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  • 1.
    Biswas, Priti
    et al.
    University of East Anglia.
    Kabir, Zarina Nahar
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Zaman, Shahaduz
    BRAC.
    Dynamics of Health Care Seeking Behaviourof Elderly People in Rural Bangladesh2006In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 69-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bangladesh is projected to experience a doubling of its elderly populationfrom the current level of 7 million to 14 million by the end of the nextdecade. Drawing upon qualitative evidence from rural Bangladesh, thisarticle focuses on coping strategies in cases of illness of elderly peopleand the contributing factors in determining the health-seeking behaviourof elderly persons. The sample for this study consisted of elderly menand women aged 60 years or older and their caregivers. Nine focus groupdiscussions and 30 in-depth interviews were conducted. Findingsindicate that old age and ill-health are perceived to be inseparableentities. Seeking health care from a formally qualified doctor is avoideddue to high costs. Familiarity and accessibility of health care providersplay important roles in health-seeking behaviour of elderly persons.Flexibility of health care providers in receiving payment is a crucialdeciding factor of whether or not to seek treatment, and even the type oftreatment sought.

  • 2.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Jan, Nilsson
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lillemor, Lindwall
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

  • 3. Castren, M.
    et al.
    Makinen, M.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindström, V.
    The effects of interprofessional education - Self-reported professional competence among prehospital emergency care nursing students on the point of graduation - A cross-sectional study2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) during the educational program had an impact on prehospital emergency care nurses' (PECN) self-reported competence towards the end of the study program. A cross-sectional study using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale was conducted. A comparison was made between PECN students from Finland who experienced IPE and IPC in the clinical setting, and PECN students from Sweden with no IPE and a low level of IPC. Forty-one students participated (Finnish n = 19, Swedish n = 22). The self-reported competence was higher among the Swedish students. A statistically significant difference was found in one competence area; legislation in nursing and safety planning (p < 0.01). The Finnish students scored significantly higher on items related to interprofessional teamwork. Both the Swedish and Finnish students' self-reported professional competence was relatively low according to the NPC Scale. Increasing IPC and IPE in combination with offering a higher academic degree may be an option when developing the ambulance service and the study program for PECNs. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Gardulf, Ann
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Immunol,Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalama Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Clin Diabetol & Metab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lepp, Margret
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Ostfold Univ Coll, Holden, Norway..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Hedmark Univ Coll, Hedmark, Norway..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Dept Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients. Objectives: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors. Methods and participants; The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1[20-56] years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated. Results: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27 years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (932% vs 875% of NSPGs). Summary and conclusion: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Lewen, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Gardulf, Ann
    The Red Cross University College.
    Nilsson, Jan
    The Red Cross University College and Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Documented assessments and treatments of patients seeking emergency care because of pain.2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 4, p. 764-771Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Are nurses´ competence utilized within the world-wide Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement?: A 30-year follow-up focusing on nursing activities relating to ethics, disasters and community health.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences from the Linnaeus-Palme Exchange Program.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nurse competence and its contribution to safe and high-quality patient care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract for workshop

    Background: The International Council of Nurses states that 90 % of all health-care services worldwide is delivered by nurses. In 2005 the Swedish National Board for Health and Welfare developed competence requirements for registered nurses, thereby describing the views and recommendations of the Swedish government and society with respect to nurses’ expected knowledge and skills. The competence requirements, which are in line with the Munich Declaration (2000), have the goal to contribute to safe and high-quality patient care. In order to assess the outcome of the competence requirement, a tool has been developed and validated by the Swedish Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) research project group. The tool is used for measuring self-reported competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses.

    Aim/goal: To present studies conducted by the research group with focus on the use of  the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale and its potential use in research and quality improvement in nursing education and nursing practice in Sweden as well as in Europe.

    Procedure: In this workshop the research group will present several studies and invite to explore and discuss its further applicability in the European context with aspects of professional nurse competence such as; (1) the establishment and use of the NPC Scale, (2) the current self-reported competence level among nurse students at 50% of the higher education institutions in Sweden, (3) the outcome of internationalization in nursing education among registered nurses and their self reported competence, (4) the level of self-reported disaster nursing competence among nurse students and graduated nurses, (5) the effect of educational interventions on nurse students self-reported competence.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Florin, Jan
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Lepp, Margret
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Nursing in a globalized world: Nursing students with international study experience report higher competence at graduation2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, no 4, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to globalization, there is a need for nurses with skills and competence in providing safe, competent and culturally appropriate care. The aim of the study was to investigate whether International Study Experiences (ISE) in other countries during basic nursing education had an impact on newly graduated nurses as regards to self-reported competence. Moreover, a second aim was to explore what background factors that facilitated or constituted a hindrance for nursing students to choose to conduct part of their basic nursing education abroad. At 11 Universities/University Colleges (henceforth called Higher Education Institutions [HEIs]) in Sweden, 565 nursing students responded to the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale. Students with ISE rated their competence significantly higher on three NPC competence areas; “Legislation in nursing and safety planning”, “Leadership and development of nursing” and “Education and supervision of staff/students”. Background factors that significantly seemed to enhance ISE were; living alone, not having children or other commitments, international focus at the HEI and previous international experience. Lack of financial means was reported to prevent students from choosing ISE. The study implies that several background factors are of importance whether students choose ISE or not. ISE during basic nursing education might result in better self-reported competence in leading and developing nursing care, including education of future nurses, and in providing safe care.

  • 10.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Stockholm University; Japanese red cross institute for humanitarian studies, Japan.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle; Uppsala University.
    Florin, Jan
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet; Japanese red cross institute for humanitarian studies, Japan.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University; Gävle University.
    A short version of the nurse professional competence scale for measuring nurses' self-reported competence2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 71, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale with 88-items has been used to measure self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses in many national and international nursing research projects. However, a shorter version of the scale with maintained quality has been requested to further enhance its usability.

    Objectives

    To develop and evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a shorter version of the NPC Scale.

    Design

    A developmental and methodological design.

    Participants and Settings

    The study was based on a sample of 1810 nursing students at the point of graduation from 12 universities in Sweden.

    Methods

    The number of items in the original NPC Scale was reduced using several established research steps and then evaluated for data quality and construct validity using principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was measured as internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha.

    Results

    The extensive process of reducing the number of items resulted in a version with 35 items. Principal component analysis resulted in six factors explaining 53.6% of the variance: “Nursing Care”, “Value-based Nursing Care”, “Medical and Technical Care”, “Care Pedagogics”, “Documentation and Administration of Nursing Care”, and “Development, Leadership, and Organization of Nursing Care”. All factors showed Cronbach's alpha values of >0.70. The confirmative factor analysis goodness-of-fit indexes were for root mean square error of approximation 0.05 and for comparative fit index 0.89.

    Conclusions

    The NPC Scale Short Form (NPC Scale-SF) 35-items revealed promising results with a six-factor structure explaining 53.6% of the total variance. This 35-item scale can be an asset when used alone and together with other instruments it can provide the possibility of more complex analyses of self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Higashiura, Hiroshi
    THE JAPANESE RED CROSS COLLEGE OF NURSING, HEAD OF THE JAPANESE RED CROSS INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITARIAN STUDIES,.
    A 30 year follow-up on red cross and red crescent nursing educations and activites responding to local and global vulnerability and disasters2012In: Conference book of abstracts. Nursing History in a Global Perspective, International Nursing History Conference in Denmark,, Denmark, 2012, p. 70-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: From its very inception in 1863, the Red Cross and Red Crescent (RCRC) Movement has worked towards assisting vulnerable people, and as long as the nursing profession has existed, nurses have been ready to respond to public health threats. The main aim of the current research project was to perform a 30-year follow-up to investigate to what extent nurses’ competences are utilized within the RCRC 186 National Societies and to identify Societies running nursing education programmes, including identification of education in nursing disaster preparedness and response. Methods: The questionnaire from 1979 was slightly adapted to reflect the current global health situation and sent to all 186 National Societies. The questionnaire was translated into all four of the International Federation’s official languages. After two reminders, 84/186 replies were received,giving a response rate of 45.2%. Among the 79 National Societies that responded to the 1979 survey, 43 (54.4%) responded to the 2009 survey.ResultsThe results showed that nurses’ competence was regarded as important by a majority (76%) of the National Societies. More than 50% of the National Societies considered nurses’ competence to be specifically important for the International Federation’s working areas, which includes ethics, pandemic/disaste,r preparedness/response and health and care in the community. However, 12% of the National Societies did not consider nurses’ competence important in achieving their national mission. Moreover, we found that there is approximately the same number of RCRC nursing education institutions throughout the world today, as compared with 30 years ago. However, at some institutions a higher level of education (up to PhD) is now offered. Some of the educational institutions are old, starting the nursing education in the mid 19th century, and already from this time with focus on nurses’ help in wars and disasters. Discussion and conclusionThe RCRC Movement is 150 years old and has through history gained a wealth of knowledge and experience of disaster preparedness and response. Most National Societies considered that nursesare important in responding to humanitarian needs and health threats in the community. However, a further utilization of nurses’ competence should be considered as one vehicle to reach the goalsset by national and international organizations to reach quality and access to health, especially among marginalized groups affected by wars and disasters.

  • 12. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Grafström, Margareta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Zaman, Shahaduz
    Research and Evaluation Division, BRAC.
    Nahar Kabir, Zarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Role and function: Aspects of quality of life of older peoplein rural Bangladesh2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, no 19, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the meaning of quality of life (QoL) for elderly people in a rural communityin Bangladesh. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews with 11 elderly persons aged 63–86 years.Interview data were analysed using content analysis to determine the conceptual meaning of elderly peoples’experiences of QoL. Two major themes emerged from the data as being of utmost importance in QoL of elderlypeople in rural Bangladesh. These were: (i) having a role in the family and the community and (ii) beingfunctional, both physically and economically. Results also showed that elderly people in rural Bangladeshprioritise being healthy, having a good social network, social support and a secure financial situation in order tohave good QoL. This study is a step towards a better understanding of QoL experienced by the elderly peoplethemselves in a rural Bangladeshi context.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Higashiura, Hiroshi
    THE JAPANESE RED CROSS COLLEGE OF NURSING, HEAD OF THE JAPANESE RED CROSS INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITARIAN STUDIES,.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    The development of nursing within the red cross and redcrescent movement from 1890 to 20112012In: Conference book of abstract: International nursing history conference in Denmark, Denmark, 2012, p. 68-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In 1859, Henri Dunant from Switzerland, witnessed the battle in Solferino and the suffering amongthe soldiers. In 1863 the ”International Committee for Relief to the Wounded” held its first meeting.It later became the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Henry Dunant suggestedcreating national relief societies, recognizable by the common emblem, and an international treatyto protect the wounded on the battlefield. Shortly thereafter states responded by establishingnursing schools educating Red Cross/Red Crescent (RCRC) nurses. Methods: The historical data on RCRC nursing education derives mainly from two of our research projects; i)the 2009 international questionnaire-survey of nursing activities within the InternationalFederation of the RCRC 186 Societies, and ii) an on-going study where a questionnaire has beensent to RCRC nursing education institution in 30 countries from Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle Eastand South America. Results: Already during the late 19th century, Japan and Sweden as pioneer countries commenced RCRCnursing education, as a response to the humanitarian needs forced by wars and disasters. Later onin 1919, the International Federation of the RCRC established a Nursing Division at the headquarterin Geneva to support and guide its member societies in nursing related issues. In 1947 theNursing Division was reorganized as a respond to the situation after the Second World War and called Nursing and Social Service Bureau. In 1984 the Nursing Bureau was dissolved and nursing issues organized within the Health and Care Department. However, this reorganization did not support a focus on nursing issues including nursing education for the years to come. As a result the Red Cross Nursing Education institutions in Japan and Sweden invited RCRC nursing institutions from all over the world to set up a new Global RCRC Nursing Education network for educational issues with focus on disaster preparedness and response. This new and unique network was launched in connection to the ICN International Nursing Conference in 2011. Discussion and conclusion: Nursing education within the RCRC Movement has over time been responsive to local and globalvulnerability. Countries affected by unrest and disaster and with weak health systems couldbenefit from the experience of nursing education within the RCRC Movement and the newlycreated Global RCRC Nursing Network can be seen as a vehicle of such knowledge.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Higashiura, HiroshiI
    THE JAPANESE RED CROSS COLLEGE OF NURSING, HEAD OF THE JAPANESE RED CROSS INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITARIAN STUDIES,.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Disaster response network. Nurses’ competence within the redcross and red crescent: disaster preparedness and response2012In: Conference book of abstract, Denmark, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nursing education within the Red Cross/Red Crescent (RCRC) Movement was initiated already in the late 19th century as a response to situations of war and disasters. In a previous study we have shown that more than 50% of the RCRC National Societies consider nurses competence to be important for disasterpreparedness and disaster response. The aim of the current research project was to conduct a globalbase-line survey of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Nursing Education Institutions.MethodsThe data derives from an on-going study where a questionnaire has been sent to the existing RCRCNursing Education Institution in 30 countries from Africa, Asia, Europe, Middle East and South America.The survey includes questions in the following areas: History of Nursing Education, Administration ofNursing Education, Partnership and Cooperation.Results and conclusionsPreliminary results indicate that RCRC Nursing Education Institutions have a very long tradition andknowledge in teaching disaster preparedness and response, as they over time have emerged and developed in relation to disasters and armed conflicts. Nurses within the RCRC movement get unique experiences through their work as international delegates in disaster prone areas/armed conflicts. Among the Nursing Education Institutions, the Japanese Red Cross Nursing Schools stands out in terms of giving significantly more education in national as well as international disaster preparedness and response. Although some countries are performing on a relatively high level in providing education indisaster nursing, there is room for improvement. Belonging to the unique global network of National Societies, Nursing Education Institutions should focus more on education in  international disasterpreparedness and response to be ready to support each other in terms of catastrophic events.

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nursing, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, SE-75105 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, SE-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79131 Falun, Sweden..
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, SE-79131 Falun, Sweden..
    Lepp, Margret
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Ostfold Univ Coll, Halden, Norway..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Japanese Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res Immunotherapy, Div Clin Immunol,Dept Lab Med, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

  • 16.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska institutet.
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    Röda korsets sjuksköterskeskola.
    Florin, Jan
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Lepp, Margret
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Development and validation of a new tool measuring nursesself-reported professional competence—The nurse professionalcompetence (NPC) Scale2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 2014, no 34, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competenceamong both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formalcompetence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHOguidelines.Design: A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometricproperties.Participants and settings: 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges.Results: The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88items and covering eight factors: “Nursing care”, “Value-based nursing care”, “Medical/technical care”, “Teaching/learning and support”, “Documentation and information technology”, “Legislation in nursing and safetyplanning”, “Leadership in and development of nursing care” and “Education and supervision of staff/students”.All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted intwo main themes: “Patient-related nursing” and “Nursing care organisation and development”. In addition,evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained.

  • 17.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Masud Rana, AKM
    Huy Loung, Duong
    Winblad, Bengt
    Nahar Kabir, Zarina
    Health-Related Quality of Life in Old Age: A Comparison Between Rural Areas in Bangladesh and Vietnam2012In: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1010-5395, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 610-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its determinants among older people (≥60 years) in rural Bangladesh and Vietnam. Cross-sectional studies among older people were conducted in Bangladesh (n = 1031) and Vietnam (n = 870). Data on HRQoL were collected using an instrument that includes 24 items distributed into 6 dimensions. Older people in Vietnam reported more favorable HRQoL outcomes than those in Bangladesh, reporting better HRQoL on physical, psychological, social, and financial dimensions. Hierarchical linear regression analyses show that advanced age, being a woman, belonging to a poor household, and reporting poor health were significantly associated with lower HRQoL scores in both Bangladesh and Vietnam. In Bangladesh, being illiterate was additionally associated with lower HRQoL scores. The results of this explorative study underline the importance of a cross-cultural understanding of HRQoL of older people and the influence of the socioecological context.

  • 18. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Parker, Marty
    Karolinska Ins.
    Kabir, Zarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Assessing Health-Related Quality of Life among Older People in Rural Bangladesh2004In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 298-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he purpose of this study was to review instruments of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) to identify an instrument appropriate for elderly people in rural Bangladesh. In addition, it hypothesizes that it is important to include physical, psychological, social, spiritual, economic, and environmental dimensions when assessing HRQoL in this group. Sixteen generic instruments found through PubMed were reviewed with regard to content and construct. None of the reviewed instruments fully met the criteria required in the intended context. In-depth interviews were conducted with 11 elderly people in rural Bangladesh to explore the dimensions of HRQoL they considered important. Content analysis of the interview transcripts supported the hypothesis that all six dimensions were important. Suggestions for a new HRQoL instrument appropriate for elderly people in rural Bangladesh are presented.

  • 19. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Rana, Masud
    Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee.
    Kabir, Zarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Social Capital and Qualityof Life in Old Age2006In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 419-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to identify determinants of quality of life (QoL) andinvestigate their association with individual- and community-level social capitalamong older people in rural Bangladesh.Across-sectional study of 1,135 elderly persons(aged ≥ 60 years) was conducted in a rural district in Bangladesh. Independentvariables included age, sex, education, economic status of the elderly person, andindividual- and community-level social capital. Self-rated QoL was the dependentvariable. Descriptive analyses were done to showgroup differences in QoL and logisticregression analyses to identify determinants of QoL. Advanced age, poor householdeconomic status, and lowsocial capital at individual and community levels weresignificant determinants of poor QoL among the elderly. This population-based studyprovided empirical evidence that social capital both at individual and community levelswas directly associated with the QoL of elderly people in rural Bangladesh.

  • 20.
    Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Hedmark Univ Coll, Dept Nursing & Mental Hlth, Fac Publ Hlth, Hedmark, Norway..
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Gavle, Sweden..
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res Immunotherapy,Di, Stockholm, Sweden.;Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Unit Clin Nursing Res & Clin Res Immunotherapy,Di, Stockholm, Sweden.;Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Japan Red Cross Inst Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan..
    Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. Objectives: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. Setting: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. Participants: In total, 119 (2011 n = 69, 2014 n = 50) nursing students responded. Methods: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students- both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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