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  • 1.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg; COWI AB, Gothenburg.
    Thorsson, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rayner, David
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Janhäll, Sara
    The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Moback, Ulf
    City of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Bergman, Ramona
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute (SGI), Gothenburg.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    An integrated method for assessing climate-related risks and adaptation alternatives in urban areas2015In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 7, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urban environment is a complex structure with interlinked social, ecological and technical structures. Global warming is expected to have a broad variety of impacts, which will add to the complexity. Climate changes will force adaptation, to reduce climate-related risks. Adaptation measures can address one aspect at the time, or aim for a holistic approach to avoid maladaptation. This paper presents a systematic, integrated approach for assessing alternatives for reducing the risks of heat waves, flooding and air pollution in urban settings, with the aim of reducing the risk of maladaptation. The study includes strategies covering different spatial scales, and both the current climate situation and the climate predicted under climate change scenarios. The adaptation strategies investigated included increasing vegetation; selecting density, height and colour of buildings; and retreat or resist (defend) against sea-level rise. Their effectiveness was assessed with regard to not only flooding, heat stress and air quality but also with regard to resource use, emissions to air (incl. GHG), soil and water, and people’s perceptions and vulnerability. The effectiveness of the strategies were ranked on a common scale (from -3 to 3) in an integrated assessment. Integrated assessments are recommended, as they help identify the most sustainable solutions, but to reduce the risk of maladaptation they require experts from a variety of disciplines. The most generally applicable recommendation, derived from the integrated assessment here, taking into account both expertise from different municipal departments, literature surveys, life cycle assessments and publics perceptions, is to increase the urban greenery, as it contributes to several positive aspects such as heat stress mitigation, air quality improvement, effective storm-water and flood-risk management, and it has several positive social impacts. The most favourable alternative was compact, mid-rise, light coloured building design with large parks/green areas and trees near buildings. © 2015 The Authors.

  • 2. Baja, Kristin
    et al.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    From engagement to empowerment: climate change and resilience planning in Baltimore City2018In: Local Action on Climate Change / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 126-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bröchner, Jan
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska universitet.
    Granberg, MikaelKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Klokare upphandling2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    et al.
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mård, Johanna
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Burchardt, Steffi
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Albin, Cecilia
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bondesson, Sara
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Breinl, Korbinian
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Deegan, Frances
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fuentes, Diana
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Girons Lopez, Marc
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Rydstedt Nyman, Monika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden.
    Rhodes, Emma
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Troll, Valentin
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Young, Stephanie
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walch, Colin
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden, Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden & Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    Parker, Charles F
    Centre of Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS), Sweden & Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An integrative research framework to unravel the interplay of natural hazards and vulnerabilities2018In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Kommunen - klimataktör med stor potential2010In: Sverige i nytt klimat - våtvarm utmaning / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2010, 1, p. 389-400Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Fridolfsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    FBOs and social exclusion in Sweden2009In: Faith-based organisations and social exclusion in European cities: national context reports / [ed] Danielle Dierckx, Jan Vranken, Wendy Kerstens, Leuven: Acco , 2009, p. 161-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    University of Melbourne.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Adaptation to climate change as ecological modernisation: Australian experience2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National policy approaches to adaptation to climate change in Australia are used to address a research inquiry into the political values of adaptation policies. This study examines whether this public policy response constitutes ecological modernisation and considers the implications. Ecological modernisation’s associations with neo-liberalism are reviewed and an account of key public policies is given. Particular attention is paid to maladaptation risks and the question of the possible influence of ecological modernisation in contributing to these risks. Key findings include that the Australian adaptation policy approach features ecological modernisation, that comprehensive-rational planning is used, and that ecological justice values are at risk

  • 8.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Climate change adaptation policy and political values2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and policy into climate change adaptation responses has expanded from the technological, financial and institutional realms into the social realms. There is a growing interest in, and awareness of, political aspects of adaptation policy and planning. This paper considers three aspects of this development and the broad issue of how contemporary political values influences adaptation responses. Firstly, a case is presented for identifying the political values in climate change adaptation policies, plans and programmes. Secondly, a range of political values and ideologies associated with public sector and NGO climate change adaptation measures are identified from contemporary scholarship. Thirdly, a number of implications of adaptation policy stemming from these political values are identified.

  • 9.
    Glover, Leigh
    et al.
    The University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Comparing Local Government Adaptation Responses to Climate Change in Australia and Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Alla talar om vädret: svenska kommuner, klimatförändringar och samverkan2006In: Kommunal ekonomi och politik, ISSN 1402-8700, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 9-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is one of the most challenging global issues today. Acknowledging no political or administrative borders it has to be tackled at all levels of society. This article focuses on how and to what degree Swedish municipalities cooperate with actors on different societal levels. How does politics, the levels of CO2 emissions and municipal resources affect the patterns of cooperation? The empirical material in this study is a survey conducted in the year 2005, a database with data from all Swedish municipalities, statistics from Statistics Sweden, the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. Among the conclusions are that the municipalities are involved in multilevel governance but mainly with other municipalities or other public actors. Politics and resources matter while CO2 emissions have less explanatory-power concerning the municipalities activities in co-operations addressing climate change. The state plays an important role in stimulating municipalities to address the issue of climate change.

  • 11.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Almost like government ...2009In: Urban Policy and Research, ISSN 0811-1146, E-ISSN 1476-7244, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 333-336Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Att gå i procession. Om nätverkspolitik och problemformulering2011In: Kommunforskning i Norden / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Förvaltningshögskolan , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Att gå i procession: om nätverkspolitik och problemformulering2011In: Nordisk kommunforskning: en forskningsöversikt med 113 projekt / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Förvaltningshögskolan , 2011, p. 249-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Case study Örebro: Transition pathways to low carbon futures2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Från lokal välfärdsstat till stadspolitik: politiska processer mellan demokrati och effektivitet: vision Mälarstaden och Östra hamnen i Västerås2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the thesis is to analyse the preconditions of contemporary Swedish city politics. The aim is reached through the answering of three questions; 1), what characterises contemporary Swedish city politics? 2), what contributes to the shaping and organisation of urban political processes in Sweden? 3), what problems and challenges are central to Swedish city politics?

    Based on interviews, documents and articles an empirical study of a Swedish city (Västerås) in its historical, national and international context is taken as a point of departure for reflections and conclusions with regard to the development of city politics and planning in Sweden. City politics in the studied city is analysed within the wider context of Swedish welfare state development and the international and global processes that have potential effects on national and city politics. The relationship between the historical development and urban politics is conceptualised by an approach where local actors act within structures that both constrain and enable action. Crucial concepts guiding the analysis are agenda, interests, representation, actors, democracy, planning, networks and legitimation.

    In conclusion the study shows how a specific urban process is influenced by courses of events at different societal levels, events that contribute to the formation of a contextual setting where the concrete actions are staged and played out. Global and international phenomena influence politics at the national level with consequences for the configuration of central-local relations and other preconditions of urban political processes. Urban politics occur within a framework that is favourable to the interests of some actors and negative to others. Thus, urban politics is deeply affected by extra-local determinants with substantial effects upon the urban environment. To survive and develop in a world ridden by such strong forces city politics faces the dual challenge of acting efficiently, i.e. being sensitive to the needs and demands of local elites, while keeping its democratic legitimacy, i.e. being sensitive to the needs and demands of all citizens.

  • 16.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Kommuner möter utmaningen från klimatförändring2011In: Nordisk kommunforskning: en forskningsöversikt med 113 projekt / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Förvaltningshögskolan , 2011, p. 277-279Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Local Governance 'in Swedish'?: Globalisation, Local Welfare Government and Beyond2008In: Local Government Studies, ISSN 0300-3930, E-ISSN 1743-9388, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 363-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article local governance in the Swedish context is discussed. A case study of a Swedish city is framed in its historical, national and international context. By locating the redevelopment of an old harbour within a historical context, new insights are brought into the understanding of local governance. Cities are indeed nested. Deteriorating public finances, the deregulation of the economy (nationally and globally), the changed status of the welfare state, the restructuring of industry and the neo-liberal wave all taken together form a formidable challenge. A radical questioning of the values,

    principles and forms of the Swedish welfare state has tangible impacts on local governance. It is concluded that Swedish municipal actors face the dual challenge of acting efficiently (being sensitive to the needs and demands of local elites), while keeping democratic legitimacy (being sensitive to the needs and demands of all citizens).

  • 18.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Local government, climate change and public-private interaction: The case or Örebro, Sweden2014In: Urbanization and Global Environmental Change - UGEC International Conference 2014: Contested agendas or aligned objectives? Intermediation and the role of non-state actors in the low carbon urban transition, Taipei: The Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change always manifests itself on the local arena and localities have to handle impacts of climate change. The policy and practice in the urban arena is central in relating global standards and knowledge, national and regional climate change scenarios/policies into particular action in specific contexts but also as a setting were new practices develop not necessarily related to top-down policies. Local governments’ responsibilities and climate change impacts intersect significantly with services for infrastructure and property services, planning and development, health and sanitation, community, building, facilities, culture, recreation facilities and water and sewerage.

    Local government in the city of Örebro (a city with 140 000 inhabitants in Sweden) is establishing windmill parks with the objective that local government will become self-sufficient. Local government does this through the creation of a company were private actors can buy shares and take part in the future development of the company and the local/regional energy market. The local government also runs a project were all public transport are running on biogas sourced from local feedstock. The aim is to facilitate a transition for households and business to biogas by creating and supporting a growing local/regional biogas market.

    In this paper we take a closer look at these policy practices. We will look at the political arguments and actual local government action in these two cases were the city´s local government interact with other societal actors (business and citizens) in efforts to create local/regional markets within two socio-technical systems (energy and transport). We will consider if this is a functional way to facilitate low carbon transitions within socio-technical systems. We will also consider how these endeavours is perceived by political actors (majority and opposition) and if any conflicting interests in the choice of the market pathway can be observed in political processes in the city.

  • 19.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Centrum för urbana och regionala studier, Örebro universitet.
    Politiska processer mellan demokrati och effektivitet2011In: Nordisk kommunforskning: en forskningsöversikt med 113 projekt / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Förvaltningshögskolan , 2011, p. 251-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Pressures, drivers and barriers for urban low carbon transitions2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Stadsplanering på entreprenad2005In: Spelet om staden / [ed] Gun Frank, Stockholm: Formas , 2005, p. 137-143Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Strong local government moving to the market? The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden2018In: Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City / [ed] Luque-Ayala, Andrés, Marvin, Simon och Bulkeley, Harriet, London: Routledge, 2018, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Strong local government moving to the market?: The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden2018In: Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City / [ed] Andrés Luque-Ayala, Simon Marvin and Harriet Bulkeley, Taylor & Francis, 2018, p. 129-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy and practice at the local level is central in relating global standards and knowledge, national and regional climate change scenarios and policy decisions into particular climate action in a specific context (Bulkeley and Betsill, 2003; Elander et al., 2003; Lundqvist and Biel, 2007; Storbjörk, 2007; Storbjörk, 2010; Castán Broto and Bulkeley, 2012; van den Berg and Coenen, 2012; Romero-Lankao, 2012; Bulkeley et al., 2015). This means that cities, and their local governments, are central to understanding the implementation of international agreements (regimes), national and regional climate change policy. It needs to be stressed, however, that local governments are not just implementers of policy decision taken at higher levels of government. Local governments can, and perhaps have to, be forerunners in climate change policy and practice, as the sources and impacts of climate change are always local, national policy and international negotiations are not always successful, and national governments are not necessarily taking the lead (Gore and Robinson, 2009; Bulkeley et al., 2015; Bulkeley and Betsill, 2003). Local government action on climate change takes place in a specific local setting. It also takes place in a policy environment characterized by cross-cutting issues and cross pressure from government actors on international, national and regional levels, unfolding public sector reform, continuous policy development, and demands from businesses and citizens (Granberg et al., 2016). Accordingly, why and how cities act on climate change challenges is by no means a straightforward matter (Bulkeley et al., 2015) but, certainly, one that warrants critical research. This chapter focuses on local government low carbon action within the field of alternative energy production, zooming in on the organizational modes and on intermediary functions and actors in efforts aiming at low carbon transitions (cf. Bulkeley and Betsill, 2013; Hodson et al., 2013). In the Swedish context, low carbon transitions are of course connected to the ecological need to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, mitigating future risks and impacts. But they are also increasingly connected to the more economic arguments connected to the concept of a carbon or fossil bubble (Schoenmaker et al., 2015; Rubin, 2015). That is, the idea that any investments made in fossil fuel-based companies are investments that will add to GHC emissions and, perhaps even more important from this perspective, fail to produce any long-term economic profits. According to this perspective, all viable investments need to be directed towards no-carbon solutions, businesses and markets or there will be serious negative economic impacts when the carbon bubble eventually bursts. The central questions of this chapter are how capacity-building for low carbon transitions evolves at the interface between state and market and what specific role local governments take in this interface. As already indicated above, this perspective is guided by the concept of intermediation through institutional experimentation (cf. Luque-Ayala et al., Chapter 2, this volume; also, Hodson and Marvin, 2009, 2012; Hodson et al., 2013). Intermediaries here are defined as entities that connect, translate and facilitate flows between different parties. The focus of the chapter is, more precisely, on systemic intermediation on a network level involving more than two parties (Hodson and Marvin, 2009). The intermediary role can be divided into facilitating, configuring and brokering (Stewart and Hyysalo, 2008). Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to study local government efforts to build low carbon capacity by describing, critically examining and analysing local government climate action. In the case studied here, we can see the local government organization intermediating indirectly by trying to facilitate flows of both experience and capital between public and private actors but also directly as a market actor through a boundary hybrid organization facilitating connections between local government and market actors. A hybrid organization (cf. Koppell, 2006) is an organization that mixes value systems and logics of various spheres such as the state and the market (cf. Erlingsson et al., 2014; Montin, 2016). More precisely, the local government uses a 'green' investment fund, facilitating public-private networking and a municipal company in their efforts to advance a low carbon transition. The case studied follows the development of local government climate change action over the last decade in the Swedish city of Örebro. The city profiles itself as a forerunner in environmental issues and has formulated ambitious reduction targets. Sweden is often considered a pioneer in environmental governance (Lidskog and Elander, 2012), combining high ambitions at a national level, strong local government and robust policy guided by ecological modernization (Lundqvist, 2000; Zannakis, 2015). It has been stated that if Sweden still holds on to a leading international position in environmental governance it is probably due to activities at the local level (Granberg and Elander, 2007; Uggla and Elander, 2009; Hjerpe et al., 2014). Accordingly, Sweden provides an interesting context for studies of local government climate change action via market mechanisms, given its combination of strong local government with high (national and local) environmental ambitions. Arguably, drawing from this, if Sweden is to be perceived as a 'least likely' case for utilizing market mechanisms due to its strong and resourceful local government (cf. Flyvbjerg, 2006), then local government action in Sweden becomes a critical case worthy of critical inquiry. In the sections that follow, this chapter elaborates aspects integral to the case studied. First, it briefiy presents the Swedish local government system and its development, highlighting the presence of strong local governments and their central role in the Swedish government system. This is followed by a presentation of Swedish policy development within the fields of climate change, energy generation and GHG mitigation, again highlighting the central role given to Swedish local government. The chapter ends with a set of conclusions aimed at an integrated analysis of the Swedish government system, national policy developments and the local component of the case study showing how these three components are, in fact, one integrated multilevel case. It is clear that the local government uses a form of institutional experimentation that mixes value systems and logics of both state and market in its strive to becoming a 'climate smart' city.

  • 24.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Uncertainty in decision making2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Urban transformations and policy responses2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban transformations and policy responses  

    Mikael Granberg

     

    We now have a rapidly growing global city system that is changing society. The economic and social settings are impacted and even ecology is changing as urban areas develop into new biospheres. The impact of this process is considerable and has far reaching consequences for the way society will develop in the future. Changes and challenges are channelled and mediated through societal structures and through the actions of a multitude of heterogeneous actors—formal and informal, top-down or bottom-up, individual or collective—in action and reaction to perceived changes in society. This means that the culture, lifestyles, design, economy, management and governing of cities is essential for world developments. The central issue is how societal actors in urban settings handle the impact of these changes (transformations) in a way that facilitates sustainable urban development?

    Society itself is a continuous process of action, decisions and effects where the actions of earlier generations have a considerable impact on contemporary developments and where contemporary action and decisions will impact future generations. Accordingly, we are talking about an ongoing historical conditioning of society. One aspect of this is path dependency. Path dependency occurs when incumbent structures, i.e., infrastructure or institutions (norms, routines and rules) guides (facilitates or delimits) behaviour. It is important to state, however, that the structuring always is temporary path dependency only temper continuous processes of change. Change in path dependent conditions take place through formative moments or windows opportunity and this refers to situations were historical and contemporary circumstances align in ways that make rapid change possible despite structural constraints. Changes in formative moment can be rapid and revolutionary. Formative moments can be driven by different types of crises (political, economical, technological, social and environmental) leading to paradigmatic shifts in society changing the preconditions for policy making and making more radical change possible.

    The urban setting can be perceived as a common. That is, a common pool of resource, challenges and problems that has to be owned and handled by the inhabitants of the city. Governance of commons requires a flexible system for policy making that includes interactive and adaptive steering, including social and policy learning. Flexible policy making demands a positive feedback loop that creates order out of our experience and storing these experiences as knowledge. Proactive and flexible policymaking is not about finding the right policy for the future to come. The focus must be on flexible and proactive policy making that is formulated at scales appropriate for decision makers and citizens. This is a more systemic perspective on policy that concerns itself more with who interacts with whom, about what, rather than targeting specific, well-defined outcomes as policy goals. From this perspective policy is perceived as a process. With this perspective on policy follows that a multitude of agents can act as policy-makers, not just government agencies, but also firms and industry associations, NGOs and private foundations. Uncertainty connected to social development encourages viewing policy as an on-going exploration with many possible changes of direction rather than an optimization exercise based upon detailed assumptions about the lay of the land ahead and a clear and explicit goal about where the journey is to end. One issue is, of course, if the incumbent policy system will be able to adapt to accommodate flexible policy processes or if path dependency will hinder or considerably slow down such development?

  • 26.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Urban Transitions and Flexible Policy Making2012In: Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, 26-28 september, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We now have a rapidly growing global city system that is changing society. The impact of this process is considerable and has far reaching consequences for global sustainable development. These transitions occur as a result of the complexities, uncertainties and challenges confronting society. Urban transitions are both evolutionary – incremental changes to societal structures and the environment – and revolutionary – rapid changes to societal structures and the environment. Urban transitions are about broad societal change that is the intentional and unintentional result of historical or contemporary decisions. This means that transitions are channelled and mediated through societal structures and through the actions of a multitude of heterogeneous actors—formal and informal, top-down or bottom-up, individual or collective—in action and reaction to perceived changes in society. Urban transitions are a vital global issue as more than half of the world population lives in urban areas today, and, at the same time global economy, cultures and politics becomes increasingly urban.

    Modern society has constructed forms for handling collective problems and this has taken the form of departmentalisation within the framework of the welfare state, as well as in the highly specialised business sector. These departments and branches are to a great extent geared to face identified challenges to society and consist of trained experts. Problems suitable for handling by such existing –‘prefabricated’ – departments are sometimes called ‘tame’ problems, which refer to problems that enjoy relative consensus in society on both problem definition and solution. Society faces issues characterized by fragmentation of perspectives, understanding, knowledge and interests, or when the issue at stake is given different priority by the involved actors. Complex problems that do not fit neatly into predefined policy areas and regulatory arrangements provide an opening for innovations and solutions that can break free from constraining structures.

    Uncertainty encourages viewing policy as an ongoing exploration with many possible adjustments, rather than an exercise based upon detailed assumptions and one singular image of the future to come. This requires research and reflection on social learning and institutional innovation as well as development of new modes of communication between different actors, scales and areas of expertise in the urban setting. The kingpin for handling uncertainty is an improved communication between actors leading to an increased social learning. This social learning must aim at a more common understanding of problems facing society, and take place between experts, businesses, individuals, NGOs and politicians.

    An elaborated and commonly shared understanding of the policy ‘playing field’ will bring actors from different spheres of society together and help to solve collective issues. A strong focus on social learning further call for flexible policy making that demands a positive feedback loop which may create order and efficient knowledge out of various experiences. Proactive policymaking is not about finding the one right policy for the future, but the focus must be on a flexible policy making at proper scales for both democracy and efficiency concerns. This is a more systemic perspective on policy, more concerned with who interacts with whom, about what, rather than targeting specific, well-defined outcomes as policy goals. With this perspective on policy as an ongoing process follows that a multitude of agents act as policy-makers, not just government agencies, but also firms and industry associations, NGOs and private foundations.

    Capacity to act is at the core of handling urban transitions. Capacity to act is built upon the ability to pool resources from different actors in society creating a system for efficient problem solving. How may society build the capacity to be more proactive and mitigate perceived future problems already today? How do society create authority (legitimate decision making) to handle ‘abrasive’ policy problem that can entail sacrifices by both elites and ordinary citizens?

  • 27.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Bodland, Tove
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Klimatanpassning och samhällets resiliens: Ett svenskt perspektiv2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport utgör en delrapportering inom projektet ”Samhällsresiliens i Sverige: Styrning, Sociala nätverk och lärande” finansierat av Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) och koordinerat av Risk and crisis research centre (RCR) vid Mittuniversitetet. Syftet med rapporten är att skapa förståelse för relationen mellan begreppen klimatanpassning och resiliens samt att ge en bild av hur det lokala klimatanpassningsarbetet hanteras i svenska kommuner (primärt i samhällsplaneringen) ur ett resiliensperspektiv. Denna text är en av fem inom forskningsprojektet där de andra fyra fokuserar på begreppen resiliens, community och ”community resilience”; resiliens i praktiken; flyktingskap och migration; samt terrorism och våldsbejakande extremism utifrån ett resiliensperspektiv.

  • 28.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Bosomworth, Karyn
    The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Melbourne, Australia.
    Moloney, Susie
    The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Melbourne, Australia.
    Kristianssen, Ann-Catrin
    Örebro universitet.
    Fünfgeld, Hartmut
    The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Melbourne, Australia.
    Can Regional-Scale Governance and Planning Support Transformative Adaptation?: A Study of Two Places2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 24, p. 1-17, article id 6978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea that climate change adaptation is best leveraged at the local scale is a well-institutionalized script in both research and formal governance. This idea is based on the argument that the local scale is where climate change impacts are “felt” and experienced. However, sustainable and just climate futures require transformations in systems, norms, and cultures that underpin and reinforce our unsustainable practices and development pathways, not just “local” action. Governance interventions are needed to catalyse such shifts, connecting multilevel and multiscale boundaries of knowledge, values, levels and organizational remits. We critically reflect on current adaptation governance processes in Victoria, Australia and the Gothenburg region, Sweden to explore whether regional-scale governance can provide just as important leverage for adaptation as local governance, by identifying and addressing intersecting gaps and challenges in adaptation at local levels. We suggest that regional-scale adaptation oers possibilities for transformative change because they can identify, connect, and amplify small-scale (local) wins and utilize this collective body of knowledge to challenge and advocate for unblocking stagnated, institutionalized policies and practices, and support transformative change.

  • 29.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Local governance and climate change: reflections on the Swedish experience2007In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 537-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is the Swedish experience of local governance and climate change, including mitigation and adaptation. The municipal response to these two challenges is set within a broader policy context that acknowledges Sweden as a pioneer in environmental governance, including its comparatively high ambitions with regard to the reduction of greenhouse ga emissions. Central–local relations in climate policy are analysed, and climate change mitigation and adaptation are exemplified by some snapshots of municipal initiatives, including the popular habit of networking between municipalities within as well as across national borders. In conclusion we briefly evaluate the Swedish local governance experience of climate change mitigation and adaptation to date as characterized by radical rhetoric and ambitious goals combined with a lot of promising initiatives, although still with fairly modest results in terms of tangible outcomes. Finally, we reflect upon what we consider to be the most important questions for future research on local governance and climate change.

  • 30.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Glover, Leigh
    Australasian Centre for the Governance and Management of Urban Transport (GAMUT), Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Adaptation and Maladaptation in Australian National Climate Change Policy2014In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, ISSN 1523-908X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines Australia's national policies for adapting to climate change impacts. Recent developments in research funding, institutional capacities and extreme events have resulted in a greater interest and level of activity in adaptation policy. Based on a historical review of national policy, adaptation policy is considered within a political frame and political values, especially the values of neoliberalism, within adaptation policy are identified. Of interest are the implications of these values for the outcomes of adaptation policy, with attention given to the problem of maladaptation.

  • 31.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Adapting Australian cities to climate change: is there a growing risk of maladaptation?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose that public climate change adaptation policy arises frompolitics and, accordingly, understanding and analysing such policy has to engagescholars with a keen interest in politics. In line with this proposition a distinguishingfeature in this paper is that it seeks to consider adaptation policy for cities in a politicalcontext. This paper aims to review issues associated with the public policy response toclimate change adaptation in Australian cities and consider whether the approachadopted by the federal government increases the risks of maladaptation.

  • 32.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Glover, Leigh
    Adapting Australien Cities to Climate Change: Is There a Growing Risk of Maladaptation?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Climate change adaptation and the regional mess2013In: Workshop of climate change policy arranged by the network Social and Political Studies on Climate Change (SPSCC), 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus in this paper is on policy and implementation of adaptation policies. The interest in adaptation policy in this text concerns the public policy dimension and not spontaneous social adaptations to changing climate or that undertaken independently by corporations or communities. The focus is on public policy and implementation that are planned, purposeful and intentional. The main issue in this text is how Swedish governance of climate change adaptation is organised and if this type of organising (or lack or organising) can lead to difficulties in reaching long term sustainable adaptation measures or even maladaptation at the local level?

  • 34.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Climate Change Adaptation Policy and Practice: The Swedish Experience2012In: XXI Nordic Municipal Research Conference (NORKOM), Oslo University, Norway, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a complicated social problem. Formulating and implementing adaptation measures at the local level entails handling value conflicts, power relations, governance, equity, resource allocation, competing interests and, connected to all these issues and more, uncertainty. All this takes place in a complex context where a multitude of factors, and actors representing different societal interests, are interacting both facilitating and hindering effective action and involves changes in modes of operation in society as a whole.

    Adaptation range from the local to the large, its time horizon can range from the short to the long terms, it can be tactical or strategic, it can seek immediate, delayed, or cumulative effects, and it can encompass widely differing outcomes.

    Accordingly, formulating adaptation responses is a challenging issue for municipalities for a number of reasons. Firstly, the large range of possible climate change impacts. Secondly, the insufficient knowledge base. Thirdly, the lack of consensus on responsibilities. Fourthly, the usual set of problems facing public policy of this sort. In this paper we will focus adaptation measures implemented by Swedish municipalities. The empirical material consists of studies from state authorities of municipal adaptation to climate change.

  • 35.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Glover, Leigh
    University of Melbourne.
    Trusting invisible hands?: Climate change, political institutions and the market2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Larsson, Stig
    Dealing with uncertainty: a case study of controlling insect populations in natural ecosystems2008In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 641-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the political process for handling an outbreak of an insect causing human allergic reactions. In the southern part of the Swedish island Gotland in the Baltic Sea, an outbreak of the northern pine processionary moth, Thaumetopoea pinivora,

    has occurred. With regard to the human nuisance and long-term effects on the tourist industry, demands have been raised for intervention to reduce and control the insect population. At the same time, there have been warnings against treating the insect

    population because there are knowledge gaps concerning the wider ecological consequences, including effects on biodiversity. This paper analyses the political process and its problemsolving

    efforts. Of particular interest is how it dealt with the issue of uncertainty. It was found that the uncertainty associated with the issue hindered the development of a shared understanding of the problem and a possible solution. There seems to be a growing need in society to develop the institutional capacity to handle complex issues that cross different sectors, regulatory frameworks and policy targets.

  • 37.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Moloney, Susie
    Fünfgeld, Hartmut
    Climate change and the emergence of networked governance in Sweden and Australia2015In: The Tipping Point: Vulnerability and Adaptive Capacity: Proceedings of the 21st Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference Deakin University, Geelong, 10-12 July 2015 / [ed] Yamini Narayanan, Lambert Bräu, Pauline Deutz, Geelong, Australia: Deakin University , 2015, p. 64-73Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Montin, Stig
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Modern Municipalities. Notion and ideas guiding the development of Swedish municipalities2014In: European Consortium for Political Reseach (ECPR) General Conference: Section: Contemporary Local Self-Governance and Democracy – Challenges and Responses, Panel: Institutional Reform in Local Government,, Glasgow: Glasgow University , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the development of Swedish municipalities as we trace the origin of the modern municipality to the late 19th century to today with a special focus on the last 40-50 years of development. With this as a background, and related to the research literature, we develop four different theoretical perspectives (ideal types): (1), The municipality as community: focusing on common interests and challenges in the local social and political order. (2), The state integrated municipality: focusing on the implementation of national welfare functions, the role of the municipality and the steering and control efforts of the nation-state. (3), The facilitating municipality: focusing on mobilization and integration of different types of resources across borders within the public sector and between public and private institutions. (4), The market oriented municipality: focusing on freedom of choice reform and that public activities should be put on the market according to the belief that competition is the most important motor of public economy. The different theoretical perspectives, it is argued, catches notion and ideas guiding the development of local politics and democracy. Experiences from reforms, which are related to these ideas, are presented. The overall questions raised are what ideas are empirically represented in different policy fields? The paper concludes by discussing two examples of contemporary policy fields in the light of the four theoretical perspectives.

  • 39.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Montin, Stig
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Modern Municipalities: The Changing Role of Local Government and Local Democracy in Sweden2014In: NOPSA 2014, XVII Nordic Political Science Congress: Kommunale reformer og organisatorisk tilpasninger – utfordringer for lokalpolitikken, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the development of Swedish municipalities – we trace the origin of the modern municipality to the late 19th century to today with a special focus on the last 40-50 years of development – through four different theoretical lenses (ideal types): (1), The municipality as a common (communitarian) that focuses on common interests and challenges in the local social and political order. (2), The state integrated municipality that focuses on the implementation of national welfare functions, the role of the municipality and the steering and control efforts of the nation-state. (3), The market oriented municipality that focuses freedom of choice reform and that public activities should be put on the market according to the belief that competition is the most important motor of public economy. (4), The coordinating and facilitating municipality that focuses on how to mobilize and integrate different types of resources across borders within the public sector and between public and private institutions. By using the different theoretical perspectives it is shown that the development of local politics and democracy is driven by different ideas. Experiences from reforms, which are related to these ideas, are presented. The article concludes by pointing out some important challenges and potential pathways for future development of local democracy in Sweden.

  • 40.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, CNDS, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Climate change adaptation, city competitiveness and urban planning in the city of Karlstad, Sweden2018In: Local Action on Climate Change / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 111-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Modh, Lars-Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Understanding the local policy context of risk management: Competitiveness and adaptation to climate risks in the city of Karlstad, Sweden2016In: Risk Management: An International Journal, ISSN 1460-3799, E-ISSN 1743-4637, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 26-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand the situation of climate risk management we need to understand the priorities and politics of the wider policy context. The framing of potentially incompatible policy issues is important to take into account when analysing policy processes. In this article, we focus on two policy issues aiming at local adaptation to global forces: facilitating city competiveness and adapting to the impacts of global climate change. Global climate change always manifests itself in the local arena, which thus becomes a crucial site for adaptation to the risks connected to climate change. Adaptation has to correspond with the city policy agenda to build the attractive city through waterfront housing as a means to strengthen its competitiveness in a globalised economy. This article focuses on the relationship between pursuing competitiveness through waterfront housing and the needs to adapt to climate change in terms of contemporary and future flood risks.

  • 42.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Civic participation and interactive decision-making: a case study2010In: New forms of citizen participation: Normative implications / [ed] Erik Amnå, Baden-Baden: Nomos , 2010, 1, p. 53-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Deltagandets dilemman: erfarenheter från stadsomvandling Södra Älvstranden2007In: Kommunal ekonomi och politik, ISSN 1402-8700, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 25-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro universitet.
    From Citizen Participation to Interactive Decision-making?: A case study of Urban Renewal2010In: New forms of participation: Normative implications / [ed] Erik Amnå, Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Medborgarnas deltagande i stadsplaneringen och effekter av ny teknik2011In: Nordisk kommunforskning: en forskningsöversikt med 113 projekt / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Förvaltningshögskolan , 2011, p. 332-333Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Granberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Planners support of e-participation in the field of urban planning2010In: Handbook of research on e-planning: ICTs for urban development and monitoring / [ed] Carlos Nunes Silva, Hershey-New York: IGI Global , 2010, p. 237-251Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Mobjörk, Malin
    et al.
    SIPRI.
    Berglund, Camilla
    Örebro universitet.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Uppsala universitet; Försvarshögskolan.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå universitet.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013). Uppsala universitet; Försvarshögskolan.
    Evers, Mariele
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Facilitating Doctoral Education in Cross-disciplinary Milieus: Experiences from PhD-candidates2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-disciplinarity shapes much research today and many PhD candidates areengaged in this research. The doctoral education is a formative phase in a scientist’sintellectual development. Despite a large body of research about cross-disciplinarity,less attention has focused on how cross-disciplinarity shapes doctoral education.This report explores the organisation of doctoral education in four cross-disciplinaryresearch milieus and the experiences of 14 PhD candidates enrolled in these milieus.One key finding is that PhD candidates are more comfortable when their educationhas involved meta-communication about conceptual approaches and experiencesof conducting cross-disciplinary research. This calls for research milieus’ providingdoctoral education in cross-disciplinary settings to take a deliberative approach.This will both benefit the PhD candidates and the research milieus, and is centralin the socialisation process of the next cadre of researchers and for the future ofcross-disciplinary research.

  • 48. Moloney, Susie
    et al.
    Fünfgeld, Hartmut
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Climate change responses from the global to local scale: an overview2018In: Local action on climate change: opprtunities and constraints / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49. Moloney, Susie
    et al.
    Fünfgeld, HartmutGranberg, MikaelKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Moloney, Susie
    et al.
    The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Melbourne, Australia.
    Fünfgeld, Hartmut
    The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), Melbourne, Australia.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Towards transformative action: learning from local experiences and contexts2018In: Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 146-156-Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 63
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