Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Mattila, Pekka
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Schouten, John W.
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Toyoki, Sammy
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Reimagining society through retail practice2016In: Journal of Retailing, ISSN 0022-4359, E-ISSN 1873-3271, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 411-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marketing scholars with sociological and anthropological leanings have made great strides in uncovering strategic and theoretical implicationsof consumer collectives and consumption-driven market phenomena. It has not been very common that their perspectives have been brought to bearon retailing practice or theory. This ethnographic study examines a highly successful, globalizing, consumer-driven pop-up retail festival for itspotential lessons about social movements. It reveals new insights into logics and potentialities for retailing as a field of affordances for reimaginingsociety and social practices. It points especially to how eruptions of ‘carnivalesque mood’ unite everyday citizens to imagine change in a highlyregulated social context and how they utilize the practice of retailing collectively to actualize societal change.

  • 2.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    University Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland.
    Mattila, Pekka
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Paradox and market renewal Knockoffs and counterfeits as doppelganger brand images of luxury2018In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 750-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to continue the emerging stream of literature that has found knockoffs and counterfeits to be unobtrusive or even beneficial to luxury companies by analyzing how they produce paradoxes of meaning and contribute to the renewal of luxury markets. This is done by exploring them as doppelganger brand images that reappropriate brand imagery for their own purposes. Design/methodology/approach - This is a conceptual paper that focuses on the role of knockoffs and counterfeits in the renewal of luxury markets. Findings - The findings highlight how knockoffs and counterfeits can contribute to the emergence and cyclical diffusion of luxury. As luxury offerings are introduced to the market, knockoffs and counterfeits accelerate the snob effect, aid in anchoring trends and contribute to induced obsolescence. During diffusion, knockoffs and counterfeits can strengthen aspiration, bandwagon and herding effects. In doing so, knockoffs and counterfeits create a paradox as they simultaneously legitimize the idea of the authenticity of genuine offerings through their presence in the market and create cyclical demand for novel offerings by undermining the authenticity claims of existing luxury offerings. Thus, knockoffs and counterfeits can be understood as a paradox of luxury markets that contributes to the market cyclicality not despite but because of this paradoxical interplay. Originality/value - While research on knockoffs and counterfeiting is plentiful in the field of marketing, this is among the few studies that analyze how these offerings contribute to luxury markets and their renewal.

  • 3.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Murray, Jeff B.
    University of Arkansas, USA.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Seduced by "fakes": Producing the excessive interplay of authentic/counterfeit from a Baudrillardian perspective2019In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, article id UNSP 1470593119870214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Authenticity has often been considered to be a key theme in contemporary consumer culture. One of its manifestations is how branded market offerings can maintain authentic meanings, especially in a market increasingly saturated with counterfeit substitutes. By following a Baudrillardian perspective, we focus on fashion objects in the "branded luxury" category to problematize the sanctity of the authentic/counterfeit distinction. We argue that marketing literature generally attempts to normatively maintain and impose the distinction in ways that obscure the complexities of this conceptual interplay. We posit that instead of normative accounts that attempt to sanctify the extant orders of global capitalist markets, literature on luxury consumption should instead recognize the excess of meaning in the semiotic interplay of commodified authentic/counterfeit meanings. Any view of morality in luxury consumption should thus recognize "ambivalence" and "seduction" as its intensive qualities.

  • 4.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mattila, Pekka
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    'Managerial Storytelling’: How we produce managerial and academic stories in qualitative B2B case study research2014In: Journal of Global Scholars of Marketing Science, ISSN 2163-9159, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 295-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a focus on case study research methods, this study continues the epistemological debate about qualitative research approaches in the IMP literature by reconsidering the reliance on managerial interviews as a primary empirical source in the production of knowledge claims. In this empirical approach, researchers seem to often treat the interview process and the analysis and reporting of research findings in a manner that generally gives situational credence to the veracity and factuality of the interview data. In line with several epistemological approaches that have already surfaced in IMP literature, this study further emphasizes the context-dependent, ephemeral and ultimately unstable nature of managerial “truths” imparted in the interviews. We argue that the data should be empathically and reflexively understood as the production of stories and their reporting as a form of academic storytelling of pragmatic academic and managerial value.

  • 5. Huhtala, Juho-Petteri
    et al.
    Mattila, Pekka
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Barriers to Innovation Diffusion in Industrial Networks: A Systematic Combining Approach2014In: Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing / [ed] H. M. Pattison, R. Marshall, and A. G. Woodside, Bingley, U.K.: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014, p. 61-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 50 years, a substantial interest has been put to research onhow innovation spreads within social networks over time (see Rogers,1962, 2010). Our initial aim was to examine innovation diffusion inindustrial networks. We operationalized the research through a casestudy of an advertising network by using systematic combining as theapproach (Dubois & Gadde, 2002, 2014). From the initial focus of innovationdiffusion, the rematching of data and theory led us to focus on thebarriers of innovation diffusion. By doing so, we found out that multilevelstrategizing appears to be an important phenomenon in understandingdynamics of innovation diffusion within industrial networks. Specifically,strategizing occurs in two levels: (1) the groups within the network competefor position, and (2) actors within a group compete for position bytrying to differentiate themselves from other group actors. A strategic mismatch between the two levels leads the network to become deceleratedor even static in diffusing new innovations (Abrahamsen, Henneberg, &Naude`, 2012). Uncovering these findings would not have been possiblewithout the use of systematic combining and the constant matchingbetween theoretical and empirical domains.

  • 6.
    Huhtala, Juho-Petteri
    et al.
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Frösén, Johanna
    St Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Jaakkola, Matti
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Market orientation, innovation capability and business performance: Insights from the global financial crisis2014In: Baltic Journal of Management, ISSN 1746-5265, E-ISSN 1746-5273, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 134-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The paper aims to examine the role of market orientation (MO) and innovation capability in determining business performance during an economic upturn and downturn. Design/methodology/approach - The data comprise two national-level surveys conducted in Finland in 2008, representing an economic boom, and in 2010 when the global economic crisis had hit the Finnish market. Partial least square path analysis is used to test the potential mediating effect of innovation capability on the relationship between MO and business performance during economic boom and bust. Findings - The results show that innovation capability fully mediates the performance effects of a MO during an economic upturn, whereas the mediation is only partial during a downturn. Innovation capability also mediates the relationship between a customer orientation and business performance during an upturn, whereas the mediating effect culminates in a competitor orientation during a downturn. Thus, the role of innovation capability as a mediator between the individual market-orientation components varies along the business cycle. Originality/value - This paper is one of the first studies that empirically examine the impact of the economic cycle on the relationship between strategic marketing concepts, such as MO or innovation capability, and the firm's business performance.

  • 7.
    Sihvonen, Antti
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Department of Marketing, Aalto University School of Business, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pajunen, K.
    School of Business and Economics, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Causal complexity of new product development processes: a mechanism-based approach2018In: Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice, ISSN 1447-9338, E-ISSN 2204-0226, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 253-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcomes of new product development (NPD) processes are dependent on the interplay of several interdependent activities. One product development activity can be dependent on the presence or absence of other activities, different kinds of NDP processes may lead to the same outcome, and specific kinds of activities may have a positive effect in one process but no effect in other processes. However, we currently lack means to examine and explain this causal complexity inherent in NPD processes. To address this issue, we introduce mechanism-based approach as a way to capture conjunctural and equifinal causal relations. We build this approach on the philosophical literature on mechanism-based explanations and the methodological opportunities provided by the qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to identify how the activities of entities are configured together to generate outcomes. We elaborate this approach by presenting an in-depth historical analysis of the NPD projects of Vaisala, a meteorological instrument company. We discover and suggest that the company’s NPD projects were driven by three mechanisms (ideation, evaluation and commercialisation) and that each of them were actualised by a set of different activity configurations. Accordingly, we contribute to the NPD and innovation literature by showing how mechanism-based explanations take into account both the abstract theorisation of NPD processes and their inherent causal complexity.

  • 8.
    Sukhov, Alexandre
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Netz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Magnusson, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Business Administration. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Idea screening: Explaining activities, modes and processesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Sukhov, Alexandre
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013).
    Sihvonen, Antti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, The Service and Market Oriented Transport Research Group. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Magnusson, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Service Research Center (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    That makes sense to me: Openness to change and sensemaking in idea screening2018In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 1-15, article id 1840009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how a person’s sense of identity (expressed in terms of openness to change vs. conservation) influences the way in which they screen early ideas for innovation projects. To study this, we recruited 20 experts from a leading IT-consultancy firm to individually evaluate and comment on 12 R&D project ideas. This data was then analysed by using a configurational approach (fsQCA) to understand how different experts combine various evaluation dimensions together to make sense of and decide on the goodness of an idea. The findings show that experts who are open to change view ideas as opportunities and approach idea screening as a generative process, while conservative experts are more reserved in their idea screening activities.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf