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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nurse students learning acute care by simulation: Focus on observation and debriefing2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 24, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Simulation creates the possibility to experience acute situations during nursing education which cannot easily be achieved in clinical settings. Aim: To describe how nursing students learn acute care of patients through simulation exercises, based on observation and debriefing. Design: The study was designed as an observational study inspired by an ethnographic approach.MethodData was collected through observations and interviews. Data was analyzed using an interpretive qualitative content analysis.Results: Nursing students created space for reflection when needed. There was a positive learning situation when suitable patient scenarios were presented. Observations and discussions with peers gave the students opportunities to identify their own need for knowledge, while also identifying existing knowledge. Reflections could confirm or reject their preparedness for clinical practice. The importance of working in a structured manner in acute care situations became apparent. However, negative feedback to peers was avoided, which led to a loss of learning opportunity.Conclusion: High fidelity simulation training as a method plays an important part in the nursing students' learning. The teacher also plays a key role by asking difficult questions and guiding students towards accurate knowledge. This makes it possible for the students to close knowledge gaps, leading to improved patient safety.

  • 2.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    The learning process of recently graduated nurses in professional situations: Experiences of an introduction program2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 289-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increased theoretical focus and decreased clinical training have resulted in sharp criticism from health care institutions of the content of the nursing education program. As a consequence of this criticism, employers offer introduction programs to recently graduated nurses after they have completed their nursing education. This study is part one of a larger research study. The aim of the present study was to analyze and describe how recently graduated nurses learn at the place of work and how they seek a meaning in their encounter with that environment. The research method was ethnographic, and the empirical material was based upon data from participant observations, interviews and field notes. The results disclosed that workplaces using the master–apprentice system as a model for supervising recently graduated nurses during the introduction program. The results also showed that the novices have acquired theoretical knowledge and know what action to take, but may have trouble assessing which part of their knowledge to use. The introduction program constitutes an obstacle in the professional development of the novices.

  • 3.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    The professional socialization of recently graduated nurses: Experiences of an introduction program2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 278-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education entails a three-year program leading up to a Bachelor's degree. Recently graduated nurses lack theoretical as well as clinical skills, thus experiencing difficulties in taking on the professional role. Health care institutions have previously expressed great concern about the increase of theoretical focus at the cost of decreased clinical training and consequently employers presently offer introduction programs after the completion of the nursing education. The present study is part two of a larger study. The aim of the present study was to describe and analyze how recently graduated nurses are socialized into the profession. The research was conducted using an ethnographic approach and the empirical data was acquired by means of participant observations, interviews and field notes. The findings revealed that the staff questions the novices' nursing knowledge and strongly doubts their professional skills. In order for novices to attain member status at the clinical facility, they must constantly prove their professional ability. The findings showed furthermore that deviation by the novices from the norms and expectations associated with the professional role results in their becoming outsiders. Within nursing education the ideology of nursing is prominent, but within the profession the emphasis is on good occupational skills.

  • 4.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro universitet.
    Agneta, Kullén Engström
    Höhskolan i Borås.
    Annelie, Sundler Johansson
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro universitet.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

  • 6.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Value conflicts in perioperative practice2019In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 26, no 7-8, p. 2213-2224, article id 969733018798169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves.

    OBJECTIVES:: This study describes operating theatre nurses' experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:: The study followed ethical principles in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and approval was granted by the local university ethics committee.

    FINDINGS:: The result showed that value conflicts arose in perioperative practice when operating theatre nurses were prevented from being present in the perioperative nursing process, because of current habits in perioperative practice. The patient's care became uncaring when health professionals did not see and listen to each other and when collaboration in the surgical team was not available for the patient's best. This occurred when operating theatre nurses' competence was not taken seriously and was ignored in patient care.

    CONCLUSION:: Value conflicts arose when operating theatre nurses experienced that continuity of patient care was lacking. They experienced compassion with the patient but still had the will and ability to be there and take responsibility for the patient. This led to feelings of despair, powerlessness and of having a bad conscience which could lead to dissatisfaction, and even resignations.

  • 7.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

  • 8.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1510-1516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During many years the operating theatre nurse's clinical competence has been describing in relation to patient safety, but the nursing care of the patient remains unclear. Therefore, we want in this study to investigate the relationship between background factors of operating theatre nurses self-rated clinical competence and describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence in perioperative nursing.Methods: A cross-sectional study with a mixed method approach was chosen. The instrument Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence was used for self-rating operating theatre nurses' clinical competence in perioperative nursing, and an open-ended question was added to describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence. In total, 1057 operating theatre nurses in Sweden were asked to participate, and 303 responded (28 %). They had different educational backgrounds and professional experiences, and were employed in universities or central/regional and district hospitals.Results: Academic degree, professional experience and place of employment were significant for the development of the operating theatre nurses' clinical competence. Academic degree appeared to affect operating theatre nurse leadership and cooperation, as well as how consultations took place with other professions about patient care. Being employed at a university hospital had a positive effect on professional development and critical thinking.Conclusions:  An academic degree influenced the operating theatre nurses' ability to act in complex situations, and along with professional experience strengthened the nurses' ability to use different problem-solving strategies and face the consequences of decisions made. Scientific knowledge and interprofessional learning and competence development in medical technologies should supplement nursing care for the development of clinical competence.

  • 9.
    Blomberg, karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Swedish Red Cross Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Clinical group supervision for integrating ethical reasoning: view from students and supervisors2016In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 761-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical group supervision has existed for over 20 years in nursing. However, there is a lack of studies about the role of supervision in nursing students' education and especially the focus on ethical reasoning. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe nursing students' ethical reasoning and their supervisors' experiences related to participation in clinical group supervision. Research design: The study is a qualitative interview study with interpretative description as an analysis approach. Participants and research context: A total of 17 interviews were conducted with nursing students (n = 12) who had participated in clinical group supervision in their first year of nursing education, and with their supervisors (n = 5). Ethical considerations: The study was based on the ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki, and permission was obtained from the Regional Ethical Review Board in Sweden. Findings: The analysis revealed that both the form and content of clinical group supervision stimulated reflection and discussion of handling of situations with ethical aspects. Unethical situations were identified, and the process uncovered underlying caring actions. Discussion and conclusion: Clinical group supervision is a model that can be used in nursing education to train ethical reflection and to develop an ethical competence among nursing students. Outcomes from the model could also improve nursing education itself, as well as healthcare organizations, in terms of reducing moral blindness and unethical nursing practice.

  • 10.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Swedish nursing students’ experience of stress during clinical practice in relation to clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15/16, p. 2264-2271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice and evaluate the risk of stress in relation to the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education.

    Background

    Stress during clinical practice is well documented, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning whether the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education make a difference.

    Design

    A cross-sectional study with evaluative design.

    Methods

    Data were collected by means of a numerical rating scale for the assessment of stress and questions about the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education. One hundred and eighty-four students who had completed their final year on the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden were included.

    Results

    Nearly half of the students (43%) experienced high level of stress during clinical practice. Measured by decision in the tree analysis, the absolute risk of stress was 57% in students with placements in hospital departments, as compared to 13% in students with placements in other clinical settings. The risk of stress increased to 71% if the students with placement in a hospital took the national clinical final examination. Performance of practice in a hospital department overcrowded with patients was also associated with increased risk of stress. The organisation of supervision and number of students at the clinical placement had an effect on the experience of stress, but did not prove to be risk factors in the analysis.

    Conclusions

    The risk of stress in nursing students during their clinical practice differs depending on clinical setting characteristics. The taking of the national clinical final examination could be a source of stress, but this requires further investigation.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    It is important that supervisors are aware that students in hospital departments overcrowded with patients are at risk of stress and may have increased need of support.

  • 11.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Allvin, Renee
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Orebro Univ Hosp, Clin Skills Ctr, Orebro, Sweden..
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Engstrom, Agneta Kullen
    Univ Boras, Sch Hlth, Boras, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Johansson, Annelie Sundler
    Univ Skovde, Sch Life Sci, Skovde, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, S-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to investigate occupational stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to the workplace and clinical group supervision. Background Being a newly graduated nurse is particularly stressful. What remains unclear is whether the workplace and clinical group supervision affect the stress. Method A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in 2012. Data were collected by means of a numerical scale measuring occupational stress, questions about workplace and clinical group supervision. One hundred and thirteen nurses who had recently graduated from three Swedish universities were included in the study. Results The stress was high among the newly graduated nurses but it differed significantly between workplaces, surgical departments generating the most stress. Nurses who had received clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. The stress between workplaces remained significant also when participation in clinical group supervision was taken into account. Conclusions Newly graduated nurses experience great stress and need support, especially those in surgical departments. Nurses participating in clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. Implications for nursing management It is important to develop strategies that help to adapt the work situation so as to give nurses the necessary support. Clinical group supervision should be considered as an option for reducing stress.

  • 12.
    Granrud, M. D.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Örebro universitet.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Steffenak, A. K. M.
    Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Public health nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration related to adolescents' mental health problems in secondary schools: A phenomenographic study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 15-16, p. 2899-2910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe the variation in public health nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration related to adolescents' mental health problems in secondary schools in Norway. Background: Mental health problems among adolescents account for a large portion of the global burden of disease and affect 10%–20% of adolescents worldwide. Public health nurses in school health services play an important role in disease prevention and promotion of physical and mental health. In order to serve adolescents with regard to mental health problems, public health nurses are dependent on collaboration with other professionals in schools. Design: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 public health nurses working in the school health services. Method: A phenomenographic approach was used for interviewing and for analysing the qualitative interviews. This study is presented in line with COREQ's checklist. Result: The analysis resulted in three descriptive categories based on eight identified conceptions. The categories are as follows: “The formal structure has an impact on interprofessional collaboration”; “The public health nurse is an important, but not always self-evident, partner in interprofessional collaboration”; and “The primary players are the teachers in collaboration.”. Conclusion: The public health nurses describe that they had limited impact on collaboration and were dependent on both the school principal and the teachers for achieving good collaboration. Teachers have the power to decide whether to collaborate with the public health nurse, and public health nurses regard teachers as the most important collaborative partners. The public health nurses need to make themselves and their competence visible. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings demonstrated that public health nurses are important collaborators, but are not always included in interprofessional collaboration. This knowledge is essential to strengthen public health nurses' roles and presence in schools, which could most certainly benefit adolescents with mental health problems in secondary school.

  • 13.
    Granrud, M. D.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Örebro universitet.
    Myhrene Steffenak, Anne Kjersti
    Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum.
    Overcoming barriers to reach for a helping hand: Adolescent boys' experience of visiting the public health nurse for mental health problemsManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Engstrom, Agneta Kullen
    Univ Boras, Sch Hlth, Boras, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Univ Orebro, Sch Hlth & Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    Univ Skovde, Sch Hlth & Learning, Skovde, Sweden.;Malardalens Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses: A mixed method study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1289-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses. Design and Settings: The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design. Participants: The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study. Methods: A questionnaire including the CLES + T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception. Results: Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor. Conclusions: In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Björk, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro universitet.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro universitet.
    Student nurses experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: A questionnaire survey2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized. Background The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models. Method A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire. Results In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship. Conclusion The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere.

  • 16.
    Sundler, A. J.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Blomberg, K.
    Örebro universitet.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Windahl, J.
    Örebro universitet.
    Larsson, Maria
    Experiences of supervision during clinical education among specialised nursing students in Sweden: A cross-sectional study2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of the clinical learning environment in nurse education has gained increasing attention over the last decades. However, there is a lack of research on the learning environment, its significance and meaning in specialist nurse education. Objective: The objectives of the study were to investigate specialised nursing students' experiences of supervision during clinical practice and to compare students who were satisfied with the supervision with those who were dissatisfied with respect to a)organisation of supervision and number of preceptors, as well as time allocated by preceptors for b)supervision, c)reflection, d)discussion of intended learning outcomes, and e)assessments of students' performance by preceptors. Design: This study used a cross-sectional design. Sample and settings: A convenience sample of specialised nursing students was derived from five Swedish universities in the years 2016 and 2017. Methods: Data were collected using a questionnaire. Statistical analyses and a qualitative conventional content analysis were performed. Results: While almost all specialised nursing students reported that there had been time for discussion on their performance assessment, almost half of the students reported not getting time for supervision, or time for reflections and discussions on intended learning outcomes with the preceptor. Students reporting having time allocated for supervision by preceptors were found to be more satisfied with supervision. It was described as important that the preceptor(s)acknowledged the students previous work experiences. Even though being a registered nurse, reflections and feedback were described as valuable for the students learning. Several preceptors were described as positive allowing a broader picture and different views regarding working as a specialist nurse. Conclusions: This study indicates that supervision, in terms of discussions and reflections, of specialised nursing students is significant for learning experiences and satisfaction during clinical placement.

  • 17.
    Terp, Ulrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hjärthag, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Manuscript: A feasibility study of a Cognitive Behavioral based stress management intervention for nursing students: Results, challenges, and implications for research and practiceManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Terp, Ulrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hjärthag, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Not Just Tools to Handle It: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Students' Experiences From Participating in a Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Intervention2019In: Health Education & Behavior, ISSN 1090-1981, E-ISSN 1552-6127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Stress-related problems are an increasing challenge within nurse education since it affects learning, professional development, and mental health negatively. Despite this, knowledge is scarce regarding nursing students' experiences of being in stress management interventions. Aim. This study aimed to describe how nursing students experienced a preventive cognitive behavioral therapy-based stress management intervention. Method. Data were collected through 14 semistructured interviews with nursing students who had participated in a stress management intervention, and analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Results. The analysis yielded one theme, Turning points, which consisted of four categories: (1) more in touch with reality, (2) increased self-confidence, (3) improved communication skills, and (4) a new way of reflecting. Discussion. Findings emphasize the importance of both theoretical and structural aspects when planning a stress management training intervention. A group format delivery in combination with a multicomponent cognitive behavioral intervention can be interrelated elements for positive stress-related changes. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that participants developed new and more adaptive coping strategies, which were attributed to the intervention. The participants expressed that they had increased their ability to reflect, which led to increased insight and self-reflection. The intervention constitutes an example of a contribution to stress management research and provides information for stress management training initiatives in nurse education.

  • 19.
    Terp, Ulrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Hjärthag, Fredrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral-Based Stress Management Program on Stress Management Competency, Self-efficacy and Self-esteem Experienced by Nursing Students2019In: Nurse Educator, ISSN 0363-3624, E-ISSN 1538-9855, Vol. 44, no 1, p. E1-E5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing students' exposure to stress negatively affects both academic and clinical performance and potentially their future as professional nurses. This pilot study measured the effects of a 10-week cognitive behavioral therapy-based stress management program, using a quasi-experimental design. Independent t tests showed positive effects of the training program compared with a control group. Students' perceived stress management competency, self-efficacy, and self-esteem were higher 1 year after the intervention.

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