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  • 1.
    Bergersen, Emily Beatrice
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lovgren, Malin
    Marie Cederschiöld University.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Adolescents' and young people's needs and preferences for support when living with a parent with life-threatening cancer: a grounded theory study2022In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Living with a parent facing life-threatening illness and losing a mom or dad at a young age can cause both short- and long-term health problems. Without satisfactory support, adolescents' and young people are at risk of developing low self-esteem, behavioural difficulties (e.g., anger and aggression), long-term illness or premature death caused by severe mental illness, substance abuse, self-harm and suicide attempts. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' and young people's needs and preferences for support as they live with a parent with life-threatening cancer. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 respondents (17-24 years) in Norway and Sweden. Data were analysed through grounded theory according to Charmaz. Results Adolescents' and young peoples' needs and preferences for support were described through the main category 'To feel safe and secure and to be prepared' and further broken down into five subcategories 'Relationships in the immediate family-balancing support and protection'; 'The social network-support and normalcy in a carefully selected group'; 'Maintaining everyday life-challenges in school and working life'; 'The right support at the right time-competence, trust and continuity in meeting health care professionals'; and 'Support outside the home-an opportunity for full transparency'. Conclusion Adolescents' and young peoples' preferences for support when living with a parent facing life-threatening illness are individual and unique, but they share a common need to feel safe and secure and to be prepared. Adolescents and young people express that they primarily want support from parents and friends, but they also want support from health care professionals, especially in situations when the ill parent becomes worse. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance for health care professionals to identify the most vulnerable adolescents and young people by mapping their social networks and paying extra attention to their needs for support when there is deterioration in the parent's illness state. This study also highlights the importance for health care professionals to establish a good relationship with adolescents and young people to meet their needs and preferences for support. In addition, information and support are needed in a timely manner and adapted to the life-threatening ill parent's illness state and individual's needs and preferences to optimise preparedness.

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  • 2.
    Bergersen, Emily Beatrice
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lövgren, M.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    What kind of support does young people need when a parent is life-threateningly ill?2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergersen, Emily Beatrice
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Science , NOR.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). ..
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, NOR.
    Children and adolescents' preferences for support when living with a dying parent: An integrative review2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 1536-1555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify and synthesize the evidence base regarding children and adolescents' preferences for support when living with a dying parent. Design: Integrative literature review study. Methods: Searches were conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, Sociological Abstracts and Scopus, between 1 October 2019 and May 2021. Data were analysed and synthesized using integrative thematic analysis according to the analysis stages specified by Whittermore and Knafl. Results: Twenty-two articles were identified. Children and adolescents' preferences for support were described through one overarching theme, Striving to achieve control and balance, together with six subthemes; "Involvement in the sick parent's care and treatment"; "Wanting to be with the sick parent but needing respite"; "Information must be continuous and individually adapted"; "emotional and communicative support from parents and family members"; "professional, compassionate and informative support"; and "support in friendships and opportunities to maintain normality."

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  • 4.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Innland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Self-reported Professional Competence Among Swedish Contact Nurses in Cancer Care: A Cross-sectional Study2022In: Cancer Care Research Online, E-ISSN 2691-3623, Vol. 2, no 3, p. e024-e024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since 2011, patients in Swedish cancer care have been offered a contact nurse (CN). The CN role is to improve patient participation, care continuity, and provide information and manage patients’ symptoms and needs across the whole continuum of the cancer pathway. A competence profile for the CN role is yet to be developed, and it is important to assess CNs’ self-reported competence to assure that they are well equipped for the role.

    Objectives: To assess self-reported professional competence among contact nurses working in Swedish cancer care and relate the findings to education level and clinical experience.

    Methods: The Nurse Professional Competence scale short form (35 items) was used to assess the nurses’ professional competence. Data were collected through a web-based survey in 2017 in 2 regional cancer centers in Sweden.

    Results: One hundred eight CNs participated in the study and reported highest scores in “value-based nursing care” and lowest scores in “development, leadership, and organization of nursing care.” Higher age, extended clinical work experience, and academic degree were significantly associated with higher competence.

    Conclusions: CNs with extensive work experience and CNs with an academic degree reported higher scores concerning their generic competence. There is a need in future studies to assess CNs’ specific competence in cancer care.

    Implications for Practice: There is room for improvement in the competence development of CNs, primarily in the areas of leadership and organization of nursing care.

    What is Foundational: CNs’ competence regarding leadership and organization should be improved, preferably as part of academic education.

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  • 5.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Competence for a new role - Contact Nurses´self-reported competence related to education and clinical experience.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Eriksen, Siren
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole; Nasjonal kompetansetjeneste for aldring og helse, Sykehuset Vestfold HF, Tønsberg, Norge.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Gjevjon, Edith Roth
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Det er nødvendig å sette søkelyset på bærekraftig sykepleieforskning for å motvirke forskningssløseri.2022In: Tidsskriftet sykepleien, ISSN 0806-7511, E-ISSN 1892-6304Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    et al.
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Eriksen, Siren
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole; Nasjonalt senter for aldring og helse, fagområde kognisjon og demens, Norge.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Gjevjon, Edith Roth
    Lovisenberg diakonale høgskole, Norge.
    Når forskningsprosjekter planlegges og designes, er teoretiske og metodologiske rammeverk nyttige. De kan forhindre forskningssløseri og gi bærekraftige forskningsresultater.2022In: Tidsskriftet sykepleien, ISSN 0806-7511, E-ISSN 1892-6304, article id 90602Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Technology, Cyprus and DOCENT & Department of Nursing Studies, University of Turku, Finland.
    Wells, Mary
    Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
    Campbell, Pauline
    Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit (NMAHP RU), Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Torrens, Claire
    Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit (NMAHP RU), Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Centre for Research & Development, Sweden.
    Oldenmenger, Wendy
    Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    Nursing Faculty, School of Health Sciences, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
    Sharp, Lena
    Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden & Karolinska Institute, Department of Learning Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nohavova, Iveta
    Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Domenech-Climent, Nuria
    Alicante University, Spain.
    Eicher, Manuela
    Institute for Higher Education and Research in Healthcare and Nurse Research Consultant Department of Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Farrell, Carole
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, UK.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Simpson, Mhairi
    NHS Lanarkshire, Scotland, UK.
    Wiseman, Theresa
    Clinical Chair of Applied Health in Cancer Care, Strategic Lead for Health Service Research, The Royal Marsden, NHS Foundation Trust, University of Southampton, UK.
    Kelly, Daniel
    Royal College of Nursing Chair of Nursing Research, Cardiff University, Wales, UK.
    A scoping review of trials of interventions led or delivered by cancer nurses2018In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 86, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Advances in research and technology coupled with an increased cancer incidence and prevalence have resulted in significant expansion of cancer nurse role, in order to meet the growing demands and expectations of people affected by cancer (PABC). Cancer nurses are also tasked with delivering an increasing number of complex interventions as a result of ongoing clinical trials in cancer research. However much of this innovation is undocumented, and we have little insight about the nature of novel interventions currently being designed or delivered by cancer nurses.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and synthesise the available evidence from clinical trials on interventions delivered or facilitated by cancer nurses.

    DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCTs and controlled before and after studies (CBA) of cancer nursing interventions aimed at improving the experience and outcomes of PABC. Ten electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, Epistemonikos, CDSR, DARE, HTA, WHO ICTRP) were searched between 01 January 2000 and 31 May 2016. No language restrictions were applied. Bibliographies of selected studies and relevant Cochrane reviews were also hand-searched. Interventions delivered by cancer nurses were classified according to the OMAHA System. Heat maps were used to highlight the volume of evidence available for different cancer groups, intervention types and stage of cancer care continuum.

    RESULTS: The search identified 22,450 records; we screened 16,169 abstracts and considered 925 full papers, of which 214 studies (247,550 participants) were included in the evidence synthesis. The majority of studies were conducted in Europe (n = 79) and USA (n = 74). Interventions were delivered across the cancer continuum from prevention and risk reduction to survivorship, with the majority of interventions delivered during the treatment phase (n = 137). Most studies (131/214) had a teaching, guidance or counselling component. Cancer nurse interventions were targeted at primarily breast, prostate or multiple cancers. No studies were conducted in brain, sarcoma or other rare cancer types. The majority of the studies (n = 153) were nurse-led and delivered by specialist cancer nurses (n = 74) or advanced cancer nurses (n = 29), although the quality of reporting was poor.

    CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to synthesise evidence from intervention studies across the entire cancer spectrum. As such, this work provides new insights into the nature of the contribution that cancer nurses have made to evidence-based innovations, as well as highlighting areas in which cancer nursing trials can be developed in the future.

  • 9.
    Edlund, S. M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Carstens-Söderstrand, J.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Åkerman, B.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hed, E.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Facing negative emotions: Evaluating the effects of training in affirmative communication for contact nurses in cancer care2022In: Facing negative emotions: Evaluating the effects of training in affirmative communication for contact nurses in cancer care, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Edlund, Sara M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Söderstrand, Johan Carstens
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Åkerman, Björn
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hed, Elsa
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Facing negative emotions: Evaluation of a brief training in validating communication for contact nurses in cancer care2023In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 66, article id 102401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Contact nurses in cancer care (CNCC) often face challenges when communicating with patients and their families. The overall aim was to evaluate a brief digital validation training for CNCC, to test whether it was associated with increased validation and decreased invalidation. Associations between communication skills in validation and markers of work-related stress were also investigated. Methods: This intervention study investigated associations between the training and validation skills using a within-group design with repeated measures (at pre, post, and eight-week follow-up). Additionally, associations between the training and occupational self-efficacy, self-validation, and exhaustion symptoms were explored. Results: Seventeen CNCCs (all female with relatively long work experience) completed a five-week digital training program. Results indicated a statistically significant increase in validation and a statistically significant decrease in invalidation, showing that the nurses improved their communication skills following the training. No changes were found in markers of work-related stress. Conclusion: The results indicate that digital validation training for CNCCs is potentially beneficial by means of improving communication skills. This study further demonstrates that a brief digital training in validating communication to CNCC is associated with improved person-centered communication regarding strong negative emotions.

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  • 11.
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Carlson, Elisabeth
    Malmö University.
    Sundin-Andersson, Christina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Experiences of the clinical learning environment in peer learning: A mixed method study from bachelor students’ and main preceptors’ perspectives2023In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of clinical placements for bachelor nursing students (BNS). Due to this, stringent educational models for clinical practice need to be developed. The aim was to describe bachelor nursing students’ and main preceptors’ experiences of the clinical learning environment during peer learning. This mixed method study was based on a joint project between the Karlstad University and the Region Värmland, Sweden, where peer learning was launched in two geriatric clinical education wards. A total of 23 bachelor nursing student and four main preceptors participated. The data were collected in parallel, qualitative data through focus group interviews and reflective journals, and quantitative data with the CLES + T scale between November 2017 and February 2018. A directed content analysis of all results was performed. The COREQ Checklist was used. The student–patient and the student–main preceptor relationships were important for the students’ development. The students described the educational atmosphere as comfortable and safe and that the staff were knowledgeable about them. Peer learning with close interaction between patients and all staff can create authenticity, which in turn drives the BNSs’ professional development. All staff should be involved in the supervision of the students and include them as members of the nursing team.

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  • 12.
    Gjevjon, E. R.
    et al.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Rolland, E. G.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Are we prepared to educate the next generation of bachelor nursing students?: A discussion paper2022In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 59-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper answers a call from Nordic colleagues for new strategies in education to meet the needs of a new generation of bachelor nursing students regarding the development of clinical skills. We, as they, believe that educational models targeting the development of clinical skills must be customised to meet the learning style of the current and future generations of bachelor nursing students. In this paper we put forward that using a comprehensive, collaborative, student-centred approach will assist younger generations’ learning processes. We describe a pedagogical model of peer learning that combines collaboration, reflection and assessment aligned with learning outcomes. Such an approach, we believe, is likely to be in line with expectations, needs and preconditions of the current and future generations of nursing students.

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  • 13.
    Granrud, M. D.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis
    Høgskolen i Østfold, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Östfold university, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Österlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Melin Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Helsepersonells erfaringer med kvalitet i palliativ behandling og omsorg under Covid-19-pandemin - en tverrsnittstudie.2022In: Helsepersonells erfaringer med kvalitet i palliativ behandling og omsorg under Covid-19-pandemin - en tverrsnittstudie., 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Granrud, Marie Dahlen
    et al.
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Grondahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    Østfold University College, Norway.
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Østfold University College, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Osterlind, Jane
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Hamar Municipality, Norway.
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Cross-Sectional2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents' demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective-Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used. Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement. Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 15. Granrud, MD
    et al.
    Grøndahl, VA
    Helgesen, AK
    Bååth, Carina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Tillfors, M
    Melin Johansson, C
    Österlind, J
    Larsson, M
    Hov, R
    Sandsdalen, T
    Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study2023In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents' demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective-Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used. Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement. Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 16.
    Henoch, I.
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ahlberg, K.
    Sahlgrenska Akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Symptom dimensions as outcomes in interventions for patients with cancer: A systematic review2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: Symptom experience in patients with cancer consists of several dimensions, often measured descriptively within various populations but seldom used as intervention outcomes. This review aims at describing symptom dimensions as outcomes of interventions designed to alleviate symptoms in patients with cancer and to describe these interventions' effects on at least two symptom dimensions. LITERATURE SEARCH: The PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews was used. Searches were undertaken in various indexing sites. DATA EVALUATION: Extracted data included design, participants, intervention and control group treatment, targeted symptom dimension, and summary of results. SYNTHESIS: 2,041 articles were identified and 15 were included. The symptom dimensions were intensity, distress, prevalence, frequency, consequences, and quality. Eleven interventions had significant effect on symptom dimensions, mostly on intensity and distress. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses need clinical skills to be able to understand patients' experiences through their narratives. Various interventions are targeted at symptoms, and these need to be implemented to provide evidence-based symptom management.

  • 17.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ahlberg, K
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    An application of the theory of unpleasant symptoms - a methodological framework in an integrative review2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ahlberg, Karin M.
    Erlandsson, Ann
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Exploring the simplicity and intricacy of symptom clusters in patients living with lung cancer - presentation of a research plan2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Central Hospital of Karlstad, Sweden.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Erlandsson, Ann
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ahlberg, Karin M.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Exploring Symptom Clusters and Their Measurements in Patients With Lung Cancer: A Scoping Review for Practice and Research2023In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 783-815Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: This scoping review aimed to explore symptom clusters (SCs) in patients with lung cancer and how included symptoms and symptom dimensions are measured. LITERATURE SEARCH: PubMed®, CINAHL®, Scopus®, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies published until December 31, 2021. Fifty-three articles were included. DATA EVALUATION: Data extracted included descriptive items and SC constellations. Patient-reported outcome instruments and measured symptom dimensions were described according to the middle-range theory of unpleasant symptoms. SYNTHESIS: 13 articles investigated SCs a priori and 40 de novo. Thirty-six instruments were used, mostly measuring intensity alone or in combination with timing. Qualitative articles (n = 6) provided rich descriptions within the distress, timing, and quality dimensions. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: Fatigue was the symptom found to most frequently co-occur with other symptoms in SCs. Fatigue, psychological symptoms, and nutritional aspects are emphasized as important areas for oncology nursing practice and further research to improve SC management for patients with lung cancer.

  • 20.
    Kelly, Daniel
    et al.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Campbell, Pauline
    Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Torrens, Claire
    Stirling University, UK.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University; Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Eicher, Manuela
    Lausanne University Hospital; University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nohavova, Iveta
    European Oncology Nursing Society, Brussels, Belgium.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Simpson, Mhairi
    NHS Lanarkshire, UK.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Sharp, Lena
    Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm; Karolinska Institute.
    Wiseman, Theresa
    NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
    Oldenmenger, Wendy
    Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Wells, Mary
    Imperial College London, UK.
    The effectiveness of nurse-led interventions for cancer symptom management 2000–2018: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Health Sciences Review, ISSN 2772-6320, Vol. 4, article id 100052Article, review/survey (Refereed)
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  • 21.
    Kling, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Grundel, Karina
    Arvika kommun.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Säker och bättre vård vid livets slut: Erfarenheter av Liverpool Care Pathway i Arvika kommun2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Säker och bättre vård vid livets slut – Erfarenheter av Liverpool Care Pathway i Arvika kommun

    Bakgrund: Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) är en standardvårdplan som syftar till att säkerställa en god vård vid livets slutskede oavsett vårdform. Genom bedömning av centrala behov och symtom, tydliga mål, samt utvärdering av given vård innebär LCP en struktur för att kvalitetssäkra vården. I en strävan efter en god vård i livets slut för alla har användningen av LCP blivit alltmer utbredd, men trots detta är den utvärderad i begränsad omfattning. Mot denna bakgrund, samt att LCP under de senaste åren ifrågasatts är det angeläget att studera effekter av LCP på kvaliteten av vården i livets slutskede.

     

    Syfte: var att undersöka hur sjuksköterskor och omvårdnadspersonal i kommunal vård uppfattade att vården i livets slutskede påverkades efter införandet av LCP, samt vilken betydelse de anser att LCP fått för vården i livets slutskede.

     

    Metod: Deskriptiv tvärsnittsstudie med kvantitativ ansats. Data samlades in mellan januari och juni 2014 med en studiespecifik enkät (50 frågor) med utgångspunkt i LCP. Tjugotvå sjuksköterskor och 120 omvårdnadspersonal (svarsfrekvens 63 %) verksamma på en korttidsavdelning, fem särskilda boende och inom fyra hemtjänstgrupper deltog. Icke parametrisk statistik användes för att testa skillnader inom- och mellan grupper.

     

    Resultat: Både sjuksköterskor och omvårdnadspersonal ansåg att implementering av LCP inneburit att vårdens kvalitet i livet slut förbättrats. Omvårdnadspersonalen uppfattade att införandet av LCP innebar att patienterna erhöll bästa möjliga omvårdnad och medicinska vård i högre grad än sjuksköterskorna (p=.011). Att arbeta enligt LCP när patienten var döende innebar en vård som uppfattades både säker och av hög kvalitet av båda personalkategorierna. Vidare uppfattades LCP underlätta bedömning av patienternas symtom och behov, samt underlätta kommunikation och överföring av information mellan olika personalkategorier.

     

    Slutsats: Att vårda patienter i livets slut i kommunal vård innebär en stor utmaning för både omvårdnadspersonal och sjuksköterskor. Genom att strukturera och systematisera vården vid livets slut med LCP säkerställs bedömning av patienters symtom och behov, bemötande av patienter och närstående samt kommunikation inom teamet. Parametrar som är betydelsefulla för en säker och god vård.

  • 22.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hwa Lee, Siew
    Robert Gordon University, UK.
    Grov, Ellen Karine
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Hov, Reidun
    Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Support to family carers when caring for a family member at the end of life at home: Implications for practice based on family carers´preferences2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hwa Lee, Siew
    Robert Gordon University, UK.
    Grov, Ellen Karine
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Hedmark University College, Norway.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Kennedy, Catriona
    Robert Gordon University, UK.
    Family carers´preferences for support when caring for family member at the end of life at home: an integrative literature review.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hwa Lee, Siew
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hov, Reidun
    Hedmark University College, Institute of Nursing, Department of Public Health, Elverum, Norway.
    Grov, Ellen Karine
    Institute of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Kennedy, Catriona
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, Robert Gordon University.
    Family carers’ preferences for support when caring for a family member at the end of life at home: An integrative literature review2018In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 56, no 6, p. e59-, article id CRD42016037839Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 25.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Contact Nurses´self-reported competence in managing cancer related symptoms and consequences: A cross sectional survey2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ax, Anna-Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Degerfeldt, Jan
    Lunds universitet.
    Björkhem-Bergman, Linda
    Karolinska institutet.
    Klasson, Caritha
    Karolinska institutet.
    Omvårdnad vid cancersjukdom2021In: Klinisk omvårdnad 2 / [ed] Dag-Gunnar Stubberud; Randi Grønseth; Hallbjørg Almås, Stockholm: Liber , 2021, 3, p. 403-499Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Klinisk omvårdnad 2 är del två av en serie om två böcker. Klinisk omvårdnad del 1 och 2 tydliggör vilka konsekvenser olika sjukdomar och skador har för patienten. Hur upplever patienten att vara sjuk, hur påverkas hens grundläggande behov och vilka copingstrategier behövs? Böckerna tillhandahåller systematisk kunskap om datainsamling, de kliniska bedömningar och omvårdnadsåtgärder som behövs för att kunna tillgodose patientens grundläggande behov samt om sjuksköterskans ansvar och kompetens i sin professionsutövning. Alla kapitel har en liknande struktur, vilket gör det enkelt att orientera sig. Texterna är granskade av svenska experter och anpassade till svenska förhållanden. Böckerna vänder sig till blivande sjuksköterskor och kan användas som referens för sjuksköterskor inom olika verksamhetsområden.

  • 27.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Kaisa, Bjuresäter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sexual problems in patients with head and neck cancer- an area in need of further attention.2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies show that the incidence of sexual dysfunction ranges between 40% and 100% in patients where the tumor and treatment have a direct impact on sexuality. Head and neck cancer is a physically and emotionally devastating disease. Unlike other forms of cancer the disease and side-effects of treatment cannot be hidden as tumors of the head and neck affect the most visible area of the body. Treatment include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy often in combination leading to severe side-effects such as facial disfigurement, pain in the mouth and throat, thick and ropy saliva and taste changes leading to malnutrition and loss of energy and strength.  In addition, fatigue, social isolation and low self esteem – factors that are known to influence sexuality – are common and apparently, patients with head and neck cancer are at high risk to develop sexual problems. However, little is known regarding sexual problems and sexual adjustments among this group of patients under treatment as well as during the rehabilitation period. Therefore this study was conducted with the objective to examine occurrence of sexual problems during and after the medical treatment.

    Materials and method: In this descriptive study 40 consecutive patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer participated. Data were collected each week during radiotherapy and six and twelve months after completed radiotherapy using EORTC QLQ-30 and EORTC H&N35, for health-related quality of life. The questionnaires include specific questions regarding sexual functioning and sexual desire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used.

    Results: Sexual problems were common and were reported to occur quite a lot or a lot by 60% after completed radiotherapy, 30% after six months, and by 32 % after one year. Data analysis is ongoing and further results will be presented at the conference.

    Conclusions: Sexual problems are common in patients with head and neck cancer and this issue needs to be further studied

  • 28.
    Nordaunet, Ole Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Gjevjon, E. R.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway; UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Aagaard, H.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Borglin, G.
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    What about the fundamentals of nursing-its interventions and its continuity among older people in need of home- or facility-based care: a scoping review2024In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 59Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThis scoping review investigated and descriptively summarised previous research about fundamental nursing, its focus (what care needs are described, how is it described and by whom is it described), continuity of care (is it described in relation to fundamental nursing) and possible nursing interventions or activities targeting older people's fundamentals of care needs in home- or facility-based care.MethodsThis scoping review was carried out following the steps of Arksey and O'Malley's methodology and PRISMA-ScR reporting guidelines. Searches were conducted in PubMed via NIH, CINAHL via EBSCO and PsycInfo via ProQuest for the time period between January 2002 and May 2023.ResultsForty-two studies were included where the majority had been conducted in a facility-based care context. Nutrition-or rather nutritional care activities targeting eating and drinking-was the most frequently described fundamental care needs addressed. After this came personal care such as cleansing, dressing, oral care, skin, and foot care. Few studies addressed more than one fundamental care need at the time. The nursing staff described fundamental nursing as complex, comprehensive, and demanding. Older people and relatives described a gap between the fundamental nursing provided and their perceived need for support. Less attention was given to older peoples relational and psychosocial needs. Identified nursing interventions mainly targeted physical care needs. Our findings also implied that interventions focusing on fundamental nursing were described as feasible in practice with favourable or moderate results, while long-term effects were difficult to detect. No studies were identified focusing on fundamental nursing in relation to outcomes such as continuity of care.ConclusionFundamental nursing was mainly described in relation to physical care needs, which were essentially conducted within facility-based care contexts. Interventions and activities primarily focused on one fundamental need at the time, mainly within the physical domain. No nursing interventions were identified focusing on relational and psychosocial needs where continuity of care can be viewed as a relevant outcome. Such limited focus are especially concerning as research has highlighted the importance of that older people with complex care needs can benefit from a holistic and person-centred approach i.e. fundamental nursing.

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  • 29.
    Nordaunet, Ole Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Gjevjon, Edith Roth
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Aagaard, Hanne
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Fundamental nursing care focusing on older people’s needs and continuity of long-term care: A scoping review protocol2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e069798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about long-term care services ability, regardless of if the service is home-based or facility-based, to provide an optimal and comprehensive fundamental nursing care (understood as focusing on physical, relational and psychosocial needs) consistently over time is sparse. Research into nursing indicates the presence of a discontinuous and fragmented healthcare service, and that fundamental nursing care such as mobilisation, nutrition and hygiene among older people (65 years and above) seems to be, regardless of reasons, systematically rationed by nursing staff. Thus, our scoping review aims to explore the published scientific literature on fundamental nursing care and continuity of care targeting older people’s needs while also describing identified nursing interventions with the same foci in a long-term care context. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The upcoming scoping review will be conducted in accordance with Arksey and O’Malley’s methodological framework for scoping studies. Search strategies will be developed and adjusted to each database, for example, PubMed, CINAHL and PsychINFO. Searches will be limited to the years 2002-2023. Studies focusing our aim, regardless of study design, will be eligible for inclusion. Included studies will be quality assessed and data will be charted using an extraction form. Textual data will be presented through a thematic analysis and numerical data by a descriptive numerical analysis. This protocol adheres to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol checklist. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The upcoming scoping review will take into consideration ethical reporting in primary research as part of the quality assessment. The findings will be submitted to an open-access peer-reviewed journal. Under the Norwegian Act on Medical and Health-related Research, this study does not need ethical clearance by a regional ethical review authority as it will not generate any primary data or obtain sensitive data or biological samples.

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  • 30.
    Nysaeter, Toril Merete
    et al.
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Hov, Reidun
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway; Centre for Development of Institutional and Home Care Services (USHT),, Norway.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Family caregivers' preferences for support when caring for a family member with cancer in late palliative phase who wish to die at home - a grounded theory study2024In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundFamily caregivers are essential in end-of-life care for cancer patients who wish to die at home. The knowledge is still limited regarding family caregivers needs and preferences for support and whether the preferences change during the patient's illness trajectory. Therefore, the aim was to explore family caregivers' preferences for support from home care services over time when caring for a family member with cancer at the end of life who wished to die at home.MethodsA qualitative method was applied according to Grounded Theory. Data was collected longitudinally over the illness trajectory by means of repeated individual interviews (n = 22) with adult family caregivers (n = 11). Sampling, data collection and data analysis were undertaken simultaneously in line with the constant comparative method.ResultsThe findings are captured in the core category "hold out in duty and love". The categories "having control and readiness for action" and "being involved in care" describe the family caregivers' preferences for being prepared and able to handle procedures, medical treatment and care, and to be involved by the healthcare personnel in the patient's care and decision making. The categories "being seen and confirmed" and "having a respite" describe family caregivers' preferences for support according to their own needs to be able to persevere in the situation.ConclusionDespite deterioration in the patient's illness and the increasing responsibility family caregiver struggle to hold out and focus on being in the present. Over time together with deterioration in the patient's illness and changes in the situation, they expressed a need for more intense and extensive support from the home care services. To meet the family caregivers' preferences for support a systematic implementation of a person-centred care model and multicomponent psycho- educational interventions performed by nurses can be proposed. Moreover, we suggest developing a tool based on the conceptual model generated in this study to identify and map family caregivers' needs and preferences for support. Such a tool can facilitate communication and ensure person-centred interventions.

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  • 31.
    Nysæter, Toril Merete
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sandsdalen, Tuva
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR.
    Hov, Reidun
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, NOR; Centre for Development of Institutional and Home Care Services (USHT), NOR.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Preferences for home care to enable home death among adult patients with cancer in late palliative phase - a grounded theory study2022In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The wish to be cared for and to die at home is common among people with end-stage cancer in the western world. However, home deaths are declining in many countries. The aim of this study was to explore the pref‑ erences for home care over time to enable home death among adult patients with cancer in the late palliative phase.

    Methods: A qualitative method was applied according to grounded theory (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Data was collected using individual interviews (n=15) with nine adult patients. One to two follow up interviews were conducted with four patients. Sampling, data collection and constant comparative analysis were undertaken simultaneously.

    Results: The findings are presented as a conceptual model of patients’ preferences for care to enable home death. The core category “Hope and trust to get the care I need to die at home” showed that the preference to die at home seemed stable over time and did not change with deterioration in health status and progression in illness. Five cat‑ egories were related to the core category. The categories “being in the present”, “be safe and in charge” and “be seen and acknowledged” describe the patients’ preferences to live a meaningful life until death and be the same person as always. These preferences depended on the categories describing characteristics of healthcare personnel and the organisation of care: “reliable, compassionate and competent healthcare personnel” and “timely, predictive, continuous and adaptive organisation”.

    Conclusion: An important preference over time was to be here and now and to live as meaningful a life as possible until death. Moreover, the patients preferred to retain control over their lives, to be autonomous and to be seen as the person they had always been. To achieve this, person-centred care provided by healthcare personnel with competence, skills and enough/ample time were required. In addition, home care needed to be organised in a way that ensured continuity and predictability. Systematic implementation of a person-centred care model and the use of advanced home care plans with continued re-evaluation for patients’ preferences of home care were proposed measures to enable home death.

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  • 32.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Affected sexuality in patients treated for malignt blood diseases: During and after treatment2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Att samtala om sexulaitet med cancerpatienter - sjuksköterskors ansvar?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Cancer patients sexuality during and after treatment: cancer nurses responsibility2015In: Quality of life - rehabilitation. FSK Landskonference 2015, 24–25 juni, Bella Center, Copenhagen, Denmark., 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    CN26 - Nurses caring for patients at the end of life report affected psychosocial work environment when relocated during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study2022In: Nurses caring for patients at the end of life report affected psychosocial work environment when relocated during the COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Kontaktsjuksköterskors självskattade kompetens i att samtala om hälsofrämjande levnadsvanor2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lets talk about sex!  – eller varför du ska ta upp samtal om sexuell hälsa med (dina) patienter2022Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lets talk about sex!: Eller varför du ska ta upp samtal om sexuell hälsa med (dina) patienter2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Mer intressant forskning från ECCO i Stockholm2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskap rapportering från ECCO The 2011 European Multidisiplinary Cancer Congress i Stockholm, 23-27 sept. Som TEVA stipendiat rapporterade jag i tidningen Cancervården nr 6, 2011 från två forskningsprojekt, dels angående genombrottssmärta hos cancerpatienter samt kvinnors behov av kunskap gällande sexualitet och relation när de har gynekologisk cancer.

  • 40.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Om du bjuder in-kanske jag samtalar med dig: sjuksköterskors samtal med cancerpatienter om sexualitet2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patientfokuserad handledning - framgångsfaktorer för peer learning i praktiken: Tema cancer2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Påverkan på sexualiteten hos patienter med maligna blodsjukdomar2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Lägesbeskrivning av mitt avhandlingsarbete för kliniskt verksamma sjuksköterskor och läkare, samt ansvariga forskare för  kliniska studier i Uppsala-Örebroregionen.  Resultat studie I samt beskrivning av studie II och III, med några preliminära resutat.

  • 43.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Sexuality in patients treated for hematologic malignancies - Problems and need for support from patients’ and nurses’ perspectives2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to describe and explore how sexuality, body image and HRQoL were affected in patients treated for hematologic malignancies, and their need for support. A further aim was to describe nurses’ conceptions of dialogues about sexuality.

    Methods: Ten nurses in cancer care (I) and twelve patients were interviewed (II). Data were analysed according to phenomenography (I-II). Data were also collected from patients (≥45 years) included consecutively: at baseline (n=32), one month (n=25; III-IV) and six months (n=20; IV) after treatment. Three instruments were used: SAQ-S, BIS and EORTC QLQ-C30. The data were analysed statistically.

    Main findings: The nurses (I) conceived that they should talk about sexuality with cancer patients, but usually did not due to their own attitudes, lack of knowledge about sexuality, communication skills and environmental conditions. The patients (II) experienced negative effects on sexual function and sexual relationship due to affected strength and sexual desire. The patients’ sexuality, body image and HRQoL were affected during (II-III) and one month after treatment (III-IV). Patients recovered with regard to these issues within six months, except for sexual relationship (IV). However, when the disease and side effects were experienced as severe, thoughts about and interest in sexuality were overshadowed, and the need or wish for support related to this issue was low (II). Sexuality and body image seemed to influence changes in HRQoL (IV).

    Conclusion: Patients above the age of 45 treated for hematologic malignancies with chemoimmunotherapy experienced problems related to sexuality, body image and HRQoL. However, as sexuality was found to be of low priority due to concerns for life when the disease and side effects were severe, support must be timely and individualized. Patient-centered care, with patients continuously meeting a nurse guided by the idea of holistic individual nursing care throughout the care trajectory, is suggested.

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  • 44.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sjuksköterskors samtal om sexualitet2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Support to family carers when caring for a family member at the end of life at home: Implications for practice based on family carers´preferences2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Time to Bring It Up: Sexuality Issues in Cancer Care2023In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 333-334Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sandin-Bojö, Ann-Kristin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Sexuality is not a priority when disease and treatment side effects are severe: conceptions of patients with malignant blood diseases2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, p. 3503-3512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To describe how patients with malignant blood diseases conceive the influence of chemo- or chemoimmunotherapy on sexuality, and their need of support related to this issue.

    BACKGROUND:

    Sexuality is often negatively affected in cancer patients with sex-specific diagnoses. For patients with malignant blood diseases, the research is limited with regard to the effect on sexuality. Knowledge about their need for support related to sexuality is also needed as nurses are found to often avoid this area of their responsibility.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Bengtsson, P
    Sundin Andersson, C
    Eldh, E
    Klinisk utbildningsavdelning: Att förberedas för framtidens vård2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergersen, Emily Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Alvariza, Anette
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Sverige.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Sverige.
    Lövgren, Malin
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Sverige.
    Illness-related information and communication when a parent with dependent children has a life-threatening illness: A parental perspective2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergersen, Emily Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Sverige.
    Lövgren, Malin
    Marie Cederschiöld högskola, Sverige.
    A long-term follow-up of The Family Talk Intervention when a parent with dependent children is severely ill2023Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 96
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