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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholms universitet.
    Different Types of Laboratory Work - Different Types of Communication: Students’ talk during laboratory work in upper secondary school physicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholms universitet.
    Student talk during the process of laboratory work of linear motion in school physicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholms universitet.
    The Effectiveness of Laboratory Work in Physics: A Case Study at Upper Secondary School in Sweden2012In: Proceedings of The World Conference on Physics Education 2012: WCPE 2012 / [ed] Mehmet Fatih Taşar, 2012, p. 729-740Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper reports on a case study that examined the effectiveness of a practical activity in physics, at a Swedish upper secondary school. A teacher and 19 students participated in the study. The students were observed while working with the topic motion, in a computer based laboratory environment (CBL). This case study is part of an ongoing longitudinal study, about the role of laboratory work with different degrees of freedom. The analysis of interviews, written reports and posttest, shows that the practical work was effective based on Millar’s model. Even so, the students had difficulties expressing what they learned from the activity. This study emphasizes the complexity of planning and conducting laboratory work that is effective, from several different aspects. 

  • 4.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Arbete med en egen frågeställning som ger lärande i fysik om ownership of learning2006In: In: Bering, Dolin, Krogh, Sølberg, Sørensen och Troelsen Naturfagsdidaktikkens mange facetter. Proceedings fra Det 8. nordiske forskersymposium om undervisning i naturfag (Aalborg 2005), Køpenhavn: Danmarks pædagogiske Universitets Forlag, 193- 200) , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Miniprojects and Context Rich Problems: Case studies with qualitative analysis of motivation, learner ownership and competence in small group work in physics2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    This thesis reports case studies of students working with context rich problems (CRP) and mini projects (MP) in physics in an upper secondary school class and in a physics teacher education class at university. The students report a big shift from physics in secondary school as fun and easy, to physics in upper secondary school as boring, difficult and with lack of time for reflections and physics talking, but they also found physics as interesting in itself. In order to study how group discussions in physics influence the students learning and to study the phenomena of students ownership of learning (SOL) we introduced CRP and MP. We video recorded five groups with 14 teacher students at university in the end of 2002, and five group with 15 students at upper secondary school during the beginning of their second physics course in the spring term in 2003. MP and CRP in physics were used as instructional settings in order to give students possibility to strengthen their holistic understanding and their possibilities to ownership. When students get the opportunity to manage their own learning and studying by open-ended tasks in physics, without the teacher determining all details of the performance, this gives more ownership of learning. The advantage of MPs and CRPs from the students point of view is more freedom to act, think and discuss and from the teachers view, to get insights of the students ability and how they really think in physics. The ownership is found to be crucial for motivation and development of competence.



    Students ownership of learning (SOL) is the students influence/impact to affect tasks and the learning environment in such a way that the students have a real opportunity to achieve learning of physics.



    Students ownership of learning (SOL) is found at two levels:



    Group level: At the start of a task the SOL is determined by the design of the task. The choice of task, the performance (when, how, where), the level of result and presentatio n and report have to be determined by the students themselves.



    Individual level: A persons experiences and anomalies of understanding have created unique questions that can create certain aspects of the task that drive this person to be very active and highly motivated. This gives the person a high individual ownership. We developed hypotheses concerning the relation between ownership, motivation and competence and we see some evidence in the cases reported in this thesis. The importance of exploratory talks to enhance learning, and to see aspects of communication as part of the motivation are discussed in the model of ownership, motivation and competence that is proposed

  • 6.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    The importance of interaction and talk to enhance physics understanding2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Two dimensions of student ownership of learning during small-group work with miniprojects and context rich problems in physics2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis the theoretical framework student ownership of learning (SOL) is developed both theoretically and with qualitative research, based on studies of small-group work in physics with miniprojects and context rich problems. Ownership is finally defined as actions of choice and control, i.e. the realised opportunities to own organisation of the work. The dimension group ownership of learning refers to the groups actions of choice and control of the management of the task: how the task is determined, performed and finally reported. The other dimension, the individual student ownership of learning, refers to the individual student's own question/idea that comes from own experiences, interests, or anomalies of understanding; an idea/question that recurs several times and leads to new insights. From literature and from own data, categories are constructed for group and individual student ownership of learning, which have been iteratively sharpened in order to identify ownership in these two dimensions. As a consequence, the use of the framework student ownership of learning is a way to identify an optimal level of ownership for better learning and higher motivation in physics teaching.The first part of the thesis gives an overview of the theoretical background to the studies made, and summarises the findings. The second part consists of six articles that report case studies with analyses of audio/video-recorded student cooperative work, and student group discussions, from three collections of data: 1) students working with miniprojects in teacher education, 2) upper secondary school students taking a physics course that includes both context rich problems with group discussions and miniprojects, and 3), aeronautical engineering students working with context rich problems in an introductory physics course at university.The thesis describes in a fine-grained analysis the conversation in the groups based on Barnes discourse moves, and finds that ownership and communication are related. Group discussions are found to be an indicator for group ownership of learning and exploratory talks often promotes individual student ownership of learning

  • 8.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    University students personal ideas about school physics as starting point for dialogic/interactive talk2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Forsman, Jonas
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Linder, Cedric
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    MacKinnon, Allan
    Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, V5A 1S6.
    Moons, Ellen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science.
    Using a disciplinary discourse lens to explore how representations afford meaning making in a typical wave physics course2013In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 625-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We carried out a case study in a wave physics course at a Swedish university in order to investigate the relations between the representations used in the lessons and the experience of meaning making in interview–discussions. The grounding of these interview–discussions also included obtaining a rich description of the lesson environment in terms of the communicative approaches used and the students’ preferences for modes of representations that best enable meaning making. The background for this grounding was the first two lessons of a 5-week course on wave physics (70 students). The data collection for both the grounding and the principal research questions consisted of video recordings from the first two lessons: a student questionnaire of student preferences for representations (given before and after the course) and video-recorded interview–discussions with students (seven pairs and one on their own). The results characterize the use of communicative approaches, what modes of representation were used in the lectures, and the trend in what representations students’ preferred for meaning making, all in order to illustrate how students engage with these representations with respect to their experienced meaning making. Interesting aspects that emerged from the study are discussed in terms of how representations do not, in themselves, necessarily enable a range of meaning making; that meaning making from representations is critically related to how the representations get situated in the learning environment; and how constellations of modes of disciplinary discourse may be necessary but not always sufficient. Finally, pedagogical comments and further research possibilities are presented.

  • 10.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    From everyday life experiences to physics understanding occurring in small group work with context rich problems during introductory physics work at university2007In: Research in Science Education, 37:449-467Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics and Physics, Mälardalen University.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    Department of Mathematics and Physics, Mälardalen University.
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Department of Mathematics and Physics, Mälardalen University.
    Talking physics during small-group work with context rich problems: analysed from an ownership perspective2009In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 455-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides analyses of the conversations when university students work in small groups solving context-rich physics problems. We constructed context-rich, open-ended physics problems related to everyday life situations that lack some information required to solve and complete the tasks. The students' ownership of learning, their actions of choice and control, was analyzed in two dimensions: group and individual. Conversation analyses and flowcharts of the conversation were constructed from the complete transcripts of three groups. The theoretical framework for student ownership of learning demonstrated that it was possible to show that even if students have group ownership of the task, the individual student ownership of learning is not self-evident. The study also demonstrates the methodological power and value of the flowchart to identify conversation patterns in the groups that were effective in the search for exploratory talks and individual questions. We discuss implications for teacher development to enhance group work

  • 12.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Moons, Ellen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science.
    Forsman, Jonas
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Andersson, Steffan
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Linder, Cedric
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Student evaluations of themselves as disciplinary practitioners2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Niedderer, H
    Physics learning with exploratory talks during a miniproject - a case study of four girls working with electric circuits2005In: Journal of Baltic Science Education,1(7), (5-11)Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Niedderer, Hans
    Two Dimensions of Student Ownershipof Learning During Small-Group Work in Physics2008In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education 6:629-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical framework student ownership of learning is developed both theoretically and with qualitative research. The metaphor ownership is related to the process towards meaning making and understanding and is seen as relevant especially to improve physics instruction. The dimension group ownership of learning refers to the groups actions of choice and control of the management of the task; how the task is determined, performed and finally reported. The other dimension, the individual student ownership of learning, refers to an individual students own question/idea that comes from own experiences, interests or anomalies of understanding; an idea/question that comes back several times and leads to new insights. From literature and from our own data, we have developed categories for group and individual student ownership of learning, which were iteratively sharpened in order to identify ownership in the two dimensions. As a consequence, we argue for use of the framework student ownership of learning as a way to identify an optimal level of ownership for better learning and higher motivation in physics teaching

  • 15.
    Enghag, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Wahlquist, B
    Hell, L
    Emergent Dialogic Teaching of Newtons Second Law2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Peter
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Educ Culture & Commun, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Enghag, Margareta
    Stockholm Univ, Math & Sci Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The problem-solving process in physics as observed when engineering students at university level work in groups2015In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 380-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem-solving process is investigated for five groups of students when solving context-rich problems in an introductory physics course included in an engineering programme. Through transcripts of their conversation, the paths in the problem-solving process have been traced and related to a general problem-solving model. All groups exhibit backward moves to earlier stages in the problem-solving process. These earlier stages are revisited by the groups for identifying sub-problems, setting parameter values or even restating the goal. We interpret this action as coming from the fact that the students have not yet developed a knowledge base and a problem-solving scheme. Connected to the backward moves in the process are opportunities for the group members to build such a knowledge base from contributions and experiences from all group members. Problem contents that induce such moves are identified and can thus be considered by science teachers when constructing problems for group work.

  • 17.
    Jonsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Enghag, Margareta
    Gustafsson, Peter
    Discussing Physics in Groups Using Quantitative and Qualitative Problems2011Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
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