Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arvidson, Markus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    The seduction community: Constructing masculinity as social magic2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centrum för genusforskning (from 2013).
    Affective inequalities in intimate relationships2019In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 144-146Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Gender Studies (from 2013).
    Degendering the display of homosocial relationships?: A visual content analysis of brothers and sisters in Swedish newspaper photos2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on homosociality has often assumed differences between female and male homosocial relationships, where sociality and intimacy form a continuum among women and a binary among men. Also, female homosociality is understood as associated with family and home, while the male equivalent would be associated with public space and work. However, some have argued that with the increasing acceptance of male homosexuality, as well as with feminist organising and women’s inclusion in the public sphere, these gender differences in homosociality would disappear. Such reduced gender differences would presumably be more prevalent in countries where the tendencies mentioned are more pronounced, such as Sweden.

    In this presentation, I present a quantitative visual content analysis of Swedish newspaper photos featuring same-sex siblings. I argue that the representation of such sibling relationships can be a good measurement of homosociality in society. The hypothesis tests overall disconfirm the hypothesis that homosociality is becoming less gender-specific, for example showing that brothers touch less frequently in the photos than sisters and that they are associated more often with work while sisters are associated with home and family. There are however caveats to these results, and some measurements do show signs of homosocial convergence.

  • 4.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Digital Media and the Order of Ethnography:: On Modes of Digitization in the Museum of World Culture2009In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 1, p. 205-226Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Norm-critical rationality: Emotions and the institutional influence of queer resistance2017In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Norm critique is a recent discourse and practice in Sweden that is associated with queer resistance. It is taken up as a mode of governance in several Swedish institutions and companies. At face value, norm critique allows queer resistance to have a direct impact on institutional sources of norms in society. However, this article argues that such a shift in queer resistance replaces the queer emotionally overt subject with a rationalist style of emoting. It also argues that norm critique (re)institutes a subject position that paradoxically sides with contemporary forms of power and its demands for emotional competence.

  • 6.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Organising Intimacy: Exploring Heterosexual Singledoms at Swedish Singles Activities2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Single activities have long been places where single people can come to meet friends, build community or look for partners. The activities have relevance for studies of heterosexuality, intimacy, personal life and space. This dissertation discusses a conference, a cruise, an online site and an association for heterosexual singles in contemporary Sweden. It shows how these activities, analysed as organising people and spaces, offer participants different versions of intimacy, relationships, personal life and ultimately singledom itself.  The concept non-relationality is coined to describe how people understand and enact what it means to lack a certain kind of relationship.

    Multi-sited ethnographic observations are combined with interviews and a survey (n=416). The chosen methods allow insight into both the heterogeneous character of the contemporary single activity scene, as well as existing tendencies to form communities. The group whose single activities are examined is deemed fairly typical of the single population at large. Nevertheless, most conclusions centre on the specific set of activities described in the book and relate them to historical examples and theory.

    The single activities examined can be interpreted to enact different practices entailed in a relationship without necessarily demanding commitment to a whole relationship or a specific person. In that way, the activities accommodate the inflexible personal lives that some singles report having. This challenges strict boundaries between coupledom and singledom. Such transgressive or “hetero-doxical” potential in single activities is nevertheless circumscribed by organisers’ notion that the activities provide therapeutic community in a phase before singles take the step (back) into coupledom.

  • 7.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Singles’ activities: Sociability and the ambiguities of singledom2017In: Families, Relationships and Societies, ISSN 2046-7435, E-ISSN 2046-7443, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the proportion of singles grows in Sweden, the number of commercial and non-commercial activities catering to singles has increased. This article argues that these activities are situating singles within relations to others and to a community, and are becoming sites for performing and negotiating singledom. Using Simmel’s concept of sociability, the article presents an analysis of two cases of singles’ activities in Sweden – a company arranging singles’ cruises and festivals, and a singles’ association. It argues that while the organisers talked about singles’ needs for therapeutic social contact, participants themselves sometimes used the activities differently. Rather than understanding themselves as in need of proxy social interaction, they either intended to find a mate, or found actual satisfaction in a community of singles that superseded the need for a partner. Apart from stressing the importance of sociability in understanding singles’ activities, the article shows that this latter conception also challenges normative notions of coupledom, for example, by allowing for singles with partners.

  • 8.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Fürst, Henrik
    Singlehood spaces: An investigation into the constitutive arrangement of two Swedish spaces for singles2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is often said to be one of the countries with the highest share of single households. Today, different single sexualities are emerging, some being co-produced together with different on- and offline spaces. By comparing two of these spaces, one offline and one online, we show how sexuality and space are connected. We also suggest a number of concepts to help in the further investigation of such interrelations. In particular, on the ground of our data, we wish to promote the combination of Actor-Network Theory's concept of arrangement and the more generally used concept of situation, found in Adele Clarke's Situational Analysis and the Sociology of Emotions.

    We combine observations from two related single events and on-line interviews with members of a Swedish dating site. In the analysis, we use extensive coding and content analysis. The logic behind our comparison should be understood as what George Marcus has called juxtaposition: finding real world connection between cases and increasing the stringency of theoretical concepts by describing similarities and dissimilarities between them.

    We conclude that there is a utopian character to both cases. Single sexuality is portrayed as a transition period of many sexual choices, but these choices are not part of everyday life. The spaces investigated are arranged to emphasize their distinction from the everyday and to maximize the number and variety of choices. But while the single events emphasize commitment to the moment and intimate and intense (if short) meetings, the dating site arrangements encourage reflexive distance.

  • 9.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Gender Studies (from 2013).
    Mellström, Ulf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Centrum för genusforskning. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Gender Studies (from 2013).
    Priori, Andrea
    Fulda Hochschule.
    Considering the Parameters of Transnational Bachelorhood2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reaching beyond the media portrayals of 'dangerous migrant men', we ask what bachelorhood entails for migrated men within the European union. Using ethnographic data from Italy and interviews from Sweden, and drawing on previous research, we suggest that critical masculinity studies can be combined with the transnational family framework to situate the single men in a relational and transnational context. Our results indicate that bachelorhood is experienced as both freedom and a challenge to build a life that stretches across cultures and nationalities. In this context, masculinity is construed as both freedom from relations and as (conflicting) loyalties. Considering some differences between Italy and Sweden, we suggest ways in which to further examine transnational bachelorhood across Europe and across groups of migrating men.

  • 10.
    Krekula, Clary
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Arvidson, Markus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    On gray dancing: Constructions of age-normality through choreography and temporal codes2017In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 42, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the background of population aging, older peoples dance has attracted attention in research and its health promoting effects and social meanings have been brought to the fore. In this article we focus on the context and power dimensions of dance with an emphasis on the organizing of dance among older adults in terms of social discourses and age relationships. On the basis of qualitative interviews with 33 older dancers and 11 dance providers in Sweden, the study illustrates how dance is organized through social discourses on healthism and on the increasing group of older people as a powerful consumer group. The study highlights that older people and their social dance contexts are marked and subordinated in relation to younger age groups through non-verbal practices such as choreography and temporal codes. In short, dancing among older adults is not only a common health promoting and social activity, but also an arena in which age and age normality are negotiated and constructed.

  • 11.
    Lilja, Mona
    et al.
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Baaz, Mikael
    Department of Law, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    (Re)thinking the Precarity of Swedish Migrants: Governing through Decelerations and Timescapes2019In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 144-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses the concept of 'time' in order to better understand the situation of precarious migrants in Sweden. Through analysing a number of reports and interviews undertaken with newly arrived migrants in Sweden, it displays how different temporal understandings of the migrants are linked to and managed by governing bodies, laws and regulations. The article centres around two related research questions: (i) What constructions of time are used in the governing of precarious migrants? and (ii) How do these migrants understand their own and society's time?

  • 12.
    Mohr, Sebastian
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Gender Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Gender Studies (from 2013).
    Immutably fluid: biographical reflections on gayness in (queer) academia2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The term gay is often associated with a certain gender-dichotomous, liberalising paradigm. As such, it is juxtaposed to the term queer understood as open to gender and sexual fluidity, as well as critical of liberation in the name of identities. Yet the experiences of being gay in (queer) academia do not fit neatly into any of these paradigms. Based on biographical reflections on our academic trajectories as openly gay scholars in gender and queer studies, anthropology, and sociology, in this presentation we want to explore the everyday institutional politics (Ahmed 2012) of being gay in (queer) academia and the affective dissonances (Hemmings 2012) that they lay bare. Difficulties fitting into homosocial groupings of any gender as well as problematizations of gay identity in contemporary gender and queer studies speak to the inherent in-determinability of ’gayness’ and point to the normative frameworks of contemporary (queer) academia. Thus in this presentation, we will suggest to understand gayness as immutably fluid in order to investigate the onto-epistemological boundary work of contemporary (queer) academia and to explore the analytic potentials of gayness as a form of situated knowledges (Haraway 1988).

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf