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  • 1.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Jansson, AndréKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).Lindell, JohanKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).Ryan Bengtsson, LindaKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).Tesfahuney, MekonnenKarlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Tesfahuney, Mekonnen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Introducing Geomedia Studies2018In: Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds / [ed] Fast, Karin; Jansson, André; Lindell, Johan; Ryan Bengtsson, Linda; Tesfahuney, Mekonnen, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Elastic mobility: Negotiating the ’home’ and ’away’ continuum2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out provide an understanding of internationally mobile life-conducts from a perspective that takes into account social costs that come with being away from localized, everyday life. We show that mobile elites are oftentimes reluctant travellers. A way of coping with the existential dilemmas of being away is to stay connected with family and friends with technologies of communication, which are deployed by the mobile elite under the regime of what Tomlinson calls “technologies of the hearth”. Furthermore, few informants ascribe any value to travelling in itself. Cosmopolitanism can here be understood as a form capital rather than a way of immersing the self into the culture of the other. We arrive at the concept of elastic mobility, which highlights central push-and-pull processes within mobile life-conducts. The concept forwards a perspective on the social consequences of globalization that goes beyond contemporary “flow speak”.

  • 4.
    Fast, Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    The elastic mobility of business elites: Negotiating the 'home' and 'away' continuum2016In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 435-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out to provide an understanding of internationally mobile elites from a perspective that takes into account the social costs that come with being away from localized, everyday life. We show that mobile elites are often reluctant travellers and employ Bude and Dürrschmidt’s notion of ‘transclusion’ to understand the often-unrecognized ambivalence of mobile lifestyles. One way of coping with

    the existential dilemma of being away is to stay connected with family and friends through technologies of communication, which are deployed by the mobile elite under the regime of what Tomlinson calls ‘technologies of the hearth’. We arrive at the concept of ‘elastic mobility’, which highlights central push-and-pull processes in mobile lifestyles. The concept forwards a perspective on the social consequences of globalization that goes beyond contemporary ‘flow speak’.

  • 5.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    News consumption in the transmedia age: Amalgamations, orientations and geo-social structuration2016In: The Places and Spaces of News Consumption / [ed] Peters, C., London, New York: Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Jansson, André
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Media Studies for a Mediatized World: Rethinking Media and Social Space2018In: McKinsey Quarterly, ISSN 0106-469X, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial introduces a thematic issue on "Rethinking Media and Social Space". By critically rethinking the relationship between media and social space this issue takes initial steps towards ensuring that media studies is appropriate for a mediatized world. Contemporary societies are permeated by media that play important roles in how people maneuver and position themselves in the social world. Yet, analyses of media-related social change too often fail to engage with the complex and situated nature of power relations. This editorial highlights three enduring problems: (1) the annihilation of the socially structured and structuring role of media technologies and practices; (2) the conflation of inherent social capacities of media technologies and discourses with existing mediations of power, and (3) the reduction of social space to one predominant dimension which overshadows all other forms of social power that media technologies, discourses, and practices are part of. As a response to these problems - and in bringing together the arguments of the five articles included in the thematic issue-this editorial calls for sociologized approaches to media technologies, discourses, and practices.

  • 7.
    Jansson, André
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    News Media Consumption in the Transmedia Age: Amalgamations, Orientations and Geo-Social Structuration2015In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 79-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jansson, André
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Världsmedborgare eller bara utlandsboende?: Kosmopolitism som ett uttryck för supermobilitet2016In: Svenska utlandsröster / [ed] Solevid, M, Göteborg: SOM-institutet , 2016, p. 79-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Mapping the space of journalistic labor in the new media environment: a model2016In: Communicating with Power: 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    OMNIBUS NEWS: Engagement or bussed?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer of 2013 the municipal public bus system, Karlstadbuss, installed television sets (BUSS-TV) on all city buses. These TV sets are airing user-generated content, and traffic information, weather forecasts as well as news from the hybrid commercial/public service broadcaster TV4. This paper addresses the phenomenon from the theoretical intersection of communication geography and journalism studies. This means understanding the city-buses, at once mobile and semi-public spaces, as decorated with a new “communicative texture” that is renegotiating the time-space nexus traditionally tied to news consumption. Furthermore, it potentially implies that a basic news diet become more or less dispersed amongst commuters across the city, and across previous class-demarcations that would engender divergent news diets. This constitutes a potential challenge to the notion of the fragmented news audience and related worries over the increased number of “news avoiders”. From previous research we know that news consumption, even accidental, is linked with political and civic engagement. In an era where media consumption is increasingly fragmented or even avoided, the buss-news reinstalls the almost inescapable news of the 1970’s albeit in a highly situated and limited context. Nevertheless, this new space of ‘news on the move’ is yet to be explored theoretically and empirically. Thus, we ask about the role of Karlstadbuss as a carrier of omnibus news in the media ecology. The paper uses data derived from representative surveys (Värmlands-SOM) conducted before (2010) and after (2014) the introduction of BUSS-TV to study the impact of travelling with the city-buses on political interest and civic engagement as well as general news interest and consumption.

  • 11.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    A Methodological Intervention in Cosmopolitanism Research: Cosmopolitan Dispositions Amongst Digital Natives2014In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 19, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept cosmopolitanism has the potential of becoming one of the most interesting social scientific tools for understanding contemporary social life. Operationalising it however, has proved a difficult task. Here, researchers utilise different single indicators while making claims towards the same theoretical concept. This not only undermines the theoretical complexity immanent in the term cosmopolitanism, but also creates a false intersubjectivity in the field of cosmopolitanism studies. In order to 'save' cosmopolitanism from the risk of becoming an 'empty signifier' (Skrbis et al. 2004) or a '"free-floating" discursive geist' (Holton 2009), in an attempt to address the 'muddy' (Calhoun 2008) nature of the concept, this paper presents a methodological blueprint that locates the process of definition in the intersection of the theoretical and the empirical. As such, the proposed methodological way of conduct starts on the conceptual level in order to define the central theoretical tenets included in the cosmopolitan disposition. It then operationalises these claims into indicators that are included in an exploratory analysis of the data set. In conducting a minor quantitative study on 'digital natives' in Sweden the method is illustrated as being able to discern manifestations of 'actually existing cosmopolitanisms' (Malcomson 1998) and thus avoid the risk of reductionism involved with the use of one-dimensional indicators or pre-existing, less-than-adequate variables in secondary data.

  • 12.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Actually Existing Cosmopolitanism, Media Practices and The Social Dynamics within the Nation-state: The case of Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism, when relocated from normative political theory and moral philosophy to social theory and sociological research, invites social scientists to consider the relationship between the individual and the world as a whole in times of global interconnection and interdependence (Calhoun, 2008; Holton, 2009). As an analytical concept, cosmopolitanism allows social research to pose novel questions about the “interiority” of globalization (Swain, 2009) – a specific mode of “being-in-the-world” pertaining to social life in global modernity. It has been argued that the main task for such endeavors is to identify the “structural realities” of various forms of “actually existing” cosmopolitanisms (Malcomson, 1998; Skrbis et al., 2004; Kendall et al., 2009). Theoretically, having access to faraway peoples and cultures at the press of a button or the turn of a page yields a historically unprecedented opportunity for cosmopolitan cultivation on an everyday basis. Two central problems emerge in the growing literature covering the question regarding the conditions of cosmopolitan cultivation. Firstly, the interdisciplinary field of “cosmopolitanism studies” tends to take the media as an agent of cosmopolitan socialization for granted. Secondly, media and communication research concerning itself with questions of cosmopolitanism operate mainly in the paradigm of “media and morality” (Ong, 2009). While dealing with topical, moral questions regarding Western spectatorship of suffering in the distance, and the role of the media in facilitating humanitarian activity (see e.g. Chouliaraki, 2006; 2013) this kind of research understands cosmopolitanism exclusively as a moral response to certain media messages.

     

    In order to further our understanding of contemporary cosmopolitanism on a broader level what is needed is the study of cosmopolitan dispositions, conceptualized as a general dispositions of worldly openness across moral, cultural and political dimensions as manifested in peoples’ outlooks and practices and the conditions of their cultivation. In the attempt at mapping the general contours of these conditions, this study deploys a representative survey in Sweden (n = 1025) designed explicitly to study (a) the social location of various cosmopolitan dispositions and (b) relationship between media practices and various cosmopolitan dispositions. In tandem with previous quantitative research, findings suggest that various cosmopolitan dispositions are socially stratified: the cosmopolitan dispositions display a tendency to belong to more mobile and more educated individuals. Also, the dispositions are associated with women and people that are politically engaged (either to the left or to the right). Furthermore, results reveal the ambivalent role of the media: while certain media practices (such as watching television news) relate to a cosmopolitan disposition, others do not. What is more, “cosmopolitans” tend to approach the contemporary media landscape as an avenue for cosmopolitan socialization, whereas “locals” do not. Taken together, findings inform a mediatized cosmopolitanism that is impossible to disentangle from the social dynamics operating within a given society, in this case the nation-state of Sweden.

  • 13.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Asocial Media Studies: Bourdieu as Remedy2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary media studies has a tendency of ‘bracketing out’ the social dimension, and thus it needs to be better versed in social theory. Failing to account for "the social" is problematic since all media, and all communication are located in social contexts. This paper offers an exploration of the epistemological consequences of insisting on the location of media production, media content, and media use in social contexts in terms of Bourdieu’s social theory. A Bourdieusian approach to media and communication involves understanding that media production is always situated in complex, multi-leveled relations of power, be it the journalistic field, the field of cultural production or the wider social space occupied by the ‘produser’ of mediated content. The perspective furthermore implicates a refusal to succumb to an ‘internalist vision’ when studying communication or the content of the media that is the result of isolating communication from its context of production and consumption, which is where meaning is ultimately generated. Finally, it involves studying media use as a classifying practice that is becoming increasingly mediated through the habitus and an agents’ position in social space as the media landscape gains in appeal to persons – as individuals with preferences, tastes and lifestyles – rather than masses. It is argued that a move towards Bourdieusian media studies ushers the study of old and new forms of media production, content and use onto paths that provoke critical and enduring questions of the role of media in society.

  • 14.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Beyond ´Distant suffering´ and Pity-Compelled Cosmopolitanism: Examining the Relation Between the Consumption of Ordinary News, General Media Consumption and Cosmopolitan Outlooks in Scandinavia2012In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 47-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions arising out of the global character of the media include whether or not one can become a kosmou politês (citizen of the world) by consuming and using different media whose “relay function” (Schulz, 2004) potentially draws the world into the sphere of the everyday. This potential has mainly been researched from a reception-of-distant-suffering paradigm where what is at stake is the possibility for news reporting to set in motion an “electronic empathy” (Hannerz, 1996). This study ventures beyond this dominant paradigm and uses ESS (European Social Survey) Round 5 2010 to examine the impact of the empirically neglected variables of ordinary news consumption and media consumption in general to see to what extent they cultivate a cosmopolitan outlook in audiences and users. The results indicate that ‘the media’ display ambivalent and multi-directional effects and thus that the notion of “mediated cosmopolitanism” does not withstand empirical testing

  • 15.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Book review: Digitala distinktioner: Klass och kontinuitet i unga mäns vardagliga mediepraktiker2015In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 37, no 3-4, p. 127-129Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Book review: Media and Cosmopolitanism2015In: Communications: the European Journal of Communication Research, ISSN 0341-2059, E-ISSN 1613-4087, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 263-265Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Bourdieusian Media Studies: Returning Social Theory to Old and New Media2015In: Distinktion Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, ISSN 1600-910X, E-ISSN 2159-9149, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 362-377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Bringing field theory to social media, and vice-versa: Network-crawling an economy of recognition on Facebook2017In: Social Media + Society, ISSN 1896-1800, E-ISSN 1557-7112, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Classified News Consumption: A Bourdieusian Take on Fragmented News Publics2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper posits the issue of the increased fragmentation of news consumers as part of an overarching shift from mass media to “class media”. To this end, the sociological thinking of Pierre Bourdieu, and the notion that media consumption is conditioned by one’s social position, is particularly useful. Generally, previous research fail to account for news fragmentation as included in processes that uphold relations of power between different, more or less privileged, groups in society. In terms of news consumption, one such instance of social reproduction is that news diets become avenues for “legitimating social differences” as the media landscape diversifies. The purpose of this paper is to study this empirically by focusing on how young people with different sets and volumes of capital orient themselves in a diversifying news landscape. More specifically, the paper asks about the role of capital and habitus in relation to news related attitudes (for example what is considered newsworthy or what sense one makes of the news outlet) and behaviors (such as news avoidance). The paper will draw on focus group interviews to be conducted in the spring of 2015.

  • 20.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Communication as spatial production: Expanding the research agenda of communication geography2016In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The founders of the interdisciplinary field of communication geography argue that the field carries the potential to provide a processual view of communication as spatial production. This article sets out to delineate this underexplored aspect of communication geography. The aim is to expand the research agenda of communication geography by acknowledging the role of everyday social interaction on the one hand, and media environments on the other, in producing and maintaining peoples' taken-for-granted senses of space. This focus is guided by combining central insights of social phenomenology and medium theory. In synthesizing these positions, a research agenda emerges that emphasizes the capacity of media to mold the scope and character of communication that in turn maintain the scope and character of taken-for-granted space in everyday reality.

  • 21.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Cosmopolitan Divide?: Examining the Tension Field Between Media, Residential Patterns and Cosmopolitan Attitudes2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Today, global media such as the Internet provides media audiences scattered across the globe with the possibility of cross-cultural moral interaction upon a plethora of global digital public spheres. Such trends have been the catalyst for increased academic attention to the field of media and morality and the notion of media audiences as global citizens – ‘cosmopolitans at home’, consuming a wide array of mediated, global images and thus enforcing a proximity with the ‘distant Other’. Parallel to such trends is the dichotomous relationship between rural- and urban areas that have emerged as increasingly ambivalent in ‘network society’. Due to the ‘urbanization of media culture’ and the ‘digital divide’, it is argued that rural areas, in an era characterized by global interconnectedness, are rendered dysfunctional. On the other hand however, media can be argued to promote inclusion and new possibilities for rural people.

     

    This study set out to empirically examine the tension field between residential patterns (rural/urban), the media (Internet) and cosmopolitanism. Setting out from the research questions: (1) What variables determine a ‘cosmopolitan outlook’ in Sweden?, (2) Does media use/access promote a ‘cosmopolitan outlook’, and under what circumstances?, and (3) Is there a ‘cosmopolitan divide’ between different residential patterns – and if so: how does it relate to different patterns of media use and access?. To attend the research questions, data from the annual national survey, Riks-SOM 2008, was analysed and the findings indicated the general trends for the Swedish cosmopolitan was, in accordance with other empirical accounts, young and well educated. Furthermore, respondents ‘high’ on Internet use where more likely to be cosmopolitans – confirming theoretical accounts of e.g. Anthony Giddens, Ulrich Beck and Dick Hebdige. Also, ‘locality’ proved to be more important for rural people than for people living in metropolitan areas. Finally, men and women displayed different ‘cosmopolitan patterns’: rural women being more cosmopolitan than metropolitan women in terms of a ‘willingness to move to a country outside of Europe’ while men displayed the opposite, following the hypothesis.

     

  • 22.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Cosmopolitanism in a Mediatized World: The Social Stratification of Global Orientations2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary media landscape invites us to experience a belonging to various distant places, mourn the victims of faraway disasters, expose ourselves to foreign cultures and engage in political issues in places far from our local context of living. In other words, we are invited to become citizens of the world – cosmopolitans. But are we? And if so, how is such cosmopolitanism expressed in a given society, under what social conditions, and in relation to what media practices?

    Contemporary social theory depicts a global or cosmopolitan mode of orienting in the world as paradigmatic of social life in global modernity. To date, little is known about the structural realities of such orientations. Against this backdrop, the aim of the present study is to understand the potentially “cosmopolitan” character of peoples’ outlooks and practices, and the societal conditions in which they can be identified. On the one hand, the aim of the study is to contribute to the largely theoretical accounts of the “cosmopolitan” character of social life in present times, andon the other, to understand the specific role of various media practices in the process generally described as “cosmopolitanization”.

    Results yielded by a national survey deployed in Sweden (n = 1 025) show that the distribution of various cosmopolitan dispositions abides by logics of social stratification. In tandem with previous research, cosmopolitanism – when studied “from below” – has a tendency to emerge in more privileged spheres of society. Being “connected” and simply living in a potentially global media landscape does not nullify this pattern. Contrary to significant parts of popular and scholarly conviction, the media is no uniform, all-encompassing environment operating as a force of cosmopolitanization across all social strata. The results of this study point towards a “mediatized cosmopolitanism” that is impossible to disentangle from social context and the power dynamics pertaining to that context.

  • 23.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Distinction recapped: Digital news repertoires in the class structure2017In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Distinctions in the world of news: A Bourdieusian approach to audience fragmentation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Expanding Social Imaginaries: Studying the Relationship between "Actually Existing Cosmopolitanisms" and Media Practices2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Filterbubblan är klassifierad: Nyheter via internet och det kulturella kapitalet2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: Politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Norell, PO & Nilsson, L, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 499-512Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Media, Power & Cosmopolitanism: Rethinking Cosmopolitanism in a Digital Age2010In: Transcultural Communication: Intercultural Comparisons, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Mediapolis, Where art Thou?: Mediated Cosmopolitanism in Three Media Systems between 2002 and 20102015In: International Communication Gazette, ISSN 1748-0485, E-ISSN 1748-0493, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 189-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the extent to which cosmopolitan dispositions are cultivated in news consumption, and how this relationship differs between three media systems and over time (2002–2010). It is based on a study using European Social Survey-data covering 14 European countries and over 70,000 respondents in search of a media culture that fosters cosmopolitan sensibilities among citizens – what Roger Silverstone referred to as the 'mediapolis'. The study contributes to contemporary debates on the conditions under which cosmopolitan dispositions are cultivated since the results put into question the assumption of a 'mediated cosmopolitanism', existing on the level of mass mediation across various media systems. This challenge suggests that the 'mediapolis' is more of a normative category than an empirical one, and that the theorizing on the relationship between media and cosmopolitanism is in need of recalibration.                  

  • 29.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Mediated Cosmopolitanism?: Examining the Tension Field Between Media, Communication and Social Reality2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Medier och Kosmopolitism: Varthän?2012In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Medierad kosmopolitism: en empirisk inblick2011In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Searching for Mediapolis: Mediated Cosmopolitanism in Three Media Systems Between 2002-20102014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addressed the question regarding the extent to which cosmopolitan outlooks are cultivated in news consumption, and how this relationship change over space (three different media systems) and time (2002-2010). In searching for a media culture that fosters cosmopolitan sensibilities among citizens - the “mediapolis” (Silverstone, 2007) - this study used ESS-data covering fourteen European countries and over 70,000 respondents. Findings make important contributions to contemporary theoretical debates on the conditions under which cosmopolitan outlooks are cultivated as results showed that no “mediated cosmopolitanism” (Rantanen, 2005; Robertson, 2010) existed on the level of mass mediation across various media systems. This suggests that the “mediapolis” is more a normative category than an empirical one, and that theorizing around the relationship between media and cosmopolitanism is in need of recalibration.

  • 33.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Skådespelsstaden2016In: Den postpolitiska staden / [ed] Mekonnen Tesfahuney, Richard Ek, Recito förlag , 2016, p. 104-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Social reproduktion i Värmland2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: Politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Norell, P.O. & Nilsson, L., Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 331-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Social reproduktion i Värmland: Klass, utbildning och livsstil2016In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 289-306Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The City as Spectacle: A Debordian Critique of the City as Commodity and Brand2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper focus is put on how the ”meta-processes” (Krotz, 2007) of mediatization and commercialization are expressed in relation to the city – how they conflate and create the conditions from which the being of the contemporary city is renegotiated from polis to postpolis. The contemporary “commodification of everything” (Harvey, 2005) and the logic of the global market economy means that the city expresses a need to create a “competitive identity” (Anholt, 2007) and elevate to the fore of attention its’ “collective symbolic capital” (Harvey, 2012). This involves turning the city into a brand and as such, the city becomes dependent upon the logics of the media and the symbol – the contemporary city is “the realm of the sign” (Tesfahuney & Schough, 2009: 142). In all its shapes, suggests Debord, “the society of the spectacle constitutes the model for the dominant perspective in society” (2002: 22). Thus the representation of the city – the city-as-a-brand - is both ideological and political in the sense that makes claims as to “represent the entirety of the city when the image is actually a strongly selective and partial ideal image” (Ek, 2007: 97). But the city-as-a-brand is also political in its attempts at reifying the city as a non-political entity. The spectacle-city – the city which turned in to a commodity which turned into a brand which lost itself in its own appealing mirror image like Narcissus - embodies an extreme commodity fetishism in the way in which its’ social relations (criminality, segregation, unemployment, gentrification) are placed in the shadows. The resources spent on city-branding amplifies the image of the city as the “space of ultimate experiences” (Tesfahuney & Schough, 2009: 120) while the consequences of neoliberal doctrine veils itself behind the curtains. 

  • 37.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The Cosmopolitan Ethos: An Empirical Inquiry into the Question of a 'Mediated Cosmopolitanism'2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University.
    "And like that I'm talking to a Girl from China, you know": Cultural capital and the classification of media as avenues of cosmopolitan cultivation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of a “mediated cosmopolitanism” has mainly been studied from a perspective that attempts to discern the extent to which various messages of the media succeed or fail in establishing moral solidarity with “the distant other”. This perspective misses two crucial points worthy of pursuing when attempting to understand the relationship between media and cosmopolitanism. Firstly, it still remains rather unclear what sense audiences and users make of the globalizing potential of the contemporary media landscape. Secondly, cosmopolitanism cannot solely be conceptualized as a moral obligation across vast distances, but needs also to be understood as a form of capital, as social fields become increasingly transnational. By understanding users and audiences of potentially global media as contextualized social agents we engage with the relationship between cosmopolitanism and the media from a new vantage point. In departing from the media-centric tendencies in the research area, we turn to the question of how classified social agents classify the contemporary media landscape as gateways to the wider world. What emerges in our qualitative and quantitative data is a pattern of social reproduction – agents strong on cultural capital are particularly prone to approach the media landscape as an avenue for the generation of cosmopolitan capital. There is thus reason to question the universalizing rhetoric pertaining to notions of a “mediated cosmopolitanism” and study the ways in which agents’ orientations in the media landscape are part of strategies of social reproduction.

  • 39.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University.
    (Mediated) cosmopolitanism as symbolic violence2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The notions of a “mediated cosmopolitanism”, a “global imagined community” and an “imagined cosmopolitanism” speak of a cosmopolitan opportunism gaining ground in contemporary media and communication studies. This line of research tends to epistemologically situate human beings exclusively as users or audiences of media. The risk by such a media-centric focus is to confine oneself to the question of “what the media does to people”. By understanding users and audiences of potentially global media as contextualized social agents we engage with the relationship between cosmopolitanism and the media from a different vantage point. Our media sociological perspective insists on accounting for social context, and so we turn to the question of how classified social agents classify the contemporary media landscape as gateways to the wider world. What emerges in our qualitative and quantitative data is a pattern of social reproduction by way of cultural distinction – agents strong on cultural capital is particularly prone to approach the media landscape as an avenue for cosmopolitan socialization. There is thus reason to question the universalizing rhetoric pertaining to notions of a “mediated cosmopolitanism”.

  • 40.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Danielsson, Martin
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Moulding cultural capital into cosmopolitan capital: Media practices as reconversion work in a globalising world2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, ISSN 1403-1108, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various media allow people to build transnational networks, learn about the world and meet people from other cultures. In other words, media may allow one to cultivate cosmopolitan capital, defined here as a distinct form of embodied cultural capital. However, far from everyone is identifying this potential. Analyses of a national survey  and in-depth interviews, conducted in Sweden, disclose a tendency among those in possession of cultural capital to recognise and exploit cosmopolitan capital in their  media practices. Those who are dispossessed of cultural capital are significantly less liable to approach media in this way. Relying on various media practices in order to reshape one’s cultural capital exemplifies what Bourdieu called a reconversion strategy. As social fields undergo globalisation, media offer opportunities for the privileged to remain privileged – to change in order to conserve.

  • 41.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Trading Cultural Capital for Cosmopolitan Capital: Media Practice as Reconversion Work in a Globalizing World2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Enghel, Florencia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Looking for the ironic spectator, or the limits to media-centric approaches to cosmopolitanization and proper distance2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing literature on imagined cosmopolitanism (Schein, 1999), mediated cosmopolitanism (Rantanen, 2005; Robertson, 2010; Skrbis & Woodward, 2013), a global imagined community (Poster, 2008), a global imaginary (Orgad, 2012) and mediated humanitarianism (Chouliaraki, 2013) suggests that a cosmopolitan opportunism may be gaining foothold in media studies.

     

    In this context, the extent to which various mediated appeals to the moral sensibilities of Western publics generate support for distant others on the lesser side of “the global” has become a key concern in contemporary media studies. With a few important exceptions in which actual audiences are studied (e.g. Höijer, 2004; Kyriakidou, 2011; Scott, 2013a), the methodological bias in the field of “media and morality” favors the study of the power of text (Ong, 2009; see also Joye, 2013). The epistemological tendency is, subsequently, to locate a globalizing or cosmopolitanizing agency in the media themselves. By way of the analysis of genres such as contemporary art (Papastergiadis, 2012), documentaries (Bondebjerg, 2013), specific news coverage (Chouliaraki, 2006; Moyo, 2010; Orgad, 2012), socially networked humanitarian campaigns (Madianou, 2013), or mediated concerts and celebrity (Chouliaraki, 2013), the cosmopolitan is understood as “brought forth” by the media through their messages. In this strand of research, the work of Chouliaraki (2006; 2013) has come to occupy the center of the stage (Franks, 2012; Joye, 2013; Ong, 2013; and Scott, 2013b).

     

    By way of a critical reading of Chouliaraki’s most recent contribution to  the field of “media and morality” - The Ironic Spectator: Solidarity in the Age of Post-Humanitarianism (ibid, 2013) - this paper discusses the consequences of a media-centric approach to understanding communication for social change in general, and the relation between media and cosmopolitanism in particular. Chouliaraki’s main argument is that certain changes in the “aesthetics of humanitarian communication” (her object of analysis) have turned Western publics into “ironic spectators”. As such, the “theatre” (the media) has largely failed to establish what Silverstone referred to as “proper distance” (2007).

     

    Firstly, we consider the implications of this approach for research on the cosmopolitan dispositions and actions of citizens of donor countries. Secondly, we turn to its implications for the communicative strategies of multilateral agencies and international NGOs towards engaging those citizens in morally and practically significant ways. We argue that there are limits to how much a media-centric approach can inform an understanding of audiences as citizens of the world, and favor instead a research agenda that studies audiences in their heterogeneity, as they orient themselves in a complex media landscape. Furthermore, we claim, in line with Ong (2013), that Chouliaraki’s call to improving the content of international NGOs’ appeals and news coverage falls short of linking the important debate around mediated proper distance that she forwards with a meaningful critique of the  neoliberal project and its standard operating procedures as expressed at the interface between the international development system and the media industries in a context of financial crisis, austerity measures and concerns about waste and corruption in the delivery of aid (Glennie, Straw and Wild, 2012).

  • 43.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Hovden, J. F.
    Bergen University.
    Distinctions in the media welfare state: audience fragmentation in post-egalitarian Sweden2017In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study draws on Pierre Bourdieu’s sociology of culture in order to shed new light on the ongoing fragmentation of media audiences and users. We use a multiple correspondence analysis on national survey data (n = 1604) collected in Sweden in 2015–2016 to (1) create a statistical representation of the contemporary Swedish class structure and proceed to (2) analyze the distribution of a broad range of media practices and media preferences in that space. Results show that social groups reproduce their social status by monopolizing distinct media repertoires. We are able to show that class matters for how people orient themselves in an increasingly high-choice media environment – even in a so-called media welfare state. Following the results of our media-sociological approach, we introduce the concept of audience islands which promotes a non-media-centric understanding of the fragmentation of society and media audiences. 

  • 44.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Hovden, Jan Fredrik
    Bergen University.
    Distinctions in the media welfare state: A Bourdieusian take on audience fragmentation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Hovden, Jan Fredrik
    Distinktioner i medievälfärdsstaten2016In: Ekvilibrium, Göteborg: SOM-institutet , 2016, p. 315-327Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Centre for HumanIT.
    Nyhetsvärdering, omvärldsorientering och regional identitet2012In: Värmländska landskap: Politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Nilsson, Lennart; Lars Aronsson och PO Norell, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press , 2012, p. 457-472Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    The Geo-Social Structuration of Mediatized Lifeworlds: An Empirical Re-Assessment of "Local" and "Cosmopolitan" Modes of News Consumption2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of “cosmopolitanization” (Beck) holds a complex, even contradictory, meaning. On the one hand, globalization has created growing opportunities for geo-socially expanding the lifeworld beyond local and regional boundaries, as well as for exploring different parts of the world in a cosmopolitan way. On the other hand, new global connectivities and cultural flows are in certain social contexts seen as a threat to local communities and the existing social order. Thus, also in a cosmopolitanized society, where fewer boundaries can be taken for granted, there exist tensions between “cosmopolitans” and more protectionist groupings. In a certain sense, this tension (which is of course much more complex than a one-dimensional continuum) corresponds to Merton’s classical distinction between “locals” and “cosmopolitans” – a distinction that refers to whether people are oriented towards issues and events related to their local environment or to the world at large, for example in their media use and political engagement. In this paper we provide an empirical illumination of how the expansion of the lifeworld, via news media consumption, is related to various structural and positional factors. Analyzing the results from a statistically representative survey, conducted in the region of Värmland, Sweden, in 2010, we show how different groups of media users value news content pertaining to different regional and extra-regional levels. In particular, we explicate how these preferences are distributed in social space (Bourdieu), and in relation to cultural value structures (notably in terms of “cosmopolitanism”). Firstly, the statistical pattern actualizes the relevance of Merton’s distinction between “locals” and “cosmopolitans” (given its original, very confined understanding of “cosmopolitan”); there is indeed a socio-cultural polarization related to whether people think news from extra-regional centres are important or not. These findings confirm that there are significant social tensions integral to the cosmopolitanization process. Secondly, our results show that the regional centre, the city of Karlstad, is generally understood as the most important “news-space”, across social space. Accordingly, one must conclude that the mediatization process also today is perhaps more significant in terms of reproducing regional identity and a local lifeworld, than in fostering cosmopolitan outlooks

  • 48.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Cosmopolitan Journalists?: Global Journalism in the Work and Visions of Journalists2016In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 860-870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Karlsson, Michael
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Media and Communication Studies.
    Cosmopolitan Journalists?: Journalist professional values across a local-global continuum2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of cosmopolitanism has gained momentum in contemporary social sciences. The term has come to describe identities, belongings and moral geographies that reach out beyond various localities to encompass “the world as a whole”. In the literature discussing how cosmopolitanism is becoming “real”, journalists are often treated as agents of cosmopolitan cultivation since they report “the world” to their publics. However, empirical studies on the relationship between media and cosmopolitanism have mainly turned to the particular cosmopolitan “invitations” of various messages of the media, and to some extent the sense that audiences are making of them. While the issues of a “global media ethics” and “cosmopolitan journalism” have been theorized from various directions there are nearly no empirical studies on the extent to which journalist professional values comprise cosmopolitan values. It is against this background we will draw upon a survey with journalists from across various positions in the Swedish journalistic field, to be conducted in the spring of 2015, to chart journalistic values across a local-global continuum. We thus ask about a.) the extent to which global, or “cosmopolitan”, professional values exists amongst Swedish journalists and b.) which factors (age, gender, education, position, type of organization) that explain such values. Findings will shed much needed empirical light on a highly topical, yet almost exclusively theoretical discussion on the (in)capacity of the media to sustain cosmopolitan imaginations. 

  • 50.
    Lindell, Johan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Sartoretto, Paola
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Young people, class and the news: Distinction, socialization and moral sentiments2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalism studies almost exclusively rely on a “sociology of integration” perspective when theorizing the social function of journalism. Focus is put on if and how journalism facilitates democratic processes, encourages civic engagement and strengthens the sense of community. In providing an alternative view, this study mobilizes the cultural sociology of Pierre Bourdieu – a “sociologist of conflict” – in order to study how young people’s conditions of existence have given rise to vastly different orientations towards news and the normative order surrounding journalism. Based on focus group interviews with young people in Brazil and Sweden, the study shows that socialization into the world of news in the family and in school generates class-distinctive news orientations. The world of news is a site where social groups draw moral and cultural boundaries against each other. Since different social groups monopolize completely different news practices and preferences, they work to legitimate social differences. As such, the findings challenge common notions of news as creating the “healthy citizen”, and that news media provide spaces for the practice of civility and citizenship. 

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