures that can cope with the hydromorphologicconsequences of the Room for the River and WFD measures

  • 5.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety. Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, CNDS, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Transnational education for integrated flood risk management - the master course IFRM: [Transnationale bildung für integriertes hochwasserrisikomanagement - Der masterkurs "integrated flood risk management"]2013In: Hydrologie und Wasserbewirtschaftung, ISSN 1439-1783, Vol. 57, no 3, 100-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flood Risk Management (FRM) is a topic of growing importance. This is signiicantly illustrated by the European Directive on Flood Risk Management, which entered into force in 2007. FRM in general but also the Directive require integrated and interdisciplinary approaches and skills. Against this background the International Master Course "Integrated lood risk management" was developed and implemented under the EU project "Strategic Alliance for Water Management Actions" (SAWA). Six universities and 12 non-academic partners from ive European countries participated in the course. The paper describes the background and requirements of such an education ofer as well as its content and its pedagogical and organizational format. Furthermore, the implementation of the course and evaluation results are presented.

  • 6.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety. Bonn University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Svedung, Inge
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Reducing flood risk by integrative land use planning2012In: Proceedings of the 43rd ESReDA seminar on land use planning and risk-informed decision making. Saint-Étienne-du Rouvray, France, Oct 22-23, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jager, Nicolas W.
    et al.
    Univ Luneburg, Res Grp Governance Participat & Sustainabil, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Challies, Edward
    Univ Luneburg, Res Grp Governance Participat & Sustainabil, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Kochskaemper, Elisa
    Univ Luneburg, Res Grp Governance Participat & Sustainabil, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Newig, Jens
    Univ Luneburg, Res Grp Governance Participat & Sustainabil, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Benson, David
    Univ Exeter, Environm & Sustainabil Inst, Penryn TR10 9FE, Cornwall, England..
    Blackstock, Kirsty
    James Hutton Inst, Social Econ & Geog Sci Grp, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland..
    Collins, Kevin
    Open Univ, Appl Syst Thinking Practice Res Grp, Engn & Innovat Dept, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, Bucks, England..
    Ernst, Anna
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Energy & Climate Res Syst Anal & Technol, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Evers, Mariele
    Univ Bonn, Inst Geog, D-53113 Bonn, Germany..
    Feichtinger, Judith
    CSI, A-1150 Vienna, Austria..
    Fritsch, Oliver
    Univ Leeds, Sch Geog & Water Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, W Yorkshire, England..
    Gooch, Geoffrey
    DelPar Environm, S-58752 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Grund, Wiebke
    Univ Luneburg, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hernandez-Mora, Nuria
    Univ Seville, Dept Geog Humana, Seville 41004, Spain..
    Hueesker, Frank
    TU Kaiserslautern, Fachgebiet Siedlungswasserwirtschaft, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany..
    Huitema, Dave
    Open Univ Netherlands, Fac Management Sci & Technol, NL-6419 AT Heerlen, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Inst Environm Studies IVM, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Irvine, Kenneth
    Univ Dublin, Trinity Coll, Sch Nat Sci, Dublin 2, Ireland.;UNESCO Inst Water Educ, NL-2611 AX Delft, Netherlands..
    Klinke, Andreas
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Environm Policy Inst, Corner Brook, NF A2H 5G4, Canada..
    Lange, Leonie
    Univ Luneburg, D-21335 Luneburg, Germany..
    Loupsans, Delphine
    French Natl Agcy Water & Aquat Environm, ONEMA, F-94300 Vincennes, France..
    Lubell, Mark
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Environm Sci & Policy, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Maganda, Carmen
    AC INECOL, Inst Ecol, Xalapa Enriquez 91070, Ver, Mexico..
    Matczak, Piotr
    Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Inst Sociol, PL-61712 Poznan, Poland..
    Pares, Marc
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Inst Govern &Polit Publ, Bellaterra 08193, Spain..
    Saarikoski, Heli
    Environm Policy Ctr, Finnish Environm Inst, POB 140, Helsinki 00251, Finland..
    Slavikova, Lenka
    Univ Jana Evangelisty Purkyne & Usti nad Labem, IEEP, Usti Nad Labem Mesto 40096, Czech Republic..
    van der Arend, Sonja
    SenF Serious Fict, NL-6703 AP Wageningen, Netherlands..
    von Korff, Yorck
    Flow Ing, F-34980 Montferrier Sur Lez, France..
    Transforming European Water Governance?: Participation and River Basin Management under the EU Water Framework Directive in 13 Member States2016In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 8, no 4, 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires EU member states to produce and implement river basin management plans, which are to be designed and updated via participatory processes that inform, consult with, and actively involve all interested stakeholders. The assumption of the European Commission is that stakeholder participation, and institutional adaptation and procedural innovation to facilitate it, are essential to the effectiveness of river basin planning and, ultimately, the environmental impact of the Directive. We analyzed official documents and the WFD literature to compare implementation of the Directive in EU member states in the initial WFD planning phase (2000-2009). Examining the development of participatory approaches to river basin management planning, we consider the extent of transformation in EU water governance over the period. Employing a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach, we map the implementation "trajectories" of 13 member states, and then provide a detailed examination of shifts in river basin planning and participation in four member states (Germany, Sweden, Poland and France) to illustrate the diversity of institutional approaches observed. We identify a general tendency towards increased, yet circumscribed, stakeholder participation in river basin management in the member states examined, alongside clear continuities in terms of their respective pre-WFD institutional and procedural arrangements. Overall, the WFD has driven a highly uneven shift to river basin-level planning among the member states, and instigated a range of efforts to institutionalize stakeholder involvement-often through the establishment of advisory groups to bring organized stakeholders into the planning process.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hansson, Max
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Social learning in education – an important step in practical integration of preventive risk reduction and adaptation to climate change2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of linking the preventive phase of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) with the adaptation in human society to forecasted consequences from climate change, has received growing acceptance internationally, but the integration of both fields is still at an embryonic stage. Integration in this case implies transdisciplinary approaches in complex fields where liabilities and stakeholders normally are found in different sectors and levels in society. For integration to be successful, a first step is to create platforms and contexts where participants may generate raised awareness about each other’s roles and evolve a shared problem identification. Social learning is a concept that has been used in many different contexts where uncertainty and change are crucial and challenging. It has earlier been linked as a suitable approach to issues such as public participation, governance or natural resource management. Here it is used in education, gathering among others stakeholders working within the fields of Flood Risk Management, DRR and Climate Change Adaptation at local or regional level around the two Swedish lakes Vänern and Mälaren. Teaching arrangements and didactic elements are described for the two pilot-courses that were held 2009-2010. The academic institutional arrangements favoured an open exchange and knowledge building, with local examples of management and strategies repeatedly in focus during several study visits in different cities along the shoreline. The elements of social learning facilitated the build-up of shared holistic perspectives, identified areas in need of development or research efforts and contributed to informal as well as formal relationships among participants.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Hansson, Max
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    SOCIALT LÄRANDE OCH STUDIER AV PRAKTISK TILLÄMPNING: EN UNDERVISNINGSMODELL SOM INTEGRERAR UTBILDNING, SAMVERKAN OCH FORSKNING (IntECR)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hansson, Max
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Using education and social learning in capacity building- the IntECR concept2013In: Disaster Prevention and Management, ISSN 0965-3562, E-ISSN 1758-6100, Vol. 22, no 1, 17-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to present a concept where social learning is used in education. Thematically, the concept is suitable for complex, interdisciplinary, societal challenges with a high degree of uncertainty regarding future changes. It is exemplified here by the need to link disaster risk reduction (DRR) with climate change adaptation (CCA) and flood risk management (FRM). The concept answers to the variety of adopted solutions and build-up of knowledge that exist, as a consequence of far-reaching local liabilities and initiatives. The concept advocates building of platforms and procedures where managers, stakeholders, researchers, policy makers, and regular students can meet, interact and learn from local examples.

    Design/methodology/approach – The concept IntECR (integrated education, research and collaboration) has been tested in two courses during 2009 and 2010 around the Swedish lakes Vanern and Malaren. Seminars and field visits were arranged in ten different cities. Participants replied anonymously to a course evaluation and were questioned in groups about their perceived benefit from the concept.

    Findings – Informal networking, holistic perspective, shared problem identification and the positive possibility to study several examples of local management in arrangements with high degree of structural openness, were mentioned by the participants as positive outcome of the concept.

    Originality/value – The use of this educational concept aims to increase the adaptive capacity of societal entities through raised capacity of their individual members. The applied example is timely, relevant and a contribution to DRR and CCA

  • 11.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Andersson-Skold, Yvonne
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Sustainability Aspects of Flood Risk Management: Interrelations and Challenges2010In: SELECTED PAPERS FROM IDRC ON RISK REDUCTION AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT, HARBIN INST TECHNOLOGY, P R CHINA , 2010, Vol. 1, 101-107 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aspects of sustainable development are crucial for Flood Risk Management (FRM). These aspects are relevant for the flood risk analysis, risk evaluation and risk-reduction. Two case studies are used to identify potential conflicts between different values: Lake Vanern and Gota alv River in Sweden and Elbe River in Germany. In both cases there are diverging interests of how to manage the systems, e.g. how to regulate water levels and use floodplains. The conclusion is that the relevant sustainability aspects must be identified, addressed and valued in the risk management process, especially for different risk-reducing measure options.

  • 12.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Pettersson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    How to reduce flood risks in Lake Vänern - A sustainability perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety. Bonn University.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Pettersson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Sustainability aspects of water regulation and flood risk reduction in Lake Vänern2014In: Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management, ISSN 1463-4988, E-ISSN 1539-4077, Vol. 17, no 4, 331-340 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modern feature of flood risk management is to integrate ecological, economic and social aspects in risk prevention and mitigation. Risk-reducing measures can be in conflict with ecosystem functions and complicate upstream/downstream relations. Flood risks are also influenced by processes in the catchment, such as changes in climate and land-use, or increases of vulnerable urban areas. Lake Vänern in Sweden has high ecological and social values but is also flood-prone, which in this article has been analyzed from a perspective of sustainable development. Lake Vänern and the Göta älv River are used for drinking water supply, shipping, hydropower production, fishing, tourism, as a recipient for industries and wastewater plants, etc. The flood risks are connected to landslide and industrial risks. One interest at stake is the drinking water supply for 800,000 persons in the Gothenburg region. According to climate scenarios, flood risks will increase in the 21st century due to increased precipitation. Recent studies in the region were used to identify relevant interests and values connected to Lake Vänern. The study reveals differing interests in relation to water level regimes. From a flood protection perspective (risks around the lake and downstream to Gothenburg) a low and stable water level is beneficial. For shipping and hydropower, a stable medium-high water level is wanted, whereas from an ecosystem and landscape development perspective larger water level amplitudes are optimal. One out of a few reasons for this is the need to prevent a massive increase in vegetation in coastal areas. There are good reasons to have a broad decision-support, representing different values and interests, when the permanent water regulation scheme will be decided. This study also addresses the potential to reconcile the concept of flood risk management with that of a sustainable development.

  • 14.
    Svedung, Inge
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    A socio-physical systems perspective on Land Use Planning: Mapping preconditions and planning process as a base for discussion2012Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 14 of 14
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