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  • 1.
    Calles, Olle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Griffioen, Ben
    IMARES Wageningen UR, Netherlands.
    Winter, Erwin
    IMARES Wageningen UR, Netherlands.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Nyqvist, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Hagelin, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Stina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Fish Migration River Monitoring Plan2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fish have problems passing the Afsluitdijk Dam that separates the Wadden Sea from Lake IJsselmeer. To re-establish the connectivity and thereby allow fish to pass there is an initiative to build a fishway, the Fish Migration River (FMR), at the Konwerderzand sluice complex. This report proposes a monitoring program to evaluate the functionality of the FMR, but also to monitor passage possibilities through the existing sluices. The goals of the monitoring plan are to estimate 1) The overall passage past the Afsluitdijk dam to and from Lake IJsselmeer, 2) The attraction efficiency, 3) The passage efficiency, and 4) The use of the FMR as habitat and for acclimatization for the transition into freshwater.

    We present an overview of previous and ongoing monitoring in the area to establish the current state of knowledge. The report also includes a presentation of available and suitable methods for a future monitoring program considering the broad spectra of target fish species, and their abundances. The proposed program includes a description of study design and available techniques and cost-estimates of the monitoring program.

    The proposed program will target ten species: European eel (aal), flounder (bot), three-spined stickleback (dreidoornige stekelbaars), twait shad (fint), North Sea houting (houting), river lamprey (rieverprik), smelt (spiering), Atlantic salmon (zalm), brown trout (forel) and sea lamprey (zeeprik). The monitoring program includes plans for how to capture, tag and track the study fish using the most suitable tagging techniques. Furthermore, the most optimal sites for installation of automatic data detection stations are identified.

    The total cost for the proposed project is 3.5 M€ and covers both investments in equipment and costs for personnel. However, if costs for investments in techniques such as RFId-stations and fish counters are excluded, the total cost is reduced to 1 M€ for a program running two years before and four years after the completion of the FMR. The program is considered sufficient to evaluate the FMR at Kornwerederzand from the most important perspectives: the overall passage efficiency and the use of the FMR as habitat.

    It should be noted that this report is the first step towards a full-scale monitoring program, giving insight into possible methods, study design and associated costs. The next important step will be to develop the program in more detail and to start the initial phase of the monitoring project. We predict that such activities will identify the need for, and the relevance of, a more extensive monitoring program to study the effects of the FMR on a population level and on a large geographical scale.

  • 2.
    Enefalk, Åsa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Winter sheltering by juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta): Effects of stream wood and an instream ecothermic predator2017In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In boreal streams, juvenile salmonids spend substantial amounts of time sheltering in the streambed and in stream wood, presumably as a means of protection against the physical environment and from terrestrial endothermic predators. Relatively little is known about sheltering by salmonids in response to instream ectothermic predators.We tested the effects of burbot (Lota lota) on the winter sheltering behaviour of PIT-tagged 0+ brown trout (Salmo trutta) in daylight and darkness. Sheltering in the streambed by trout was studied in the presence and absence of fine wood bundles.We found that the use of streambed and fine wood was lower in darkness than in daylight. Availability of fine wood significantly decreased sheltering in the streambed, and this effect was more pronounced in daylight than in darkness. The presence of a burbot significantly decreased sheltering in the streambed, had no effect on use of fine wood and resulted in a higher number of exposed trout.Our results indicate that juvenile brown trout decrease streambed sheltering in response to a burrowing, ectothermic predator.

  • 3.
    Filipsson, Karl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Erlandsson, Ann
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of temperature and a piscivorous fish on diel winter behaviour of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)2019In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low winter temperatures constrain predator-detection and escape capabilities, making poikilotherms vulnerable to predation. Investigations of temperature effects on predator-prey interactions can therefore be of special importance in light of ongoing climate change, where winter temperatures are predicted to increase substantially at northern latitudes. Behavioral responses of stream fishes to terrestrial predators in winter are well recognised, whereas responses to predatory fish have received little attention. Using stream flumes, we examined the anti-predator behaviour of one-summer-old brown trout (Salmo trutta) at 3 and 8 degrees C in the presence and absence of burbot (Lota lota) under night, dawn, and daylight conditions. Burbot was placed upstream of the trout, separated by net screens. Lower temperature and the presence of burbot reduced trout activity. Light increased trout shelter use, and trout sheltered more in the presence of burbot. An interaction between the presence of burbot and light conditions affected trout position in the flumes: at night and dawn, trout positioned themselves further downstream when burbot were present than when absent, whereas during the day, trout maintained the same position in the presence or absence of the predator. Our results suggest that piscivorous fish, in addition to terrestrial predators, shape the behaviour of prey fishes in streams during winter. We show how predator avoidance results in altered diel patterns of juvenile brown trout under winter conditions, and that temperature has additional effects on trout behaviour.

  • 4.
    Hart, Paul BJ
    et al.
    Department of Biology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Eriksson, Stina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gustafsson, Stina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Lans, Linnea
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Norrgård, Johnny R
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Piccolo, John J
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Rees, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Familiarity with a partner facilitates the movementof drift foraging juvenile grayling (Thymallus thymallus) into a new habitatarea2014In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 515-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preferring one social partner over another can enhance fitness. This paper reports that juvenile grayling were significantly more likely to enter and forage in new, upstream habitats when paired with familiar versus unfamiliar social partners. Fish paired with unfamiliar partners or when alone were more reluctant to enter the new area. The entry times for both fish in a familiar pair were significantly correlated, but uncorrelated for unfamiliar fish. These differences between familiars and unfamiliars were consistent over a 2-week period. Fish with familiar partners spent more time within three body lengths of each other than did those with unfamiliars. The results are discussed in relation to optimality models of drift foraging, which do not included sociality. It is suggested that the social dimension creates a more dynamic foraging response to variable environmental conditions and could have consequences for growth.

  • 5.
    Piccolo, John
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Foraging Behaviour of Brown Trout: A Model Species For Linking Individual Ecology to Population Dynamics?2017In: Brown Trout: Biology, Ecology and Management / [ed] Javier Lobón-Cerviá and Nuria Sanz, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, 1, p. 369-382Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Piccolo, John
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Experimental Data for Drift-Foraging Models: What's New and What's Next2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimating net energy intake (NEI) of is a key requirement in a new suite of models being developed to assess habitat quality for stream fish.  To estimate NEI, habitat quality models use a drift-foraging sub-model, typically based on Hughes and Dill's (1990, CJFAS) well-known model.  The Hughes and Dill model estimates the energetic costs and benefits of a fish's position in the stream based upon swimming costs and prey capture success. The model includes a number of unrealistic assumptions about prey detection and capture, and swimming costs, however, some of which might be addressed through lab or field experiments. Here we present the results of some recent experiments on the effects of water depth and velocity, and cold temperatures, on the foraging success of juvenile salmonids. We demonstrate that prey capture success is reduced by both faster velocities and colder temperatures, and that swimming costs appear to play a minor role in estimating NEI.  We also report on the effects of fish species and size. In general, much experimental work remains to be done in the area of drift foraging theory, however, and we will discuss ongoing research and future needs.

  • 7.
    Tamario, Carl
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.;Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Degerman, Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Coastal river connectivity and the distribution of ascending juvenile European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.): Implications for conservation strategies regarding fish-passage solutions2019In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 612-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many diadromous fish populations are declining and at risk of collapse. Lack of river connectivity is a major contributor to these declines, as free migration routes between marine and freshwater habitats are crucial for life-history completion. For the conservation and ultimately recovery of such species, it is imperative that remedial measures aimed at increasing connectivity are effective. This study investigated the distribution patterns of ascending juvenile European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) in rivers in south-western Sweden, with a focus on the effects of barriers and measures that aim to reduce the impact of barriers, i.e. fish-passage solutions (FPSs). Eel occurrence data were spatially and temporally integrated with the national databases of dams and FPSs in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment to evaluate their effect on ascending eel distribution. The types of barriers assessed were: (i) dams with nature-like fishways; (ii) dams with eel ramps; (iii) dams with technical fishways; and (iv) dams without FPSs. Dams fitted with eel ramps or technical fishways, as well as dams without FPSs, produced a significant negative effect on the probability of eel occurrence upstream. This negative effect was not found for dams fitted with nature-like fishways, indicating that these solutions may function better than the other FPS types in this study. The probability of eel occurrence decreased with distance from the sea and increased with area sampled, number of electrofishing runs, water temperature, and with the size of the bottom substrate. We suggest that future conservation strategies for improving the natural immigration of juvenile eels should include optimizing FPS function (e.g. placement and design), the continued maintenance of FPSs, the construction of nature-like fishways, and preferably the removal of dams, which will also benefit the downstream migration of maturing eels as well as restoring other ecosystem services.

  • 8.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences. Hokkaido University, Japan.
    Brown trout in ice-covered streams: effects of surface ice on anti-predator behavior and habitat use2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Brown trout responses to ice cover2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Degerman, Erik
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Freshwater Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Orebro, Sweden.
    Tamario, Carl
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Freshwater Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, € Orebro, Sweden.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Climbing the ladder: an evaluation of three different anguillid eel climbing substrata and placement of upstream passage solutions at migration barriers2019In: Animal Conservation, ISSN 1367-9430, E-ISSN 1469-1795, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conservation programmes for endangered, long-lived and migratory species often have to target multiple life stages. The bottlenecks associated with the survival of juvenile anguillid eels migrating into inland waters, the survival and growth of the freshwater life stage, as well as the recruitment and survival of silver eels, migrating back to the ocean to spawn, must be resolved. In this study, we focus on the efficiency of passage solutions for upstream migrating juveniles. Such solutions can consist of inclined ramps lined with wetted climbing substrata. We evaluated different commonly used substrata in a controlled experiment, recorded eel behaviour at the entrance of the ramp with infrared videography and validated the experimental results at a hydropower dam, where we also investigated the effects of ramp placement on performance. In the experiment on eel substratum selection, 40 % of the eels passed in lanes with studded substratum, whereas only 21 and 5 % passed using open weave and bristle substrata, respectively. Video analysis revealed that the studded substratum attracted more approaches and initiated climbs than the other substrata, but once a climb had been initiated, passage success rates did not differ between substrata. Eels using the studded substratum climbed 26 % faster than those using the bristle substratum and almost four times as fast as those climbing in the open weave. The superior performance of the studded substratum was supported by data from the field validation. Moreover, ramps positioned by the bank with low water velocities caught the most eels, but proximity to the dam had no effect on performance. To strengthen the European eel population, more juveniles need to reach their freshwater feeding grounds. A critical step to achieve this increase is to equip upstream passage solutions with suitable substrata and to optimize ramp placement at migration obstacles.

  • 11.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Overwintering behaviour of stocked brown trout: effects of the rearing environment and river habitat complexity2017In: 50th Anniversary Symposium of the Fisheries Society of the British Isles, Exeter, UK, 3-7 July, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In channelized and structurally simple temperature streams and rivers, adverse winter conditions may challenge the ability of riverine fishes to adapt in terms of their behaviour and physiology. Access to shelter is a key habitat factor that may influence overwinter survival chances and, consequently, population dynamics. In many river restoration projects, structural elements are added to the river to increase the complexity of the physical environment. When this habitat enhancement is combined with a stocking programme, the stocked fish mayadopt different behavioural strategies to cope with the winter season depending both onthe rearing environment in the hatchery and the level of habitat complexity in the river. In this study, young-of-the-year brown trout were reared in either barren or structurally enhanced tanks, and the effects of the rearing environment on resting ventilation rate (proxy for resting metabolic rate) and score in an open field test (proxy for activity) were assessed. In side channels of a Swedish regulatedriver, trout were then released at untreated control sites or at sites that were structurally enhanced by adding whole trees to the water. Throughout winter, trout were tracked on a weekly basis, and their movements as influenced by the river habitat complexity and the previous hatchery environment were analysed. The rearing environment affected resting metabolicrates and activity, which resulted in different behavioural overwintering strategies, and adding trees to the side channels increased apparent survival. These results have implications for managing river restoration projects and further studies of stream fish winter ecology.

  • 12.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Salmonid behaviour under winter conditions2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Winter conditions are believed to play an important role in the population dynamics of northern temperate stream fish, challenging the ability of fish to physiologically and behaviourally adapt. Climate change is predicted to increase both mean temperature and temperature fluctuations, especially during winter, leading to dynamic environmental conditions in terms of river ice production and flow. Therefore, knowledge about the winter ecology of stream fish is important for predicting and mitigating anthropogenic impacts on fish production in boreal streams. Stream salmonids are relatively active throughout winter, and behavioural responses to different winter conditions may be critical for survival. Yet, relatively little is known about overwintering behaviour of salmonids, particularly in streams with ice. In this doctoral thesis, I report the results from experimental field and laboratory studies on the behavioural ecology of juvenile salmonids under winter conditions. My results from the field show that salmonids grow more and use a broader range of habitats in the presence of surface ice than in its absence. Results from the laboratory experiments show that the presence of surface ice increases food intake rates, reduces stress and affects social interactions. These laboratory results may explain the positive effects of ice cover on growth that was found in the field experiment. Moreover, I show that drift-feeding ability is reduced at low temperatures, and that nocturnal drift foraging under winter conditions has a low efficiency.

  • 13.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Stress responses of juvenile brown trout under winter conditions in a laboratory stream2017In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 802, no 1, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Winter can be a challenging period for fish in northern temperate rivers and streams, particularly in those that are channelized, structurally simple or regulated by, for instance, hydropower. In these systems, dynamic sub-surface ice formation commonly occurs and stable periods with ice cover may be short. Under these adverse conditions, access to shelters has been shown to be an important factor that influences overwinter survival, and exclusion from shelters by anchor ice may cause stress. Here, stress responses of juvenile brown trout under simulated winter conditions in an artificial stream were studied. Trout were subjected to three treatments in which the trout (1) were excluded from an instream wood shelter, simulating the effects of anchor ice, (2) had access to the shelter or (3) had surface ice cover in addition to the shelter. There was a positive correlation between ventilation frequency and plasma cortisol concentration. Trout without access to shelter had 30% higher ventilation frequency than trout with instream shelter and surface ice, but no differences in cortisol concentration or stress colour were found between the treatments. River regulation that reduces surface ice and increases anchor ice formation may lead to increased stress and consequently reduce overwinter survival rates.

  • 14.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Structural complexity in the hatchery rearing environment affects activity, resting metabolic rate and post‐release behaviour in brown trout Salmo trutta2019In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 638-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of structural enrichment in the hatchery rearing environment of brown trout Salmo trutta was linked to post‐release performance. Enrichment resulted in reduced swimming activity scored in an open field test and reduced movement in a natural river after release. Also, enrichment increased resting metabolic rates, which correlated positively with overwinter growth.

  • 15.
    Watz, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Winter behaviour of stream salmonids: effects of temperature, light, and ice cover2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In boreal streams, stream salmonids typically face low water temperatures and variable ice conditions during winter, and thus stream salmonids are expected to use different behavioural strategies to cope with these environmental conditions. The studies presented in this thesis explore how temperature, light intensity, and surface ice affect salmonid behaviour, with focus on drift-feeding and ventilation rates. The first paper reports results from a laboratory study designed to measure prey capture probabilities and reaction distances of drift-feeding Atlantic salmon, brown trout, and European grayling at light intensities simulating daylight and moonlight at seven temperatures ranging from 2 to 11°C. There was a positive relationship between water temperature and prey capture probability for all three species at both light levels, but the temperature-dependence did not scale according to the Metabolic Theory of Ecology. Reaction distance was also positively related to temperature for the three species, which may explain the temperature effects on prey capture probability. The results from this study should be of interest for those working with energetic-based drift-foraging models. In the second paper, the effects of ice cover on the diel behaviour and ventilation rate of brown trout were studied in a laboratory stream. Ice cover is believed to afford protection against endothermic predators, and thus the need for vigilance should be reduced under ice cover. This hypothesis was tested by observing ventilation rates at night, dawn, and during the day in the presence and absence of real, light-permeable surface ice. Further, trout were offered drifting prey during the day to test if ice cover increased daytime foraging activity. Ice cover reduced ventilation rates at dawn and during the day, but not at night. Moreover, trout made more daytime foraging attempts in the presence of ice cover than in its absence. These results suggest that ice cover affects the behaviour of brown trout and presumably has a positive effect on winter survival. Global warming, by reducing the extent or duration of surface ice, may therefore have negative consequences for many lotic fish populations in boreal streams.

  • 16.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Enefalk, Åsa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gustafsson, Stina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Hagelin, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, P. Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Norrgård, Johnny
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Fortum generation.
    Nyqvist, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John J.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Schneider, Lea Dominique
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Jonsson, Bror
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Norsk institutt for naturforskning, Oslo.
    Ice cover alters the behavior and stress level of brown trout Salmo trutta2015In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 820-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface ice in rivers and lakes buffers the thermal environment and provides overhead cover, protecting aquatic animals from terrestrial predators. We tested if surface ice influenced the behavior (swimming activity, aggressive encounters, and number of food items eaten) and stress level (coloration of eyes and body) of stream-living brown trout Salmo trutta at temperatures of 3–4 °C in indoor experimental flumes. We hypothesized that an individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR, as measured by resting ventilation rate) would affect winter behavior. Therefore, groups of 4 trout, consisting of individuals with high, low, or mixed (2 individuals each) RMR, were exposed to experimental conditions with or without ice cover. Ice cover reduced stress responses, as evaluated by body coloration. Also, trout in low RMR groups had a paler body color than those in both mixed and high RMR groups. Trout increased their swimming activity under ice cover, with the highest activity found in high RMR groups. Ice cover increased the number of aggressive encounters but did not influence the number of drifting food items taken by each group. In mixed RMR groups, however, single individuals were better able to monopolize food than in the other groups. As the presence of surface ice increases the activity level and reduces stress in stream-living trout, ice cover should influence their energy budgets and production. The results should be viewed in light of ongoing global warming that reduces the duration of ice cover, especially at high latitudes and altitudes.

  • 17.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Effects of ice cover on the behaviour and growth of brown trout2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Effects of ice cover on the diel behaviour and ventilation rate of juvenile brown trout2013In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 58, no 11, p. 2325-2332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. Winter ice conditions in boreal streams are highly variable, and behavioural responses by fish to river ice may affect overwinter survival rates. One type of ice, surface ice, stabilises water temperatures, reduces instream light levels and may provide overhead cover.
    2. Because surface ice is believed to afford protection against endothermic predators, we predicted that metabolic costs associated with vigilance would be lower under surface ice than in areas lacking surface ice. This potentially favourable effect of ice cover was tested by observing ventilation rates of juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) in a laboratory stream at dawn, during the day and at night in the presence and absence of real, light-permeable surface ice. Further, we offered trout drifting prey during daylight to test whether ice cover increased daytime foraging activity.
    3. Ice cover reduced ventilation rates during the day, but not at night or dawn. Moreover, fish made more daytime foraging attempts in the presence of ice cover than in its absence.
    4. We suggest that the most plausible explanation for these results is that fish experience a reduced perceived predation risk under surface ice.
  • 19.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Ice cover affects the growth of a stream-dwelling fish2016In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 181, no 1, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protection provided by shelter is important for survival and affects the time and energy budgets of animals. It has been suggested that in fresh waters at high latitudes and altitudes, surface ice during winter functions as overhead cover for fish, reducing the predation risk from terrestrial piscivores. We simulated ice cover by suspending plastic sheeting over five 30-m-long stream sections in a boreal forest stream and examined its effects on the growth and habitat use of brown trout (Salmo trutta) during winter. Trout that spent the winter under the artificial ice cover grew more than those in the control (uncovered) sections. Moreover, tracking of trout tagged with passive integrated transponders showed that in the absence of the artificial ice cover, habitat use during the day was restricted to the stream edges, often under undercut banks, whereas under the simulated ice cover condition, trout used the entire width of the stream. These results indicate that the presence of surface ice cover may improve the energetic status and broaden habitat use of stream fish during winter. It is therefore likely that reductions in the duration and extent of ice cover due to climate change will alter time and energy budgets, with potentially negative effects on fish production.

  • 20.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Prey capture rates of two species of salmonids (Salmo trutta and Thymallus thymallus) in an artificial stream: effects of temperature on their functional response2014In: Marine and Freshwater Behaviour & Physiology, ISSN 1023-6244, E-ISSN 1029-0362, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The foraging success of predators depends on how their consumption of prey is affected by prey density under different environmental settings. Here, we measured prey capture rates of drift-feeding juvenile brown trout and European grayling at different prey densities in an artificial stream channel at 5 and 11 °C. Capture rates were lower at 5 than at 11 °C, and the difference was most pronounced at high prey densities. At high prey densities, we also observed that European grayling had higher capture rates than brown trout. Type III functional response curves, i.e. sigmoidal relationships between capture rates and prey densities, fitted the data better than type I (linear) and II (hyperbolic) curves for all four combinations of temperatures and species. These results may explain the dominance of grayling in stream habitats with low water velocities and results such as these may be of use when developing foraging-based food web models of lotic ecosystems that include drift-feeding salmonids.

  • 21.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John J.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Winter Behavior of Brown Trout: The Presence of Ice Cover Influences Activity, Stress and Growth2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predation on fish by mammals and birds may be high during winter in boreal streams, and juvenile salmonids respond by reducing their daytime activity to minimize exposure. Surface ice may offer protection from terrestrial predators, and salmonids under ice cover should spend less time on anti-predator behaviors and increase their activity. Using brown trout as a test species, these predictions were tested in laboratory and field experiments.

    In an artificial laboratory stream, the presence of ice cover reduced stress and increased swimming activity, foraging and aggression. The effect of ice cover on activity was greatest for trout with high resting metabolic rates, suggesting that individual intraspecific differences in metabolism may influence the strategies used to cope with different winter conditions. In a boreal forest stream, we simulated ice by suspending plastic sheeting over five 30-m-long stretches, and trout that spent winter under this simulated ice cover grew better than trout in control stretches. These results may explain why salmonid production is high in rivers with long periods of stable ice cover and should be viewed in light of ongoing global warming.

  • 22.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Carlsson, Niclas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Teemu, Collin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Huusko, Ari
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Kainuu Fisheries Research Station, Paltamo, Finland.
    Jörgen, Johnsson
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lund University.
    Norrgård, Johnny
    Gammelkroppa Lax, Filipstad.
    Nyqvist, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Institute of Marine Research in Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Wood addition in the hatchery and river environments affectspost-releaseperformance of overwintering brown trout2018In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Habitat structural complexity affects the behaviour and physiology of individuals,and responses to the environment can be immediate or influence performancelater in life through delayed effects.

    2. Here, we investigated how structural enrichment, both pre-release in the hatcheryrearing environment and post-release in the wild, influenced winter growthand site fidelity of brown trout stocked into side channels of a regulated river.

    3. Experiencing structural enrichment in the rearing environment during 3 months inautumn had no pre-release effect on growth, but a delayed positive effect afterrelease during the subsequent winter. Moreover, trout recaptured in wood-treatedsections of the side channels had grown more than trout recaptured in controlsections. Wood enrichment in the side channels also increased overwinter sitefidelity.

    4. These results show that adding structure during a relatively short period may altergrowth trajectories, and adding wood to side channels is a cost-effective methodto enhance winter habitat carrying capacity for juvenile salmonids in regulatedrivers.

  • 23.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Elghagen, Jonas
    Elghagen Fiskevård.
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Department of Biology - Aquatic Ecology, Lund University.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Evaluation of a novel mobile floating trap for collecting migrating juvenile eels, Anguilla anguilla, in rivers2017In: Fisheries Management and Ecology, ISSN 0969-997X, E-ISSN 1365-2400, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 512-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve the situation for the threatened European eel in regulated rivers, better methods need to be developed that more efficiently collect and transport juvenile eels past dams. In this study, a novel mobile, floating eel trap is described, and the results from an evaluation of the trap in two Swedish regulated rivers are presented. The mobile trap was designed to reduce the length of the climbing distance while maximizing the width of the entrance. The mobile trap caught more juvenile eels than a stationary eel ladder, serving as control. Furthermore, the mobility of the floating trap enables adaptive placement and thus offers managers the possibility to search for the spatial optimum for trapping efficiency.

  • 24.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    The role of temperature in the drift-feeding behaviour of juvenile stream salmonids2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    The role of water temperature in the foraging behaviour of juvenile stream salmonids2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Per Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Lund University.
    Degerman, Erik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Tamario, Carl
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Calles, Olle
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Enhancing upstream passage solutions for juvenile eels: Effects of climbing substrate and ramp placement2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Juvenile anguillid eels migrating into inland waters often face migration barriers. Upstream passage solutions normally consist of inclined ramps lined with a wetted climbing substrate. In this study, we compared the performance of three commonly used substrate types in a controlled experiment, using European eel as the test species. We also analyzed climbing behavior with videography and validated the experimental results under natural conditions at a hydropower plant. In addition, we investigated the effects of ramp placement. Studded substrate attracted more approaches and climbs and passed more eels at a higher climbing velocity than open weave and bristle substrates, results that were confirmed by the field validation. Moreover, ramps placed in the tailrace caught more eels in low than in high water velocities. To conserve anguillid eels, both safe routes for downstream-migrating adult silver eels and improved recruitment at the freshwater feeding life stage must be achieved. Optimizing ramp position and equipping upstream passage solutions with functioning climbing substrate are key factors to enhance the performance of eel ramps.

  • 27.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
    Otsuki, Y.
    Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
    Nagatsuka, K.
    Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
    Hasegawa, K.
    Hokkaido National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency, Sapporo, Japan.
    Koizumi, I.
    Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
    Temperature-dependent competition between juvenile salmonids in small streams2019In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, p. 1534-1541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biotic interactions affect species distributions, and environmental factors that influence these interactions can play a key role when range shifts in response to environmental change are modelled. In a field experiment using enclosures, we studied the effects of the thermal habitat on intra- versus inter-specific competition of juvenile Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma and white-spotted charr Salvelinus leucomaenis, as measured by differences in specific growth rates during summer in allopatric and sympatric treatments. Previous laboratory experiments have shown mixed results regarding the importance of temperature-dependent competitive abilities as a main driver for spatial segregation in stream fishes, and no study so far has confirmed its existence in natural streams. Under natural conditions in areas where the two species occur in sympatry, Dolly Varden dominate spring-fed tributaries (cold, stable thermal regime), whereas both species often coexist in non-spring-fed tributaries (warm, unstable thermal regime). Enclosures (charr density = 6 per m2) were placed in non-spring-fed (10–14°C) and spring-fed (7–8°C) tributaries. In enclosures placed in non-spring-fed tributaries, Dolly Varden grew 0.81% per day in allopatry and had negative growth (−0.33% per day) in sympatry, whereas growth rates were similar in allopatry and sympatry in spring-fed tributaries (0.68 and 0.58% per day). White-spotted charr grew better in sympatry than in allopatry in both thermal habitats. In non-spring-fed tributaries, they grew 0.17 and 0.79% per day and in spring-fed tributaries 0.46 and 0.75% per day in allopatry and sympatry, respectively. The negative effect of inter-specific competition from white-spotted charr on Dolly Varden thus depended on the thermal habitat. However, there was no strong evidence of a temperature-dependent effect of intra- and inter-specific competition on white-spotted charr growth. Multiple factors may shape species distribution patterns, and we show that temperature may mediate competitive outcomes and thus coexistence in stream fish. These effects of temperature will be important to incorporate into mechanistic and dynamic species distribution models.

  • 28.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Day and night drift-feeding by juvenile salmonids at low water temperatures2014In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 505-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drift-feeding salmonids in boreal streams face temperatures below physical optima for extensive periods of the year. Because juvenile salmonids react to low water temperatures by becoming nocturnal, knowledge about their foraging ability at low light intensities in cold water is needed to accurately estimate energy intake during non-summer conditions. In a laboratory stream channel, we studied temperature effects on the drift-feeding behaviour of juvenile Atlantic salmon, brown trout, and European grayling in simulated daylight and moonlight at temperatures ranging from 2 °C to 11 °C. Prey capture probability was positively related to temperature, but the temperature dependence did not agree with predictions of the Metabolic Theory of Ecology. Furthermore, reaction distance was positively related to temperature for the three species, which may be one of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the temperature effects on prey capture probability. Overall, the three species had similar capture rates at the different temperature and light levels, although there were species differences. European grayling had a slightly higher prey capture probability than brown trout, and brown trout had a shorter reaction distance than Atlantic salmon and European grayling. These results have implications for both energetics-based drift-foraging theory and for studies of winter ecology.

  • 29.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John J
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    The role of temperature in the prey capture probability of drift-feeding juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta)2011In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cold water temperatures are widely supposed to reduce the food intake of stream salmonids. Although cold temperatures have been documented to reduce swimming ability, digestion and gastric evacuation rates, little is known about how temperature influences the ability of fish to capture prey. We examined the effects of water temperature on the prey capture probability of drift-feeding juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta) in a laboratory stream. Temperatures ranged between 5.7 °C and 14 °C. We found significant effects of water temperature on prey capture probability and capture manoeuvre time. The mean capture probability dropped from 96% at 14 °C to 53% at 5.7 °C. At 8 °C and higher temperatures, foraging performances did not differ much among treatments. We suggest that reduced swimming ability could be one of the most important mechanisms for the observed pattern of reduced prey capture probability at cold water temperatures, but prey detection limitations and predator avoidance may play a role. Our results will be of use for bioenergetics-based drift-foraging models, which to date have not incorporated a temperature-dependent prey capture function.

  • 30.
    Watz, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Piccolo, John J.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Temperature-dependent prey capture efficiency and foraging modes of brown trout Salmo trutta2012In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prey capture success and foraging mode were studied in brown trout Salmo trutta at temperatures ranging from 5·7 to 14·0° C. At low temperatures, there was a positive correlation between prey capture success and the proportion of time that the fish spent holding feeding stations. This correlation was not found at temperatures >10° C.

1 - 30 of 30
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