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  • 1.
    Clerwall, Christer
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Nord, Lars
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Public Trust and Journalistic Transparency: An experimental study of disclosure and participatory effects in online news2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media matter. Most citizens’ in contemporary democracies get their information about current affairs and politics through the media. Political communication studies have for long time analysed the interplay between media content and journalistic style and political attitudes and public trust in political institutions. This paper adds to this discussion by addressing another dimension: the possible impact of journalistic transparency – offered in online-journalism – on political trust.

    Methodologically, the study was based on a web-based experiment including 1,320 respondents. The treatment groups comprised the same version of an online news article with additional indicators for disclosure transparency and participatory transparency. The article covered a local political issue and politicians form both ruling and opposition political parties appeared in the text.

    The results indicate that transparency effects on political trust may be overestimated. This experimental study did not confirm any significant positive correlation between transparency and the public trust towards local politicians appearing in the news.

  • 2.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Metaphors of free labor: A typology of unpaid work in the media sector2016In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 963-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, free labor has emerged as a key analytical tool for understanding new or semi-new forms of labor in the contemporary digital economy. This article critiques and develops this concept, with specific reference to work in the media industries, by presenting a historically grounded typology of free labor that also highlights some of the analytical problems with the current use of the concept. Our typology presents seven metaphors of free labor based on historical instances of roles people have taken on when performing unpaid labor: those of The Slave, The Carer, The Apprentice, The Prospector, The Hobbyist, The Volunteer, and The Patsy. A key conclusion is that free labor is performed by different actors at either end of increasingly complex and temporally stretched out value chains. This necessitates a more fine-grained and historicized use of the concept of free labor.

  • 3.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Metaphors of Free Labor: A Typology of Unpaid Work in the Media Sector2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, free labor has emerged as a key analytical tool for understanding new or semi-new forms of labor in the contemporary digital economy. This paper critiques and develops this concept, with specific reference to work in the media industries, by presenting a historically grounded typology of free labor that also highlights some of the analytical problems with the current use of the concept. Our typology presents eight metaphors of free labor based on historical instances of roles people have taken on when performing unpaid labor: those of The Slave, The Carer, The Apprentice, The Prospector, The Hobbyist, The Volunteer, The Agent and The Patsy. A key conclusion is that free labor is performed by different actors at either end of increasingly complex and temporally stretched out value chains. This should motivate, or so we argue, a more fine-grained scholarly use of the concept of free labor.

  • 4.
    Ferrer Conill, Raul
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The Gamification of Journalism2015In: Emerging Research and Trends in Gamification / [ed] Harsha Gangadharbatla & Donna Z. Davis, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 356-383Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional news outlets are on the decline and journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle tosurvive. New models of delivering news to the public are being explored in order to increase the levelsof readership and user engagement.The narrative of this chapter focuses on the future of journalismand media, and the potential benefits and dangers of gamifying journalism. Since gamification is a newtrend, a thorough look at the intersection between the enhancements of public mobility, the digitalizationof news services, and the engagement of gamified systems can bring better understanding of futurechannels of reading news to the users, to researchers, and to the industry. This chapter aims to bridgethe gap between gamification as an emerging practice in news distribution and yet a vastly unchartedarea or research.

  • 5.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Edited Participation: Comparing editorial influence on traditional and participatory online newspapers in Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Edited Participation: Comparing Editorial Influence On Traditional and Participatory Online Newspapers In Sweden2011In: Javnost - The Public, ISSN 1318-3222, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although participatory journalism involves publishing content created by users, editorial influence is an impor- tant aspect of participatory online media. Editors shape the conditions under which user generated content is produced, the context of publication and the perceived prominence of the content. It is still unclear how this influence manifests itself, and how it can be related to the discussion about participatory media’s potential for revi- talising democracy. In this paper, three online news media in Sweden are analysed comparatively: Sourze – the first Swedish participatory newspaper; Newsmill – a social me- dia focusing on news and debate; and DN – the online ver- sion of the largest Swedish morning paper Dagens Nyheter. The question is how participation is affected by editorial influence. The findings suggest that participatory arenas are constrained by the logic of their context of production. People from different categories in society participate on different terms. Furthermore, editors influence the agenda by suggesting topics, and by rewarding articles that fol- low their suggestions. These findings do not challenge assumptions about participatory newspapers as more accessible channels for citizens and therefore interesting as possible means of allowing a more democratically involved citizenry, but it challenges assumptions about freedom from constraints related to traditional mass media, such as agenda setting, gate-keeping and media logic.

  • 7.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    How are citizen journalists telling news? The Swedish case2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on citizen journalism has an Anglo-Saxon bias and frequently studies specific cases that focus on conflict, crisis events or war creating a selection bias of existing and, at least modestly, successful examples. In this study, situated in Sweden, we reverse the process and examine how actual communities are served by digital citizen community journalism in an everyday context. The study has a particular focus on how events are portrayed in terms of news topics dimensions, framing, presentation style, geographical focus and the authorship of news items. Preliminary findings indicate that the citizen journalists’ only present one perspective, rarely refers to policy plans or talks to the actors involved and provide individual and episodic news frames. Their focus is mostly on the local level and they have embraced the impersonal and unemotional presentation style from mainstream news. Half of the news items are being written by citizens while representatives from organisations or politicians author a quarter of them.   All in all, citizen journalism in general falls short from both traditional journalistic standards and many scholarly claims of being alternative.

  • 8.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Participatory Journalism and Editorial Influence2011In: Communication @ the Center: The 61st Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Boston, USA 26-30 May 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Holt, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, S-39182 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Random acts of journalism?: How citizen journalists tell the news in Sweden2015In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 1795-1810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the results from a content analysis of four Swedish online citizen journalism outlets are presented and discussed. The analysis focuses on new digital venues for news-making in theory and the question of the political relevance of citizen journalism in reality. This broad question is operationalized by asking more specifically how citizen journalists tell the news, according to established distinctions between variations in topic dimensions, focus, and presentational style. Our results show that citizen journalists tend to tell soft news. They rarely report on policy issues, local authorities, or people affected by decisions being made by them. Furthermore, the news focuses on individual relevance and is mostly episodic in nature. The style of writing is predominantly impersonal and unemotional. In sum, our results suggest that citizen journalism in Sweden is not yet at a stage where it can be considered a plausible alternative to traditional journalism.

  • 10. Kammer, Aske
    et al.
    Sjøvaag, Helle
    University of Bergen.
    Stavelin, Eirik
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT.
    3rd party actors in the hyperlinked, Scandinavian news-ecology2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Brott lönar sig inte – om nyhetsämnen i förändring,2016In: Journalistik i förändring : Om mediestudiers innehållsanalys 2007 och 2014 / [ed] Lars Truedson, Stockholm: Institutet för mediestudier , 2016, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Charting the Liquidity of Online News: moving towards a method for content analysis of online news2012In: International Communication Gazette, ISSN 1748-0485, E-ISSN 1748-0493, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 385-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terms such as liquid, dynamic and fluid news have been used to illustrate and emphasize the ever-changing, user-influenced and border-crossing nature of contemporary online news. However, although often used, what such terms actually denote often remains unspecified, and no existing studies have tried to propose a way to measure and analyse the impact of liquidity’s potential on authentic online news. The three-fold purpose of this exploratory study is therefore to move towards a clearer understanding of liquid news and to propose and explore a method of empirically measuring online news’s liquidity.

  • 13.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Content analysis is dead, long live content analysis?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Content analysis has been a commonly used method of social science for decades and can be considered to be an inseparable part of media and communication studies. It has formed basis for important theoretical advances within the field such as agenda setting, framing and cultivation theory. Yet, paradoxically, not all media content can, as I will argue, be properly analyzed within a traditional content analysis approach. In this paper inherent assumptions of content analysis is juxtaposed with the logic of digital and, increasingly, mobile media. In particular the difference between traditional content analysis need for ‘dead’ objects and the liquid and lively character of digital media is emphasized. Moreover, the paper proposes and discusses kernels of methodological approaches designed to study the content of digital media on it’s own terms.

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Crisis communication and online journalism: Crisis management in an elastic communication environment2008In: ECREA 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Den digitaliserade journalistiken 1.02015In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Michael Karlsson, Jesper Strömbäck, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 429-444Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Digital journalistik i et norskt perspektiv2008In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 386-387Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Digitalization and tabloidization: A longitudinal study of news topics in tabloid, quality and local newspaper websites in U.K. and Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although considerable efforts have been pursued in studying online news no studies so far have investigated how the actual news content is affected by digitalization in general, if at all, or compared different media traditions. Instead, changes in content are assumed or illustrated anecdotally rather than systematically assessed. This empirical study, covering Swedish and UK news sites with a tabloid, quality morning, and local/regional background between 2002-2012, shows that there is a tabloidization effect in general but that it is stronger in tabloids and in Sweden compared to the UK. Further, this tabloidization can be more precisely described as a lifestylization and de-politization process as it is in these areas where the biggest growth and decline are. In addition, the study reveals that it is the slower news that increases most suggesting that the immediate character of online news is mediated by production conditions.

  • 18.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Flourishing not restrained: The evolution of participatory journalism in Swedish online news, 2005-20092011In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 68-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research concerning user participation in online news has demonstrated that news websites offer a wide range of participatory features, but largely permit users only to comment on already- published material. This longitudinal analysis of Sweden’s four major mainstream national news websites focuses on front-page news items to investigate to what extent user participation has increased over time and whether the participatory features present allow users to exert control over key journalistic processes. Its findings indicate that user participation has increased rapidly in regard to processes peripheral to news journalism, but also that users have to a minor extent begun over time to perform work previously reserved for professional journalists.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Getting softer or harder?: A longitudinal study of news topics in tabloid, quality and local newspaper websites in U.K. and Sweden.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have been studying online journalism for well over fifteen years theorizing how this new environment affects news. A reoccurring argument is that a combination of real time tracking of the audience behavior in conjunction with a lack of viable business models fosters a journalistic culture with increasing sensational and shallow news. In effect, leading to a lesser-informed citizenry and a weaker democracy. Although considerable efforts have been pursued in studying online news no studies so far have investigated how the actual news content is affected in general, if at all, or compared different media traditions. Instead, changes in content are assumed or illustrated anecdotally rather than systematically assessed. This study, covering Swedish and UK media from 2002-2012, shows that there is a tabloidization effect in general but that it varies across publishing contexts and reveals some unexpected results.

  • 20.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Goodbye politics, hello lifestyle: Changing news topics in tabloid, quality and local newspaper websites in the U.K. and Sweden from 2002 to 20122016In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 150-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although considerable efforts have studied online news, studies so far have not investigated how the actual news topics are affected by digitalization in general, if at all, or compared them to different media constructs. Instead, changes in content are assumed or illustrated anecdotally rather than systematically assessed. This empirical study, covering Swedish and UK news sites within tabloid, quality morning, and local/regional varieties between 2002 and 2012, shows that there is a tabloidization effect in general but that it is stronger in tabloids and in Sweden compared to the UK. Further, this tabloidization can be more precisely described as a shift from political to more lifestyle journalism, as it is in the areas where the prime growth and decline are found. In addition, the study reveals that it is the slower news that increases most suggesting that the immediate character of online news is mediated by production conditions

  • 21.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Goodbye politics, hello lifestyle: Changing news topics in tabloid, quality and local newspaper websites in U.K. and Sweden 2002-2012.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although considerable efforts have been pursued in studying online news no studies so far have investigated how the actual news topics is affected by digitalization in general, if at all, or compared different media traditions. Instead, changes in content are assumed or illustrated anecdotally rather than systematically assessed. This empirical study, covering Swedish and UK news sites with a tabloid, quality morning, and local/regional background between 2002-2012, shows that there is a tabloidization effect in general but that it is stronger in tabloids and in Sweden compared to the UK. Further, this tabloidization can be more precisely described as a lifestylization and de-politization process as it is in these areas where the biggest growth and decline are. In addition, the study reveals that it is the slower news that increases most suggesting that the immediate character of online news is mediated by production conditions.

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    How media inform democracy: review2012In: Global Media Journal, ISSN 1550-7521, E-ISSN 1550-7521, Vol. 12, no 20Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Immediacy of online news: Journalistic credo under pressure2007In: Proceedings of ICA 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using journalistic normative theory as backdrop, this study tests whether the news cycle of online news differs from that of the traditional paper medium on four Swedish websites. Further it is investigated if the high speed and continuous flow of information on the Internet has any impact on the quality at online news. Finally it is argued that that the speed of which information is published on the Internet will raise serious questions about the quality, integrity and trustworthiness of the news product. Findings like these could, if commonly found, lead to a debate about and a redefinition of journalism in both online and traditional media.

  • 24.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Increasingly interactive: Swedish online news 2005-20072008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Interaktiv journalistik - en realitet?2007In: Journalistik, nätet och maktens ordningar, Stockholm: Sim(o) , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Journalistiker2013In: På väg mot medievärlden 2020: Journalistik, teknik, marknad / [ed] Gunnar Nygren, Ingela Wadbring, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 5, p. 255-274Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Mittuniversitetet.
    Kriskommunikation i förändring: Internet, den ökade publiceringshastigheten och de förändrade villkoren för kriskommunikation2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågan om hur medierna rapporterar om olika samhälleliga hot och riskerär på flera sätt central. De flesta inser att mediebevakningen inte är någonexakt spegling av de faktiska hot mänskligheten står inför, utan i stället ärett resultat av en medveten nyhetsvärdering där vissa händelser avmedierna bedöms som mer intressanta än andra att skildra.Varför vissa hot och risker på detta sätt beskrivs som allvarliga kriser imedierna, medan andra hot och risker (ofta av samma karaktär) inte är gördet är väl värt att fundera över. Det är också utgångspunkten förforskningsprojektet Hot på agendan som Demokratiinstitutet DEMICOMgenomfört 2005-2008 med finansiering från KrisberedskapsmyndighetenKBM.Denna rapport ingår i en serie av flera rapporter som dokumenterarprojektet. I rapporten Kriskommunikation i förändring. Internet, den ökadepubliceringshastigheten och de förändrade villkoren för kriskommunikationanalyserar Michael Karlsson hur Internet förändrar krisjournalistikensvillkor. För rapportens innehåll och slutsatser svarar författaren själv.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Mapping the Liquidity of Online News Content: The case of Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Measuring journalistic role performance in a digital news environment: Utilizing a liquid content analysis approach2016In: Journalistic Role Performances / [ed] Claudia Mellado, Lea Hellmüller, Wolfgang Donsbach, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 235-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediernas teknologiska villkor2012In: Medierna och demokratin / [ed] Lars Nord & Jesper Strömbäck, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 2, p. 93-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Mer sport till folket – på webben: Intryck av utvecklingen i några lokala och regionala svenska medier 2007-20142015In: Mediestudiers årsbok: Tillståndet för journalistiken 2014/2015 / [ed] Lars Truedson, Stockholm: Institutet för mediestudier , 2015, p. 138-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nätjournalistik: En explorativ fallstudie av digitala mediers karaktärsdrag på fyra svenska nyhetssajter2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    ‘Nothing, late and analogue’: How organizations utilized their websites to respond to issues covered by Swedish mainstream online news2009In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 224-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has the potential to change how organizations communicate with the public, both by allowing them to bypass news media by having their own websites and by offering interactive features and multimedia on their websites. Simultaneously, major news media remains an important factor, especially online, where more and more people visit them for information. Online news functions differently compared to traditional news with regards to, for instance, the much shorter news cycle, which implies that issues can surface and disappear quickly. This provides an intriguing setting where online media can report quickly on any issue and where organizations indicated as stakeholders in the issue can reply on their own websites. This study uses three cases, encompassing 14 organizations, to investigate if and how organizations reply on their websites when they have been identified as stakeholders in an issue. The results indicate that organizations are far from realizing the full potential of their websites.

  • 34.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nätet och medborgare i globaliseringsperspektiv2002In: Internet, medier och kommunikation / [ed] Peter Dahlgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2002, p. 291-322Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Nätjournalistik: En explorativ fallstudie av digitala mediers karaktärsdrag på fyra nyhetssajter2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nätjournalistik i krissitutioner - information eller desinformation?: En populärvetenskaplig sammfattning2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nätnyheter - från sluten produkt till öppen process2010In: Journalistisk kvalitet?: En antologi om hot och möjligheter när medievärlden förändras / [ed] Torbjörn von Krogh, Stockholm: Institutet för mediestudier , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Nätnyheter: Från sluten produkt till öppen process2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Papperstidningarna i Sverige har de senaste åren tappat i upplaga, men når fler människor än någonsin via nätet. Samtidigt skiljer sig journalistiken på nätet från traditionell journalistik och utmanar etablerade arbetssätt, normer och värderingar. I den här boken görs en genomgång av nätjournalistikens potential och i vilken utsträckning den har realiserats. Boken bygger på internationell forskning och på svenska studier av nätnyheter 2005-2010.

  • 39.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Online news, organizational websites and issues management: Swedish case studies on how organizations utilized their websites to address issues noticed by online news media2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Participatory Journalism and Crisis Communications: A Swedish Case Study of Swine Flu Coverage2010In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 201-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public relations research has recently explored how the digitalization of the media has affected crisis communications, focusing on such phenomena as corporate websites and blogs. This study first argues that digitalization involving user participation also changes traditional news production and that this affects the frame in which issues and crisis are told and understood. It then empirically explores media users’ influence on news frameworks through a case study of how mainstream Swedish online news covered the swine flu outbreak in 2009, finding that such users were an integral part of the media coverage of that crisis, contributing with a variety of voices that primarily criticized the media’s paradigms. It concludes by discussing these findings’ implications for crisis communications, in particular the impact of crisis communications becoming multidirectional and decentralized through participatory journalism.

  • 41.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Politik blir virala nyheter: om de hårdvinklas2016In: Journalistik i förändring: Om mediestudiers innehållsanalys 2007 och 2014 / [ed] Lars Truedson, Stockholm: Institutet för mediestudier , 2016, p. 54-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Rituals of Transparency: Evaluating online news outlets use of transparency rituals in the US, UK and Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Rituals of Transparency: Evaluating online news outlets’ uses of transparency rituals in the United States, United Kingdom and Sweden2010In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 535-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been suggested as a new norm in journalism. However, few studies have investigated how the overarching notion of transparency is utilized in everyday news. The purpose of this study is to identify and compare how leading mainstream online news media in the United States, United Kingdom and Sweden make use of transparency techniques in news items. The results show that transparency has begun to affect online news but that current journalism practice is a long way from a fully fledged transparency norm.

  • 44.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Rituals of Transparency: Evaluating online news outlets' uses of transparency rituals in the US, UK and Sweden2011In: The Future of Journalism / [ed] Bob Franklin, New York: Routledge, 2011, p. 535-545Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been suggested as a new norm in journalism. However few studies have investigated how the overarching notion of transparency is utilized in everyday news. The purpose of this study is to identify and compare how leading mainstream online news media in the US, UK and Sweden make use of transparency techniques in news items. The results show that transparency has begun to effect online news but that current journalism practice is a long way from a fully-fledged transparency norm.

  • 45.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Skilda valdagar: hur påverkas demokratin?1998Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The immediacy of online news, the visibility of journalistic processes and a restructuring of journalistic authority2011In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 279-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparency has been emphasized as a new norm within journalism and has received a great deal of attention. The credo of transparency is openness, and the interactive potential of digital media has been identified as one key element in achieving openness. In this essay it is argued that by exposing previously hidden journalistic processes, the high speed of online news plays a part in this orientation towards transparency in journalism.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The Online News Cycle and the Continuous Alteration of Crisis Frames: A Swedish case study on how the immediacy of online news affected the framing of the swine flu epidemic2012In: Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change, ISSN 1477-9633, E-ISSN 2040-056X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 247-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This explorative case study investigates how the continuous publication cycle and the immediacy of online news affected the Swedish news media framing of the swine flu epidemic between April and May 2009. The findings suggest that media framing changes continuously, several times a day, effectively painting different frames of the crisis. Consequently, an organization involved in this crisis may face stakeholders that have encountered contrasting frames depending on when they accessed the latest news. Furthermore, the results show that the speed of modifications seems to be highest in the initial stages of reporting when the flu was perceived as more dangerous. Because the crisis frames change constantly, this provides both a challenging crisis communication environment and an opportunity to influence and shape the frames by organizations that are aware of them and act swiftly.

  • 48.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The Unceasing Reframing of the Swine Flu: Immediacy of online news, Crisis communication and Swedish online media coverage of outbreak of the Swine flu2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    The Unleashed Scandal: The end of control in the digital age2015In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 793-794Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Vem skall man tro på?1998In: Vem skall man tro på? / [ed] Börje Alström, Sundsvall: Demokratiinstitutet , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 100
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