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  • 1.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Game-based Lean Production training of university students and industrial employees2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 578-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production simulation games are increasingly popular for training students and industrial employees in Lean Production principles. They range from paper- or desktop-based games to full scale simulators and proper manufacturing machinery. This paper reports on experiences from using both desktop games and a full scale simulator. Desktop games are suitable when training people who already have a fair understanding of lean principles. Shop floor workers usually have difficulties in seeing analogies between desktop games and their work environment. For both students and industrial workers, training effects and immersion tend to be higher when using full scale simulators.

  • 2.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Simulator-assisted lean production training2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 433-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Lean Production training and education, simulators are often used.These can take the form of for instance desktop games, computersimulations, or full-scale simulators. Many training participants perceivemodels for experiential learning and for continuous improvementprocesses as complex and abstract. Based on experiences from trainingsessions in a full-scale simulator Karlstad Lean Factory®, a unifiedmodelfor learning and improvementwork is presented. Thismodel stimulatestraining transfer and is perceived as intuitive. It also shows instructionalscaffolding as a learning method. Suggestions for future work includeinvestigating synergy with Smart Manufacturing and the use of LeanProduction simulators for innovative product realisation.

  • 3.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Simulator-Assisted Lean Production Training and Education2018In: Advances in manufacturing technology / [ed] P. Thorvald and K. Case, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2018, p. 487-492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Lean Production training and education, simulators are often used. These can take the form of for instance desktop games, computer simulations, or full-scale simulators. Most evidence of training transfer from the training environment to the work situation is anecdotal, and as such is assessment of training transfer a research gap. Experiences from training sessions in Karlstad Lean Factory® are presented, including a combination with computer simulation. A unified model for learning and improvement work is presented. Some suggestions for future work include investigating synergy with Smart Manufacturing and/or innovative product realization.

  • 4.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Wickberg, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Lean Production Training for the Manufacturing Industry: Experiences from Karlstad Lean Factory2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, article id 1019-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both literature and manufacturing companies state that simulators for providing training in lean production to industrialemployees must be similar to the work environment. This motivated the design of Karlstad Lean Factory, which is a trainingenvironment that realistically resembles an industrial environment. It is a full-scale training facility that incorporates acombination of materials processing and assembly. Parameters such as processing times, breakdown intervals and repair typescan be set. Examples of basic and more advanced training scenarios are given. Experiences from training groups of industrialemployees are described; inhomogeneity of these groups requires some specific attention.

  • 5.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Säfström, Mattias
    IUC Värmland / Stål & Verkstad, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lean Production Simulators: From Training Environments to Innovation Testbeds2019In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXIII / [ed] Y. Jin and M. Price, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2019, Vol. 9, p. 461-466Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Models for continuous improvement processes and for game-based learning currently have some drawbacks. Based on work with Karlstad Lean Factory®, a dual model for game-based learning and improvement processes is presented. This model also shows instructional scaffolding, and there is evidence that its use stimulates training transfer. A natural step is to extend the use of fullscale lean production simulators to a novel use as innovation testbeds. This can lower the threshold for production innovation in SMEs. A small case study shows how this novel use can be organised, with several benefits for the company.

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