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  • 1.
    Christophliemk, Hanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Johansson, Caisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Oxygen and water vapor transmission rates of starch-poly(vinyl alcohol) barrier coatings for flexible packaging paper2017In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 113, p. 218-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating efficient water-borne dispersions based mainly on renewable materials for coating of flexible packaging paper was the aim of this study. The effects of an ethylene modified poly(vinyl alcohol) grade and a standard poly(vinyl alcohol) on the oxygen and water vapor barrier performance of corn starch and potato starch coatings was studied. The results showed that a coating composition with a high fraction of a renewable polymer was effective in keeping the oxygen barrier at a technically and commercially applicable level. An ethylene modified poly(vinyl alcohol) grade was found to provide lower oxygen transmission rates at high relative humidity, as compared to a standard poly(vinyl alcohol) grade. The oxygen barrier properties of blends of starch and poly (vinyl alcohol) were similar to that of the pure modified poly(vinyl alcohol) in the range from 0% starch to 60% starch. This was observed with both hydroxypropylated and octenyl succinate modified starch grades. The drying conditions of the mixed starch:poly(vinyl alcohol) coatings were based on drying trials with pure poly (vinyl alcohol) coatings. Drying at moderate temperatures indicated the possibility to slightly decrease water vapor transmission rate by higher drying temperature. Several secondary effects of increased drying temperature such as coating hold-out and formation of defects may also be of importance.

  • 2.
    Christophliemk, Hanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Johansson, Caisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Starch-poly(vinyl alcohol) barrier coatings for flexible packaging paper and their effects of phase interactions2017In: Progress in organic coatings, ISSN 0300-9440, E-ISSN 1873-331X, Vol. 111, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starch and poly(vinyl alcohol) based barrier coatings for flexible packaging papers were studied. Both octenyl succinate modified and hydroxypropylated corn and potato starches were blended with regular and ethylene modified poly(vinyl alcohol) to increase the water vapor barrier properties and enhance the flexibility of the starch coatings, in order to accomplish superior barrier performance. Phase separation between starch and poly (vinyl alcohol) was studied in detail, both in the solution and in dry draw-down coatings on paper. The barrier performance of the coated paper was evaluated with respect to water vapor transmission rate. Conditions for the creation of a thin surface layer consisting of only one of the pure polymers were identified and discussed in terms of phase separation in solution migration of poly(vinyl alcohol) to the uppermost surface layer. The phase separation promoted low water vapor transmission rates also with a rather high fraction of starch in the coatings

  • 3.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Fibre and polymer technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Eva
    Department of Plant Breeding, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Newson, William
    Department of Plant Breeding, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Gallstedt, Mikael
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    The Swedish University of Agricultural Scienc, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ture, Hasan
    Faculty of Marine Sciences, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey.
    Extrusion of protein plastics2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253, article id 449Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Rättö, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Crack analysis of barrier coatings based on starch and starch-PVOH with and without plasticizer2018In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 336-347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Rättö, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Lignin-containing coatings for packaging materials2018In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 548-556Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences.
    Ernstsson, Marie
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, SP Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Chemical Engineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Paper Surface Centre. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science.
    Study of starch and starch-PVOH blends and effects of plasticizers on mechanical and barrier properties of coated paperboard2016In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 499-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of self-supporting films based on starch-plasticizer and starch-PVOH-plasticizer and the barrier properties of paperboard coated with solutions of these polymers have been studied. The plasticizers used were glycerol, polyethylene glycol and citric acid. It was shown that the addition of a plasticizer and PVOH to starch substantially increases the flexibility of starch films. It was seen that curing the self-supporting films led to a decrease in flexibility. After heat-treatment, a substantial increase in storage modulus was observed only in the starch-PVOH-citric-acid blend films. Tensile tests on the films indicate that citric acid did not cause any noticeable phase separation. Citric acid acted as a compatibilizer for starch-PVOH blends even though a similar enrichment of PVOH at the air-solid interface was observed with both citric acid and polyethylene glycol as plasticizer. The properties of barrier coatings greatly reflected the compatibility of starch-PVOH blends containing citric acid. The only plasticizer that resulted in a lower water vapour transmission rate through the starch and starch-PVOH coatings was citric acid, which suggests that cross-linking took place. With four layers, coatings based of starch-PVOH possessed the same oxygen-transmission rate with citric acid as without citric acid.

  • 7.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects on Oxygen-barrier Properties of Pretreating Paperboard with a Starch–Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Blend before Polyethylene Extrusion2016In: Packaging technology and science, ISSN 0894-3214, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 399-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Rättö, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Lignin-containing coatings for packaging materials: Pilot trialsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kudahettige-Nilsson, Rasika Lasanthi
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Plastic Composites Made from Glycerol, Citric Acid, and Forest Components2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 6600-6612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ecofriendly approach for the synthesis of plastic biomaterials based on renewable materials suitable for 3D printing application or other applications has been developed. The material was prepared from native (microcrystalline) or amorphous cellulose, citric acid, and glycerol or ethylene glycol, by a pretreatment at 40 degrees C and a curing at 175 degrees C for 1 h. The results showed that tensile properties and the water absorption level of the material were acceptable. The highest strain at break (14%) was obtained from materials made of 10% amorphous cellulose with 90% glycerol/citric acid. It had a maximum stress at 37 MPa. Moreover, materials were without ash content. Possible applications of the material in 3D-printers were discussed. In addition, application of mechanical pulp and wood powder into novel plastic material production was discussed. Foaming during curing might be a problem for this type of material, but this can be avoided by using amorphous cellulose in the recipe.

  • 10.
    Petkova-Olsson, Yana
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Altun, Samuel
    Attana AB, Bjornnasvagen 21, S-11419 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013), Paper Surface Centre.
    Temperature effect on the complex formation between Pluronic F127 and starch2017In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 166, p. 264-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a systematic investigation of the temperature effect on the interactions between Pluronic F127 and hydroxypropylated oxidised potato starch by surface tension titrations and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis is presented. The binary mixture examined was subjected to 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C and the results indicated no presence of binary complexes at the lower temperature. However, at elevated temperature, an ability for inclusion complex formation was detected by the here used independent techniques. The formed inclusion complexes at 30 degrees C are presumably a product of hydrophobic interaction between Pluronic F127 and starch, where starch acts as a host molecule and Pluronic F127 due to its increased hydrophobicity is the guest molecule in this complex. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Petkova-Olsson, Yana
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Oelschlaeger, Claude
    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany.
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Structural, microrheological and kinetic properties of a ternary silica-Pluronic F127-starch thermosensitive system2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 514, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis: The sol-gel transition in aqueous suspensions consisting of silica particles and thermosensitive polymer is controlled by inter-particle forces and solution properties of the polymer. Addition of a second non-thermosensitive polymer may affect the transition. The purpose of this work was to characterize the kinetics of the sol-gel transition and to understand the effects of a second non-thermosensitive polymer on the microstructure, using a combination of classical rheology and microrheology. Experiments: Classical rotational rheology as well as two microrheology methods, Multiple Particle Tracking (MPT) and Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy (DWS), were used to investigate the sol-gel transition of a ternary silica-Pluronic F127-starch thermosensitive system. Findings: Classical rheometry and DWS indicated sol-gel transition temperature similar to 25 degrees C at 1 wt% Pluronic, independently of the concentration of the other components. DWS showed a fast gelation process, less than two minutes for all samples, beside a second slow kinetic process. In the gel state, MPT indicated micro-structural and micro-viscoelastic differences compared to rotational rheology. This was explained by formation of an elastic matrix of silica and polymers in combination with assembly of silica particles in large macroporous agglomerates. Presence of starch led to breakdown of the macro porous network, leaving the homogeneous elastic network left.

  • 12.
    Petkova-Olsson, Yana
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Thermosensitive silica-pluronic-starch model coating dispersion-part I: The effect of Pluronic block copolymer adsorption on the colloidal stability and rheology2016In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 506, p. 245-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloidal stability of a model paper coating dispersion consisting of silica particles, Pluronic F127, starch and glycerol was studied with respect to PF127 temperature responsiveness and its adsorption on the silica surface. Rheological characterization of this system in order to extract structural information for the wet suspension state was accomplished in terms of rotational tests. The analysis, done by Krieger-Dougherty model and the elastic floc model for all flow curves at three different temperatures, 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C, and at different particle volume fractions (phi between 0 and 0.31), revealed that the structure of the system changes. Two regions with different behaviour and a plateau region at particle volume fraction of phi similar to 0.16 were observed. At phi <= 0.16 temperature was affecting the suspension structure. By rising the temperature the well dispersed suspension at 20 degrees C transformed to flocculated one, where the higher the temperature was, more open floc structures were detected in terms of degree of flocculation parameter, C-fp, but at the same time with increasing the particle concentration the flocs got denser according to the calculated. At phi >= 0.16, there were not detected major structural differences by changing temperature or particle concentration. At phi similar to 0.16 a plateau in yield stress values was observed. The behaviour of the investigated model coating suspension was discussed in terms of shear stresses and C-fp. 

  • 13.
    Petkova-Olsson, Yana
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Thermosensitive Silica-Pluronic-Starch model coating dispersion-Part II: The relationship between rheology and microstructure2016In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 509, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloidal interaction between the components in coating dispersions play a key role in the structural organization on a micro level, which has influence upon the macroscopic properties of the material. The viscoelastic properties of a model coating suspension, consisting of colloidal silica particles, a temperature-responsive triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 and starch were studied and related to the corresponding dried structures. Pluronic F127 was used in order to produce a temperature-sensitive starch system and to simulate the drying of a paper coating at a low shear rates. The gelation process was investigated by the change in storage modulus upon heating and the change in particle volume fraction, empty set. The results revealed a dense disordered liquid-like state at empty set less than or similar to 0.10, where the strength of attraction between particles increased with increasing particle volume fraction and increasing temperature, a solid-like microcrystalline state at empty set greater than or similar to 0.20, where the temperature did not affect the rheology of the system and a solid-like microcrystalline state were coexisting at empty set similar to 0.16. The structures detected by rheology were related to the dried structures of the corresponding suspensions. At empty set less than or similar to 0.10 and elevated temperatures, a controlled formation of self-supporting floc structure was performed, which could be used to promote the even distribution of starch within the composite material. 

  • 14.
    Sjöstrand, Björn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Barbier, Christophe
    BillerudKorsnäs AB, R&D Gruvön, Solna, Sweden.
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Dewatering of Softwood Kraft Pulp with Additives of Microfibrillated Cellulose and Dialcohol Cellulose2019In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 6370-6383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The addition of nano-and micro-fibrillated cellulose to conventional softwood Kraft pulps can enhance the product performance by increasing the strength properties and enabling the use of less raw material for a given product performance. However, dewatering is a major problem when implementing these materials to conventional paper grades because of their high water retention capacity. This study investigated how vacuum dewatering is affected by different types of additives. The hypothesis was that different types of pulp additions behave differently during a process like vacuum suction, even when the different additions have the same water retention value. One reference pulp and three additives were used in a laboratory-scaled experimental study of high vacuum suction box dewatering. The results suggested that there was a linear relationship between the water retention value and how much water that could be removed with vacuum dewatering. However, the linear relationship was dependent upon the pulp type and the additives. Additions of micro-fibrillated cellulose and dialcohol cellulose to the stock led to dewatering behaviors that suggested their addition in existing full-scale production plants can be accomplished without a major redesign of the wire or high vacuum section.

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