Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden, Loughborough University, UK & Volvo Powertrain, Sweden .
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, Sweden & Loughborough University, UK.
    De Vin, Leo
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, Sweden & Loughborough University, UK.
    The impact of information presentation on work environment and product quality: a case study2008In: Proceedings of the 40th annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference, Reykjavik: NES , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In manufacturing, it is vital that production personnel have the right information at the right time and place. The main purpose of information delivered to a workplace is to support the worker in a way that contributes to the quality of the product as well as productivity. However, when information processing becomes a large part of the workload, the time for core workplace activities is reduced. A study was conducted at a heavy diesel engine assembly line with the aim of finding how the assembly personnel interact with the information presented to them in their work context and how this affected quality and productivity. The study focused on four assembly stations and involved 70 assembly workers over a period of ten days and nights during which 2600 standard and customised variant engines were assembled. The main feature of the study was a change in the information system that reduced the amount of data and information provided, changed the location of the information, and modified the timing of information presentation. Results from the study show that the information presented at an assembly workstation influences the quality as well as the assembly process itself. The number of internal rejects decreased by 40% on two of the stations and on the other two stations no errors occurred during the study. This influence on the assembly process is of great importance from a quality perspective; by changing the information system and thereby the workers’ behaviour, the errors were reduced significantly. Whilst errors are few and detected internally, redressing these errors is a waste. Furthermore, an adequate information system boosts operator confidence and reduces cognitive stress levels. The information system used in this study was relatively simple (simpler than the regular system) and based on colour coded cards. Nevertheless, the impact was major and this indicates that when designing an information system for mass-customised assembly, a wide range of solutions needs to be considered. A study in final assembly of heavy trucks is planned for the future where the ultimate goal is to arrive at worker and task tailored presentation of information in customised assembly.

  • 2.
    Case, Keith
    et al.
    Loughborough University, UK & University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    Loughborough University, UK, University of Skövde, Sweden, Volvo Powertrain, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Thorvald, Peter
    Loughborough University, UK & University of Skövde, Sweden.
    De Vin, Leo
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    An assembly line information system study2008In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology – XXII: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR 2008) / [ed] Kai Cheng, Harris Makatsoris and David Harrison, Uxbridge: Brunel University , 2008, p. 181-188Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
    Credibility of Simulation Results – a Philosophical Perspective on Virtual Manufacturing2012In: Proceedings of the 13th Mechatronics Forum International Conference / [ed] R.Scheidl & B. Jakoby, Linz: TRAUNER Verlag, 2012, p. 784-791Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the factors that play a role in credibility of simulation results. It focuses on virtual manufacturing and in particular resource simulation as an example. However, a simulation model can be used in a number of different ways. Verification and validation of models is amongst other factors important for credibility. In this area, much work has been carried out in defense research. There are also some striking similarities between virtual manufacturing and information fusion, in particular in the field of human competence development related to credibility of simulations.

  • 4.
    de Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science.
    Feature-based process planning for sheet metal components revisited2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract

    The concept of form features in design and manufacturing is not new, but has in recent times received renewed attention in industry and academia. Manufacturing features play an important role in process planning. There are different ways to extract these manufacturing features from a product model, depending on how the model was generated. Problems related to feature extraction and reasoning include feature interactions and tolerances. For sheet metal components, some additional issues exist as the base material is flat sheet whereas the completed product is usually a three-dimensional structure. Feature abstractions can be used to avoid problems in manufacturing and increase flexibility in decision making. Compared to machining, some additional functions exist in sheet metal process planning such as flat wrap generation and nesting

  • 5.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Form-Feature Based Process Planning: Part 1 : Overview2011In: IMC-28 : Manufacturing Sustainability: Proceedings of the 28th international manufacturing conference, 2011, p. 236-245Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Form-Feature Based Process Planning: Part 2: Sheet Metal Examples2011In: IMC-28 : Manufacturing Sustainability: Proceedings of the 28th international manufacturing conference, 2011, p. 246-255Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    On the Suitability of the Information Fusion JDL-U Model as a Reference Model for Virtual Product and Production development2009In: 19th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing 2009 (FAIM 2009): Proceedings of a meeting held 6-8 July 2009, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom / [ed] Nabhani, F., Curran Associates , 2009, p. 1348-1355Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Plagiering: en moralisk fråga eller en pedagogisk utmaning?2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln beskriver plagiat men även otillåtet samarbete. Uppfattningarna om vad som räknas till plagiat varierar dock. Plagiat är inte lika med fusk, för fusk krävs uppsåt att vilseleda. Plagiat uppstår ofta när studenter känner tidspress eller osäkerhet. Lärare brukar upptäcka indikeringar på möjligt plagiat på manga olika sätt, det är relativt sällan att antiplagieringsverktyg larmar utan att läraren redan har fått misstankar. Sättet som plagiat hanteras på beror på ett antal faktorer, till exempel om studenten vet om korrekt källhantering eller ej. Inte alla fall av plagiat blir ärenden för disciplinsnämnden. Som lärare kan man förebygga plagiat på olika sätt. Dels handlar det om information och träning för studenter, dels handlar det om utformning av examinationsuppgifter, till exempel variation av uppgifter och muntlig återkoppling.

  • 9.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Process Planning Issues in Air Bending of Sheet Metal2009In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Swedish Production Symposium, SPS '09, Göteborg, 2009, p. 334-341Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Simulation, Models, and Results: Reflections on their Nature and Credibility2015In: Proceedings of Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2015, Wolverhampton, UK / [ed] Chike F. Oduoza, Wolverhampton, UK: The Choir Press , 2015, p. 148-155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation tools are widely used across the product, process and resource domains of product- and production development. This paper discusses the nature of simulation models and the wide use of simulation models .It uses virtual manufacturing, in particular discrete event simulation project methodology, as an example to elucidate important aspects of simulation, in particular human roles and some selected project phases of which verification and validation in relation to the simulation’s intended purpose are discussed in particular. The paper uses the NASA CAS model for credibility assessment of simulations to arrive at a schematic representation of how overall credibility as composed of aspect related to the model, the data, and the model’s use.

  • 11.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Virtual Manufacturing Practice and Advanced Applications2010In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Machine Design and Production: UMTIK 14 / [ed] Akkök, M. et al, Güzelyurt: Middle East Technical University , 2010, p. 19-38Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This keynote gives a general description of simulation and its associated system of interest. In the context of virtual manufacturing, three domains can be distinguished; product domain, process  domain  and  resource  domain.  Examples  of  simulation  in  these there  domains  are given, as well as some examples of simulation across these domains. Typical steps/phases in  a  simulation  project  are  described,  as  well  as  common  pitfalls.  In  industrial  simulation projects, usually a number of stakeholders are involved with different maturity/experience in the  field  of  simulation.  It  is  described  how  such  industrial  simulation  projects  can  be supported by a handbook, developed in close collaboration with a group of companies. As one example of advanced applications, simulation-based remote monitoring and diagnostics is  described.  The  other  example  of  advanced  applications  given  in  the  paper  is  that  of simulation-based optimisation.

  • 12.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Virtual manufacturing: Theory and Practice2012In: Manufacturing Engineering / [ed] Savarese, Anthony B., New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter gives a general description of simulation and its associated system of interest. In the context of virtual manufacturing, three domains can be distinguished; product domain, process domain and resource domain. Examples of simulation in these there domains are given, as well as some examples of simulation across these domains. Typical steps/phases in a simulation project are described, as well as common pitfalls. In industrial simulation projects, usually a number of stakeholders are involved with different maturity/experience in the field of simulation. It is described how such industrial simulation projects can be supported by a handbook, developed in close collaboration with a group of companies. As one example of advanced applications, simulation-based remote monitoring and diagnostics is described. The other example of advanced applications given in the paper is that of simulation-based optimisation. Many simulation tools and projects aim at providing decision support to a human decision maker. High level information fusion, a development originating from defence research, also aims at providing decisions support. A comparison between virtual manufacturing and information fusion reveals that a popular reference model for information fusion called JDL-model is very apt to serve as a reference model for virtual manufacturing.

  • 13.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
    Virtual Manufacturing Theory and Practice2011In: Manufacturing Engineering / [ed] Anthony B. Savarese, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011, p. 1-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives a general description of simulation and its associated system of interest. In the context of virtual manufacturing, three domains can be distinguished; product domain, process domain and resource domain. Examples of simulation in these there domains are given, as well as some examples of simulation across these domains. Typical steps/phases in a simulation project are described, as well as common pitfalls. In industrial simulation projects, usually a number of stakeholders are involved with different maturity/experience in the field of simulation. It is described how such industrial simulation projects can be supported by a handbook, developed in close collaboration with a group of companies. As one example of advanced applications, simulation-based remote monitoring and diagnostics is described. The other example of advanced applications given in the paper is that of simulation-based optimisation. Many simulation tools and projects aim at providing decision support to a human decision maker. High level information fusion, a development originating from defence research, also aims at providing decisions support. A comparison between virtual manufacturing and information fusion reveals that a popular reference model for information fusion called JDL-model is very apt to serve as a reference model for virtual manufacturing.

  • 14.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Virtual Systems Research Centre, University of Skövde.
    Holm, Magnus
    Virtual Systems Research Centre, University of Skövde.
    Ng, Amos
    Virtual Systems Research Centre, University of Skövde.
    The Information Fusion JDL-U Model as a Reference Model for Virtual Manufacturing2010In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 629-638Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Karlstad Lean Factory: An instructional factory for game-based lean manufacturing training2017In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 268-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation for training lean manufacturing ranges from simple paper-based or LEGO®-based games to larger scale simulation environments, for instance push car assembly. Some models for game-based learning are discussed and a model for lean manufacturing training is adopted . Many types of simulation may be suitable for teaching some basic elements of Lean manufacturing to students, but they are often less suitable for training industry workers in applying Lean manufacturing in their work environment. The latter group is more used to intuitive learning than to formal instruction. Thus, it is important that a training environment for this group more realistically represents the work environment; otherwise training transfer will be limited. For this reason, a lean training environment that includes materials processing stations as well as assembly areas was created. The stations exhibit some realistic behaviour such as stochastic breakdowns. Based on a comparison between factory workers and university students, five hypotheses for testing in future work are proposed.

  • 16.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Jacobsson, Lasse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Odhe, JanErik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Wickberg, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Lean Production Training for the Manufacturing Industry: Experiences from Karlstad Lean Factory2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 1873-6580, E-ISSN 2212-0173, Vol. 11, article id 1019-1026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both literature and manufacturing companies state that simulators for providing training in lean production to industrialemployees must be similar to the work environment. This motivated the design of Karlstad Lean Factory, which is a trainingenvironment that realistically resembles an industrial environment. It is a full-scale training facility that incorporates acombination of materials processing and assembly. Parameters such as processing times, breakdown intervals and repair typescan be set. Examples of basic and more advanced training scenarios are given. Experiences from training groups of industrialemployees are described; inhomogeneity of these groups requires some specific attention.

  • 17.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Ng, Amos
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Editorial2009In: International Journal of Sustainable Engineering, ISSN 1939-7038, E-ISSN 1939-7046, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 79-79Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ng, Amos
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Guest Editorial2009In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 861-862Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Ng, AmosThorvald, PeterSullivan, WilliamAhmad, Munir
    Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent manufactring: FAIM 2008 June 30th – July 2nd, 2008 University of Skövde, Sweden2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ng, Amos
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Urenda, M
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Jägstam, M
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    King, P.D.
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Ballester, E.
    Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain.
    Fuentes, F.
    Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain.
    MMI: Engineering Studies with a Truly European Dimension2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes a new engineering Master's program called MMII (manufacturing management and industrial informatics) that is co-located at universities in Sweden, Spain and the United Kingdom. One reason for developing the program was that the changing manufacturing landscape due to globalisation, increasing complexity of manufacturing systems itself and an increased need to integrate manufacturing systems with corporate information systems forces educators to find solutions that provide industry with engineers who have the right skills. Apart from "hard" skills related to the above-mentioned issues, industry increasingly also requires engineers to have well-developed "soft" skills such as an ability to work in an international environment and willingness to work abroad. A program given at only one location would not provide a truly European dimension and besides, it would draw heavily upon the teaching resources; hence the decision to seek international partners with complementing competences and resources; these were found at universities in Skövde, Valencia and Loughborough. In Loughborough, students read capita selecta from CAE (computer aided engineering) during one semester. In Valencia, they spend a project-based semester on international industrial management. In Skövde, they read virtual manufacturing during one semester and carry out their degree project during the final semester.

  • 21.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Solding, Petter
    Swecast.
    Ng, Amos
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Approaches to Energy Efficiency Assessment: A State of the Art Study2009In: Energy Efficient and Low Carbon Manufacturing, Dublin: Trinity college , 2009, p. 9-16Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    De Vin, Leo
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Solis, JorgeKarlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Proceedings of the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference Mechatronics 20142014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Holm, Magnus
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Doverborn, Josefin
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ng, Amos
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Optimisation of Operation Sequences in Flexible Manufacturing Cells Using Virtual Manufacturing Tools2009In: FAIM 2009 Proceedings of the 19 th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing / [ed] Nabhani, Farhad, Middlesbrough: University of Teesside , 2009, p. 1317-1324Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Johansson, Daniel
    et al.
    MSE Weibull AB.
    De Vin, Leo
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    A Low Cost Video See-Through Head Mounted Display for Increased Situation Awareness in an Augmented Environment2008In: Proceedings of 5th INTUITION International Conference, Turin: INTUITION , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Johansson, Daniel
    et al.
    MSE Weibull AB.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Design and development of an augmented environment with high user mobility for training purposes2008In: Proceedings of Mechatronics 2008, Limerick: University of Limerick , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Daniel
    et al.
    MSE Weibull AB.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Enineering.
    Omnidirectional Robotic Telepresence through Augmented Virtuality for Increased Situation Awareness in Hazardous Environments2009In: Systems, Man and Cybernetics: Conference Proceedings, IEEE , 2009, p. 6-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a novel low-cost robotic telepresence approach to situation awareness, initially aimed for hazardous environments. The robot supports omnidirectional movement, wide field of vision, haptic feedback and binaural sound. It is controlled through an augmented virtuality environment with an intuitive position displacement scheme that supports physical mobility. The operator thereby can conduct work away from danger whilst retaining situation awareness of the real environment.

  • 27.
    Johansson, Daniel
    et al.
    MSE Weibull AB.
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.
    Towards Convergence in a Virtual Environment: Omnidirectional Movement, Physical Feedback, Social Interaction and Vision2012In: Mechatronic Systems, ISSN 1986-5147, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement, physical feedback, social interaction and vision are important factors for humans inthe real world, and therefore also in a virtual world whose aim is to mimic the real world. The effect of avirtual environment application could increase through the use of a human-computer interface that canmatch natural human capability in such areas, and several novel components are presented herein. Here,movement and feedback is gained through an omnidirectional walking surface that enables untetheredmovement throughout a virtual world without imposing physical restrictions. Although several differentapproaches exist to the mechanical problem of two-dimensional translation, an alternative top-downapproach can reduce complexity to one-dimensional space. Furthermore, interchange of subtle bodylanguage can be vital and achieved with a system that supports high fidelity in virtual texturerepresentation of users, which can be more powerful in some cases than virtual geometry. Also, a newapproach is taken to the design of a head mounted display with minimal weight through optics in the formof soft contact lenses, mounted directly on the eyes.

  • 28. Moore, Philip
    et al.
    Ng, Amos
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    San Ho, Y
    Sundberg, Martin
    Wong, Bill
    De Vin, Leo
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Advanced Machine Service Support using Internet-enabled 3-D based Virtual Engineering2008In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 46, no 15, p. 4215-4235Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ng, Amos
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Adolfsson, Josef
    Sundberg, Martin
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Virtual Manufacturing for Press Line Monitoring and Diagnostics2008In: International journal of machine tools & manufacture, ISSN 0890-6955, E-ISSN 1879-2170, Vol. 35, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden & Loughborough University, United Kingdom .
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    University of Skövde, Volvo Powertrain, Sweden & Loughborough University, United Kingdom .
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    De Vin, Leo
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, Sweden & Loughborough University, United Kingdom .
    Demands on Technology from a Human Automatism Perspective in Manual Assembly2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing / [ed] Leo De Vin, Skövde: Runit AB , 2008, p. 632-637Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    Högberg, Dan
    De Vin, Leo
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics.
    Case, Keith
    Information Presentation in Manual Assembly – A Cognitive Ergonomics Analysis2008In: Proceedings of the 40th annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference, Reykjavik: NES , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf