Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Molema, Marijn
    et al.
    Fryske Akademy, Leeuwarden, the Netherlands.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Åberg, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    van der Zwet, Arno
    University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK.
    Report on the Inaugural Workshop of the RSA Research Network on Regional and Economic Policy History2017In: Regions Magazine, ISSN 1367-3882, Vol. 307, no 1, p. 29-30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Parrish, Michael
    et al.
    Central European University, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Central European University, Hungary.
    Molema, Marijn
    Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Report on the Second Workshop of the RSA Research Network on Regional Economic and Policy History: “Cross-border regions & inter-regional policy transfer in the past, present & future,” 29–30th June 2017, Center for Policy Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary2017In: Regions Magazine, ISSN 1367-3882, Vol. 308, no 4, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Beyond Borealism: New Perspectives on the North2016In: Coastal Cultures in Scotland and Norway: Narratives, Affinity, Contact / [ed] Ian Giles, Laura Chapot, Christian Cooijmans, Ryan Foster, Barbara Tesio., London: Norvik Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume presents a range of new perspectives on the Nordic region, as well as its myriad of influences on its surroundings. The fifteen chapters in this publication showcase some of the best research being conducted by emerging researchers in Britain on Nordic topics.

    The article investigates transnational cultural encounters that cross the established research areas of Northern European, Nordic, and Scandinavian Studies. Using approaches from Scandinavian research on coastal communities and cultural spaces, the article examines cultural transfer between Norway and Scotland through trade and exchange during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The interdisciplinary and transnational approach adopted throughout the paper suggests new perspectives in researching coastal communities in Britain, as part of a wider understanding of cultural encounters between the communities of the North.

  • 4.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Book Review: Stefanie Stockhorst (ed.) (2010) Cultural Transfer Through Translation: The Circulation of Enlightened Thought in Europe by Means of Translation2012In: Cultural History, ISSN 2045-290X, E-ISSN 2045-2918, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 269-271Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    University of the Highlands, Scotland.
    Civilising the North: British Identities and the European ideal2016Other (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development (from 2013). University of the Highlands and Islands.
    Coastal Cultures in Scotland and Norway: Narratives, Affinity, Contact2016In: Beyond Borealism: New Perspectives on the North: Proceedings from the 2015 Nordic Research Network Conference held at Edinburgh University / [ed] Ian Giles; Laura Chapot; Christian Cooijmans; Ryan Foster; Barbara Tesio, London: Norvik Press, 2016, 1, p. 208-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book chapter investigates transnational cultural encounters that cross the established research areas of Northern European, Nordic, and Scandinavian Studies. Using approaches from Scandinavian research on coastal communities and cultural spaces, the chapter examines cultural transfer between Norway and Scotland through trade and exchange during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The interdisciplinary and transnational approach adopted throughout the paper suggests new perspectives in researching coastal communities in Britain, as part of a wider understanding of cultural encounters between the communities of the North.

  • 7.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Des bateaux et des hommes: Objets interculturels et identite regionale en Norvege Occidentale et dans les IŽles Shetland2016In: Ding, ding, ting: Objets médiateurs de culture / [ed] Andringa, Kim; Harry, Frederique; Mareuge, Agathe; Terrisse, Benedicte, Paris: L'Harmattan , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Intercultural Opportunities and Regional Identity: Nordic Voices in Scottish Literature2010In: E-Sharp, E-ISSN 1742-4542, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 112-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regions of Identity

    Originally motivated by the 2008 ‘European Year of Intercultural Dialogue’, the research agenda for this article is focussed on the ways in which cultural and literary practices have become marked as national or global. 1 The central question explored is whether and how regional literature may be said to mediate between different communities of cultural practice, and national cultural ‘territories’, in a way that crosses and interrogates established geo-political boundaries. In light of an intercultural approach to this question, it seems most fruitful to define Nordic literature as a site of interplay between plural, converging, but also seemingly contradictory regions of identity, a site of continuous change but, most importantly, of human agency, intercultural dialogue and ‘our ability to go beyond the limits set by our existing beliefs and practices’ (Callinicos 2006, p.243).

  • 9.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    University of the Highlands and Islands.
    John H. Ballantyne (ed). Naught but Trouble: The Hays in Yell 1755-1824. Lerwick: Shetland Times Ltd., 20142014In: Northern Studies: The Journal of the Scottish Society for Northern Studies, ISSN 0305-506XArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Lerwick Brewery and UHI Collaborate to Brew up a Sailing Success2015Other (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Nordic Border Crossings: Coastal Communities and Connected Cultures in Norway and Scotland2016In: Scandinavian Canadian Studies / Études Scandinaves au Canada, ISSN 0823-1796, Vol. 23, p. 28-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coastal cultures form a complex area of research, offering new opportunities to investigate and understand the historyof cultural encounters and transnational “regionsof culture” across the Northern peripheries. This article investigates the connected cultures of coastal communities of Norway, Scotland, and  Canada after 1700. A shared, diverse, but similarly sea-focused cultural landscape exists across the North that informs the way in which regional cultural identities are formed and maintained. Using new methodologies of cultural transfer such as entangled histories or histoire croisée, this article pays particular attention to the creationof transient cross-cultural networks and regions stimulated by trade and related contacts across the North Sea and the North Atlantic.

  • 12.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Nordic Regions of Culture: Intercultural links between Norway and Shetland after 17702010In: Scandinavica - International Journal of Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5653, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 74-75Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Northern Maps: Re-negotiating space and place in the Northern Isles and Norway in the eighteenth century2015In: Northern Scotland, ISSN 0306-5278, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 24-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a 2010 public lecture, ‘Loss and Gain: The Social History of Knowledge, 1750–2000’,2 Peter Burke pointed out just some of the significant social processes that have taken place since the mid-eighteenth century in Europe and the world. Reform, quantification, secularisation, professionalisation, democratisation, nationalisation, globalisation and technologisation have all played an important part in the way knowledge has been constructed.3 This statement relates very well to what happened to maps and mapping in Northern Europe during the eighteenth century. The relationship between representations and descriptions of place changed, influenced by the images and activities of map-making as a cultural and historical practice, and the political and social context of the period, particularly the European Enlightenment.4 Landscapes were quantified and re-arranged visually, via the map and chart. Nature and landscape, no longer seen solely as God's creation and subject to his will, became secular spaces and human territory, providing resources and wealth for humanity, and the basis for the creation of individual and communal identities.5

    This article argues that cartography and topographical description played a significant role in the way in which areas of the Scottish Northern Isles were represented and visualised, as a regional space, after the political union of England and Scotland in 1707, and, alongside that, the development of the concept of a British state and nation.6 Not only did topographical literature become more professionalised and commercially-oriented during the eighteenth century, but the visual representations of territories created in maps and charts became part of a network of cultural practices that both linked and divided historical regions across the British Isles. On the one hand, map-making re-negotiated national spaces in order to contribute to the formation the United Kingdom or Great Britain (itself a complex national entity) and, on the other hand, it provided an opportunity to re-create a sense of place or Northern regional identity, continuing to be part of an intercultural Northern European maritime region linked by the North Sea.7 As can be seen in the following case studies from the Shetland Islands and Western Norway, at ‘image level’,8 the change in perceptions about a region's identity (or one's own, within that region), often follows a long process, ‘since shifts in the attitudes of mental mapping tend to slowly follow changes in political and social conditions, mixing with philosophical and aesthetic conventions of the time’.9

  • 14.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development (from 2013). University of the Highlands and Island, Scotland; Volda University College, Norway..
    Of Boats and Men: intercultural objects and regional identity in Western Norway and the Shetland Islands2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Peripheral Visions: Engaging Nordic Literary Traditions on Orkney and Shetland2017In: Scandinavica - International Journal of Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5653, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 34-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the reception of Old Norse literature and culture in the literatures of the Scottish islands of Orkney and Shetland. It compares in particular the work of Shetland author James John Haldane Burgess (1862-1927) and the Orcadian author George Mackay Brown (1921-1996) and it evaluates the ways in which these two figures use their geographically peripheral positions as unique vantage points from which to reframe Nordic identity in their writing. By re-orientating the Scottish Islands from the periphery of Britain to the centre of important scenes in Nordic history, Haldane Burgess and Mackay Brown each construct a distinctive sense of geographical and cultural place. This approach allows the boundaries of the Nordic cultural sphere to be extended, and for a new and complex third space to emerge, in which the islands connect the Nordic and Anglo-Celtic realms and situate them within world literature.

  • 16.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University.
    Peripheral Visions: The reception of Nordic literatures in Orkney and Shetland2017In: Scandinavica - International Journal of Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5653, ISSN 0036-5653, Vol. 56, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the reception of Nordic literature in the literatures of the Scottish islands of Orkney and Shetland. It introduces the work of Shetland author James John Haldane Burgess (1862-1927) and the Orcadian author George Mackay Brown (1921-1996), evaluating in what ways both writers usse their geographically peripheral position as a unique vantage point from which to reframe Nordic literature. By re-orientating the Scottish Islands from the periphery of Britain to the centre of important scenes in Nordic history, the two authors construct a new sense of both geographical and cultural place. This approach allows the modern boundaries of the Nordic world to be extended, and for a new and complex third space to emerge, where the islands form a connection between the Nordic and Anglo-Celtic realms.

  • 17.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Phasing out the Colonial Status of Greenland, 1945-1954: A Historical Study.Erik Beukel, Frede P. Jensen and Jens Elo Rytter, translated by Nancy E. Ake Aen2012In: Northern Studies: The Journal of the Scottish Society for Northern Studies, ISSN 0305-506X, Vol. 44, p. 135-138Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Reading Material Culture in the North Atlantic: Traditional wooden boxes as intercultural objects2013In: Journal of the North Atlantic, E-ISSN 1935-1933, Vol. 4, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores intercultural links between the coastal communities of the North Atlantic region by discussing the cultural and social history of Norwegian objects displayed in regional heritage collections in Orkney and Shetland. The relationship between Norway and the Northern Isles of Scotland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, especially trading links, is considered using the bentwood box as a way of accessing both tangible and intangible knowledge. Different types of traditional wooden boxes from Shetland, Orkney, Norway, and Iceland are compared using a microhistorical approach, which enables us to consider Norway and Scotland both as individual “ethno-territories” and as part of continuously changing networks of social and cultural contact across the North Atlantic.

  • 19.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Research Blog: Silke Reeploeg2009Other (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    The Far Islands and Other Cold Places: Women Travellers in the Arctic, 1850-19352017In: Conference of the International Journal of Arts and Sciences, ISSN 1943-6114, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current Research (2016-18)

    Project title:  Women in the Arctic, 1818-2018

    The project Women in the Arctic examines the intercultural aspects of how women are represented in circumpolar societies.  It will place representations of women in migratory literature within the existing 'Northern' cultural landscapes and histories, but also seek a new methodology that analyses their position within the context of global diversity.  Migration often leads to the emergence of ‘geographically diffuse socio-cultural fields’ (Olwig, 2003), which cross political and geographical borders.  Although these always impose some sort of structural constraint, this does not necessarily change the nature or continuity of the relationship, feelings of affinity or images of difference and/or transgression.  The project focuses on: 

    1. understanding the diverse roles that women have played in the history of the Arctic, both as colonisers and colonised, and
    2. demonstrating the contemporary issues affecting women in the Arctic. 
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21. Reeploeg, Silke
    The Uttermost Part of the Earth: Islands on the edge ... and in the centre of the North Atlantic2012In: Islands and Britishness: A Global Perspective / [ed] Matthews, Jodie; Travers, Daniel, Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2012, p. 207-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Dept Polit Hist & Cultural Studies, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Women in the Arctic: Gendering Coloniality in Travel Narratives from the Far North, 1907-19302020In: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, ISSN 0869-6365, E-ISSN 2309-9968, no 165, p. 94-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is dedicated to the complex web of gender and colonial relationships in biographical writing. The author's main focus is on publications by two women of high society who traveled through the colonial North in the early 20th century, Danish Emilie Demant-Hatt (1873-1958) and Scottish Isobel Wylie Hutchison (1889-1982). An analysis of these textual and visual works allows us to see how they made a contribution to the colonial project, while undermining it at the same time, and how colonial femininity combines obedience and disobedience.

  • 23.
    Reeploeg, Silke
    et al.
    Centre for Nordic Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland.
    Jennings, Andrew
    University of the Highlands and Islands.
    Watt, Angela
    University of the Highlands and Islands.
    Northern Atlantic Islands and the Sea: Seascapes and Dreamscapes2017Book (Refereed)
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • apa.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf