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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Hagsmo, Leena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    The role of Culture and Lifestyles in Placemaking2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aronsson, Lars
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Hagsmo, Leena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Värmlänningarnas kulturella landskap2012In: Värmländska landskap: Politik, Ekonomi, Samhälle, Kultur, Medier / [ed] Lennart Nilsson, Lars Aronsson och PO Norell, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, 1, p. 293-321Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Camilla
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Political Regions, Human Landscapes: A divide between political policies and human meanings and practices?2014In: AAG – Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Tampa, Florida. 8th - 12th of April 2014., 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s and the headways of neoliberalism, the city is seen as the agent of creativity and innovation. In Sweden, the devolution of state power to the regional and city-level has implied enhanced focus on the city as the ideal entity for planning. These neoliberal policies have also led to increased urban and rural gentrification, and as a result widening gaps both within and between cities, regions and rural areas. At the same time wider neoliberal discourses and urban as well as regional policies promote city-regions, leading to the marginalization of rural areas in both policy and planning. Within policy circles, the countryside is seen mainly as an arena and resource for leisure and tourism, reinforcing images of rural areas as incidental or ancillary spaces. However we argue that humans are not passive receivers of policies about what constitutes the good life. Humans are landscapers in both an individual and collective sense. We experience and shape the world through the embodiment of practices and meanings constituted relationally with both other humans as well as the more-than-human world. The article discusses the gaps between current ideals of city and regional planning and the more-than-representational landscapes in the life and dwelling of human beings. We argue that regional and national Swedish polices are contested, especially in relation to notions of what constitutes the good life in rural areas.

  • 4.
    Grip, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Hemmahörighet i Värmland och i världen2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur och medier. / [ed] Lennart Nilsson & P O Norell, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Grip, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Regional Development, Sense of Place and Belongingness: a Swedish perspective2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden discussions on regional identity and regional belonging have become more and more integrated with perspectives of the meaning of culture and local communities as important for regional development and growth. In local, regional and national policies cultural diversity is emphasized as a potential for development and growth. Sweden is today a multi-cultural society where its citizens have backgrounds from all over the world. However, there is a distance in regional politics between policies of cultural diversity for local and regional development and the actual citizens. It is therefore not clear how policies of cultural diversity are to be applied in practical regional planning. Research shows that immigrants in Sweden often have a feeling of exclusion and that they do not belong there and that they aren’t accepted as they are. There seems to be a gap between policies and the actual situation in everyday life of inhabitants in Swedish regions.

    Research on sense of place and migration is extensive, but there is still not much done on the influence of place in relation to issues of integration. The meaning and importance of place has not been emphasized enough in immigration studies. Therefore, this paper will – from a Swedish perspective - discuss the sense of place and belonging related to a person’s identity and background, with the aim to contribute to an understanding of who feel belongingness where. This discussion is mainly based on a survey conducted in the region of Värmland in Sweden. The results show that persons with a Swedish background feel more at home in the place where they live, in the municipality where they live, as well as in the region of Värmland, than persons with a foreign background. Not surprisingly people having lived more than ten years or their whole life at the same place feel more at home in as well the local, regional as the national level. This can in turn be related to Swedish integration policy and the situation of immigrants in Sweden experiencing a sense of exclusion and thereby a lack of sense of belonging to a certain place. But we can also see that other factors, like if you live in the city or in the countryside), are important for a sense of place and feeling at home. Our results will be discussed in relation to issues of urban, regional and social sustainable development.

  • 6.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Bioeconomy and quadruple helix as a way towards inclusiveness and sustainability?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Branding Regions2012In: 32nd International Geographic Congress, Cologne 2012, 26-30 August Commission: C08.13 Geography of Governance Session: Governing development in regions, cities and rural communities, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how different kinds of representations of regions form part of the institutionalization and creation of new and older regions of today. As a result of the discourses of new regionalism, we see ongoing processes where culture and identity are seen as important parts to create strong and competitive regions, which have become more and more important for peripheral and weaker regions around Europe. Regional culture and identities are seen as part of different soft factors that are seen as strengthening the regional level and in that way contribute to the attractiveness and competitiveness of the region.  It is also believed that different soft factors will strengthen the inner unity in the region and thereby lead to further development. Culture and identity have to a greater extent than before been given an economic value. By enhancing the distinctive attributes and features of a region such as culture, it is said to be more competitive in an international and national context. Different representations of the regions are used to create an image of the regions. This connection between regions and regional features could be seen as a result of a political agenda where it is the uniqueness of the region that is enhanced to create an idea of the region as a base for identity construction. By creating this attractiveness within the regions in different contexts, it exist several different representations of the regions in the same time. This altogether creates the identity of the region. Earlier it was possible to say that the marketing of regions and places mainly aimed to attract visitors, but today it is rather about attracting visitors, business, investors, new inhabitants and in scarce regions even to keep the inhabitants.

     

    There is also an emphasis on cooperation across borders between regions in different border areas between the member states in the EU. But in the same time the regions are also seen as competitors both nationally and internationally. Different regional policy programs enhance the importance to create strong, attractive and competitive regions. But what does this actually mean? By studying different representations of two peripheral border regions in Europe, Värmland in Sweden, and Hedmark in Norway, the aim is to show different representations of how the discourse of new regionalism affects different regional policies in scarcer regions in Europe, mainly with focus on different ways of branding regions.

  • 8.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Contemporary regionalism(s). The case of the Scandinavian 8 Million City.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Den värmländska själen2012In: Värmländska landskap: politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Nilsson, Lennart; Aronsson, Lars; Norell, P-O, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, p. 323-340Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Entrepreneurial Urban Governance Shaping Regional Territories2013In: Regional Studies Association European Conference, Shape and be Shaped: The Future Dynamics of Regional Development, Gateway: Territorial politics and policy. Tampere, 5th - 8th of May 2013., 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this presentation is to discuss how the ongoing decentralization processes of the state transforms and shapes regional territories and regional politics and policies. The discourse of enhanced competition between different places has led to new territorial strategies aiming at enhancing the competitiveness of places, both at a local, regional and national level.  This has resulted in the implementation of urban regeneration policies where different place marketing techniques are used to strengthen a place brand or a place image. To a great extent these policies work in favor of supporting larger metropolitan areas, both as growth engines but also as representative and image building for a larger region. Harvey (1989) calls this shift from a state Keynesianism building on convergence between weaker and stronger regions, to new policies supporting economic growth on the local, regional and national level entrepreneurial urban governance. This entrepreneurial urban governance rather supports urban metropolitan areas, than less economic developed regions. It is the city-regions that are seen as able to compete with other regions all over the world, where the importance of being a “global city”, represented by cosmopolitanism, culture, diversity, internationalization and most important as a financial center and as a headquarter for international firms that are promoted. These processes are characterized by market driven growth, flexibility, competitiveness but also larger economic disparities between regions and cities both nationally and internationally.

     

    To adapt to the competitiveness discourse new territories and spaces are being created.  The concept of urban regeneration of a city or in this case a region to better its reputation has led to a shift away from being a provider welfare services to the importance of being someone in an international market by changing its image and reputation. In some cases by focusing on a larger urban area to create a different image as a metropolitan region represented by cosmopolitanism, culture, diversity but also by being innovative, learning and entrepreneurial. Policies and planning are enhancing urban economic development, by investments in infrastructure, new shopping areas, new neighborhoods, flagship projects, monuments but also by privatization of welfare services and public space. As a result there has been an increase in different place marketing techniques that aiming to better the image and the place brand of a certain region to attract investments, firms, visitors and new inhabitants to the region. Capital and investments are no longer as place bound as before which increase the competition between different places and a necessity to be as attractive as possible in an international market. New solutions such as New Public Management are therefore challenging more traditional political systems in the democracies of the western world. Public administration have more similarities with how firms and businesses are run by being dependent on the market, rather than being a provider of public services, democratic responsibility and public participation. The competitiveness discourse shapes territory and space, creating new and complex networks of relations between multiple actors in society, both private and public. This in turn makes it difficult for citizens to affect politics and the creation of space leaving little or no room for marginalized groups in society to participate. 

     

    Based on two separately case studies of two essentially different regions, one administrative region, Värmland in Sweden and one informal, functional region “The 8 million city”, stretching from Oslo in the north to Copenhagen in the south, the practices  and techniques used in urban regeneration projects on the regional level will be presented.

     

  • 11.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Jakten på den attraktiva regionen: En studie om samtida regionaliseringsprocesser2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores different expressions of regionalism(s) and regionalization processes in a Swedish and a westernized context. The case studies in the study conducted are represented by two different kinds of regions, Värmland and The Eight Million City. Värmland is a rather typical administrative and political bordered region at the subnational level in the Midwest of Sweden. The Eight Million City in turn exemplifies an imaginary cross border region, stretching from Oslo in the north, to Gothenburg, Malmö and Copenhagen in the south, connected in a network by a larger infrastructure corridor. It is also an example of how new planning practices stretching over already institutionalized national as well as local and regional borders, can be seen as challenging earlier planning and policy structures connected to the state.

    It is possible to see how different kinds of strategies related to strategic spatial planning practices are used to enhance the competitiveness of each region. In both cases this produce and reproduce different perceptions about what represents and constitute a competitive region. The empirical material analyzed in the study has been generated by interviews, participant observations, and document analysis based on discourse theory and discourse analysis.

    Different imaginaries are institutionalized in each region by different means and practices. In Värmland new perceptions about regional citizenship, regional identity and the idea of what constitutes a modern region are being institutionalized into the regional context by building a brand for the region. In The Eight Million City the project idea is based on an enlarged labor market connecting the larger cities in the region together in a network. As well as in Värmland, the knowledge produced in the project contributes to institutionalize different perceptions of citizenship and what makes up a competitive and attractive region.

  • 12.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Kommersialisering av regioner: Om platsmarknadsföring och regionbyggande2013In: Det regionala samhällsbyggandets praktiker: Tiden, Makten, Rummet / [ed] Mitander, Tomas; Säll, Line; Öjehag-Petterson, Andreas, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2013, p. 163-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Quadruple and Quintuple Helix as a way towards socially and inclusive growth in the development of bioeconomies in Europe? 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Regional Comparisons of Quadruple Helix, Smart Specialisation and Bio Economy2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Regionala policys i rörelse: Bioekonomi och smart specialisering i Värmland2018In: Globala flöden och lokala praktiker: policymobilitet i tid och rum / [ed] Andersson, Ida, Stockholm: SSAG - Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2018, p. 138-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Grundel, Ida
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Sustainability transitions in the transition to bioeconomy2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Grundel, Ida
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    A Quadruple and Quintuple Helix Approach to Regional Innovation Systems in the Transformation to a Forestry-Based Bioeconomy2016In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 963-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to understand the possible preconditions for the transformation of a regional innovation system (RIS) into a quadruple and quintuple helix system applied to the development of a sustainable forestry-based bioeconomy in Värmland, Sweden. Research points to the necessity not only of further developing current innovation systems to include more actors than earlier but also of taking concern for the environment as a way towards attaining sustainability. The research was carried out in response to the need to understand he fourth helix and its role in RIS and to transform to a sustainable bioeconomy, as identified by researchers, policymakers and industry representatives. This study was inspired by participatory transdisciplinarity and a transdisciplinary research design, acknowledging the importance of a variety of actors in knowledge production from different spheres of society. Much of the empirical material gathered for this research was based on interviews and a workshop with different stakeholders. The results show that the use of a quintuple helix RIS in Värmland for the transformation to a forestry-based bioeconomy could be a possible way forward towards sustainability. The model proposes that involvement of civil society in the innovation system could contribute to a larger societal transformation that aims to change consumer behaviour, production patterns, technological developments, infrastructure, norms and values. However, the involvement of civil society in the innovation system must still be regarded as part of a vision statement in regional policy documents.

  • 18.
    Grundel, Ida
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    A Quadruple Helix Approach to Regional Innovation Systems for a Transformation to a Forestry Based Bio Economy?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change and environmental problems are becoming more complex, uncertain and multi-scalar, affecting a variety of actors and agencies. Therefore calling for a variety of knowledge’s and values in decision making processes. New forms of government and governance are being implemented and in the same time public participation in decision making processes is pointed out as a democratic right by as well environmentalist and pressure groups as in the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe 1998 (Reed, 2008). Further collaboration between more actors than in earlier innovation systems is pointed out as important in as well innovation policys concerning smart specialization strategies as well as in the development of a European bio economy. In the latter context the European 2012 Bio Economy Communication Strategy lifts the importance of engaging society in the transition, thereby creating a link between society and policy makers in decision making processes. Thereby, this article mainly takes its departure in the broadening field of literature around regional innovation systems and the concepts of quadruple and quintuple helix in a forestry bio economy in Sweden. More specifically it aims to examine the preconditions of a possible transition into a forestry based bio economy by the move from a triple helix to a quadruple helix system in the region of Värmland in Sweden. Which actors are involved in the current innovation system and how is environment included in the transition?

    One point of departure is where the European Commission in 2012 established a strategy for the development of a European bio economy; Innovating for sustainable growth: A bio economy for Europe, aiming to transform the European economy into becoming more sustainable by the: production of renewable biological resources and the conversion of these resources and waste streams into value added products, such as food, feed, bio-based products and bioenergy (The European Commission, 2012:3). The European Union thereby sees the bio economy as one possible way of transforming society into becoming fossil free, creating a more sustainable European economy. Further the European Commission’s imposition on European regions to develop smart specialization strategies so called RIS3 – Research and innovation smart specialization strategies (Aranguren & Wilson 2013), have led to an extension of earlier regional innovation systems. Regions around Europe now develop smart specialization strategies to draw on their own unique resources to withhold funds from the European structural funds (Aranguren & Wilson 2013; Carayannis & Rakhmatullin 2014).

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