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  • 1. Axelsson, P.
    et al.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Bjerner, B.
    How Swedish dental hygienists apply their training program in the field1993In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, E-ISSN 1600-0528, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 297-302Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hellovist, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lingstrom, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dental caries and associated factors in a group of Swedish snus users2015In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Swedish moist powder tobacco product known as "snus" on dental caries and to measure the pH fall in dental plaque. The subjects comprised male and female adults between 26 and 62 years of age (n=102), all habitual snus users for >= 10 years. The control group (n=101) consisted of similar individuals in terms of gender, age and educational level but with no tobacco use for >= 10 years. A clinical and radiographic examination and a questionnaire were completed.The pH fall after a sucrose rinse was estimated in situ in 10 randomly selected subjects per group. The salivary secretion rate was higher in snus users than non-users (2.5 vs 2.2 ml/min, p=0.005). There was no statistically significant difference regarding salivary buffer capacity. No differences were found between the two groups in terms of the plaque index, primary or secondary enamel and dentine caries, DFS and salivary counts of mutans streptococci or lactobacilli. The pH fall was somewhat more pronounced among non-users compared with snus users (NS). Snus users had a lower intake of snacks between meals and a less frequent intake of cookies (p=0.000). Furthermore, snus users had a mean gingival index (+/- SD) for the whole dentition of 20.4 +/- 18.2, while the index for non-users was14.4 +/- 13.9 (p=0.009); the corresponding values for teeth 13-23 were 14.9 +/- 20.6 and 7.7 +/- 11.9 respectively (p=0.003). To conclude, this clinical study revealed no statistically significant differences in caries prevalence between snus users and non-users and only minor differences regarding different cariesassociated factors.

  • 3.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Boström, Anita
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Lingström, Peter
    Odontologi, avd för Cariologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Odontologi, avd för Cariologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Effect of nicotine-free and nicotine-containing snus on plaque pH in vivo2012In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate pH changes in plaque in vivo during the use of nicotine-free and nicotine-containing snus. The carbohydrate content of the products was also analysed. Ten subjects, all regular snus users, participated in an experimental cross-over study, on eleven occasions with an interval of one week. Six nicotine-free and four nicotine-containing products, which are sold on the Swedish market, were included and a sucrose solution was used as a control. The subjects did not brush their teeth for three days before coming to the laboratory, without eating, drinking or using snus/smoking for two hours prior to the test. pH was measured at three approximal sites up to 45 min with the test product placed under the upper lip. The carbohydrate analysis showed that the nicotine-containing products contained only traces of glucose, fructose and sucrose (0.5-1%) and starch (approximate to 1.5%). Some of the nicotine-free products contained up to 6.5% low-molecular-weight carbohydrates and 26.0% starch. The intraoral pH measurements showed that four nicotine-containing products increased the plaque pH, in contrast to three of the six nicotine-free products, which lowered the pH. These pH changes may have an effect on the caries risk, both positively and negatively, depending on which product is used.

  • 4.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Odontologi, avd för Cariologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hugoson, Anders
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Tobacco use in relation tosocioeconomic factors anddental care habits amongSwedish individuals 15–70 yearsof age, 1983–20032009In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the use of tobacco and changes in its use over time among individuals living in Jo¨nko¨ping, Sweden, and to analyse tobacco habits in relation to socioeconomic conditions, personality aspects and dental care habits. Methods: This study comprised three epidemiological cross-sectional studies, involving a random selection of individuals aged between 15 and 70 years, and was conducted in 1983, 1993 and 2003. The participants were asked to complete a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed a statistically significant reduction from 34% tobacco users in 1983 to 27% in 1993 and 28% in 2003. The main decrease was seen among smokers. At the same time, the number of users of snuff increased in all the age groups between 20 and 60 years of age. The use of tobacco was therefore largely unchanged in 1993 and 2003. In 2003, there was a statistically significant difference between users and nontobacco users when it came to the frequency of dental visits; more tobacco users than non-tobacco users did not visit a dentist at all or did not visit a dentist regularly. In 1993, nontobacco users brushed their teeth more frequently than tobacco users and this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions: During the 20-year study, there was a reduction in the number of smokers and an increase in the number of snuff users. There was a difference between tobacco users and non-tobacco users when it came to the frequency of dental visits and oral hygiene habits.

     

     

  • 5.
    Hugoson, A
    et al.
    Jönköping university.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Periodontal disease in relation to smoking and the use of Swedish snus: epdemiological studies covering 20 years (1983-2003)2011In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 809-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractAim: The aim of the present study was to examine how deleterious current smokingand the use of Swedish moist snuff (snus) is for periodontal health compared with nontobaccousers.Materials and Methods: The studies comprised three epidemiological crosssectionalstudies, in 1983, 1993 and 2003, of stratified random samples aged 20, 30, 40,50, 60 and 70 years. The numbers of dentate participants were 550, 552 and 523,respectively. The participants were examined clinically and radiographically.Diagnostic criteria were the number of teeth, plaque, gingival status, probing pocketdepth (PPD)X4 mm, height of the alveolar bone level and classification by periodontaldisease experience. In addition, participants were asked about their tobacco habits.Results: Multiple logistic regression shows, after adjusting for age, gender andsociodemographic variables, that relative to non-tobacco users, cigarette smokers hadstatistically significant less gingivitis, a higher frequency of PPDX4mm and a higherincidence of severe periodontitis. There was no significant association betweengingivitis, frequency of PPDX4mm and periodontal disease experience and snus use.Conclusions: Cigarette smokers were found to have a statistically significant higherrisk of severe periodontitis than non-tobacco users and users of snus. Using snus didnot seem to be a risk factor for periodontitis

  • 6.
    Hugoson, Anders
    et al.
    Center for Oral Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Jönköping Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/00016357.2011.654247.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Dental caries in relation to smoking and the use of Swedish snus: epidemiological studies covering 20 years (1983–2003)2012In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate some intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use on dental caries. Materials and methods. The participants were randomly recruited from three cross-sectional studies in Jönköping, Sweden, in 1983, 1993 and 2003. Each study consisted of 130 individuals in each of the 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70-year age groups. Of these, 550, 552 and 523 dentate individuals attended respective year of examination. They were all examined both clinically and radiographically. A questionnaire was completed in conjunction with the examination. In the studies, 345 were smokers, 104 snus users and 1142 non-tobacco users, in total 1591 individuals. Results. In 1983 and 1993, there were no significant differences in mean DFS between non-users and smokers, but a statistically significantly higher mean DFS in comparison with snus users. In 2003, there was no statistically significant difference in mean DFS between the groups. Multiple regressions showed that, after adjusting for age, gender and socio-demographic variables, there was a statistically significant association between DFS and smoking in 1983 (smoking excluded in favour of lactobacilli when further analysed) and DFS and plaqueindex (PLI) in 1993. In 2003, there was no association, apart from buffer capacity (Power rising) between DFS and the examined intra-oral caries-associated variables and tobacco use. Conclusions. The results of these epidemiological studies, performed in 1993 and 2003, indicate that daily smoking or snus use does not increase the risk of dental caries.

  • 7.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Snuff use and oral health among young ice-hockey players: Implications for oral health promotion2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Tandhygienistens huvudämne börjar ta form2008In: Tandhygienisternas historia En 40-årig resa 1968-2008, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    , Hugoson
    Factors associated with snuffing habits among ice-hockey-playing boys2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, Vol. 2001;25:145-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present investigation was to study differences in background factors between ice-hockey-playing boys who used snuff, who had tried using snuff, and who had never used snuff. The background factors studied were the socio-economic conditions of the boys' parents; the tobacco habits of the boys' parents, siblings, and friends; the boys' choice of theoretical or practical upper secondary school programme; knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco as well as participation in a sport other than ice hockey. Data were collected usinG a questionnaire. Of 249 boys in the age group 12-19 years who participated in the study, 13% used snuff, 34% had tried using snuff, and 53% had never used snuff. The factors knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco and choice of theoretical or practical upper secondary school programme had no significant association with the boys' snuffing habits. This was also true for the parents' tobacco habits unless their habits were analysed separate from each other, where "mother smoked" showed an association with boys who used snuff. The study also showed a significant difference between boys who used snuff and boys who had never used snuff and between boys who had tried using snuff and boys who had never used snuff; boys who used snuff tended to have siblings who used snuff. Of boys who used snuff, 77% reported that their friends' use of snuff had influenced them to start using snuff. A significant difference could also be shown between boys who used snuff, had tried using snuff and never-users depending on whether the boys participated in a sport other than ice hockey. Snuff usage was not as widespread among boys who participated in other sport activities. This was verified by the multivariate logistic regression analysis where "taking part in other sports than ice hockey" was the explanatory variable that showed the strongest association with the dependent variable. An active participation in ice hockey and the environment, in which this sport is practised, would consequently be a strong influencing factor to start using snuff.

  • 10.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hallberg, L.
    , Hugoson
    Influence of the ice-hockey environment on taking up snuff: An interview study among young males2006In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, Vol. 2006;64:47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, snuff-use is an established and accepted phenomenon in society, especially in connection with certain sports. The aim of this qualitative study was to analyze and describe the psychosocial environment influencing young male ice-hockey players into starting to use snuff. The study sample comprised 16 male participants between 15 and 32 years of age strategically selected for being active or having been active as ice-hockey players--snuff-users and non-users alike. A grounded theory design, including in-depth interviews, was used to generate a theory from data and thereby create theoretical concepts explaining social phenomena, human behavior, and process. An interview guide containing different themes was used to cover the study area. Five higher-order categories were developed and labeled: having a role model, residing in a consenting environment, experiencing performance demands, experiencing a sense of community and creating an image. Socialization in and through psychosocial norms of the ice-hockey environment was identified as a core category describing the central meaning of the informants' experiences of snuff in the ice-hockey environment. In the present study, the identified categories that integrate within the environment in which the young people reside and pursue their sports activities have been interpreted as factors enhancing the commencement of snuff-use. We suggest health promotion activities within the ice-hockey environment based on a health psychology model of planned behavior.

  • 11.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hellqvist, L.
    Lindqvist, L.
    , Hugoson
    Effects of snuff on oral health status of adolescent males: A case-control study2005In: Oral Health and Preventive Dentistry, Vol. 2005;3:77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of snuff on the oral health status of adolescent males. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants consisted of 80 adolescent males between 16-25 years, 40 snuff users and 40 non-users. The snuff users and non-users were matched with reference to their age. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing questions on general and oral health, daily oral hygiene and tobacco habits. The clinical examination was carried out in a dental office by two experienced dental hygienists. Snuff lesions were clinically classified on a four-point scale and documented on colour slides. The examination also assessed the number of teeth, restored tooth surfaces, plaque index and gingival index, probing pocket depth and gingival recessions. RESULTS: Out of 40 snuff users, 35 showed snuff incluced lesions. The clinical diagnosis of snuff users' mucosa showed snuff lesions of different severity clinically classified as degree 1, 2 and 3. When explaining snuff lesions of degree 2 and 3, hours of daily snuff use and package form (portion-bag snuff versus loose snuff) was statistically significant. There were no statistical differences between snuff users and non-users regarding restored tooth surfaces, presence of plaque, gingival inflammation and probing pocket depth. Seventeen percent of the cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions. CONCLUSION: In spite of mucosal lesions caused by snuff there were no statistical differences in prevalence in plaque and gingivitis between snuff users and non-users. However, some cases showed loss of periodontal attachment as gingival recessions.

  • 12.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hellqvist, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Birkhed, D
    Hugoson, A
    Tobacco use in relation to socioeconomic factors and dental care habits among Swedish individuals 15-70 years of age, 1983-20032009In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 62-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract

    Abstract: Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe

    the use of tobacco and changes in its use over time among

    individuals living in Jo¨nko¨ping, Sweden, and to analyse

    tobacco habits in relation to socioeconomic conditions,

    personality aspects and dental care habits. Methods: This

    study comprised three epidemiological cross-sectional

    studies, involving a random selection of individuals aged

    between 15 and 70 years, and was conducted in 1983, 1993

    and 2003. The participants were asked to complete a

    questionnaire. Results: The results revealed a statistically

    significant reduction from 34% tobacco users in 1983 to 27%

    in 1993 and 28% in 2003. The main decrease was seen

    among smokers. At the same time, the number of users of

    snuff increased in all the age groups between 20 and

    60 years of age. The use of tobacco was therefore largely

    unchanged in 1993 and 2003. In 2003, there was a

    statistically significant difference between users and nontobacco

    users when it came to the frequency of dental visits;

    more tobacco users than non-tobacco users did not visit a

    dentist at all or did not visit a dentist regularly. In 1993, nontobacco

    users brushed their teeth more frequently than

    tobacco users and this difference was statistically

    significant. Conclusions: During the 20-year study, there was

    a reduction in the number of smokers and an increase in the

    number of snuff users. There was a difference between

    tobacco users and non-tobacco users when it came to the

    frequency of dental visits and oral hygiene habits

  • 13.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hugoson, A.
    Changes in tobacco habits: a prospective longitudinal study of tobacco habits among boys who play ice hockey2003In: Swedish Dental Journal, Vol. 2003;27:175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the investigation was to follow up tobacco habits and actual sporting activities among the boys who participated in an earlier study by the authors, and to examine whether knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco and tobacco behaviour patterns and/or the choice of tobacco had changed amongst the participants. The study was conducted 3 years after the original study. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Of the 183 boys in the age group 15-22 years who participated in the study, 26.8% were tobacco users: 19.7% only snuff users, 6.0% both snuff users and smokers and 1.1% smokers. Compared with the original study, a further 16.4% of the boys had started to use tobacco. The use of tobacco increased in all age groups except amongst 19-year-olds where tobacco use was unchanged. The age group 17-22 years included boys who were both snuff users and smokers. An increase in tobacco use between the ages of 17 and 19 years could be shown compared with the original study, for equivalent age groups. Among the 132 boys who still played ice hockey, 25.8% were tobacco users: 18.2% only snuff users, 6.1% both snuff users and smokers and 1.5% smokers. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) could be shown between boys who used snuff and non-users depending on whether the boys participated in another sport besides ice hockey. Snuff usage was thus not as widespread among boys who participated in other sporting activities. The increase in tobacco use amongst the boys in the study showed that the various preventive initiatives which society so far has offered have been inadequate. Hence, the preventive measures need to be evaluated and developed to prevent tobacco habits from becoming established. The results of this and previous studies show that the environment in which ice hockey is practiced can, in itself, constitute a risk for tobacco usage becoming established among ice-hockey-playing adolescents

  • 14.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hugoson, A
    Knowledge and habits of tobacco among ice-hockey-playing boy: An intervention study2000In: Swedish Dental JournalArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate tobacco habits among ice-hockey-playing boys in three clubs in the County of Värmland, Sweden and to analyse whether health information about the harmful effects of tobacco could change the players' tobacco habits. In addition, the issue of whether there is any correlation between knowledge of tobacco and its harmful effects with tobacco habits was studied. Ice-hockey-players from three ice-hockey clubs were represented and one of the clubs acted as a control group. A total of 252 male ice-hockey-players, 12-19 years old participated. A specially designed questionnaire containing 33 questions on background, socioeconomics, behaviour, and knowledge was used. The boys answered the questionnaire on three occasions. The first and second examinations took place on the same occasion with the intervention occurring between the examinations. The third examination was carried out after 3-5 weeks. The study showed that the use of snuff played a more important role among the ice-hockey-players than did smoking and that they had tried using snuff at the age of 12. The baseline investigation showed that there were no significant differences between the clubs in tobacco habits and knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco. After the health information, the boys' knowledge of tobacco and its harmful effects increased significantly (p<0.001), but regardless, no change in their use of tobacco was found after 3-5 weeks. Knowledge also increased significantly among the boys in the control group (p<0.001), but no change in the use of tobacco was found here either. No significant difference could be demonstrated between the group of boys who used snuff and the non-users with regard to their knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco.

  • 15.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Knowledge and habits of tobacco among young athletes in Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Tobacco Use and Dental Caries: An epidemiological study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Tobacco Use and Periodontal Disease: An epidemiological study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Tobacco habits among Swedish youth athletes and the influence of the social environment.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Tobacco use habits among Swedish female youth athletes and the influence of the social environment2014In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examined the prevalence of tobacco habits and the influence of the social environment among Swedish female athletes representing both individual and team sports in Sweden. Material and method: A self-reported cross-sectional survey was performed with 791 female athletes 15-24 years old representing ten of the most common sports in Sweden. The questions related to the participants' involvement in sports and their tobacco habits. Results: Findings revealed that a large proportion of the female athletes had never smoked (65%) or used snus (74%). However, a considerable portion of the participants had tried smoking (27%) or using snus (20%), especially those involved in team sports. Results also showed statistically significant associations between female athletes' smoking habits and those of both their mothers and their peers, but not with the tobacco habits of their coaches, indicating that coaches do not influence the female athletes' use of tobacco. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study indicated that the vast majority of female athletes did not use tobacco. A significant portion had sometimes tried tobacco, especially members of team sports, but this behaviour did not seem to be influenced by the tobacco habits of their coaches.

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