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  • 1.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    University of Melbourne.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Adaptation to climate change as ecological modernisation: Australian experience2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National policy approaches to adaptation to climate change in Australia are used to address a research inquiry into the political values of adaptation policies. This study examines whether this public policy response constitutes ecological modernisation and considers the implications. Ecological modernisation’s associations with neo-liberalism are reviewed and an account of key public policies is given. Particular attention is paid to maladaptation risks and the question of the possible influence of ecological modernisation in contributing to these risks. Key findings include that the Australian adaptation policy approach features ecological modernisation, that comprehensive-rational planning is used, and that ecological justice values are at risk

  • 2.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Climate change adaptation policy and political values2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and policy into climate change adaptation responses has expanded from the technological, financial and institutional realms into the social realms. There is a growing interest in, and awareness of, political aspects of adaptation policy and planning. This paper considers three aspects of this development and the broad issue of how contemporary political values influences adaptation responses. Firstly, a case is presented for identifying the political values in climate change adaptation policies, plans and programmes. Secondly, a range of political values and ideologies associated with public sector and NGO climate change adaptation measures are identified from contemporary scholarship. Thirdly, a number of implications of adaptation policy stemming from these political values are identified.

  • 3.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    The University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Comparing Local Government Adaptation Responses to Climate Change in Australia and Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Glover, Leigh
    Australasian Centre for the Governance and Management of Urban Transport (GAMUT), Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Adaptation and Maladaptation in Australian National Climate Change Policy2014In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, ISSN 1523-908X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines Australia's national policies for adapting to climate change impacts. Recent developments in research funding, institutional capacities and extreme events have resulted in a greater interest and level of activity in adaptation policy. Based on a historical review of national policy, adaptation policy is considered within a political frame and political values, especially the values of neoliberalism, within adaptation policy are identified. Of interest are the implications of these values for the outcomes of adaptation policy, with attention given to the problem of maladaptation.

  • 5.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Climate change adaptation and the regional mess2013In: Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC), 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus in this paper is on policy and implementation of adaptation policies. The interest in adaptation policy in this text concerns the public policy dimension and not spontaneous social adaptations to changing climate or that undertaken independently by corporations or communities. The focus is on public policy and implementation that are planned, purposeful and intentional. The main issue in this text is how Swedish governance of climate change adaptation is organised and if this type of organising (or lack or organising) can lead to difficulties in reaching long term sustainable adaptation measures or even maladaptation at the local level?

  • 6.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Climate Change Adaptation Policy and Practice: The Swedish Experience2012In: XXI Nordic Municipal Research Conference (NORKOM), Oslo University, Norway, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a complicated social problem. Formulating and implementing adaptation measures at the local level entails handling value conflicts, power relations, governance, equity, resource allocation, competing interests and, connected to all these issues and more, uncertainty. All this takes place in a complex context where a multitude of factors, and actors representing different societal interests, are interacting both facilitating and hindering effective action and involves changes in modes of operation in society as a whole.

    Adaptation range from the local to the large, its time horizon can range from the short to the long terms, it can be tactical or strategic, it can seek immediate, delayed, or cumulative effects, and it can encompass widely differing outcomes.

    Accordingly, formulating adaptation responses is a challenging issue for municipalities for a number of reasons. Firstly, the large range of possible climate change impacts. Secondly, the insufficient knowledge base. Thirdly, the lack of consensus on responsibilities. Fourthly, the usual set of problems facing public policy of this sort. In this paper we will focus adaptation measures implemented by Swedish municipalities. The empirical material consists of studies from state authorities of municipal adaptation to climate change.

  • 7.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Trusting invisible hands?: Climate change, political institutions and the market2010Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 7 of 7
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