Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    et al.
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mård, Johanna
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Burchardt, Steffi
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Albin, Cecilia
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bondesson, Sara
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Breinl, Korbinian
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Deegan, Frances
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fuentes, Diana
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Girons Lopez, Marc
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Rhodes, Emma
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Troll, Valentin
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Young, Stephanie
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walch, Colin
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    Parker, Charles F
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An integrative research framework to unravel the interplay of natural hazards and vulnerabilities2018In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Trafikverket.
    Collective Learning in Organizations – Opportunities and Constraints: Case Study of an Avalanche Blocking a Railway Line2018In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 332-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Damaged infrastructures cause costly delays and losses. In this study, a collective learning framework and the theory of loops of learning are applied to a case study to develop a conceptual model on how lessons learned may be put to more effective use. Structures for systematic learning from events may serve as important tools in proactive adaptation for a more resilient infrastructure in future. This article studies an avalanche blocking a railway and an adjacent road in northern Sweden, which involves several interdependencies of critical infrastructures and actors. To enhance resilience future risk assessment and SWOT analyses should include the effects from a changing climate on the vulnerabilities of interdependence among multiple stakeholders and infrastructures. Knowledge-sharing foremost resulted in single-loop learning, leading to incremental changes. Respondents expressed an understanding of the importance of double-loops feedback but sensed that they lacked incentives from top levels in the organization for future reporting of experiences. This lack of incentives may impede establishing collective memory. The findings of this study can be used to improve policy recommendations, and support building resilience through products of learning.

  • 3.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Trafikverket.
    Managing knowledge sharing of extreme weather induced impacts on land transport infrastructure: Case study of the Swedish Transport Administration2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme weather events and effects of climate change are threats to the transport sector’s functionality and safety. Risk management in this context implies a necessity to focus on the connection between near-term experiences and coping strategies on one hand, and long-term adaptation analyses on the other. How learning from past events and subsequent knowledge sharing can be adopted is a question that needs to be explored, discussed and tested. A systematic approach to lessons learned calls for measures of investigation, reporting, planning, implementation and evaluation. A qualitative case study approach was used in this thesis. In the first paper the practices of accident investigation in operation and maintenance were inventoried within the Swedish Transport Administration (STA). Three accident investigation methods were applied and tested on a cloudburst event, causing flooding in a railway tunnel in Sweden. In the second paper, semi-structured interviews, documents, and archival records were used as means for penetrating deeper into the attitudes and understanding of lessons learned concerning extreme weather events within a procured public-private partnership. The results of the two studies showed weak signals of feedback on lessons learned. Partly, these weak signals could be traced back to weak steering signals. Various obstacles impeded learning curves from lessons learned. The obstacles were of both hard and soft values, e.g. resources in time and equipment, systematic investigation methods, incentives for lessons learned, education and knowledge, values, norms and attitudes towards how and why identified problems should be solved. Successful knowledge sharing requires that close attention is paid to such obstacles and that an adaptive approach is adopted.

  • 4.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Trafikverket.
    MANUSCRIPT: Can Organizational Memory be Built?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational memory has become a key concept for many actors in society who want to stress the importance of deliberate change and progress in an organization. In the review of 40 articles from 1995 until today have some aspects for opportunities and challenges on memory building been identified. Building memory in an organization involves many different factors and prerequisites, but aspects of functional learning processes are perhaps most important for organizational memory building. Some scholars argue that organizational memory is part of the culture and sustainability of an organization, while others argue that organizational memory cannot be built in practice. Others point to learning from normal daily activities, and others are seeing the good examples as means to build memory. Yet others point to changes in rules, procedures and even in regulations as essential to progress. Severity of events and trust are dominant factors for learning that can lead to memory building, since individuals are effected by the severity, and trust since bond between individuals mean that they sense that their experiences may be of significance for actions or change. Common notions are that memory building and learning are ongoing activities that may lead to efficiency. Memory building may have to be flexible and adaptive to fit organizations with different means and goals. Organizational memory can be of significance for future decisions. Decisions are and may become even more intertwined with other societal actors, and decisions may have effects on other operations in society. Future research could study issues related to events that have effects on society and on organizations that have different means and goals for addressing common problems and their solutions in terms of how memory building works after such events, e.g. natural hazards related disasters, where multiple actors, institutions and operations are affected.

  • 5.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Trafikverket.
    Organizational Lessons Learned: Natural Hazards Affecting Critical Infrastructure2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on an issue often presented as a solution – albeit a debated one ­– namely learning, specifically lessons learned from natural hazard events. Empirically, this thesis examines flooding and avalanches in a Swedish context, centering on systematic feedback mechanisms and learning from extreme events. Opportunities to and constraints affecting learning and knowledge sharing are discussed.

    The thesis comprises four papers, collectively contributing a description of aspects of learning and feedback in a case study setting of the Swedish Transport Administration (STA) [Trafikverket], and providing an understanding of the present level of knowledge and awareness of climate change related natural hazards, as well as how knowledge sharing may give incentives and understanding for change. The notion of social learning is that individuals, groups, and organizations (and ultimately society) can learn from one another in a context, i.e. fostering mutual change. The goal of learning and using feedback is to create an opportunity to address changes in a thoughtful and explicit manner. At the same time, there is an implicit idea that learning occurs automatically somehow, which is problematized on the basis of the cases in the articles.

    An interdisciplinary approach was adopted to obtain understanding of lessons learned related to natural hazards affecting critical infrastructure in Sweden. Interdiciplinarity refers to the use of theories from different research fields to achieve synergies in the search for explanations and useful understanding. The different objectives and aims of each paper have increased understanding of mechanisms related to aspects of feedback, learning and knowledge sharing after natural hazard impacts. Each paper also provides examples of opportunities and constraints to feedback mechanisms and learning in a collective context.

  • 6.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Merits of using a socio-technical system perspective and different industrial accident investigation methods on accidents following natural hazards: A case study on pluvial flooding of a Swedish railway tunnel 20132015In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 13, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Liljegren, Eva
    CNDS, Uppsala; Uppsala Universitet; Swedish Def Univ Stockholm.
    Systematic Knowledge Sharing in a Natural Hazard Damage Context: How Organizational Borders Limit Lessons Learned2017In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 356-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to increase knowledge about systematic lessons learning in a public-private partnership. Empirically, it focuses on road maintenance in Sweden where the Swedish Transport Administration (STA) is responsible for the state-owned infrastructure and tendered contractors carry out all maintenance. The tendering process stipulates that the stakeholders should enable learning and the knowledge transfer that is, by necessity, required for preventive purposes. Semi-structured interviews with project leaders from the STA and respondents from two tendering contractors of maintenance were used to investigate attitudes to and the understanding of sharing experiences and knowledge about damage caused by weather extremes and the relevance of climate change adaptation in their field. The analysis suggests that most of the respondents' experiences stay within their own organization, which creates parallel feedback loops, rather than becomes shared knowledge that could be used as lessons learned enhancing preventive work against future damage and loss. The analysis indicates imbalance in feedback of knowledge concerning weather extremes and their effects.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf