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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Rörelsen mellan teori och praxis2013In: Vård i fokus, ISSN 0781-495X, no 2, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Blegeberg, Birgitt
    et al.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses conceptions of the professional role of operation theatre and psychiatric nursers2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 9-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shortage of specialist trained nurses in the operating theatre and psychiatric care is a problem in Swedish health care. There is a great needfor recruitment since in both areas nurses have a high average age and few students register in these specialties at university. The reason for thelow interest for these specialties is not clear. The purpose of the study was to investigate nurses’ and nurse students’ conceptions of the professionalrole of operating theatre and psychiatric care nurses. A qualitative approach with phenomenographic method was used. Twelve nurses andfour nurse students were interviewed. Three categories of conceptions within each specialty emerged. Operating theatre nurses’professional rolewas perceived as: Dependent assistant, Responsible monitor and Fragmented nurse. Psychiatric nurses’ professional role was perceived as:Empathetic agent, Conscious diplomat and Fragmented nurse. The informants had difficulties in understanding the professional role in bothfields. One conclusion is that the theoretical and clinical training in basic nurse education play an important role for choosing specialist trainingas operating theatre nurse or psychiatric nurse.

  • 3.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Att vårda patienten inom operationssjukvård: en fenomenografisk studie2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Det övergripande syftet med avhandlingen var att beskriva uppfattningar av operationssjuksköterskans vårdande inom operationssjukvård och perioperativ vård

    Metod: En kvalitativ beskrivande design med en fenomenografisk metod valdes i båda studierna (I och II). I studie I samlades data in genom intervjuer med 16 strategiskt utvalda legitimerade sjuksköterskor och studenter i sista terminen av grundutbildningen till sjuksköterska. I studie II samlades data in genom intervjuer med 15 kliniskt verksamma operationssjuksköterskor. Båda studierna analyserades enligt fenomenografisk metod.

    Resultat: Resultatet av studie I visade att operationssjuksköterskans yrkesfunktion uppfattades som osjälvständig men ändå med ansvar för patientens vård utifrån specifika kunskaper i hygien och operationsmetodik. Omvårdnaden i yrkesfunktionen var otydlig och uppfattades som fragmentarisk eftersom operationssjuksköterskor enbart var delaktiga i en del av patientens vårdprocess och hade få möjligheter att skapa en vårdrelation med patienten. Resultatet i studie II visade att operationssjuksköterskor ville följa patienten hela vägen. Det innebar att lära känna patienten både före och efter operationen och därigenom bli ansvariga för att säkerställa patientens kontinuitet och säkerhet i vården. Genom att hålla ett vakande öga skyddade de patientens kropp och bevarade patientens värdighet.

    Konklusioner: Operationssjuksköterskans yrkesfunktion ansågs som fragmenterad och uppfattades vara medicinskt och tekniskt inriktad. Det framkom att vårdandet inom operationssjukvård och perioperativ vård var otydlig. Det fanns en vilja att bli mer delaktig i patientens vård och att vårdandet blev tydligare för andra yrkeskategorier inom vård.

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    Att vårda patienten inom operationssjukvård
  • 4.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Operationssjuksköterskans vårdande och kompetens inom perioperativ vård2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to describe and deepen the understanding of what operating theatre nurses experience as caring and responsibility as well as ethical problems in perioperative practice. The aim was also to investigate how operating theatre nurses perceive clinical competence in perioperative nursing.

    Methods: This research has a hermeneutic design. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed method was used. In the study (I), data were collected through interviews and analysed with phenomenographic method. In studies (II-III) the interview texts from the study (I) was reused. Secondary analysis were performed with hermeneutic text interpretation. In the study (IV), data were collected through a modified questionnaire PROFFSNurse SAS I, which was supplemented with an open question. These data were analysed using statistics and qualitative conventional content analysis.

    Results: Operating theatre nurses have the will to meet the patient, be involved and created continuity in the perioperative nursing process (I). Operating theatre nurses experience that they have a formal responsibility to ensure that patients are not at risk and maintain patient integrity and dignity based on personal ethical values (II). Ethical problems and value conflicts can occur if routines and habits prevent operating theatre nurses from caring and when their clinical competence are not utilized in perioperative practice (III). The operating theatre nurses’ self-assessment of clinical competence showed that academic degree, professional experience and interprofessional learning were important for the development of clinical competence. On the other hand, existing routines and habits, as well as inadequate resources, were an obstacle (IV).

    Conclusion: Perioperative nursing care includes a nursing process and the operating theatre nurses have responsibility based on ethical values. When the operating theatre nurses are prevented from being a caregiver or that their clinical competence is not utilized, stress of conscience can be caused. Important for the development of clinical competence is an academic degree, professional experience and interprofessional learning.

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    Podcast med intervju om avhandlingen
  • 5.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

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    Blomberg_et_al_2018
  • 6.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Value conflicts in perioperative practice2019In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 26, no 7-8, p. 2213-2224, article id 969733018798169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves.

    OBJECTIVES:: This study describes operating theatre nurses' experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:: The study followed ethical principles in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and approval was granted by the local university ethics committee.

    FINDINGS:: The result showed that value conflicts arose in perioperative practice when operating theatre nurses were prevented from being present in the perioperative nursing process, because of current habits in perioperative practice. The patient's care became uncaring when health professionals did not see and listen to each other and when collaboration in the surgical team was not available for the patient's best. This occurred when operating theatre nurses' competence was not taken seriously and was ignored in patient care.

    CONCLUSION:: Value conflicts arose when operating theatre nurses experienced that continuity of patient care was lacking. They experienced compassion with the patient but still had the will and ability to be there and take responsibility for the patient. This led to feelings of despair, powerlessness and of having a bad conscience which could lead to dissatisfaction, and even resignations.

  • 7.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

  • 8.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Preserved dignity inperioperative nursing.2012In: The 13th ICNE Conferencein Izmir, Turkey, 4-6 October.Abstarct book, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1510-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During many years the operating theatre nurse's clinical competence has been describing in relation to patient safety, but the nursing care of the patient remains unclear. Therefore, we want in this study to investigate the relationship between background factors of operating theatre nurses self-rated clinical competence and describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence in perioperative nursing.Methods: A cross-sectional study with a mixed method approach was chosen. The instrument Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence was used for self-rating operating theatre nurses' clinical competence in perioperative nursing, and an open-ended question was added to describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence. In total, 1057 operating theatre nurses in Sweden were asked to participate, and 303 responded (28 %). They had different educational backgrounds and professional experiences, and were employed in universities or central/regional and district hospitals.Results: Academic degree, professional experience and place of employment were significant for the development of the operating theatre nurses' clinical competence. Academic degree appeared to affect operating theatre nurse leadership and cooperation, as well as how consultations took place with other professions about patient care. Being employed at a university hospital had a positive effect on professional development and critical thinking.Conclusions:  An academic degree influenced the operating theatre nurses' ability to act in complex situations, and along with professional experience strengthened the nurses' ability to use different problem-solving strategies and face the consequences of decisions made. Scientific knowledge and interprofessional learning and competence development in medical technologies should supplement nursing care for the development of clinical competence.

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    Blomeberg_et_al_2019
  • 10.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Swedish Red Cross University College .
    Operating theatre nurses' with managerial responsibility: Self-reported clinical competence and need of competence development in perioperative nursing2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 692-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate operating theatre nurses (OTNs) with managerial responsibility, and their self-rated clinical competence and need for competence development in perioperative nursing. Design: A cross-sectional study was applied using a modified version of Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence I. Method: Data were collected from 303 OTNs in Sweden, 80 of whom indicated that they had managerial responsibility. Statistics analysis was used to identify the relationships between background variables to compare OTNs with and without managerial responsibility and their need for competence development. Results: OTNs with an academic degree and managerial responsibility self-rated their clinical competence higher compared with OTNs without an academic degree. It also turned out that OTNs with RN education and 1-year advanced nursing in theatre care, and master's 60 credits had a lower need for competence development in cooperation and consultation, professional development and critical thinking.

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Möller, Gudrun
    Linköpings universitet Hälsouniversitetet.
    Björn, Catrine
    Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Olsson, Lotta
    Landstinget i Värmland.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Supervisor commission in distance education2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Teledahl, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patientens perioperativa vård: med fokus på den intraoperativa vården2013In: Ortopedisk vård och rehabilitering / [ed] Ami Hommer, Carina Bååth, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 75-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Willasen, E
    Akershus University Norge.
    von Post, Irene
    Åbo Akademi.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Student nurses' experiences of preserved dignity in perioperative practice: Part 12015In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 676-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:In recent years, operating theatre nurse students' education focussed on ethical value issues and how the patient's dignity is respected in the perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient's care during surgery.

    OBJECTIVE:The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nurse students experienced and interpreted as preserved dignity in perioperative practice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:The study has a descriptive design with a hermeneutic approach. Data were collected using Flanagan's critical incident technique.

    PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT:Operating theatre nurse students from Sweden and Norway participated and collected data in 2011, after education in ethics and dignity. Data consisting of 47 written stories and the text were analysed with hermeneutical text interpretation.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS:The study was conducted accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by a local University Ethics Research Committee. FINDINGS:The findings revealed that students experienced that operating theatre nurses perserved patient's dignity in perioperative practice by being present for each other and making themselves known to the patient. Operating theatre nurses caring for the patient by being compassionate and preserved the patient privacy. The new understanding that emerged was that the operating theatre nurse students understood that the operating theatre nurse wanted to care for the patient like a human being. DISCUSSION:In the discussion, we have illuminated how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic and utilitarian arguments contained in regulations and transplant act. CONCLUSION:Preserved dignity is an ethical and caring act. Ethical questions and how to preserve dignity in perioperative practice should be discussed more both in educations of healthcare professionals and in clinical practice.

  • 14.
    Willassen, Elin
    et al.
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    von Post, Irene
    Åbo Akademi.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Student nurses* experiences of undignified caring in perioperative practice: Part 22015In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 688-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:In recent years, operating theatre nurse students' education focused on ethics, basic valuesand protecting and promoting the patients' dignity in perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient's care during surgery.Objective:The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nursing students perceivedand interpreted as undignified caring in perioperative practice.Research design:The study has a descriptive design with a hermeneutic approach. Data were collectedusing Flanagan's critical incident technique.Participants and research context:Operating theatre nurse students from Sweden and Norwayparticipated and collected data in 2011, after education in ethics and dignity. Data consisting of 47written stories and the text were analysed with hermeneutical text interpretation.Ethical considerations:The study was approved by the Karlstad University's Research Ethics Committee.Findings:The findings show careless behaviour and humiliating actions among health professionals. Healthprofessionals commit careless acts by rendering the patient invisible, ignoring the patient's worry and painand treating the patient as an object. They also humiliate the patient when speaking in negative terms aboutthe patient's body, and certain health professionals blame the patients for the situation they are in. Healthprofessionals lack the willingness and courage to protect the patient's dignity in perioperative practice.Discussion:In the discussion, we have illuminated how professional ethics may be threatened by morepragmatic and utilitarian arguments contained in regulations and transplant act.Conclusion:The findings reveal that patients were exposed to unnecessary suffering; furthermore, theoperating theatre nurse students suffered an inner ethical conflict due to the undignified caring situationsthey had witnessed

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