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  • 1.
    Albury, Nathan
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Griffith University, Australia.
    Cultural heritage is a child's right, so let's celebrate International Mother Language Day2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Borkowski, Alexander
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Going beyond archiving: A collaborative tool for typological research2011In: Sustainable data from digital research: Humanities perspectives on digital scholarship / [ed] Nick Thieberger, Linda Barwick, Rosey Billington and Jill Vaughan, University of Melbourne, 2011, p. 25-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work described in this paper aims to outline some of the design aspects for a collaborative tool for typological research. This tool is designed to allow for the collation, from multiple contributors, of linguistic examples and their analysis with regards to an open set of variation dimensions of both onomasiological and semasiological nature. The resulting knowledge base combines linguistically relevant categories of human conceptualisation (e.g. in-group, such as ethnic or family group, categories) together with their linguistic coding (e.g. in gender affixes, verbal agreement), all based on actual linguistic examples from diverse natural languages as its underlying data-driven foundation. The system is based on Semantic Web technology and hence can be queried in a flexible way that allows for combining any variation dimensions within a query (e.g. it allows to answer questions such as which languages exhibit joint attention marking by way of verbal suffixing). We will focus on design aspects relating to sustainable data. How can sustainable data for such a project be delimited? Surely, this encompasses commonly accepted aspects such as standards conformity, longevity, and accessibility, which we will address in the paper. Additionally and in particular, however, we will argue that user orientation and involvement is a critical factor. Following on from this, the tool is designed in a way that it (i) does not require linguistic users to be trained extensively in system usage, (ii) allows linguists to deploy their standard methods of data entry (e.g. interlinear glossing), and (iii) provides contributors with immediate integration of their own with previously entered data and access to the resulting analysis (i.e. querying) and research potential. The paper will roughly be structured as follows: We will describe the background and aims of the project, and contextualise it in relation to other similar projects. We will then concentrate on how sustainability is addressed, discussing a number of different facets of sustainability. This includes data storage formats, user interface and workflow modelling, knowledge base design, and system features (in particular system output). We will also outline some problems that have arisen so far and close with an outlook on future development.

  • 3.
    Cunningham, Una
    et al.
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    King, Jeanette
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Seals, Corinne A.
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Editorial2016In: Journal of Home Language Research, E-ISSN 2537-7043, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Guillemin, Diana
    Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    Schools transforming multilinguals into illiterates?2012Other (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    Bilingualism: Myths and Realities2013In: The MLTAQ Journal – A journal of professional current practice and research for language teachers, ISSN 1327-7782, Vol. 158, no Dec, p. 3-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    Brush It Up: On-line resources for fostering independent learning2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Educational Innovation through Technology (EITT 2016), New York: IEEE, 2016, p. 143-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Australian universities are increasingly pressured into attracting participation of groups previously underrepresented in the higher education system, the need to support these cohorts of students becomes more evident. This paper describes an online resource developed by members of the Linguistics team at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, to engage students with disciplinary knowledge, provide opportunities for independent and/or small group practice, test their understanding of materials covered in the lectures, self- evaluate their work, conduct exam revisions, and overall scaffold the learning process, fostering independent learning and self- reliance. While reporting on students’ perceptions of this resource, we finish the paper with a word of caution about the effectiveness on online learning in university settings.

  • 7.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    Raising bilingual children: Options and tips2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Reaching out to migrant and refugee communities to support home language maintenance2019In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 564-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrant and refugee parents considering raising their children in their non-mainstream home language often fear that this decision may impact negatively on their children’s English language ability and thus affect their academic prospects. The lack of institutional support for home languages in the Australian school system, and the well-intentioned but misguided advice parents may receive to switch to the mainstream language in family interactions reinforce parents’ doubts. To assuage parents’ concerns and assist them in making an informed decision most appropriate for their family circumstances, we developed and delivered free workshops on bilingual upbringing. We also trained bilingual facilitators who adapted the workshops culturally and linguistically and conducted these in their own communities. This paper discusses these workshops, the feedback received, our observations, and lessons learned.

  • 9.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.Griffith University.Guillemin, DianaGriffith University.
    Multilingualism and Literacy: Attitudes and Policies2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Guillemin, Diana
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Multilingualism and literacy: attitudes and policies INTRODUCTION2015In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 151-161Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Guillemin, Diana
    The importance of literacy in the home language: The view from Australia2013In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While advantages of literacy in the home language have been widely documented, the Australian education system has not been proactive in providing institutional support for its development. This paper investigates the impact of (il)literacy in the home language on the academic, affective, and social development of bilingual/multilingual children and proposes principles that home-language-literacy programs should meet to be effective. It discusses programs that, although designed to develop literacy or second-language proficiency mainly in classroom contexts, could be easily adapted to address the needs of the linguistically and culturally diverse Australian context. We argue that the cost of not investing in successful homelanguage-literacy programs will be higher in the long run than their implementation costs and recommend that Australia should consider supporting grassroots home-language-literacy programs in a push to improve overall literacy outcomes for Australian home-language speakers. © The Author(s) 2013.

  • 12.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Moyes, Gordon
    Griffith Univ, Griffith Film School, Australia.
    Play to learn: Self-directed home language literacy acquisition through online games2016In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 136-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Home language literacy education in Australia has been pursued predominantly through Community Language Schools. At present, some 1000 of these, attended by over 100,000 school-age children, cater for 69 of the over 300 languages spoken in Australia. Despite good intentions, these schools face a number of challenges. For instance, children may lack motivation and perceive after-hours schooling as an unnecessary burden. Trained teachers and suitable teaching materials are often not available. Moreover, not every language can be offered in each city or region. Hence, home language speakers’ needs are often not met. This situation has detrimental effects for children, families and communities, and entails a loss of opportunities for the country. Reporting on an alternative approach, this paper presents a pilot study conducted in Australia with English–German bilinguals. We sought to investigate whether primary school-aged children can self-direct their home language literacy acquisition through playing online educational games in the privacy of their homes and with little adult input. Results indicate that the games can be effective in promoting emergent literacy development. Thus, such a grassroots approach could become a viable option for multilingual societies, addressing some of the practical challenges faced by, for instance, Community Language Schools.

  • 13.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    et al.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Qi, Grace Yue
    Massey University, New Zealand.
    Tsai, Pei-Shu
    National Changhua University of Education, Taiwan.
    Home and away – Implications of short-term sojourning of young Australian bilinguals2019In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the transnational experiences of young Taiwanese-background children living in Australia, who sojourn to their parents’ homeland during the school holidays to improve their linguistic and cultural skills, as reported by their mothers. Although this appears to be a frequent practice in the Taiwanese diaspora, showcasing the agency of this community, little research has systematically investigated this practice, and in particular its impact on the children and their families. Data for this study were obtained through online questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with mothers who engage in this practice, to gather information on family histories and participants’ backgrounds, family language policies, and parents’ perceptions of children's experiences and challenges. The data show that parents aim to enhance their children's proficiency levels in the home language as well as their Taiwanese identity. Children, however, take an agentive role with regard to identity choices, so parents’ aims are not always fulfilled. Sojourning is presented as a clear example not only of enacted family language policy, but also as an explicit management practice, positioning the Taiwanese diaspora within both their new as well as their old homeland.

  • 14.
    Estival, Dominique
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Henderson, John
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Laughren, Mary
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Mollá, Diego
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Bow, Cathy
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Nordlinger, Rachel
    University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Rieschild, Verna
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University, Australia.
    Stanley, Alexander W.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Mrowa-Hopkins, Colette
    Flinders University, Australia.
    Learning from OzCLO, the Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad2013In: 51st Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Teaching Natural Language Processing, Sofia: Association for Computational Linguistics, 2013, p. 35-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad (OzCLO) started in 2008 in only two locations and has since grown to a na- tionwide competition with almost 1500 high school students participating in 2013. An Aus- tralian team has participated in the Interna- tional Linguistics Olympiad (ILO) every year since 2009. This paper describes how the competition is run (with a regional First Round and a final National Round) and the or- ganisation of the competition (a National Steering Committee and Local Organising Committees for each region) and discusses the particular challenges faced by Australia (tim- ing of the competition and distance between the major population centres). One major fac- tor in the growth and success of OzCLO has been the introduction of the online competi- tion, allowing participation of students from rural and remote country areas. The organisa- tion relies on the good-will and volunteer work of university and school staff but the strong interest among students and teachers shows that OzCLO is responding to a demand for linguistic challenges.

  • 15.
    Fraser, Helen
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Communicating about communication: Intercultural competence as a factor in the success of interdisciplinary collaboration2011In: Human Communication Science: A Compendium / [ed] Robert Dale, Dennis Burnham and Catherine J. Stevens, Sydney: Australian Research Council Research Network in Human Communication Science , 2011, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines describe themselves as studying ‘communication’. However observation of interdisciplinary discussion suggests that ‘communication’ may be conceptualized in different ways by different disciplines. This paper aims to promote mutual understanding among disciplines, not by proposing a universally valid definition of communication to which all disciplines should subscribe, but by, first, offering a set of questions that can be used to help disciplinary groups communicate their own views on communication to colleagues from other disciplines, and then creating a (preliminary) typology to map out the range of possible positions that can be taken in relation to those questions. Noting that academic disciplines have distinct cultures, the paper presents some concepts of intercultural communication as understood in applied linguistics that may be useful in facilitating interdisciplinary communication about communication.

  • 16.
    Fraser, Helen
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Communication about communication: Intercultural competence as a factor in the success of interdisciplinary collaboration2009In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 135-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many disciplines describe themselves as studying ‘communication’. However observation of interdisciplinary discussion suggests that ‘communication’ may be conceptualized in different ways by different disciplines. This paper aims to promote mutual understanding among disciplines, not by proposing a universally valid definition of communication to which all disciplines should subscribe, but by, first, offering a set of questions that can be used to help disciplinary groups communicate their own views on communication to colleagues from other disciplines, and then creating a (preliminary) typology to map out the range of possible positions that can be taken in relation to those questions. Noting that academic disciplines have distinct cultures, the paper presents some concepts of intercultural communication as understood in applied linguistics that may be useful in facilitating interdisciplinary communication about communication.

  • 17.
    Goddard, Cliff
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Griffith University.
    Semantic analysis2010In: Handbook of Natural Language Processing / [ed] Nitin Indurkhya and Fred J. Damerau, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2010, 2, p. 93-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Khlentzos, Drew
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Mental categories in natural languages2007In: Mental States: Vol. 2: Language and Cognitive Structures / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Drew Khlentzos, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Khlentzos, Drew
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Mental states: Evolution, function, nature2007In: Mental States: Vol. 1: Evolution, Function, Nature / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Drew Khlentzos, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Morrissey, Lochlan
    et al.
    Karlstad University. Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013). Griffith University.
    A Lexical Semantics for Refugee, Asylum Seeker and Boat People in Australian English2017In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 389-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms refugee, asylum seeker and boat people are of particular prominence in the Australian discourse surrounding immigration policy, and are widely used in day-to-day conversation among Australians. Despite their frequency of use, a lexico-semantic study of the terms has not been carried out to date. This paper fills this gap by proposing a semantic analysis of them. The study is based on a corpus created from online comments to the Australian television programme Go Back To Where You Came From (Season 1, SBS 2011). After introducing the data and analytical framework—object-oriented semantics—we discuss the terms’ lexical semantics. While the discussion of immigration issues is emotionally laden, our results suggest that the default semantics of the terms do not include evaluative components. Rather, speakers tend to evaluate the agreed-upon semantic specifications differently depending on their political views. We show how each term represents a specific node in a network of concepts for translocating individuals, but may in context also be applied to neighbouring nodes that lack a lexicalization. While the terms are seemingly used interchangeably, our analysis instead emphasizes the influence of the underlying conceptual structure and the resulting constrained plasticity of nominal meaning in context.

  • 21.
    Musgrave, Simon
    et al.
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Haugh, Michael
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    The use of ontologies as a tool for aggregating spoken corpora2014In: Best Practices for Spoken Corpora in Linguistic Research / [ed] Ş̧ükriye Ruhi, Michael Haugh, Thomas Schmidt, & Kai Wörner, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 225-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Nickles, Matthias
    et al.
    Technische Universität München.
    Pease, Adam
    Articulate Software.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Zaefferer, Dietmar
    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München.
    Ontologies across disciplines2007In: Ontolinguistics: How Ontological Status Shapes the Linguistic Coding of Concepts / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Dietmar Zaefferer, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2007, p. 23-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    University of New England, Australia.
    A cross-linguistic comparison of the event-structure of FETCH: Possible coding alternatives and their realizations2003In: Views & Voices – Inquiries into the English Language and Literature, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 69-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the possible coding alternatives and the factual realizations of a complex event concept. We assume that any concept is built on a perceptional and functional basis and ask in what ways different languages encode such a concept, i.e., how the surface realizations of such a concept differ from one another. The concept under consideration in this paper, henceforth termed FETCH, is the concept realized in British English ‘fetch’ and Croatian ‘dohvatiti’. After characterizing the event structure of FETCH at the beginning, a discussion of potential coding alternatives in terms of conceptual vs. lexical chunking follows. We then compare the cross-linguistic encoding of FETCH in a sample of 29 languages and show how the different surface realizations demonstrate different instantiations of potential conceptual and lexical chunking. Moreover, we discuss whether the event concept FETCH itself is universal. Finally, we test current theories on event structures, with a focus on the often assumed binary construction scheme.

  • 24.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Australia Loves Language Puzzles: The Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad (OzCLO)2014In: Language and Linguistics Compass, ISSN 1749-818X, E-ISSN 1749-818X, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 659-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad (OzCLO) started in 2008 in only two locations and has since grown to a nationwide competition with almost 1500 high school students participating in 2013. An Australian team has participated in the International Linguistics Olympiad (IOL) every year since 2009. This paper describes how the competition is run (with a regional first round and a final national round) and the organisation of the competition (a National Steering Committee and Local Organising Committees for each region) and discusses the particular challenges faced by Australia (timing of the competition and distance between the major population centres). One major factor in the growth and success of OzCLO has been the introduction of the online competition, allowing participation of students from rural and remote country areas. The organisation relies on the goodwill and volunteer work of university and school staff but the strong interest amongst students and teachers shows that OzCLO is responding to a demand for linguistic challenges. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 25. Schalley, Andrea C.
    Cognitive Modeling and Verbal Semantics: A Representational Framework Based on UML2004Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, rigorous approaches to the representation of verbal semantics, and lexical semantics in general, have not put much effort into achieving cognitive adequacy for their frameworks. This book sets out to take a major step in this direction. It develops a representational framework for verbal semantics that is formal and intuitive at the same time. This means in effect proposing a framework that is in principle computer processable on the one hand, and yet on the other hand whose representations reflect the wealth and flexibility of natural language in an intuitively plausible way and in accordance with our current knowledge about natural language. A new decompositional framework for the modeling and description of verbal semantics is proposed, the Unified Eventity Representation (UER). The development of the framework is based on results from linguistics, psychology, and computer science. In particular, the UER framework adopts and adapts the current lingua franca for the design of object-oriented systems in computer science, the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

  • 26.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Common sense reasoning about parts and wholes2017In: Handbook of Mereology / [ed] Hans Burkhardt, Johanna Seibt, Guido Imaguire, and Stamatios Gerogiorgakis, Munich: Philosophia Verlag GmbH, 2017, p. 152-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Competing principles in the lexicon2003In: Mediating between Concepts and Grammar / [ed] Holden Haertl and Heike Tappe, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2003, p. 379-403Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    University of Munich.
    Das mathematische Weltbild der Maya2000Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In acht Kapiteln zu Schriftsystem, religiösem Weltbild, Zahlensystem, Kalendersystem, Arithmetik und Astronomie bringt das Buch eine Gesamtdarstellung des mathematisch-astronomischen Wissens der Maya nach aktuellem Erkenntnisstand.

  • 29.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Many languages, one knowledge base: Introducing a collaborative ontolinguistic research tool2012In: Practical Theories and Empirical Practice: A Linguistic Perspective / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, p. 129-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linguists traditionally have published their research in book and paper publications. However, advances in technology enable new innovative electronic dissemination paths, coupled with an immediate reuse potential and flexible accessibility of both the data and their analysis. In this chapter, a new computational research tool that is currently still under development is presented: TYTO (‘Typology Tool’) is specifically tailored to typological work carried out by a group of researchers. The first application domain of TYTO is social cognition and its cross-linguistic grammaticalisation. I outline TYTO’s features, describe its backbone ontology, and in what way it is envisaged to be able to support typologists and other linguists in their work. 

  • 30.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Object-orientation and the semantics of verbs2014In: Events, Arguments, and Aspects: Topics in the Semantics of Verbs / [ed] Klaus Robering, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, 1, p. 159-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Ontologies and ontological methods in linguistics2019In: Language and Linguistics Compass, ISSN 1749-818X, E-ISSN 1749-818X, p. 1-19, article id e12356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, linguists have started to develop and make use of ontologies, encouraged by the progress made in areas such as Artificial Intelligence and the Semantic Web. This paper gives an overview of notions and dimensions of “ontology” and of ontologies for and in linguistics. It discusses building blocks, design aspects, and capabilities of formal ontologies and provides some implementation pointers. The focus of this paper, however, is on linguistic research and what a modelling framework based on ontologies has to offer. Accordingly, the paper does not aim at providing an overview of specific models for computational processing. To illustrate the issues at hand, an example scenario from linguistic typology is selected instead, where the aim of describing the world's languages is approached through ontologies.

  • 32.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Practical theories and empirical practice: A linguistic perspective2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a perceived tension between empirical and theoretical approaches to the study of language. Many recent works in the discipline emphasise that linguistics is an ‘empirical science’. This volume argues for a nuanced view, highlighting that theory and practice necessarily and as a matter of fact complement each other in linguistic research. Its contributions – ranging from experimental studies in psychology via linguistic fieldwork and cross-linguistic comparisons to the application of formal and logical approaches to language – exemplify the mutual relationship between empirical and theoretical work. The volume illustrates how selected topics are addressed by different contributions and methodological stances. Topics include the cognitive grounding of language, social cognition and the construction of meaning in interaction, and, closely related, pragmatics from a typological perspective and beyond. Anyone interested in these topics and more generally in meta-theoretical considerations will find great value in this volume.

  • 33.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Practical theories and empirical practice: Facets of a complex interaction2012In: Practical Theories and Empirical Practice: A Linguistic Perspective / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, p. 1-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    here is a perceived tension between theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of language. Most recent works in the discipline emphasise that linguistics is an 'empirical science'. This chapter argues for a nuanced view that is not geared towards one of the two sides. Drawing on the volume's contributions, it describes the mutual relationship between theoretical and empirical work, and how theory and practice necessarily and as a matter of fact complement each other in linguistic research. It does so by examining a number of methodological facets relevant to the study of language, by illustrating how debated topics in linguistics are addressed by different contributions and hence methodological stances, and by discussing some meta-theoretical implications arising from this. 

  • 34.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Relating ontological knowledge and internal structure of eventity concepts2007In: Ontolinguistics: How Ontological Status Shapes the Linguistic Coding of Concepts / [ed] Andrea C. Schalley and Dietmar Zaefferer, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2007, p. 435-458Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    University of New England, Australia.
    Representing verbal semantics with diagrams: An adaptation of the UML for lexical semantics2004In: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Computational Linguistics (COLING 2004): , Geneva: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2004, Vol. 2, p. 785-791Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a new way of accounting for the meaning of verbs in natural languages, using a diagrammatic notation based on the Unified Modeling Language (UML). We will introduce the new framework by outlining some model- ing elements and indicating major differences to the UML. An extended example will be dis- cussed in more detail. We will then focus on the cognitive background of the framework, and in particular address the question why the usage of graphical elements within a linguistic model- ing language proves to be very fruitful. Finally, we will briefly indicate the potential of the new framework and its applicability.

  • 36.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    Semantische Modellierung: Bindeglied zwischen Sprache und Kognition2010In: Sprache und Kognition: Traditionelle und neue Ansätze – Language and Cognition: Traditional and New Approaches: Akten des 40. Linguistischen Kolloquiums in Moskau 2005 – Proceedings of the 40th Linguistics Colloquium, Moscow 2005 / [ed] Olga Souleimanova, Frankfurt a.M.: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2010, p. 179-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Språkforskaren: ”Tack för att mina barn fick undervisning i modersmål”2017In: Skolvärlden, no NovArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    University of New England.
    The modelling of relations in eventity conceptu­a­li­sa­tions2006In: The VIII-th International Conference ‘Cognitive Modeling in Linguistics’ Proceedings / [ed] Valery Solovyev, Vera Goldberg and Vladimir Polyakov, Kazan: Kazan State University, 2006, Vol. 1, p. 196-203Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of a cognitive linguistics approach, namely that linguistic semantics corresponds to conceptual structures and that semantic representations should therefore reflect conceptual configurations, this paper discusses the adequate representation of conceptual relations that can be found in the semantic structure of verbs. As representational framework, a unique modelling language for linguistic semantics – the Unified Eventity Representation (UER) – is deployed. The UER is unprecedented in that it is based on the object-oriented and graphical Unified Modeling Language (UML) from computer science. We describe prominent characteristics of the UER, outline the types of conceptual relations and how they are represented in the UER, and conclude with an assessment of the modelling power of the UER with respect to the representation of conceptual relations.

  • 39.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith University.
    The social cognition of linguists2013Other (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    TYTO: a collaborative research tool for linked linguistic data2012In: Linked Data in Linguistics: Representing and Connecting Language Data and Language Metadata / [ed] Christian Chiarcos, Sebastian Nordhoff & Sebastian Hellmann, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 139-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I introduce a computational tool, TYTO (“Typology Tool”), that utilises Semantic Web technologies in order to provide novel ways to process, integrate, and query cross-linguistic data. Its data store incorporates a set of on- tologies (comprising linguistic examples, annotations, language background infor- mation, and metadata) backed by a logic reasoner software. This allows for highly targeted querying, and, with enough data on the relevant interest areas, TYTO can return answers to rather specific typological questions such as ‘Which other lan- guages in the North America, in addition to Yuchi, do encode senior kin and in- group (such as belonging to the same ethnic group) in a suffixal case marking sys- tem?’ TYTO’s data store can be extended with additional ontologies and adapted to allow for project-specific analyses of linguistic data. It is further designed to facilitate collaboration and allow multi-user contributions, including automatic in- tegration of data submitted at different stages by different contributors. 

  • 41.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    University of New England.
    Underspecification in verbal semantics2004In: Proceedings of the 2004 LSK International Conference: Volume II: General Sessions, Seoul: Linguistic Society of Korea (LSK)/Yonsei Institute of Language and Information Studies (ILIS)/Hansin Publishing Company , 2004, p. 384-392Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Duek, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centre for Research on the Teaching and Learning of Languages and Literature. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Language and Literature in Education (from 2013).
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University.
    Reath Warren, Anne
    Stockholm University.
    Ringblom, Natalia
    Stockholm University.
    Satsa på flerspråkighet och undervisning i modersmålet2018In: Lärarnas tidning, ISSN 1101-2633Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    Griffith University.
    Gagarina, Natalia
    Centre for General Linguistics Berlin (ZAS) & Humboldt University.
    HOLM 2016 – The International Conference on Social and Affective Factors in Home Language Maintenance and Development2017In: Journal of Home Language Research, ISSN 2537-7043, Vol. 2, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A report on a conference initiated by the International Association for Applied Linguistics (AILA) Research Network (ReN) on Social and Affective Factors in Home Language Maintenance and Development. The HOLM 2016 conference, held in Berlin in February 2016, attracted close to 70 scholars and practitioners from over 20 countries interested in home language maintenance and development who met over a period of two days to exchange ideas and discuss projects.

  • 44.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    Griffith University.
    Gagarina, Natalia
    Humboldt University.
    Internationale Tagung: Social and Affective Factors in Home Language Maintenance and Development2016In: Logos – Die Fachzeitschrift für akademische Sprachtherapie und Logopädie, ISSN 0944-405X, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 142-144Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Griffith University.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.Griffith University.Guillemin, DianaGriffith University.
    Multilingualism and Literacy: Practices and Effects2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Guillemin, Diana
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Multilingualism and literacy: Practices and effects INTRODUCTION2016In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Guillemin, Diana
    Eisenchlas, Susana A.
    Multilingualism and assimilationism in Australia's literacy-related educational policies2015In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 162-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Australia is a country of high linguistic diversity, with more than 300 languages spoken. Today, 19% of the population aged over 5 years speak a language other than English at home. Against this background, we examine government policies and prominent initiatives developed at national level in the past 30 years to address the challenge of offering 'Literacy for all', in particular focusing on minority language speaking children. Across the examined policies and initiatives, a distinct negative correlation can be observed: the more multilingual Australia has become, the more assimilationist the policies, and the more monolingual the orientation of the society that governments have sought to establish through policy. We argue that to enhance literacy outcomes more generally, this orientation needs to be reversed. We explain why policy understanding and approach need to instead promote the maintenance of home languages and support literacy acquisition in these languages.

  • 48.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Khlentzos, DrewUniversity of New England.
    Mental States: Vol. 1: Evolution, Function, Nature2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collecting the work of linguists, psychologists, neuroscientists, archaeologists, artificial intelligence researchers and philosophers this volume presents a richly varied picture of the nature and function of mental states. Starting from questions about the cognitive capacities of the early hominin homo floresiensis, the essays proceed to the role mental representations play in guiding the behaviour of simple organisms and robots, thence to the question of which features of its environment the human brain represents and the extent to which complex cognitive skills such as language acquisition and comprehension are impaired when the brain lacks certain important neural structures. Other papers explore topics ranging from nativism to the presumed constancy of categorization across signed and spoken languages, from the formal representation of metaphor, actions and vague language to philosophical questions about conceptual schemes and colours. Anyone interested in mental states will find much to reward them in this fine volume.

  • 49.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Khlentzos, DrewUniversity of New England.
    Mental States: Vol. 2: Language and Cognitive Structure2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contributions to this volume focus on what language and language use reveals about cognitive structure and underlying cognitive categories. Wide-ranging and thought-provoking essays from linguists and psychologists within this volume investigate the insights conceptual categorization can give into the organization and structure of the mind and specific mental states. Topics and linguistic phenomena discussed include narratives and story telling, language development, figurative language, linguistic categorization, linguistic relativity, and the linguistic coding of mental states such as perceptions and beliefs. With contributions at the forefront of current debate, this book will appeal to anyone with an interest in language and the cognitive structures that support it.

  • 50.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Kuhn, Sandra
    Saarland University.
    A corpus-based analysis of German (sich) erinnern2007In: The Language of Memory in a Cross-linguistic Perspective / [ed] Mengistu Amberber, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2007, p. 181-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 54
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