Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    CNRS, UT1C, Toulouse Sch Econ LERNA, F-31015 Toulouse 5, France..
    Hole, Arne Risa
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England..
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Hlth Metr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Valuation of small and multiple health risks: A critical analysis of SP data applied to food and water safety2016In: Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, ISSN 0095-0696, E-ISSN 1096-0449, Vol. 75, p. 41-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Cognitive Ability and Scale Bias in the Contingent Valuation Method2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Transport Economics, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI).
    Svensson, Mikael
    Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet, Örebro universitet.
    Cognitive ability and scale bias in the contingent valuation method: An analysis of willingness to pay to reduce mortality risk2008In: Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 0924-6460, E-ISSN 1573-1502, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 481-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates whether or not the scale bias found in contingent valuation (CVM) studies on mortality risk reductions is a result of cognitive constraints among respondents. Scale bias refers to insensitivity and non-near-proportionality of the respondents’ willingness to pay (WTP) to the size of the risk reduction. Two hundred Swedish students participated in an experiment in which their cognitive ability was tested before they took part in a CVM-study asking them about their WTP to reduce bus-mortality risk. The results imply that WTP answers from respondents with a higher cognitive ability are less flawed by scale bias.

  • 4. Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Cognitive Ability and Scale Bias in the Contingent Valuation Method: An Analysis of Willingness to Pay to Reduce Mortality Risks2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Toulouse School of Economics.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Scale sensitivity and question order in the contingent valuation method2014In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 1746-1761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the effect on respondents' willingness to pay to reduce mortality risk by the order of the questions in a stated preference study. Using answers from an experiment conducted on a Swedish sample where respondents' cognitive ability was measured and where they participated in a contingent valuation survey, it was found that scale sensitivity is strongest when respondents are asked about a smaller risk reduction first ('bottom-up' approach). This contradicts some previous evidence in the literature. It was also found that the respondents' cognitive ability is more important for showing scale sensitivity when respondents are asked about a larger risk reduction first ('top-down' approach), also reinforcing the result that a 'bottom-up' approach is more consistent with answers in line with theoretical predictions for a larger proportion of respondents.

  • 6.
    Finseraas, Henning
    et al.
    Norway.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. Norway.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. Örebro University.
    Do knowledge gains from public information campaigns persist over time?: Results from a survey experiment on the Norwegian pension reform2017In: Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, ISSN 1474-7472, E-ISSN 1475-3022, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government authorities use resources on information campaigns in order to inform citizens about relevant policy changes. The motivation is usually that individuals sometimes are ill-informed about the public policies relevant for their choices. In a survey experiment where the treatment group was provided with public information material on the social security system, we assess the short- and medium-term knowledge effects. We show that the short run effects of the information on knowledge disappear completely within 4 months. The findings illustrate the limits of public information campaigns to improve knowledge about relevant policy reforms.

  • 7.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    I3 Innovus, Stockholm.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Jacobi, Frank
    Allgulander, Christer
    Alonso, Jordi
    Beghi, Ettore
    Dodel, Richard
    Ekman, Mattias
    Faravelli, Carlo
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Gannon, Brenda
    Jones, David Hilton
    Jennum, Poul
    Jordanova, Albena
    Jönsson, Linus
    Karampampa, Korinna
    Knapp, Martin
    Kobelt, Gisela
    Kurth, Tobias
    Lieb, Roselind
    Linde, Mattias
    Ljungcrantz, Christina
    Maercker, Andreas
    Melin, Beatrice
    Moscarelli, Massimo
    Musayev, Amir
    Norwood, Fiona
    Preisig, Martin
    Pugliatti, Maura
    Rehm, Juergen
    Salvador-Carulla, Luis
    Schlehofer, Brigitte
    Simon, Roland
    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph
    Stovner, Lars Jacob
    Vallat, Jean-Michel
    Van den Bergh, Peter
    den Bergh, Peter Van
    van Os, Jim
    Vos, Pieter
    Xu, Weili
    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich
    Jönsson, Bengt
    Olesen, Jes
    Cost of disorders of the brain in Europe 2010.2011In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 718-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The spectrum of disorders of the brain is large, covering hundreds of disorders that are listed in either the mental or neurological disorder chapters of the established international diagnostic classification systems. These disorders have a high prevalence as well as short- and long-term impairments and disabilities. Therefore they are an emotional, financial and social burden to the patients, their families and their social network. In a 2005 landmark study, we estimated for the first time the annual cost of 12 major groups of disorders of the brain in Europe and gave a conservative estimate of €386 billion for the year 2004. This estimate was limited in scope and conservative due to the lack of sufficiently comprehensive epidemiological and/or economic data on several important diagnostic groups. We are now in a position to substantially improve and revise the 2004 estimates. In the present report we cover 19 major groups of disorders, 7 more than previously, of an increased range of age groups and more cost items. We therefore present much improved cost estimates. Our revised estimates also now include the new EU member states, and hence a population of 514 million people.

    AIMS: To estimate the number of persons with defined disorders of the brain in Europe in 2010, the total cost per person related to each disease in terms of direct and indirect costs, and an estimate of the total cost per disorder and country.

    METHODS: The best available estimates of the prevalence and cost per person for 19 groups of disorders of the brain (covering well over 100 specific disorders) were identified via a systematic review of the published literature. Together with the twelve disorders included in 2004, the following range of mental and neurologic groups of disorders is covered: addictive disorders, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, brain tumor, childhood and adolescent disorders (developmental disorders), dementia, eating disorders, epilepsy, mental retardation, migraine, multiple sclerosis, neuromuscular disorders, Parkinson's disease, personality disorders, psychotic disorders, sleep disorders, somatoform disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Epidemiologic panels were charged to complete the literature review for each disorder in order to estimate the 12-month prevalence, and health economic panels were charged to estimate best cost-estimates. A cost model was developed to combine the epidemiologic and economic data and estimate the total cost of each disorder in each of 30 European countries (EU27+Iceland, Norway and Switzerland). The cost model was populated with national statistics from Eurostat to adjust all costs to 2010 values, converting all local currencies to Euro, imputing costs for countries where no data were available, and aggregating country estimates to purchasing power parity adjusted estimates for the total cost of disorders of the brain in Europe 2010.

    RESULTS: The total cost of disorders of the brain was estimated at €798 billion in 2010. Direct costs constitute the majority of costs (37% direct healthcare costs and 23% direct non-medical costs) whereas the remaining 40% were indirect costs associated with patients' production losses. On average, the estimated cost per person with a disorder of the brain in Europe ranged between €285 for headache and €30,000 for neuromuscular disorders. The European per capita cost of disorders of the brain was €1550 on average but varied by country. The cost (in billion €PPP 2010) of the disorders of the brain included in this study was as follows: addiction: €65.7; anxiety disorders: €74.4; brain tumor: €5.2; child/adolescent disorders: €21.3; dementia: €105.2; eating disorders: €0.8; epilepsy: €13.8; headache: €43.5; mental retardation: €43.3; mood disorders: €113.4; multiple sclerosis: €14.6; neuromuscular disorders: €7.7; Parkinson's disease: €13.9; personality disorders: €27.3; psychotic disorders: €93.9; sleep disorders: €35.4; somatoform disorder: €21.2; stroke: €64.1; traumatic brain injury: €33.0. It should be noted that the revised estimate of those disorders included in the previous 2004 report constituted €477 billion, by and large confirming our previous study results after considering the inflation and population increase since 2004. Further, our results were consistent with administrative data on the health care expenditure in Europe, and comparable to previous studies on the cost of specific disorders in Europe. Our estimates were lower than comparable estimates from the US.

    DISCUSSION: This study was based on the best currently available data in Europe and our model enabled extrapolation to countries where no data could be found. Still, the scarcity of data is an important source of uncertainty in our estimates and may imply over- or underestimations in some disorders and countries. Even though this review included many disorders, diagnoses, age groups and cost items that were omitted in 2004, there are still remaining disorders that could not be included due to limitations in the available data. We therefore consider our estimate of the total cost of the disorders of the brain in Europe to be conservative. In terms of the health economic burden outlined in this report, disorders of the brain likely constitute the number one economic challenge for European health care, now and in the future. Data presented in this report should be considered by all stakeholder groups, including policy makers, industry and patient advocacy groups, to reconsider the current science, research and public health agenda and define a coordinated plan of action of various levels to address the associated challenges.

    RECOMMENDATIONS: Political action is required in light of the present high cost of disorders of the brain. Funding of brain research must be increased; care for patients with brain disorders as well as teaching at medical schools and other health related educations must be quantitatively and qualitatively improved, including psychological treatments. The current move of the pharmaceutical industry away from brain related indications must be halted and reversed. Continued research into the cost of the many disorders not included in the present study is warranted. It is essential that not only the EU but also the national governments forcefully support these initiatives.

  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Jacobi, Frank
    Germany.
    Allgulander, Christer
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Alonso, Jordi
    Spain.
    Beghi, Ettore
    Ist Mario Negri, Lab Malottie Neurol, Milan, Italy..
    Dodel, Richard
    Univ Marburg, Dept Neurol Marburg, D-35032 Marburg, Germany..
    Ekman, Mattias
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Faravelli, Carlo
    Italy.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Karolinska Institute.
    Gannon, Brenda
    England.
    Jones, David Hilton
    England.
    Jennum, Pout
    Denmark.
    Jordanova, Albena
    Belgium.;Bulgaria.
    Jonsson, Linus
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karampampa, Korinna
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knapp, Martin
    Belgium.
    Kobelt, Gisela
    Lund Univ, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;European Hlth Econ, Mulhouse, France..
    Kurth, Tobias
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Lieb, Roselind
    Univ Basel, Dept Psychol, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland..
    Linde, Mattias
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Neurosci, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway.;St Olavs Hosp, Div Neurol & Neurophysiol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Ljungcrantz, Christina
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Maercker, Andreas
    Univ Zurich, Dept Psychol, CH-8006 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umea Univ, Dept Oncol, Umea, Sweden..
    Moscarelli, Massimo
    USA.
    Musayev, Amir
    Optumlnsight, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norwood, Fiona
    England.
    Preisig, Martin
    Switzerland.
    Pugliatti, Maura
    Italy.
    Rehm, Juergen
    Canada.
    Salvador-Carulla, Luis
    Spain.
    Schlehofer, Brigitte
    Germany.
    Simon, Roland
    Portugal.
    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph
    Denmark, Switzerland.
    Stovner, Lars Jacob
    Norway.
    Vallat, Jean-Michel
    France.
    Van den Bergh, Peter
    Belgium.
    van Os, Jim
    England.
    Vos, Pieter E.
    Netherlands.
    Xu, Weili
    Karolinska Institute.
    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich
    Germany.
    Jonsson, Bengt
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Olesen, Jes
    Denmark.
    Corrigendum to “Cost of disorders of the brain in Europe 2010” [Eur. Neuropsychopharmacol. 21 (2011) 718–779]2012In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 237-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spectrum of disorders of the brain is large, covering hundreds of disorders that are listed in either the mental or neurological disorder chapters of the established international diagnostic classification systems. These disorders have a high prevalence as well as short- and long-term impairments and disabilities. Therefore they are an emotional, financial and social burden to the patients, their families and their social network. In a 2005 landmark study, we estimated for the first time the annual cost of 12 major groups of disorders of the brain in Europe and gave a conservative estimate of €386 billion for the year 2004. This estimate was limited in scope and conservative due to the lack of sufficiently comprehensive epidemiological and/or economic data on several important diagnostic groups. We are now in a position to substantially improve and revise the 2004 estimates. In the present report we cover 19 major groups of disorders, 7 more than previously, of an increased range of age groups and more cost items. We therefore present much improved cost estimates. Our revised estimates also now include the new EU member states, and hence a population of 514 million people.

  • 9.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    The value of a statistical life in Sweden: A review of the empirical literature2012In: Health Policy, ISSN 0168-8510, E-ISSN 1872-6054, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 302-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Norwegian Social Research, Oslo, Norway .
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Class-size effects on adolescents' mental health and well-being in Swedish schools2013In: Education Economics, ISSN 0964-5292, E-ISSN 1469-5782, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 248-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether class size has an effect on the prevalence of mental health problems and well-being among adolescents in Swedish schools. We use cross-sectional data collected in year 2008 covering 2755 Swedish adolescents in ninth grade from 40 schools and 159 classes. We utilize different econometric approaches to address potential between- and within-school endogeneity including school-fixed effects and regression discontinuity approaches. Our results indicate no robust effects of class size on the prevalence of mental health problems and well-being, and we cannot reject the hypothesis that class size has no effect on mental health and well-being at all.

  • 11.
    Jaldell, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Värdering av olycksrisker: nationalekonomi2008Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Johansson, N.
    et al.
    Health Metrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Norwegian Social Res NOVA, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Williams Coll, Dept Econ, Williamstown, MA 01267 USA.
    Regional variation in health care utilization in Sweden: The importance of demand-side factors2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Differences in health care utilization across geographical areas are well documented within several countries. If the variation across areas cannot be explained by differences in medical need, it can be a sign of inefficiency or misallocation of public health care resources. Methods: In this observational, longitudinal panel study we use regional level data covering the 21 Swedish regions (county councils) over 13 years and a random effects model to assess to what degree regional variation in outpatient physician visits is explained by observed demand factors such as health, demography and socio-economic factors. Results: The results show that regional mortality, as a proxy for population health, and demography do not explain regional variation in visits to primary care physicians, but explain about 50% of regional variation in visits to outpatient specialists. Adjusting for socio-economic and basic supply-side factors explains 33% of the regional variation in primary physician visits, but adds nothing to explaining the variation in specialist visits. Conclusion: 50-67% of regional variation remains unexplained by a large number of observable regional characteristics, indicating that omitted and possibly unobserved factors contribute substantially to the regional variation. We conclude that variations in health care utilization across regions is not very well explained by underlying medical need and demand, measured by mortality, demographic and socio-economic factors.

  • 13.
    Kruger, Niclas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Economic Fluctuations and Mortality: Evidence from Wavelet Analysis for Sweden 1800-20002012In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 25, p. 1215-1235Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kruger, Niclas
    et al.
    Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Good times are drinking times: empirical evidence on business cycles and alcohol sales in Sweden 1861-20002010In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 543-546Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Krüger, Niclas
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    The Impact of Real Options on Willingness to Pay for Mortality Risk Reductions2009In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 563-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public investments are dynamic in nature, and decision making must account for the uncertainty, irreversibility and potential for future learning. In this paper we adapt the theory for investment under uncertainty for a public referendum setting and perform the first empirical test to show that estimates of the value of a statistical life (VSL) from stated preference surveys are highly dependent on the inclusion of the option value. Our results indicate an option value of a major economic magnitude. This implies that previously reported VSL estimates, used in societal benefit–cost analysis of health investments, are exaggerated.

  • 16.
    Persson, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    The Willingness to Pay to Reduce School Bullying2013In: Economics of Education Review, ISSN 0272-7757, E-ISSN 1873-7382, Vol. 35, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ryen, Linda
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013).
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Örebro University.
    The willingness to pay for a quality adjusted life year: A review of the empirical literature2015In: Health Economics, ISSN 1057-9230, E-ISSN 1099-1050, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1289-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a rapid increase in the use of cost-effectiveness analysis, with quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as an outcome measure, in evaluating both medical technologies and public health interventions. Alongside, there is a growing literature on the monetary value of a QALY based on estimates of the willingness to pay (WTP). This paper conducts a review of the literature on the WTP for a QALY. In total, 24 studies containing 383 unique estimates of the WTP for a QALY are identified. Trimmed mean and median estimates amount to 74,159 and 24,226 Euros (2010 price level), respectively. In regression analyses, the results indicate that the WTP for a QALY is significantly higher if the QALY gain comes from life extension rather than quality of life improvements. The results also show that the WTP for a QALY is dependent on the size of the QALY gain valued.

  • 18.
    Sandberg, Par
    et al.
    Örebro university, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    The Cost of Autism Spectrum Disorders - A Review of the Literature2013In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, ISSN 1091-4358, E-ISSN 1099-176X, Vol. 16, p. S30-S30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Sund, Björn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. MSB, Karlstad; Örebro University.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Toulouse School of Economics, France.
    Demographic determinants of incident experience and risk perception: Do high-risk groups accurately perceive themselves as high-risk?2017In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes demographic determinants of incident experience and risk perception, as well as the relationship between the two, for eight different risk domains. Analyses were conducted by merging the results of a Swedish population-based survey, which includes approximately 15,000 individuals, with demographic and socio-economic register data. Being male was associated with higher incident experience yet a lower risk perception for nearly all risk domains. Lower socioeconomic status was associated with higher incident experience for falls, and being a victim of violence but lower incident experience for road traffic accidents. Lower socioeconomic status was also associated with higher risk perception for falls. On aggregate, ranking the different domains, respondents’ risk perception was in almost perfect correspondence to the ranking of actual incident experience, with the exception that the risk of being a victim of violence is ranked higher than indicated by actual incident experience. On a demographic group level, men and highly educated respondents perceive their risks to be lower than what is expected considering their actual incident experience. 

  • 20.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Alcohol Use and Social Interactions among Adolescents: Do peer effects exist within and/or between the majority population and immigrants?2010In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 70, no 11, p. 1858-1864Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Cost-Benefit Analysis2010In: 21st Century Economics: A Reference Handbook / [ed] Rhona C Free, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications , 2010, p. 275-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?2007In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 833-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent papers in the literature have documented a pro-cyclical effect between business cycles and mortality. In this paper, I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence, mortality and lethality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987-2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence, mortality and lethality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. Hence, previous recent results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality.

  • 23.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Economic Upturns are Good for Your Heart but Watch out for Accidents2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Economic Upturns are Good for Your Heart but Watch out for Accidents: A Study on Swedish Regional Data 1976-20052010In: Applied Economics, ISSN 0003-6846, E-ISSN 1466-4283, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 615-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between the regional unemployment rate in total and cause-specific mortality in Sweden during 1976–2005. Overall mortality is unrelated to changes in the unemployment rate, while the biggest cause of death (heart disease) decreases when the unemployment rate decreases. At the same time, other accidents, including job-related accidents, increases when the unemployment rate decreases. Swedish evidence provide no support for the US research findings, that ‘short-term decreases in the unemployment rate are bad for your health’, in general.

  • 25.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Hypotetisk bias vid direkta värderingsmetoder: Hur stort problem och vad kan man göra?2010In: Monetära schablonvärden för miljöförändringar / [ed] Gerda Kinell, Tore Södeqvist, Linus Hasselström, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket , 2010, p. 111-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Methodological Issues in Estimating the Value of a Statistical Life2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Precautionary Behavior and Willingness to Pay for a Mortality Risk Reduction: Searching for the Expected Relationship2009In: Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, ISSN 0895-5646, E-ISSN 1573-0476, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 65-85Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Dept. of Economics, Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The Value of a Statistical Life in Sweden: Estimates from Two Studies using the "Certainty Approach" Calibration2009In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 430-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stated preference methods using surveys to elicit willingness to pay have been shown to suffer from hypothetical bias and scope/scale bias. Hypothetical bias usually means that willingness to pay is exaggerated in the hypothetical scenario and scope/scale bias means that there is an insensitivity in willingness to pay with regard to the amount of goods or the size of a good being valued. Experimental results in social psychology and economics have shown that only trusting the most certain respondents can potentially solve the problem with hypothetical bias and scope/scale bias. This paper presents the results of two different surveys in Sweden estimating the willingness to pay to reduce traffic mortality risks by only including the most certain respondents. Using the full sample, estimates of the value of a statistical life (VOSL) are $4.2 and $7.3 million. Estimates of VOSL on the subset of the samples only including the most certain respondents are lower and consistent between the two surveys with values of $2.9 and $3.1 million.

  • 29.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    The Willingness to Pay for a QALY: Empirical Evidence from Sweden2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    What is a Life Worth?: Methodological Issues in Estimating the Value of a Statistical Life2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Andrén, Daniela
    Part-Time Sick Leave as a Treatment Method for Individuals with Musculoskeletal Disorders.2012In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 418-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction There is increasing evidence that staying active is an important part of a recovery process for individuals on sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). It has been suggested that using part-time sick-leave rather than full-time sick leave will enhance the possibility of full recovery to the workforce, and several countries actively favor this policy. The aim of this paper is to examine if it is beneficial for individuals on sick leave due to MSDs to be on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave. Methods A sample of 1,170 employees from the RFV-LS (register) database of the Social Insurance Agency of Sweden is used. The effect of being on part-time sick leave compared to full-time sick leave is estimated for the probability of returning to work with full recovery of lost work capacity. A two-stage recursive bivariate probit model is used to deal with the endogeneity problem. Results The results indicate that employees assigned to part-time sick leave do recover to full work capacity with a higher probability than those assigned to full-time sick leave. The average treatment effect of part-time sick leave is 25 percentage points. Conclusions Considering that part-time sick leave may also be less expensive than assigning individuals to full-time sick leave, this would imply efficiency improvements from assigning individuals, when possible, to part-time sick leave.

  • 32.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Hagquist, Curt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Adolescent Alcohol- and Illicit Drug-Use in First and Second Generation Immigrants in Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 184-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Hagquist, Curt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Adolescents Alcohol-use and Economic Conditions-: A Multilevel Analysis of Data from a Period with Big Economic Changes 20092010In: European Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 1618-7598, E-ISSN 1618-7601, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 533-541Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    Värdet av liv2008In: Ekonomisk DebattArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School. Univ Orebro, Swedish Business Sch, Dept Econ, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Econ, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Kruger, Niclas A.
    Ctr Transport Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mortality and economic fluctuations: Evidence from wavelet analysis for Sweden 1800-20002012In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1215-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using wavelet methods, this paper analyzes the relationship between the age-adjusted, infant, and cause-specific mortality rates and the business cycle in Sweden over the period 1800-2000 (1911-1996 for cause-specific mortality). For the period 1800-2000, an increase in GDP by 1% decreased mortality by 0.7%. This overall relationship is due to a strong counter-cyclical relationship in the nineteenth century, which disappeared in the twentieth century. In contrast, in the twentieth century higher mortality in economic upturns is found for mortality caused by circulatory diseases (including stroke) and accidents.

  • 36.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Olesen, J
    Gustavsson, A
    Wittchen, H-U
    Jönsson, B
    The economic cost of brain disorders in Europe.2012In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 155-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In 2005, we presented for the first time overall estimates of annual costs for brain disorders (mental and neurologic disorders) in Europe. This new report presents updated, more accurate, and comprehensive 2010 estimates for 30 European countries.

    METHODS: One-year prevalence and annual cost per person of 19 major groups of disorders are based on 'best estimates' derived from systematic literature reviews by panels of experts in epidemiology and health economics. Our cost estimation model was populated with national statistics from Eurostat to adjust to 2010 values, converting all local currencies to Euros (€), imputing cost for countries where no data were available, and aggregating country estimates to purchasing power parity-adjusted estimates of the total cost of brain disorders in Europe in 2010.

    RESULTS: Total European 2010 cost of brain disorders was €798 billion, of which direct health care cost 37%, direct non-medical cost 23%, and indirect cost 40%. Average cost per inhabitant was €5.550. The European average cost per person with a disorder of the brain ranged between €285 for headache and €30 000 for neuromuscular disorders. Total annual cost per disorder (in billion € 2010) was as follows: addiction 65.7; anxiety disorders 74.4; brain tumor 5.2; child/adolescent disorders 21.3; dementia 105.2; eating disorders 0.8; epilepsy 13.8; headache 43.5; mental retardation 43.3; mood disorders 113.4; multiple sclerosis 14.6; neuromuscular disorders 7.7; Parkinson's disease 13.9; personality disorders 27.3; psychotic disorders 93.9; sleep disorders 35.4; somatoform disorder 21.2; stroke 64.1; and traumatic brain injury 33.0.

    CONCLUSION: Our cost model revealed that brain disorders overall are much more costly than previously estimated constituting a major health economic challenge for Europe. Our estimate should be regarded as conservative because many disorders or cost items could not be included because of lack of data.

  • 37.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Persson, Mattias
    Evidence of Class-Size Effects on Adolescent Mental Health in Swedish Schools2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Persson, Mattias
    Evidence of Class-size Effects on Bullying in Swedish Schools2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro universitet.
    The Willingness to Pay to Reduce School Bullying2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    Pettersson, Johanna
    Psykisk sjukdom i Sverige: Samhällets kostnader och forskningsinvesteringar2010Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Svensson, Mikael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Vredin-Johansson, Maria
    Willingness to Pay for Private and Public Road Safety in Stated Preference Studies: Why the Difference?2010In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 1205-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Wittchen, H U
    et al.
    Jacobi, F
    Rehm, J
    Gustavsson, A
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Jönsson, B
    Olesen, J
    Allgulander, C
    Alonso, J
    Faravelli, C
    Fratiglioni, L
    Jennum, P
    Lieb, R
    Maercker, A
    van Os, J
    Preisig, M
    Salvador-Carulla, L
    Simon, R
    Steinhausen, H-C
    The size and burden of mental disorders and other disorders of the brain in Europe 2010.2011In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 655-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To provide 12-month prevalence and disability burden estimates of a broad range of mental and neurological disorders in the European Union (EU) and to compare these findings to previous estimates. Referring to our previous 2005 review, improved up-to-date data for the enlarged EU on a broader range of disorders than previously covered are needed for basic, clinical and public health research and policy decisions and to inform about the estimated number of persons affected in the EU.

    METHOD: Stepwise multi-method approach, consisting of systematic literature reviews, reanalyses of existing data sets, national surveys and expert consultations. Studies and data from all member states of the European Union (EU-27) plus Switzerland, Iceland and Norway were included. Supplementary information about neurological disorders is provided, although methodological constraints prohibited the derivation of overall prevalence estimates for mental and neurological disorders. Disease burden was measured by disability adjusted life years (DALY).

    RESULTS: Prevalence: It is estimated that each year 38.2% of the EU population suffers from a mental disorder. Adjusted for age and comorbidity, this corresponds to 164.8million persons affected. Compared to 2005 (27.4%) this higher estimate is entirely due to the inclusion of 14 new disorders also covering childhood/adolescence as well as the elderly. The estimated higher number of persons affected (2011: 165m vs. 2005: 82m) is due to coverage of childhood and old age populations, new disorders and of new EU membership states. The most frequent disorders are anxiety disorders (14.0%), insomnia (7.0%), major depression (6.9%), somatoform (6.3%), alcohol and drug dependence (>4%), ADHD (5%) in the young, and dementia (1-30%, depending on age). Except for substance use disorders and mental retardation, there were no substantial cultural or country variations. Although many sources, including national health insurance programs, reveal increases in sick leave, early retirement and treatment rates due to mental disorders, rates in the community have not increased with a few exceptions (i.e. dementia). There were also no consistent indications of improvements with regard to low treatment rates, delayed treatment provision and grossly inadequate treatment. Disability: Disorders of the brain and mental disorders in particular, contribute 26.6% of the total all cause burden, thus a greater proportion as compared to other regions of the world. The rank order of the most disabling diseases differs markedly by gender and age group; overall, the four most disabling single conditions were: depression, dementias, alcohol use disorders and stroke.

    CONCLUSION: In every year over a third of the total EU population suffers from mental disorders. The true size of "disorders of the brain" including neurological disorders is even considerably larger. Disorders of the brain are the largest contributor to the all cause morbidity burden as measured by DALY in the EU. No indications for increasing overall rates of mental disorders were found nor of improved care and treatment since 2005; less than one third of all cases receive any treatment, suggesting a considerable level of unmet needs. We conclude that the true size and burden of disorders of the brain in the EU was significantly underestimated in the past. Concerted priority action is needed at all levels, including substantially increased funding for basic, clinical and public health research in order to identify better strategies for improved prevention and treatment for disorders of the brain as the core health challenge of the 21st century.

1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf