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  • 1.
    Gannan, Ismail
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Kubaji, Hussam
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Siwale, Workson
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Frodeson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Streamlined social footprint analysis of the nascent bio-pelletssub-sector in Zambia2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1-17, article id 5492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change concerns have goaded countries towards seeking renewable energy options (bio-energy being one of them), to replace/supplant the conventional fossil-fuel alternatives (coal, oil and natural gas) in vogue. Fuel-pellets - at the confluence of the forestry, agriculture, waste management and bio-energy sectors - when produced from biomass-residues, serve the dual purpose of ensuring energy security and environmental sustainability.  By valorising more and more organic wastes to bio-energy products, one could, to use the old adage, ‘kill two birds with one stone’.  Social-LCA is a method used to analyse a very wide range of social issues associated with the stakeholders in a value-chain – workers, local community dwellers, society, global consumers, banks, investors, governments, researchers, international organizations and NGOs. In this analysis, the authors commence with a highly-focused, niche literature review on the social dimension of sustainability in the African energy / bio-energy sector. The streamlined social footprint analysis inspired by the relatively lesser number of such studies for this sector in Africa, is not a novel addition per se to the S-LCA knowledge base. The purpose of application is to shed light on something in Zambia, which must be understood better, known and studied better, in order so as to bring about much-needed alterations in the direction of sustainable development. While the questions addressed to four different groups of stakeholders encompass a clutch of sustainable development goals, gender equality (SDG 5) and the need for greater interest on the part of governments and investors (SDG 9) to look at sustainable alternatives to the status quo, stand out as concerns which need to be tided over. This paper and the streamlined social footprint analysis carried out, is all the more relevant and timely, when one considers some key changes which have happened in Zambia over the last five years – The implementation of the National Energy Policy in 2019, and the creation of the Ministry of Green Economy in 2021.These are verily  in Zambia, are harbingers of positive change auguring well for future developments in the  supporting developments in the bio-energy (and bio-pellets) sector, not just in Zambia, but by way of emulating and learning, in other countries on the continent.    

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  • 2.
    Ghosh, Ruchira
    et al.
    Ulster University, GBR.
    Kansal, Arun
    TERI School of Advanced Studies, IND.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Urban water security assessment using an integrated metabolism approach – case study of the National Capital Territory of Delhi in India2019In: Resources, E-ISSN 2079-9276, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 1-15, article id 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a non substitutable resource and a social good, which governments must perforce provide to its citizens in the right quantity and quality. An integrated urban metabolism model is useful in understanding the status quo of an urban water and sanitation system. By defining and measuring the values of relevant hydrological performance indicators-deliverables of the model referred to-a thorough knowledge of the present performance and the gaps, which need to be plugged en route to a sustainable urban water infrastructure, can be obtained, as demonstrated in this paper. This then forms the bedrock for decision-making and policy formulation for change to be introduced top-down as well as advice, which would enable the much needed bottom-up support to policies. The authors have chosen Delhi as the case study city, but would like to point out that this application can be reproduced for any other town/city/region of the world. The water balance within the chosen system boundaries shows that the annual unutilized flows, amounting to 1443 million cubic meters, dominate the metabolic flows of water in Delhi, and the annual groundwater withdrawal, which exceeds 420 million cubic meters, is much greater than the recharge rate, resulting in a rapid depletion of the groundwater level. There is an urgent need thereby to improve the rate of infiltration of stormwater and reduce the rate of runoff by focusing on increasing the share of permeable surfaces in the city, as well as to consider the wastewater streams as potential sources of water, while not forgetting demand side of management measures, as the pressure on the urban water system in the city is likely to intensify with a combination of population growth, economic development, and climate change in the near future. The recommendations provided by the authors towards the end of the article, can, if suitable measures are undertaken and robust policies are implemented, result in Delhi's enjoying a water surplus in the short term, and progressively attain complete sustainability with regard to the utilization of its water resources.

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  • 3.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    A brief analysis of SDG 3 – Good health and well-being – and its synergies and trade-offs with the other Sustainable Development Goals2022In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), proposed by the United Nations in 2015, give countries around the world much to work on until 2030. The third SDG – Good health and well-being – surely cannot be pursued in isolation. Far from being a silo, it has strong synergies with other SDGs, notably Gender Equality (SDG 5), No Poverty (SDG 1), Reduced Inequalities (SDG 10) & Clean water and sanitation (SDG 6). Quite counter-intuitively, it has trade-offs with SDG 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production). This is a commentary on these synergies and trade-offs, which looks at Good Health and Well-being as an overarching goal on any government’s agenda, impacting and being impacted, to different degrees, by the other goals. 

  • 4.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013). Norwegian University of Science & Technology.
    A critique of the European Green City Index2014In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 317-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2009, Siemens (Germany) sponsored the research by the Economist Intelligence Unit (London), which resulted in the publication of the European Green City Index report, in which the environmental performance of 30 large cities in Europe was analysed. It provided city administrations with an idea of where they stood vis-a-vis their European counterparts. However, while adopting such performance evaluation methodologies, it is important to set targets and goals, and to be aware of pitfalls that may exist in the course of a blind pursuit of a higher Green Score. City administrations are usually segmented into different divisions and departments; often each division strives towards its own set of targets and goals, without being aware (or without being concerned, even if it is aware) of the overlaps, conflicts and synergies that may exist with the targets and goals of the others. The Green City Index needs to be considered together with an Urban Socio-Economic Index, which can be suitably structured with the inter-linkages with the indicators of the Green City Index explicitly described.

  • 5.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    A small and beautiful example of sustainability in the heart of Zimbabwe2023In: Studia Ecologiae et Bioethicae, ISSN 1733-1218, E-ISSN 2719-826X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zimbabwe has diligently started pursuing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) defined by the United Nations in 2015. While making progress and being aware of it, will be a shot in the arm, with success breeding more success, the journey may seem daunting at times. However, the journey –sustainable development towards the targets set -is what matters morethan the final destination, as philosophers and savants often remind us. This article, while dwelling on sustainable development in this southern-African landlocked country in general, presents a beautiful example of a collaborative venture, undertaken by dedicated and determined international partners, and predicated on SDG#4 (Quality Education) and SDG#5 (Gender Equality), and harnessing the complementarities and synergies with the other SDGs, which set root during the COVID-pandemic, in Mwenezi in southern Zimbabwe. The pandemic while being a scourge, tended to have some silver linings to it, as it gave birth to many collaborationsand made human beings realise that one’s own happiness is dependent to a very great extent on that of others. This venture emphasizes girls’ educationand skills-development, which open the doors, synergistically, to sustained growth, development and progress. Education, indisputably, is a key component of the freedom necessary to live a life of value. To quote Nelson Mandela, ‘It is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.

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  • 6.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    ABC of Sustainable Development2015 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is a field of thought, learning, research and endeavour, which has entrenched itself in the 21st century. This book is certainly very very far from being the be-all and end-all of knowledge about sustainability and sustainable development, as readers will appreciate. This modest effort is something which I hope provides some food for thought…and then hopefully, purposeful action. This book is about 90 pages long, and is split up into 9 chapters, and dwells on the different aspects of sustainable development and the challenges associated with integrating these so that development is truly and holistically sustainable….Chapters begin with Learning Objectives which at once tells the reader what to expect from it, and some Exercises at the end, which one may wish to attempt, en route.

    As Prof Genon Giuseppe from Turin, Italy, in the Foreword to the book, says, ‘This book is useful to university curricula, aimed at grooming professionals capable of considering all the aspects of sustainable development and of course, can very well be integrated into a host of academic disciplines, as the author has pointed out in one of the chapters.’

    As Dr Håvard Bergsdal from Trondheim, Norway, says, in his review comments, ‘The book makes for good reading and serves as a useful summary for readers who are new to the topic of sustainability.’

  • 7.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Hydraul & Environm Engn, Trondheim, Norway.
    Analysis of stocks and flows in Indian households, associated with water consumption2013In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 472-481Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Book review: Christianity for the Curious (by Sören Dalevi)2022In: Bhavan’s Journal, ISSN 2457-1032, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 69-73Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Brief commentary: Varshita Venkatesh Written-Word Workshop: A ‘no-income-to-entrepreneur’ sustainable social entrepreneurship philanthropy construct2023In: Sustainable Social Development, E-ISSN 2972-4880, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 2203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Varshita Venkatesh Written-Word Workshop set up by the author in honour and memory of his wife Varshita,who ascended to her heavenly home in January 2020, can be labelled as a ‘no-income-to-entrepreneur’ socialentrepreneurship construct which knits together a swathe of different stakeholders to the ‘Varshita Venkatesh family ofcharitable funds’, so to say, and uncovers and creates value of different types—economic, social, spiritual, psychologicaland moral. It has a long way to go, in this ‘value-creating’ journey and contribute to sustainable development in its ownhumble way

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  • 10.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Can India establish a circular bioeconomy by 2050?2021In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 31-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable bioeconomy is only feasible if, and only if, all three pillars of sustainability – economic, environmental and social – are accounted for from the very beginning and if synergies between these pillars can be achieved.

  • 11.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, S P Andersensv 5, Valgrinda, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Changes in material flows, treatment efficiencies and environmental load-shifting in the wastewater treatment sector Part II: Case study of Norway2009In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 1131-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Circular bio-economy – paradigm for the future: Systematic review of scientific journal publications from 2015-2021.2022In: Circular Economy and Sustainability, ISSN 2730-597X, E-ISSN 2730-5988, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 231-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While ‘renewable’ is the keyword in a bioeconomy and resource conservation is the motivation behind a circular economy, a circular bioeconomy is one in which waste streams from renewable bio-resources are looped back into the technosphere – open-loop or closed-loop recycling or conversion from matter to energy. This systematic review brings together 385 publications from 2015-2021, 50 countries and 150 journals, into a coherent account of the status quo of published research on circular bioeconomy. The numbers bear testimony to the growing interest in this field of research. Germany is the leading contributor to the scientific literature-base (10%), while the Journal of Cleaner Production (9%) tops the list of journals in the fray. The methodology adopted has been clearly explained, and the discussion has been segmented into sub-sections and sub-sub-sections to do justice to the diversity of the nature of the publications. A little flexibility in organisation of the flow of the text has been availed of, to improve readability.  The circular bioeconomy can be visualised as a set of ‘many through many to many’ relationships, enabling both economies of scale and scope in the longer run. This calls for extensive collaboration and cooperation among the numerous stakeholders in the fray. Several barriers will have to be overcome. Technology impact assessments and sustainability risk appraisals need to be carried out in order to ensure and convince stakeholders that they are on the right path. But as one knows and will appreciate, challenges lurk where there exist opportunities to be availed of, to replace the take-make-use-dispose paradigm of a linear economy to the grow-make-use-restore alternative.

     

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  • 13.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Circular bio-economy: Review of scientific journal publications with focus on wastewater treatment2021In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 71-79Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A circular bioeconomy is one in which waste streams from the processing of renewable bio-resources are looped back into the technosphere – open-loop or closed-loop recycling or conversion from matter to energy. This systematic review brings together a small set of 46 publications from the period 2016-2021, sourced from 28 journals and originating in 22 countries (decided solely on the basis of the first author’s affiliation) into a concise and structured account of published research pertaining to water and wastewater in a circular bioeconomy. The publications deal with either bio-products from other sectors which find use in wastewater treatment, or bio-products valorised from municipal and agro-industrial wastewater streams. Some publications (15 in all) which do not focus on water or wastewater per se have been included, in order to provide a good introduction, and take-home messages for the readers. The simple methodology has been clearly outlined, and the discussion has been organized in sub-sections and sub-sub-sections to facilitate improved readability. The take-make-use-dispose paradigm of a linear economy has to be replaced by the grow-make-use-restore alternative.

  • 14.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Classroom survey to gauge how the three pillars of sustainability are prioritised for the urban water and wastewater system2017In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 33-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Communicate and Inspire: Review of TALK LIKE TED, by Carmine Gallo2023In: Bhavan's Journal, ISSN 2457-1032, p. 73-76Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Carmine Gallo packs a punch and makes this book as novel and memorable as a top-class TED talk.

  • 16.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Cost-benefit analysis: Leakage reduction by rehabilitating old water pipelines: Case study of Oslo (Norway)2012In: Urban Water Journal, ISSN 1573-062X, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 277-286Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Cricket -  a little more2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Critique of selected peer-reviewed publications on applied social life cycle assessment: Focus on cases from developing countries2019In: Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy, ISSN 1618-954X, E-ISSN 1618-9558, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 413-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social aspect of sustainable and ‘clean’ production/manufacturing technologies is researched and understood by means of Social Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA), a Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (LCSA) tool, which is still in its infancy. In this paper, a search for all peer-reviewed publications on applied Social LCA, which have appeared in scientific journals, between O’Brien et al (1996) and the latest one at the time of writing (April 2018), was carried out, using Scopus as the repository and using “S-LCA” OR “SLCA” OR “Social LCA” OR “Social Life Cycle Assessment” as search-phrases in title, abstract and keywords of publications, separately.  Overall, 213 publications were unearthed, and the trend shows that there has been a near-exponential increase over time. A little over 55% of these publications – 121 to be precise - were applications of S-LCA – often in combination with environmental-LCA and life cycle costing analysis, in an LCSA. This paper discusses the contributions of a selected subset of these 121 publications to the body of S-LCA knowledge, with the focus being restricted to applications in developing and transition economies of the world, on the premise that there is a more urgent need to understand social aspects of production and manufacturing in these parts of the world.  A SWOT analysis of S-LCA has been carried out towards the end. There is a consensus among many researchers that while LCC and E-LCA have matured a lot over time, S-LCA, the newest of the trio, is evolving slowly to become a harmonised tool which can serve as an effective complement to the aforesaid two, in life cycle sustainability assessments of products and processes in industry.         

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  • 19.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Dishwashers: Literature Review to Summarise the Multi-Dimensionality of Sustainable Production and Consumption2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 16, p. 1-21, article id 10302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An automatic dishwasher is a water-using, energy-demanding contraption with 40-50 different component parts fashioned out of different materials-metals and non-metals-which over the last 70 years has evolved in its role as a comfort-enhancing, convenience-providing, time-saving white good in the kitchen of the modern urban household, especially in the countries of the developed world. Its lifecycle, which spans about 12-13 years on average, lends itself to research in a variety of sustainability aspects-politico-legal/regulatory, economic, environmental, social and techno-functional-and fields-thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, acoustics, economics, chemistry, microbiology, materials science, design engineering, wastewater treatment, energy engineering, consumer behaviour, and, of late, sustainable consumption and production. The end goal of this review is to present the automatic dishwasher-almost ubiquitous and taken-for-granted in the western world these days-as a candidate for progressive research and development, resulting in its continued evolution. The author facilitates this by providing an overview of the different aspects of sustainability addressed by researchers thus far. It at once reinforces the importance of transdisciplinary research, finds answers to a clutch of 'what', 'why', 'where', 'how', 'who', and 'when' questions, and reminds us that improvement/s in one aspect must not undermine or thwart those in any of the others. It is the first of its kind, as far as the automatic dishwasher is concerned; it is a well-structured review of 84 peer-reviewed journal publications focusing on the dishwasher, accessed through Scopus and contacting researchers through ResearchGate, spanning the time period 1980-2021, originating in 21 countries (with Germany leading the pack, with 22% of the publications), and sourced from 63 different journals. Over a 16-year period between 1998 and 2014, both the energy use and water consumption of dishwashers decreased by well over 40%. Consumers in the USA, reportedly, are willing to pay up to 90% more for a higher-rated dishwasher. Interestingly, a publication from Germany states that manual dishwashing, if done in accordance with the Best Practice Tips (recommended by another German study), can have a 20% lower environmental footprint than automatic dishwashers.

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  • 20.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Economic impact of upgrading biogas from anaerobic digesters to biomethane for use as transportation fuel: Case study of Bekkelaget Wastewater Treatment Plant in Oslo, Norway2014In: Sewage Treatment plants: Economic evaluation of innovative technologies / [ed] Katerina Stamatelatou, Konstantinos P. Tsagarakis, London, UK: IWA Publishing, 2014, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Eight years to Go, to Meet the SDG Targets: Waste Management as Enabler and Enabled2023In: Urban Metabolism and Climate Change: Perspective for Sustainable Cities / [ed] Rahul Bhadouria; Sachchidanand Tripathi; Pardeep Singh; P K Joshi; Rishikesh Singh, Springer Nature, 2023, p. 223-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waste management has evolved from the earlier five-step hierarchy to include many more R’s—reclaim, repurpose, remediate, renovate, replenish, revere nature, being a few of them. It can play a key role in the alleviation of, and the simultaneous adaptation to the repercussions of climate change. Waste valorisation, which is gradually entrenching itself, in both principle and practice, can go a long way in directly and indirectly enabling humankind to get closer to several sustainable development goals (SDGs) targets and perhaps overachieve in some respects. Value creation by adopting the R’s wherever, however, whenever and by whosoever possible, is a sine qua non for achieving the SDGs by year-2030 and continuing in the same vein thereafter, when the world will have to grapple more perceptibly with the repercussions of climate change. It is clear that we cannot avert climate change now. We can, at best, alleviate the intensity of its repercussions, though unfortunately not uniformly all over the world. This chapter posits waste management (urban and otherwise) in the scheme of things related to the sustainable development goals (SDGs), as both enablers and enabled. The exposition introduces readers to the multi-dimensionality of sustainable development, and thereby efficient, value-generating waste management in a circular economy/bio-economy.

  • 22.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Environment, economy and society – the ‘body’, ‘mind’ and ‘soul’ of sustainable design of buildings2023In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 249-253Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The design process in general, and the one for buildings in particular has evolved and become increasingly intricate, with additional layers and factors becoming relevant, as the drive towards sustainability (the Sustainabledevelopment goals defined by the United Nations in 2015) has gathered steam. This short chapter focuses on thediversity of issues which sustainable building design is likely to be influenced by, in the years ahead.

  • 23.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Environmental Life-Cycle Analysis: A primer2016 (ed. First)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This little book is a primer. The target readership here is not necessarily only for engineers, but also for those studying to be lawyers, political scientists, administrators, business managers, etc. Lucid language, analogies and cartoons help to impress upon readers that environmental-LCA is not rocket-science.

    The reader is taken through the steps to be assiduously followed while performing an E-LCA. You understand the importance of defining the goal and the scope of your analysis before starting, and realise that E-LCA is data-intensive. Also covered are topics like attributional/consequential LCA, rebound effect and problem shifting, and allocation of environmental impacts. Attempting the exercises which appear at the end of every chapter will enable the reader to gain in confidence. As Prof Arun Kansal says in the Foreword to the book, ‘It explains the basic philosophy of LCA and argues, by providing examples, in its favour as a standard method for environmental decision-making.’ Dr Geoffrey Guest, in his Afterword, refers to the book as a ‘unique, light-hearted though philosophically-deep introductory piece on E-LCA.’

     

  • 24.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Environmental Life-cycle Analysis as a tool for sustainability studies: A complete learning experience.2019In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Environmental systems analysis of urban water systems - limited historical account of published work in scientific journals2015In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 209-222Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Future prospects of industrial ecology as a set of tools for sustainable development2012In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 77-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Greening automatic dishwashers2022In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, Vol. 59, no 11, p. 48-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    I see the world through other eyes: Book review of 'An Immense World' by Ed Yong2023In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 49-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    I see the world through other eyes: Review of 'An Immense World' by Ed Yong2023In: Studia Ecologiae et Bioethicae, ISSN 1733-1218, E-ISSN 2719-826X, Vol. 21, no 5Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One need not be a biologist, zoologist, herpetologist, ichthyologist, entomologist, ornithologist or an academic counterpart of any of these, to be drawn towards crawling, swimming, flying, arboreal and quadruped fellow-inhabitants of Mother Earth. For that matter, you need not even be a poet, painter or writer, looking for your Muse out there in the wilderness. Indeed, An Immense Worldby Ed Yong –a ‘magic-suffused’ 13-chaptered, 450-pager–may appeal a little more to the scientifically-inclined, considering that Yong is essentially a Pulitzer-Prize-winning science writer.The immensity he addresses in this gem of a book makes a reader feel miniscule in the scheme of things on Terra Firma

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  • 30.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Industrial ecology tools as decision-making aids for sustainable phosphorus recovery: A methodology paper   Industriell-ekologi verktyg som beslutsstöd för hållbar fosfor återvinning:  en metod-artikel2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 107-121Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    India, being the second largest importer, and the largest consumer of phosphate fertilisers in the world, needs to focus on securing its supplies not merely by providing subsidies to importers but also focusing on recovery and recycling of phosphorus from waste streams. In the process, the country can avail of concomitant benefits like wastewater reclamation and bio-energy generation, and improve the lot of the millions of farmers in the country. In this paper the authors have outlined a methodology based on industrial ecology tools – MFA (SFA), E-LCA, LCC and S-LCA - which they intend to adopt in the near-term to study, analyse and model the status quo and proposed interventions, from a sustainability perspective, which will become indispensable in the not-too-distant future for the country. The literature review which has been segmented on the basis of the application of the different tools to the study and analysis of resource recovery from wastewater, provides insights into what has been done thus far, and prepares the bedrock for a more detailed analysis.  

     

  • 31.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Interpreting sustainability using Robert Pirsig's quality levels: LILA-An Enquiry Into Morals2011In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 62-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Life cycle costing: A primer2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
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  • 33.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Long walk to somewhere2022In: Contemporary Literary Review India, ISSN 2250-3366, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 10p. 155-165Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Trondheim.
    Malaysian Water tariff influences water-saving habits2011In: Journal - American Water Works Association, ISSN 0003-150X, E-ISSN 1551-8833, Vol. 103, no 7, p. 32-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Not merely public transport but green too - from footprint to toeprint2022In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, Vol. 1, no 59, p. 48-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden stands out when it comes to greening its public bus transportation network, as an example to emulate...India which is struggling to truncate its GHG footprint, can benefit from trying to take a leaf out of Sweden's book.

  • 36.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Overhauling Higher Education by Factoring Sustainability into University Curricula: Discussion Based on a Survey2016In: Metamorphosis of Architectural Education in (Post) Transitional Context / [ed] Mladen Burazor, Markus Schwai, Nermina Zagora, Senka Ibrišimbegović,, Sarajevo: University of Sarajevo , 2016, p. 101-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Pinch analysis, as a technique for optimising resource utilisation and promoting environmental sustainability: A review of recent case studies from the developing world and transition economies2019In: Resources Environment and Information Engineering, ISSN 2661-3131, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pinch analysis, as a technique to optimise the utilisation of resources, traces its beginnings to the 1970s in Switzerland and the UK – ETH Zurich and Leeds University to be more precise. Over four decades down the line, this methodology has entrenched itself in research circles around the world. While the technique was developed, to begin with, for energy (heat) recovery, it has since then expanded to embrace several other fields, and enabled optimisation of resource utilisation in general. The motive behind this article is to perform a focused, selective review of recent case studies from the developing world and transition economies, having ‘pinch analysis’ in their titles and thereby as their ‘core, crux and gist’, during the period 2008-2018. The resources focused on, include heat energy, electrical energy, water, solid waste, money, time, land (surface area), storage space (volume), human resources, mass of resources in general and hydrogen, while a handful of publications have their focus on carbon dioxide (greenhouse gases in general) emissions. Multi-dimensional pinch analysis promises to be an effective tool for sustainability analysis in the years to come; most importantly in the developing world where social well-being and economic development are priorities in the years ahead, and they ought to be attained by a simultaneous truncation of the environmental footprint, in other words, an optimisation of resource utilisation as well as adverse environmental impacts. In other words, the focus ought to be on sustainable production (efficiency) and consumption (sufficiency). 

  • 38.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Rag-pickers as benefactors and beneficiaries of the sustainable development goals: A brief literature review2023In: Studia Ecologiae et Bioethicae, ISSN 1733-1218, E-ISSN 2719-826X, Vol. 21, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ragpickers have long led a marginalised, subliminal and deprived existence, and havesilently gone about contributing to ‘informal waste recycling’, diverting in many cities and towns, overhalf of the recyclable wastes from dumpsites to the technosphere. The reviewer has based this paperon 60 peer-reviewed publications spanning a time period of 28 years – from 1995 – 2022, originatingfrom over a dozen different countries, and encompassing the social, economic and environmentaldimensions of sustainability. The discussion has been structured around the six question words –Where/Wherefrom, When, How, What, Why and Who/Whom. While there is no claim of any additionper se being made to the extant body of knowledge, the reviewer would like to describe this as anattempt to simply collate existing knowledge to serve the practical purpose of highlighting the plightof our impoverished, malnourished, oppressed brethren, to elicit appreciation, understanding andsupport for them, from policymakers in government, CSR personnel from the corporate world,journalists in the media, and most importantly, from the common urban denizens. All these entitiescan work shoulder to shoulder with the NGOs who have been relentlessly striving to help the ragpickersto ‘stay afloat’. The reviewer fondly hopes that this will motivate more concertedtransdisciplinary applied research, predicated on the Sustainable Development Goals – a collaborationamong the disciplines of healthcare, sociology, psychology, urban planning, sustainable development,environmental engineering, and even art and poetry.

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  • 39.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ragpickers: Scavengers or the Green Brigade?2023In: Bhavan's Journal, ISSN 2457-1032, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 33-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 40.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Recovery of different types of resources from wastewater – A structured review.2018In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 74, no 1-2, p. 65-82Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As the population of the world increases, and economies continue to develop, energy, water, materials of different types, and nutrients for food production will be needed in ever-increasing amounts. The water-energy nexus is well-understood in research circles, but one could modify this paradigm to water-nutrients/materials-energy nexus in order to incorporate recovery of substances that can be recirculated to the anthroposphere. ‘Resources’ would thus include both energy and materials (elements, compounds and mixtures – both organic and inorganic). Research in, and implementation of, recovery of different types of resources – material and energy - from wastewater (municipal, agricultural and industrial) has been going on for quite some time now. It will not be wrong to say that the imperativeness and importance of research in this field has been earnestly appreciated by academia, industry, utilities and governments alike in many parts of the world, over the last decade. This paper is a literature review of selected publications from the period 2010-2018, from a wide range of journals, focusing on resource recovery from wastewater. The selected publications originate from 44 different countries (in six continents) of the world.

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  • 41.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Sisyphean struggle or Pyrrhic victory ?2014In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Social LCA - An introduction: The What, the How and the Why2019Book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Socially-inclusive, environment-friendly, economic growth: Targeting the impossible?: Book review of Jeffrey D. Sachs The Age of Sustainable Development.2022In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, , p. 3p. 25-27Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Jeffrey Sachs combines his erudition, experience and understanding to help you understand the ‘quo vadis of sustainable development’.

  • 44.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Sustainable Development - quo vadis, cities of the world?2021In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations unveiled a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in September 2015, with 169 targets and a little over 230 indicators. This was a sequel to the Millennium Development Goals whose remit ended in 2015. Challenges lie ahead for governments around the world – national, provincial and municipal – to adapt the targets and indicators to effect a meaningful transition towards sustainable development by 2030. Cities are where the battle for sustainable development will be won or lost – they contribute 80% of the global GDP, and account for 70% each of global energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. With over two-thirds of the global population likely to live in cities by 2060, this is more than a cliché. A clutch of sustainable cities makes a sustainable province; a clutch of sustainable provinces makes a sustainable country, and it follows that several sustainable countries learning and sharing and helping other countries, will make for a sustainable world in the 21st century and further on into the future. While moving forward, trade-offs and complementarities must not be forgotten. Often, there are serendipitous benefits when complementarities which exist are not factored in, but the trade-offs if forgotten may end up robbing Peter to pay Paul. Despite the interregnum brought about by the Corona Virus pandemic in 2020, the world will be getting up, dusting itself clean and moving ahead in the next decade towards the SDGs set for year-2030.

  • 45.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Sustainable Development as a single measure: Case study of some developing Asian countries2015In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Sustainable development goals - Quo vadis?2021In: Science Reporter, ISSN 0036-8512, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 36-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are where the battle for sustainable development will be won or lost – they contribute 80% of the global GDP, and account for 70% each of global energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. With over two-thirds of the global population likely to live in cities by 2060, this is more than a cliché. A clutch of sustainable cities makes a sustainable province; a clutch of sustainable provinces makes a sustainable country, and it follows that several sustainable countries learning and sharing and helping other countries, will make for a sustainable world in the 21st century and further on into the future.

  • 47.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Sustainable development: The four-fold path for governance2013In: Problemy Ekorozwoju, ISSN 1895-6912, E-ISSN 2080-1971, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 63-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University for Science & Technology, Norway.
    Testing different rehabilitation options in the drinking water pipeline network in Oslo using the Dynamic Metabolism Model2014In: Vatten, ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 215-224Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    That cup of hot coffee2023Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Govindarajan, Venkatesh
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    The EU TRUST project: Coming together to seek common solutions for water utilities2012In: Journal - American Water Works Association, ISSN 0003-150X, E-ISSN 1551-8833, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 52-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TRUST is an acronym for Transition to the Urban Water Services of Tomorrow. Just into its second year, this four-year European Union project consists of a consortium that is split into eight work areas (which in turn are segmented into many work packages), focusing on different aspects of the project. These eight work areas are not islands of expertise working in isolation in different countries in Europe, but cooperating and collaborating team members actively exchanging and sharing information among themselves to ensure that progress toward the end goals is ensured and expedited.

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