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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Media and basic desires: An approach to measuring the mediatization of daily human life2021Inngår i: Communications: the European Journal of Communication Research, ISSN 0341-2059, E-ISSN 1613-4087, Vol. 46, nr 2, s. 275-296Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Media and Basic Desires: An Approach to Measuring the Mediatization of Daily Life2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Mediatization as a state of mind?: Toward an emic perspective of themediatization of everyday life2020Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 4.
    Enli, Gunn
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Fast, Karin
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Political Solutions or user Responsibilization?: How Politicians understand Problems Connected to Digital Overload2023Inngår i: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 29, nr 3, s. 675-689Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Politicians are decision-makers responsible for policy and opinion leaders with unique powers to construct challenges and problems as political. An emerging problematic issue pertains to users’ experiences of digital overload and invasive media (Syvertsen 2020; Lomborg and Ytre-Arne, 2021). Existing studies report that users struggle to self-regulate their digital media use – or ‘disconnect’. This relates to how connectivity platforms develop increasingly advanced techniques to keep them from logging off (Karppi 2018; Zuboff, 2019; Ytre-Arne et al., 2020).

    This article aims to unpack how politicians understand problems about digital overload and invasive media and to what degree they regard digital disconnection as a potential political issue. We have selected Norway as our case country because of the population’s level of digital connectivity and the tradition of media regulation in the Nordic region (Syvertsen et al., 2014). Based on 16 research interviews with politicians and think-thank experts and a document analysis of official party-political platforms, we ask to what degree the politicians experience digital overload and invasive media as problematic, and if so, whom they believe is responsible for causing and solving the problems, and what specific solutions they suggest to the issues. In addition to digital disconnection literature, we draw on theoretical perspectives from media policy, political theory, and responsibilization.

    Key findings indicate that politicians regard digital overload and invasive media as highly problematic. However, they are reluctant to suggest political interventions as solutions to these problems but rather place responsibility on the users and the platform industries. The politicians struggle to imagine political interventions that could help users disconnect while respecting personal authority and are doubtful about their power vis-à-vis the global tech companies. The article concludes with a critical discussion about the politicians’ acceptance of the neoliberal idea of responsibilization. This ultimately produces a reluctance to discuss disconnection as a political issue, not just an individual challenge.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    A Discursive Approach to Mediatisation: Corporate Technology Discourse and the Trope of Media Indispensability2018Inngår i: Media and Communication, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 6, nr 2, s. 15-28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hitherto, and mainly by way of ethnographic studies, mediatisation research has informed us regarding the relevance, influence, and role of media in various spheres of social life. Less is known, however, about how mediatisation is discursively constructed. The relevance of constructivist approaches to mediatisation has been explicated, e.g., by Krotz (2017), who calls for critical mediatisation studies that consider the economic interests of mediatisation stakeholders, including the ICT industry. Against this backdrop, this article scrutinizes what the alleged 'mobility revolution' entails according to some who would benefit most from such a revolution. More concretely, the article studies the discursive practices of three leading corporations in the mobile communications sector: IBM, Huawei,and Ericsson. Stimulated by critical mediatisation theory as well as related accounts of the (technology) discourse-reality relationship, the article asks: if mobile media changes 'everything' in life-whose lives are being changed? If mobile media are 'indispensable' to modern ways of living-what are they supposed to do? Ultimately, the article speaks to the theme of this thematic issue by interrogating how contemporary mobile technology discourse contributes to the (re-)production of social space. Findings suggest that mediatisation is constructed as the response to an internal human drive for connectivity and as an inexorable natural force. Three sub-discourses on mobile technology are identified: 'technologies of cosmos', 'technologies of self', and, ultimately, 'technologies of life'. Altogether, these sub-discourses disclose and reinforce the hegemonic nature of mediatisation by communicating the indispensability of mobile media in modern-notably, urban and privileged-lives. In addition to providing answers to the study's empirical questions, the article includes a discussion about the potential implications of existing discourse overlaps between ICT companies and mediatisation theorists, as well as a sketch for an agenda for the 'discursive turn' in mediatisation studies.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013). Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för ekonomi, kommunikation och IT, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    A discursive approach to mediatization: ICT companies, coworking spaces, and the construction of media indispensability2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When the ‘World Wide Web’ started to mature, the ‘information revolution’ was celebrated by researchers, politicians, policy makers, and others. Today, a new kind of technologically driven revolution is said to emerge: the ‘mobility revolution’. Unsurprisingly, the revolutionary potentials of mobile media tend to be particularly promoted by ICT companies. By all means, ICT corporations have a stake in marketing their technological gadgets as useful. Beyond this, however, they have an interest in constructing and safeguarding the idea of media as indispensable; as things necessary to lead a good life. While heavily promoted by technology producers, the media indispensability trope is not exclusive to the ICT industry. Rather, the trope also occurs in media research and in mediatization theory especially. Although there are still many suggestions as to how to define ‘mediatization’ (cf. Lundby, 2009; Hjarvard, 2013; Couldry & Hepp, 2013; Hepp & Couldry, 2016; Ekström et al, 2016; Krotz, 2009, 2017), some researchers foreground media indispensability as key to the concept. Jansson argues that ‘Today, we can see that media are generally, and to an increasing extent, perceived as indispensable to the interactions between individuals and groups’ (2015a, p. 380). Notwithstanding other areas of potential dispute, then, mediatization researchers and the communications industry unite in the recognition of technology as agents of social change. As noted by Krotz (2017), mediatization is not a natural, automatic process, but accomplished by humans. As such, he argues, it ‘must be reconstructed critically in order to find the points where the civil society was not asked’ (p. 114). Krotz calls for critical mediatization studies that consider the economic interests of mediatization stakeholders, including the ICT industry. My paper responds to recent calls for critical mediatization studies (see also Jansson, 2018), by scrutinizing the discursive practices of three leading corporations in the ICT sector: IBM, Huawei, and Ericsson. My overall objective is to approach the ‘mobility revolution’ from a constructivist standpoint in order to inspect what the alleged, media induced, social transformations entails according to some of those who would benefit the most from such a revolution. Stimulated by mediatization theory as well as related accounts of the (technology) discourse-reality relationship (e.g. Berger & Luckmann, 1966; Williams, 1974; Pinch & Bijker, 1984; Marvin, 1988; Fisher, 2010), this paper asks: if mobile media changes ‘everything’ in life – whose lives are being changed? If mobile media are ‘indispensable’ to modern ways of living – what are they supposed to do? Addressing these questions, the paper ultimately informs us about how mediatization is discursively constructed and sold to people.Findings suggest that mediatization is embraced and sold back to consumers as the response to an internal human drive and presented as an inexorable natural force. Three sub-discourses on mobile technology are identified in the empirical data set: ‘technologies of cosmos’, ‘technologies of self’, and, ultimately, ‘technologies of life’. Altogether, these sub-discourses disclose and reinforce the hegemonic nature of mediatization by communicating the indispensability of mobile media in modern – notably, urban, middle-class – lives.

  • 7.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Affective Mobility: Mediated Connectivity among 'Elastically' Mobile Elites2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Atypical media work in the culture of (dis)connectivity: Digital disconnection as (re)productive work2020Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Coworking spaces as postdigital territories: Prospects and paradoxes of the (dis)connected workplace2023Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    (Dis)connected territories in the post-digital city2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Enter the post-digital housewife: Re-spatializing digital labour in the culture of disconnectivity2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 12.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Extraordinary (dis)engagement with the digital mundane?: A study of political work and life under the (dis)connectivity imperative2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    'In the end they do what they want - so why even ask us?': Perspectives on the production and consumption of transmedia entertainment2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s converging entertainment industries create transmedial brand worlds in which consumers are expected to become deeply immersed. Integrated marketing campaigns connected to these worlds invite consumers to act as ‘co-producers’. While such an altered consumer identity has been taken as evidence of enhanced consumer agency, it has also been recognized as a source of consumer exploitation.

    The conference presentation was based on findings from the author's thesis, More than meets the eye: Transmedial entertainment as a site of pleasure resistance and exploitation (2012), which analyzes the increasingly ambivalent power relationships that exist between agents in the contemporary entertainment industry and their most dedicated customers – the fans. The study employs a multiperspectival theoretical framework, in that cultural studies theory is combined with perspectives from political economy. Existing theory on transmedial textuality, branding, and fandom is applied to one particular franchise, Hasbro’s Transformers. This world, home of both industrial and fan-based creativity, is studied through analyses of official and unofficial content as well as through interviews with professionals and fans.

    The case study shows that companies and fans contribute to the building and promotion of the Transformers brand world – in collaboration and in conflict. While fan productivity occasionally takes place without direct encouragement from the companies involved, it is also largely anticipated and desired by marketers. The findings suggest that consumer enjoyment potentially translates into industrial benefits, including free brand promotion. Ultimately, the study acknowledges transmedial brand worlds as, simultaneously, sites of pleasure, resistance, and exploitation.

  • 14.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Marketing for the Active Consumer in the Era of Media Convergence: Transformers and the Sector Seven Campaign2013Inngår i: Making Sense of Consumption: Selections from the 2nd Nordic Conference on Consumer Research 2012 / [ed] Lena Hansson, Ulrika Holmberg & Helene Brembeck, Gothenburg, 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för ekonomi, kommunikation och IT, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    More Than Meets The Eye: The Marketing of Transmedial Brands In the 21st Century2008Konferansepaper (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Convergence has become a buzzword to explain all sorts of processes in contemporary society. Predominantly, the concept has been used to signify ongoing changes in how media content is being produced, distributed and consumed. In this paper, I present some initial

    findings from my ongoing dissertation project. The entertainment franchise Transformers, which is used as a case-study in my research, seem to indicate that present-day marketing practices used to promote transmedial brands (such as the Transformers brand) contribute to a convergence of media content. By the utilization of various activities to extend and promote

    the brand, such as transmedia storytelling, licensing, cross-promoting and a mixture of clever marketing initiatives, the boundaries between entertainment and advertising tend to become indistinct, if not dissolved entirely

  • 16.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för ekonomi, kommunikation och IT, Avdelningen för medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap.
    More than Meets the Eye: Transmedial entertainment as a site of pleasure, resistance and exploitation2012Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s converging entertainment industry creates ‘transmedial’ brand worlds in which consumers are expected to become immersed. Integrated marketing campaigns connected to these worlds encourage various kinds of consumer productivity and invite consumers to partake in brand-building processes. Consumers, thus, are increasingly counted on to act as co-producers of contemporary entertainment. While such an altered consumer identity has been taken as evidence of enhanced consumer agency, it has also been recognized as a source of consumer exploitation. 

    This thesis aims to further our understanding of the increasingly ambivalent power-relationship that exists between agents in the entertainment industry and their most dedicated customers – the fans. The study employs a multiperspectival theoretical framework, in that cultural studies theory is enriched with perspectives from political economy. This integrated approach to the object of study yields a better understanding of the values of consumer activity, and fan productivity in particular, to industry and consumers respectively.

    The study applies existing theory on transmedial textuality, branding, and fandom to one particular franchise, Hasbro’s Transformers. This brand world, home of both industrial and fan-based creativity, is studied through analyses of official and unofficial contents, and through interviews with professionals and fans. The focus is on the brand environment established around the first live action film ever made within the franchise. Special attention is given to the all-encompassing film marketing campaign that contributed to forming this environment and to fan productivity taking place in relation to it. 

    The case study shows that companies and fans contribute to the building and promotion of the Transformers brand world – in collaboration and in conflict. While fan productivity occasionally takes place without direct encouragement from the companies involved, it is also largely anticipated and desired by marketing campaigns. The findings suggest that consumer enjoyment potentially translates into industrial benefits, including free brand promotion. Ultimately, the thesis acknowledges transmedial worlds of entertainment as concurrent sites of pleasure, resistance, and exploitation.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    KUS_2012_55
  • 17.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Off the grid: Digital disconnection, technology and social space2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 18.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Play Labour and the Search for Mass Fandom: A Transformers Brand Experience2013Inngår i: Digital Games and Playful Media (TWG), 2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s entertainment industries encourage consumer activity as a way to gain brand loyalty. Participatory marketing campaigns are calculated to promote such activity, especially when designed as transmedia entertainment and require various types of play labor. This paper seeks to add to our mounting yet still limited understanding of industry branding practices in an era of media convergence and against the background of recent theoretizations on the ‘new’ active consumer. Ultimately, awareness of such practices will help us understand the increasingly complicated relationship between producers and consumers of mediated entertainment. The paper is based on empirical data that were generated by the author in relation to her PhD thesis. Focusing on a specific marketing campaign that was launched in support of Michael Bay’s and Steven Spielberg’s 2007 Transformers film, the paper argues for the need to make manifest the interplay between the pleasurable and, at the same time, potentially exploitive traits of consumer activity in general and of fan productivity in particular.

  • 19.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Post-digital capitalism and the disconnection turn in work2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 20.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Precarious workers – or spatial elites?: Coworking as class privilege and coworking spaces as (super-)gentrifiers2020Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 21.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    'Remember to unplug': Expressions of the post-digitalization of work inside and beyond coworking spaces2023Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on empirical insights from two ongoing research projects, both of which are concerned with how we live and work with – or without – digital media: Hot desks in cool places: Coworking spaces as post-digital industry and movement (Karlstad University, PI André Jansson) and Intrusive media, ambivalent users, and digital detox (Digitox) (University of Oslo, PI Trine Syvertsen). With cues taken mainly from multi-sited ethnography in coworking spaces and qualitative interviews with (dis-)connected knowledge workers, I inquire about top-down and bottom-up forms of boundary work that are undertaken to produce particular workstyles and workspaces. I pay particular attention to expressions of what I shall call ’the post-digitalization of work’; that is, to the socio-spatial shaping of contemporary (knowledge) work by disconnectivity ideals and feelings of digital unease. 

  • 22.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Revisiting the ‘home’ (again, and again, and again): Coworking, neoliberalism and the touristification of everything2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Selling (the idea of) mediatization: Contemporary technology discourse and the indispensability of mobile media in work/life2017Inngår i: NordMedia: Mediated Realities – Global Challenges, 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hitherto, and mainly by way of ethnographic studies, mediatization research has informed us about the relevance, influence, and role of media in various spheres of social life. Less is known, however, about how mediatization is discursively constructed. The relevance of constructivist approaches to mediatization has been explicated e.g. by Krotz (2017), who calls for critical mediatization studies that consider the economic interests of mediatization stakeholders, including the ICT industry. Against this backdrop, this paper scrutinizes what the alleged ‘mobility revolution’ entails according to some of those who would benefit the most from such a revolution. More concretely, the paper studies the discursive practices of three leading corporations in the mobile communications sector: IBM, Huawei, and Ericsson. Stimulated by critical mediatization theory as well as related accounts of the (technology) discourse-reality relationship, the paper asks: if mobile media changes ‘everything’ in life – whose lives are being changed? If mobile media are ‘indispensable’ to modern ways of living – what are they supposed to do? Ultimately, the paper speaks to the theme of this special issue by interrogating how contemporary mobile technology discourse contributes to the (re-)production of social space. Findings suggest that mediatization is constructed as the response to an internal human drive for connectivity and as an inexorable natural force. Three sub-discourses on mobile technology are identified: ‘technologies of cosmos’, ‘technologies of self’, and, ultimately, ‘technologies of life’. Altogether, these sub-discourses disclose and reinforce the hegemonic nature of mediatization by communicating the indispensability of mobile media in modern – notably, urban and privileged – lives. In addition to providing answers to the study’s empirical questions, the paper includes a discussion about the potential implications of existing discourse overlaps between ICT companies and mediatization theorists, as well as a sketch for an agenda for the ‘discursive turn’ in mediatization studies.

  • 24.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    The 'disconnection turn' and its consequences for work2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 25.
    Fast, Karin
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    The disconnection turn: Three facets of disconnective work in post-digital capitalism2021Inngår i: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 1615-1630Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-digital capitalism, digital disconnection is not merely a “luxury” but also an obligation. Aiming to re-contextualize digital disconnection outside of digital detox resorts, social media, and elitist activism, this article asks how the ongoing disconnection turn affects how we (think about) work. With cues taken from digital disconnection studies and (digital) work/labour research, I inquire three facets of disconnective work. I elaborate, firstly, what disconnection might mean for work, as I scrutinize ideals pertaining to “deep” and “slow” work. Secondly, I unveil how disconnection may materialize at work, as I inspect “the post-digital workplace” and “disconnective technologies of work.” Thirdly, using “The Post-Digital Housewife” as a rhetorical figure for grasping the daily, typically unpaid, work that the disconnection turn makes acute, I recognize disconnection as work. The article concludes by presenting four dialectics of disconnective work, which serve to remind us of the paradoxical role of disconnection in processes of empowerment and exploitation.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    The Longue Durée of Transmedia Work2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the transformation of work under the pressures of mediatization. Mediatization is here understood as a historical process of media-induced change that establishes tensions between emancipating forces and increasing socio-technological dependence. The paper seeks to make sense of mediatized work and its implications by covering forms of work that has either been reconfigured through changes in the media system or developed as a direct response to mediatization and the accompanying post-Fordist regime of work.

  • 27.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    There is no place like work: The mediatization of international labor2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, mobile media technologies have come to transform the ways in which we organize life and work. Inventions like the smartphone and the spreading of free Wi-Fi networks – technologies which allow us to “stay connected” while on the move – affect how we plan and perform our everyday activities as well as how we handle relationships. Employing a theoretical framework centered on the notion of ‘the mediatization of labor’, my conference contribution focuses on the overarching question of how mobile media technologies impact on working life itself and on work/life balance. For the specific category of people who work partly internationally, access to new media can be assumed to be particularly crucial for the organization of personal- as well as working life. The empirical data upon which my contribution is based consist of 10-15 qualitative interviews, conducted with international business elites working in the private sector. For this group of workers, the time spent away from both workplace and home seems to become a time of self-negotiation; a time when questions of who to stay in touch with, when, and to what extent need to be answered in ways that please all parties involved. My preliminary results indicate that expectations of connectivity are set by both employers and family members, and that the connectivity enabled by mobile media technologies is understood by the respondents as a precondition for an international high-level career.

  • 28.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Where the spatial elite resides?: Examining coworking and coworking spaces through the lens of eliteness instead of precariousness2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Fast, Karin
    The University of Oslo (UiO), Norway.
    Who Has the Right to the Coworking Space?: Reframing Platformed Workspaces as Elite Territory in the Geomedia City2024Inngår i: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 48-62Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research suggests that coworking spaces (CWS) both respond to and legitimize work precarization. This is an important critique. Less acknowledged, however, is the fact that CWS also (re)produce eliteness. Thus, to the aim of offering perspectives that remain underrepresented in CWS research, I here scrutinize CWS as promotors of class privilege. I build my case on the premise that class privilege has to do with more than merely economic superiority and seek to dismantle, in particular, the role of geomedia technologies in the (re)production of CWS eliteness. With clues derived from a literature review as well as analyses of real-life cases, I here recognize CWS as places of elite (non-)consumption, as hubs of elite mobility, as nodes in elite networks, and, ultimately, as elite territories in the (super-)gentrified geomedia city. I end my article by reflecting on the dialectics of CWS eliteness, thereby suggesting how precariousness and eliteness are interlinked.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013). Department of geography, media and communication.
    Workplace territoriality in the postdigital age: Insights from a "hot-desking" ethnography in coworking spaces2023Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the concepts of territoriality and the postdigital as well as preliminary empirical insights from a multi-method study, combining discourse analysis and multi-sited ethnography in a number of coworking spaces. The paper inquires about manifestations of top-down workplace territoriality, with a focus on the role of media (non-)use in the diversification of space.  

  • 31.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    World-Building vs. Brand-Building: Transformers as a Marvel Outcast and Hollywood Star2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Durable media franchises are inevitably sites of change. For creative or commercial purposes, they tend to change both in terms of what commodities they hold and what stories they contain. This paper analyses Hasbro’s Transformers by way of a combined theoretical framework that considers franchise changes in relation to both ‘world-building’ and ‘brand-building’. While each concept has gained increased scholarly attention recently, they are rarely or only superficially combined in the existent literature on media franchising. The paper argues that this combination of theory allows us to, on the one hand, understand how franchises like Transformers are constituted both as ‘story-worlds’ and ‘brand-worlds’, and, on the other hand, detect potential power asymmetries in the industry/fan relationship. The Transformers case study makes evident that the processes of world-building and brand-building are not always easy to combine in ways that satisfy both companies and audiences.

  • 32.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Abend, Pablo
    University of Art and Design Halle, Germany.
    Introduction to geomedia histories2022Inngår i: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 24, nr 11, s. 2385-2395Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The maturation of mobile, convergent, and place-contingent technologies has inspired researchers from different fields to re-imagine the relationship between geography and media. Recently, the linking of site-specific media and mediatized places culminated in the overarching concept that sits at the midpoint of this special issue: geomedia. While the majority of work within geomedia studies focuses on contemporary developments, thereby offering snapshots of geomediatization processes as these currently manifest themselves, this volume wants to address the nexus of geography and media from a decidedly historical perspective. Doing so, we hope to inspire a historical turn in geomedia studies as well as contribute to the ongoing discussion about how to define geomedia (studies) beyond (the study of) particular technologies or media genres. By boldly uprooting the geomedia concept from its contemporary, predominantly digital, framework, the contributions gathered here encourage us to map the trajectories of geomedia, to challenge "geomediatization realism," to remedy epistemological biases, and to further articulate the postdigital.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Enli, Gunn
    University of Oslo.
    Digital distancing – as good as it gets?: A study of political work and life under the (dis)connectivity imperatives2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 34.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Enli, Gunn
    University of Oslo.
    Digital distancing as spatial and moral practice2021Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013). University of Oslo, Norway.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    The Post-Digital Self: How Transmedia Dissolves the Boundaries of Work and Tourism2023Inngår i: Transmedia Selves: Identity and Persona Creation in the Age of Mobile and Multiplatform Media / [ed] James Dalby, Matthew Freeman, London: Routledge, 2023, 1st, s. 52-66Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter assesses the social consequences of transmedia as a regime of cultural circulation through two thematic lenses: work and tourism. Based on our previous fieldwork, as well as the work of others, we hold that transmedia feeds into and provides new facets to geo-social de-differentiation as diagnosed by postmodern (or, “late-modern”) sociologists in the 1980s and 1990s. This means, above all, that social realms that used to be delimited in time and space are increasingly open-ended, which, in turn, has a profound impact on how relations between self and society are negotiated. Focusing on work and tourism, we try to show how people’s engagement with transmedia fuses realms that were once taken as the moral and social opposites. On the one hand, “transmedia work” denotes a social condition marked by the growing prominence of strategic recognition work and liquid boundaries between leisure and labour. On the other hand, “transmedia tourism” captures not just the growing presence of touristic expressivity in everyday life, but also the growing day-to-day significance of logistical practices - which ultimately constitute another kind of work - in the creation of tourism phantasmagoria. The chapter begins with a positioning of our analysis in relation to the theoretical discourses of transmedia and postmodern de-differentiation. The following two parts use empirical examples to tease out the characteristics of “transmedia work” and “transmedia tourism”, respectively, as increasingly liquid and contradictory social terrains. In the final section we bring together the discussions into an argument concerning (1) the prospects of revisiting postmodern theory as a way of conceptualizing social consequences of transmedia and (2) the relevance of strategic recognition work and logistical work as complementary perspectives for grasping the role of transmedia in the formation of contemporary selves.

  • 36.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Transmedia work: Privilege and precariousness in digital modernity2019 (oppl. 1)Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In Transmedia Work Karin Fast and André Jansson explore several key questions that frame the study of the social and cultural implications of a digital, connected workforce. How might we understand 'privilege' and 'precariousness' in today's digitalized work market? What does it mean to be a privileged worker under the so-called connectivity imperative? What are the social and cultural forces that normalize the appropriation of new media in, and beyond, the workplace? These key questions come together in the notion of transmedia work - a term through which a social critique of work under digital modernity can be formulated. Transmedia work refers to the rise of a new social condition that saturates many different types of work, with various outcomes. In some social groups, and in certain professions, transmedia work is wholeheartedly embraced, while it is questioned and resisted elsewhere. There are also variations in terms of control; who can maintain a sense of mastery over transmedia work and who cannot? Through interviews with cultural workers, expatriates, and mobile business workers, and ancillary empirical data such as corporate technology and coworking discourse, Transmedia Work is an important addition to the study of mediatization and digital culture.

  • 37.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Making “good use” of mobile media: Surveying smartphone practices as a social and moral space2022Inngår i: ECREA 2022 – Electronic Book of Abstracts, Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2022, s. 534-534Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 38.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Bengtsson, Stina
    “They say it has ruined their lives”: A mixed-method study of how digital natives judge their own and other people’s smartphone use2023Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 39.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, AndréKarlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).Lindell, JohanKarlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).Ryan Bengtsson, LindaKarlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).Tesfahuney, MekonnenKarlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds2018Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This book introduces and develops the concept of geomedia studies as the name of a particular subfield of communication geography. Despite the accelerating societal relevance of 'geomedia' technologies for the production of various spaces, mobilities, and power-relations, and the unquestionable emergence of a vibrant research field that deals with questions pertaining to such topics, the term geomedia studies remains surprisingly unestablished. By addressing imperative questions about the implications of geomedia technologies for organizations, social groups and individuals (e.g. businesses profiting from geo-surveillance, refugees or migrants moving across national borders, or artists claiming their rights to public space) the book also aims to contribute to ongoing academic and societal debates in our increasingly mediatized world.

  • 40.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Tesfahuney, Mekonnen
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Introducing geomedia studies2017Inngår i: Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds / [ed] Karin Fast, André Jansson, Johan Lindell, Linda Ryan Bengtsson, Mekonnen Tesfahuney, Routledge, 2017, s. 1-18Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013). Södertörns högskola.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörns högskola.
    Mediatization of culture and everyday life2014Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The report Mediatization of Culture and Everyday Life commissioned by the sector committee Mediatization of culture and everyday life of the Riksbanken Jubileumsfond provides a comprehensive overview of current Swedish mediatization research focusing on culture and everyday life in and beyond the field of media and communication studies. Based on a broad mapping of research projects financed in Sweden that are tackling questions of media-related change, the report provides insight into a still evolving area of investigation. The two parts of the report firstly provide a discussion of the state of the art of mediatization research and a review of relevant Swedish research projects to secondly present a number of outstanding research environments engaging in research of mediatization of culture and everyday life. The report concludes with outlining topics that have been overlooked in the area so far. Especially the discussion of temporal aspects of media-related change is pointed out as a gap in current research efforts.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Elastic mobility: Negotiating the ’home’ and ’away’ continuum2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out provide an understanding of internationally mobile life-conducts from a perspective that takes into account social costs that come with being away from localized, everyday life. We show that mobile elites are oftentimes reluctant travellers. A way of coping with the existential dilemmas of being away is to stay connected with family and friends with technologies of communication, which are deployed by the mobile elite under the regime of what Tomlinson calls “technologies of the hearth”. Furthermore, few informants ascribe any value to travelling in itself. Cosmopolitanism can here be understood as a form capital rather than a way of immersing the self into the culture of the other. We arrive at the concept of elastic mobility, which highlights central push-and-pull processes within mobile life-conducts. The concept forwards a perspective on the social consequences of globalization that goes beyond contemporary “flow speak”.

  • 43.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    On the Reluctant Cosmopolitanism of Kinetic Élites2015Inngår i: 12th Conference of the European Sociological Association, August 25-28, 2015, Prague, 2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 44.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    The elastic mobility of business elites: Negotiating the 'home' and 'away' continuum2016Inngår i: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 435-449Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out to provide an understanding of internationally mobile elites from a perspective that takes into account the social costs that come with being away from localized, everyday life. We show that mobile elites are often reluctant travellers and employ Bude and Dürrschmidt’s notion of ‘transclusion’ to understand the often-unrecognized ambivalence of mobile lifestyles. One way of coping with

    the existential dilemma of being away is to stay connected with family and friends through technologies of communication, which are deployed by the mobile elite under the regime of what Tomlinson calls ‘technologies of the hearth’. We arrive at the concept of ‘elastic mobility’, which highlights central push-and-pull processes in mobile lifestyles. The concept forwards a perspective on the social consequences of globalization that goes beyond contemporary ‘flow speak’.

  • 45.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Disconnection as distinction: A Bourdieusian study of where people withdraw from digital media2021Inngår i: Disentangling: The Geographies of Digital Disconnection / [ed] Jansson, A. & Admas, P. C., New York: Oxford University Press, 2021, s. 61-90Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Disconnecting from digital media is often mentioned in the public debate as a way of improving quality of life, productivity, sustainability, and so forth. However, not everyone can afford to disconnect, and media morality varies across social space. Based on data from a national Swedish survey (2019), this chapter applies correspondence analysis and a Bourdieusian theoretical framework to chart the extent to which different social groups prioritize disconnecting in different places, and the forms of digital unease associated with smartphone use. Such preferences are mapped onto a social space constructed around the distribution of economic and cultural capital in Swedish society, also illuminating how disconnection practices correspond to other lifestyle practices. The analysis reveals that the handling of digital (dis)connection (in different places) plays into overarching patterns of taste and cultural distinction. As such, disconnection manifests as an emerging moral-symbolic battleground in affluent societies.

  • 46.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Disconnection as distinction: A Bourdieusian study of where people withdraw from digital media2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 47.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Disconnection as distinction: A Bourdieusian study of where people withdraw from digital media2021Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 48.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ljungberg, Emilia
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    On the social construction of geomedia technologies2019Inngår i: Communication and the public, ISSN 2057-0473, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 89-99Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Geomedia technologies represent an advanced set of digital media devices, hardwares, and softwares. Previous research indicates that these place contingent technologies are currently gaining significant social relevance, and contribute to the shaping of contemporary public lives and spaces. However, research has yet to empirically examine how, and for whom, geomedia technologies are made relevant, as well as the role of these technologies in wider processes of social and spatial (re-)production. This special issue contributes valuable knowledge to existing research in the realm of communication geography, by viewing the current “geomediascape” through the lens of social constructivist perspectives, and by interrogating the reciprocal shaping of technology, the social, and space/place. Scrutinizing the social construction of geomedia technologies in various empirical contexts and in relation to different social groups, the essays deal with important questions of power and control, and ultimately challenge the notion of (geo)mediatization as a neutral process.

  • 49.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    A spatial approach to fan labor: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo (2015) on Spotify, she mobilized her fans through an immersive marketing campaign that stretched across and beyond media platforms: an 8-bit game, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Dreamhack, and a major Swedish music festival were key campaign platforms. The campaign construction was hardly unique, but rather illustrative of current trends in cultural production, including transmedia marketing and the increasing reliance on fan labor.This paper argues that informed spatial approaches to fan labor, and business strategies aimed to cultivate such labor, are missing in the existing research on cultural production. While descriptions of our transmediatized culture often-times do include spatial metaphors, such as “flow”, “stream”, “fluid”, and “liquid”, our conviction is that a more serious engagement with geography is vital for understanding, mapping, and ultimately critiquing industry practices that potentially are exploitive, unethical, and even harmful.Therefore, this paper suggests a theoretical framework for exploring the geographies of fan labor and presents exemplifying cartographies of authentic music marketing campaigns. The framework is influenced by two recent ‘turns’ in media and communication studies: the labor turn and the spatial turn. From labor theory, we borrow the idea that consumer engagement can be read as labor that is typically unpaid, affective, and voluntarily given. Spatial theory, next, provides us with a conceptual toolbox to disentangle the spatiality of transmedia marketing, including the relationship between physical and virtual elements.The notion of ‘transmediascape’ is brought in to describe the embodiment of transmedia marketing – in mediated and non-mediated spaces and flows. Such transmediascapes, the paper argues, can be read as the perfect soil for fan labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble fan affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Due to its multifaceted connotation – pointing towards both affectivity and mobility – the term ‘mobilization’ fruitfully bridges labor theory and spatial theory and serves, ultimately, as a key concept for analyzing contemporary forms of cultural production.

  • 50.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap (from 2013), Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation (from 2013).
    Geographies of free labor: Conceptualizing and Analyzing the 'Transmediascape'2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
12 1 - 50 of 71
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