Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arends, J
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Freburg, Germany.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients2017In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 11-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancers are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the number of new cases is expected to rise significantly over the next decades. At the same time, all types of cancer treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and pharmacological therapies are improving in sophistication, precision and in the power to target specific characteristics of individual cancers. Thus, while many cancers may still not be cured they may be converted to chronic diseases. All of these treatments, however, are impeded or precluded by the frequent development of malnutrition and metabolic derangements in cancer patients, induced by the tumor or by its treatment. These evidence-based guidelines were developed to translate current best evidence and expert opinion into recommendations for multi-disciplinary teams responsible for identification, prevention, and treatment of reversible elements of malnutrition in adult cancer patients. The guidelines were commissioned and financially supported by ESPEN and by the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an EU level initiative. Members of the guideline group were selected by ESPEN to include a range of professions and fields of experti

  • 2.
    Athlin, Elsy
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    Universitetet i Agder.
    A model for national clinical final examination in the Swedish bachelor programme in nursing2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the development and evaluation of a model for a national clinical final examination in the bachelor nursing education. Background  After the transfer of nursing education to the academy, concerns have been raised among nurses, nurse leaders, lecturers and researchers about the nursing students’ clinical competence at the entrance to professional life. Methods  During 2003 to 2005, a collaborative project was carried out between four universities and adjunctive health-care areas supplying clinical placements in Sweden. A two-part examination was agreed upon comprising a written theoretical test and a bedside test. An assessment tool for the bedside test was created. Nursing students, nurses and clinical lecturers participated voluntarily in the evaluation. Results  The model was highly appreciated, and its relevance, usability, and validity were considered quite good for the assessment of nursing students’ clinical competence at the final stage of their education. Several deficiencies were revealed, which led to further development of the model. Conclusions and implications for nursing management  The development and first evaluation of the model proved encouraging for further use, but it needs further evaluation. Involvement of nursing managers is necessary in order to satisfy new demands on competence and staffing of clinical nurses.

  • 3.
    Athlin, Elsy
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    Högskolan i Agder, Norge.
    Evaluation of a new model for a Final Clinical Examination in the Bachelor2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Bjuresäter, K
    et al.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Feeding methods, side effects and health related quality of life in patients with home enteral tube feeding2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patients’ experiences of home enteral tube feeding (HETF): a qualitative study2015In: Journal of research in nursing, ISSN 1744-9871, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 552-565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patients’ perspectives of treatment with Home Enteral Tube Feeding (HETF)2011In: Clinical Nutrition Supplements, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Struggling in an inescapable life situation: being a close relative of a person dependent on home enteral tube feeding2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 7-8, p. 1051-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To explore what it means to be a close relative of a person dependent on home enteral tube feeding (HETF) and how they can manage this situation. Background. Previous studies have shown that the situation of close relatives in home care in general can be burdensome and difficult. Research is scarce about experiences of close relatives when patients are treated with HETF. Design. A qualitative design was used, in accordance with grounded theory ( GT). Methods. Twelve close relatives were interviewed twice, using open- ended questions. Five were relatives of patients supported by home care services or advanced home care teams. Using the GT method, sampling, data collection and data analysis were carried out simultaneously. Results. One core category, ` Struggling in an inescapable life situation' and eight categories were found. The situation led to involuntary changes in the lives of the close relatives, something they could do little about. Their lives had become completely upturned and restricted by the HETF. Togetherness and pleasure was lost and they felt lonely. The relatives faced a new role of being informal caregivers and they had to adjust their daily life accordingly. They felt forced to take on a heavy responsibility for which they lacked support. The close relatives struggled to manage and to make the best of their new situation. Conclusions. This study highlighted the demands and vulnerability which is embedded in the role of being a close relative of a patient with HETF. It also pointed out their need for comprehensive support from the health care system.

  • 8.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patients Living with Home Enteral Tube Feeding: Side effects, health-related quality of life and nutritional care2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine patients’ perceptions of side effects, health-related quality of life (HRQL), generalhealth, and nutritional care among patients receiving home enteral tube feeding (HETF) at two occasions after dischargefrom hospital. Three questionnaires, one study-specific, the Short Form 12 (SF-12) and the Health Index (HI), were sent topatients with HETF (n=62) twice, two weeks after discharge from hospital and two months later. Forty patients respondedtwo weeks after discharge and out of these 29 patients also responded after two months. Data were collected in centralSweden from March 2006 to January 2010. Side effects were common at both points of data collection (70% of thepatients after two weeks and 72% after two month). Patients using bolus feeding reported significantly fewer side effectsthan patients using intermittent feeding. HRQL and HI scores for the total group were low at both points of data collection.The bolus feeding group reported significantly higher physical HRQL and emotional HI than the intermittent feedinggroup did. Most patients were satisfied with the information and support they received from the health care team. Thisstudy has revealed that patients treated with HETF experienced side effects limiting their daily life to a great extent.Differences in HRQL related to feeding methods were found. Individualized support and regular controls are needed inorder to meet patient needs. Bolus feeding may be a suitable feeding method to improve well-being.

  • 9.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Cooperation in the care for patients with home enteral tube feeding throughout the care trajectory: from nurses' perspectives2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing (2008) 17, 3021-3029Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Cooperation in the care for patients with home enteral tube feeding throughout the care trajectory: nurses' perspectives2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 22, p. 3021-3029Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Akuten och omvärlden – ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet2014In: Universitetens, Högskolornas och Svensk sjuksköterskeförenings årliga konferens, Verksamhetsförlagd utbildning: Lärande i en föränderlig värld, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Akuten och omvärlden- ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet, Malmö 20142014In: Akuten och omvärlden- ett förbättringsprojekt i samarbete mellan Landstinget i Värmland och Karlstads universitet, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Technology, Cyprus and DOCENT & Department of Nursing Studies, University of Turku, Finland.
    Wells, Mary
    Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
    Campbell, Pauline
    Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit (NMAHP RU), Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Torrens, Claire
    Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit (NMAHP RU), Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Centre for Research & Development, Sweden.
    Oldenmenger, Wendy
    Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Patiraki, Elisabeth
    Nursing Faculty, School of Health Sciences, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
    Sharp, Lena
    Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Stockholm, Sweden & Karolinska Institute, Department of Learning Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nohavova, Iveta
    Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Domenech-Climent, Nuria
    Alicante University, Spain.
    Eicher, Manuela
    Institute for Higher Education and Research in Healthcare and Nurse Research Consultant Department of Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Farrell, Carole
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, UK.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Simpson, Mhairi
    NHS Lanarkshire, Scotland, UK.
    Wiseman, Theresa
    Clinical Chair of Applied Health in Cancer Care, Strategic Lead for Health Service Research, The Royal Marsden, NHS Foundation Trust, University of Southampton, UK.
    Kelly, Daniel
    Royal College of Nursing Chair of Nursing Research, Cardiff University, Wales, UK.
    A scoping review of trials of interventions led or delivered by cancer nurses2018In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 86, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Advances in research and technology coupled with an increased cancer incidence and prevalence have resulted in significant expansion of cancer nurse role, in order to meet the growing demands and expectations of people affected by cancer (PABC). Cancer nurses are also tasked with delivering an increasing number of complex interventions as a result of ongoing clinical trials in cancer research. However much of this innovation is undocumented, and we have little insight about the nature of novel interventions currently being designed or delivered by cancer nurses.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and synthesise the available evidence from clinical trials on interventions delivered or facilitated by cancer nurses.

    DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHODS: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCTs and controlled before and after studies (CBA) of cancer nursing interventions aimed at improving the experience and outcomes of PABC. Ten electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, Epistemonikos, CDSR, DARE, HTA, WHO ICTRP) were searched between 01 January 2000 and 31 May 2016. No language restrictions were applied. Bibliographies of selected studies and relevant Cochrane reviews were also hand-searched. Interventions delivered by cancer nurses were classified according to the OMAHA System. Heat maps were used to highlight the volume of evidence available for different cancer groups, intervention types and stage of cancer care continuum.

    RESULTS: The search identified 22,450 records; we screened 16,169 abstracts and considered 925 full papers, of which 214 studies (247,550 participants) were included in the evidence synthesis. The majority of studies were conducted in Europe (n = 79) and USA (n = 74). Interventions were delivered across the cancer continuum from prevention and risk reduction to survivorship, with the majority of interventions delivered during the treatment phase (n = 137). Most studies (131/214) had a teaching, guidance or counselling component. Cancer nurse interventions were targeted at primarily breast, prostate or multiple cancers. No studies were conducted in brain, sarcoma or other rare cancer types. The majority of the studies (n = 153) were nurse-led and delivered by specialist cancer nurses (n = 74) or advanced cancer nurses (n = 29), although the quality of reporting was poor.

    CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to synthesise evidence from intervention studies across the entire cancer spectrum. As such, this work provides new insights into the nature of the contribution that cancer nurses have made to evidence-based innovations, as well as highlighting areas in which cancer nursing trials can be developed in the future.

  • 14.
    de Leeuw, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients: what is known and what is needed2013In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 21, p. 2643-2649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, cancer patient follow-up has focused on disease surveillance and detecting recurrence. However, an increasing number of patients who have survived cancer acknowledge the importance of cancer rehabilitation issues and the need for more patient-oriented models of care by reporting their unmet physical, emotional, and social needs. Nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients fulfills this need and has been developing gradually for various cancer diagnoses and prognoses. A growing body of evidence suggests that these services provide high-quality care that is both safe and efficient. Furthermore, patients benefit from the continuity of care and easy access to support for their multitude of needs, provided by such organized care. In this paper, we review the literature published in the past 5 years regarding nurse-led follow-up care for cancer patients in order to provide input and opinion for future research, clinical practice development, and nursing leadership. We pay special attention to head and neck cancer patients, a group that has been largely understudied and hence underreported in the literature. These patients have specific needs with respect to information and education regarding their cancer and potential treatment side-effects as well as a particular need for long-term psychosocial support and practical advice.

  • 15.
    Dupin, Cecile
    et al.
    French School of Public Health.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Dariel, Odessa
    French School of Public Health.
    Debout, Christophe
    French School of Public Health.
    Rothan-Tondeur, Monique
    French School of Public Health.
    Conceptions of learning research: variations among French and Swedish nurses: A phenomenographic study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The development of nursing research capacity and interactions with cultural and structural issues is at various stages throughout Europe. This process appears to be remarkably similar irrespective of the country. Sweden has developed this capacity since the 1990s, whereas France is experiencing a transition. Nevertheless, knowledge about how nurses conceive their learning about nursing research and transitioning toward being researchers is scarce.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The aim of this study was to explore French and Swedish RNs' conceptions of research education and educational passage toward research and to describe how learning research contributes to the understanding of their norms and practices.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic approach was used to understand and describe the qualitatively different ways in which French and Swedish RNs conceive research and its apprenticeship.

    SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS:

    A purposive maximum variation sampling of five French and five Swedish Nurse Researchers with PhDs.

    METHODS:

    Individual in-depth interviews conducted in France and Sweden between November 2012 and March 2013 were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    The analysis revealed one main category, "Organisational factors to sustain individual apprenticeship". Three descriptive categories have emerged from the data and its variations amongst French and Swedish nurses: (1) entrance into research--modes of commitment; (2) nurses' engagement--the need for dedicated support; and (3) research as the means to resolve nursing situations.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study demonstrates how registered nurses have integrated nursing and researcher roles following different efficient paths. Education in nursing research is part of the strategy needed for the development of nursing research and is supported by the integration of research and practic

  • 16.
    Dupin, Cecile-Marie
    et al.
    French School of Public Health, Paris, Frankrike.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    La phénoménographie, une méthode utile en recherche infirmière2015In: SOiNS, recherche en soins infirmiers, ISSN 0297-2964, no 792, p. 56-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Helgesen, Ann K
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    How do relatives of persons with dementia experience their role in the patient participation process in special care units?2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11/12, p. 1672-1681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objective To explore the role of relatives in the patient participation process for persons with dementia living in special care units in Norwegian nursing homes, with focus on everyday life. Background Studies exploring the experience of relatives of persons with dementia as to their role in the patient participation process are limited. Design The study had an explorative grounded theory design. Method Data collection was carried out by interviews with twelve close relatives. Simultaneously, data analysis was performed with open, axial and selective coding. Results The relatives' role in the patient participation process was experienced as transitions between different roles to secure the resident's well-being, which was understood as the resident's comfort and dignity. This was the ultimate goal for their participation. The categories 'being a visitor', 'being a spokesperson', 'being a guardian' and 'being a link to the outside world' described the different roles. Different situations and conditions triggered different roles, and the relatives' trust in the personnel was a crucial factor. Conclusions The study has highlighted the great importance of relatives' role in the patient participation process, to secure the well-being of residents living in special care units. Our findings stress the uttermost need for a high degree of competence, interest and commitment among the personnel together with a well functioning, collaborative and cooperative relationship between the personnel and the relatives of persons with dementia. The study raises several important questions that emphasise that more research is needed. Relevance to clinical practice Relatives need to be seen and treated as a resource in the patient participation process in dementia care. More attention should be paid to initiating better cooperation between the personnel and the relatives, as this may have a positive impact both on the residents' and the relatives' well-being.

  • 18.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Østfold University College, Norway.
    Ahtlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Relatives' participation in everyday care in special care units for persons with dementia2014In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 404-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research concerning relatives' participation in the everyday care related to persons living in special care units for persons with dementia is limited.

    Research questions: To examine relatives' participation in their near one's everyday care, the level of burden experienced and important factors for participation, in this special context.

    Design: The study had a cross-sectional design, and data collection was carried out by means of a study-specific questionnaire.

    Participants and context: A total of 233 relatives from 23 different special care units participated.

    Ethical consideration: The study was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services.

    Results: A great majority of relatives reported that they visited weekly and were the resident's spokesperson, but seldom really participated in decisions concerning their everyday care. Participation was seldom reported as a burden.

    Discussion: This study indicated that relatives were able to make a difference to their near one's everyday life and ensure quality of care based on their biographical expertise, intimate knowledge about and emotional bond with the resident. Since knowing the resident is a prerequisite for providing individualised care that is in line with the resident's preferences, information concerning these issues is of utmost importance.

    Conclusion: This study prompts reflection about what it is to be a spokesperson and whether everyday care is neglected in this role. Even though relatives were satisfied with the care provided, half of them perceived their participation as crucial for the resident's well-being. This indicated that relatives were able to offer important extras due to their biographical expertise, intimate knowledge about and emotional bond with the resident. Good routines securing that written information about the residents' life history and preferences is available and used should be implemented in practice.

  • 19. Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    A matter of presence - ‘patient participation’ in everyday activities for persons with dementia living in special care units in nursing homes2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20. Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hvordan erfarer pårørende til personer med demens sin rolle i pasientmedvirkningsprosessen?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    ‘Patient participation’ in everyday activities in special care units for persons with dementia in Norwegian nursing homes2010In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 169-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to explore ‘patient participation’ in everyday activities for persons with dementia living in special care units in nursing homes. Background.  Studies about how ‘patient participation’ appears in the context of special care units for persons with dementia are lacking. Design.  The study has an explorative design. Method.  Grounded theory was chosen. Data collection was carried out by means of open observations and additional conversations with residents and personnel. Simultaneously, data analysis was performed with open, axial and selective coding. Findings.  The findings showed that ‘patient participation’ concerned ‘A matter of presence’ as the core category. The other categories described as ‘presence of personnel’ and ‘presence of residents’, were strongly connected to the core category as well as to each other. Presence of personnel comprised three levels; being there in body, which required physical presence; being there in mind, which required presence with all senses based on knowledge and competence; and being there in morality which was understood as being fully present, as it was based on humanistic values and included the two other levels. Presence of residents comprised ‘ability and wish’ and ‘adaptation’. The presence of the personnel had a huge impact on the ability and will to participate of the residents. Organizational conditions concerning leadership, amount of personnel and routines as well as housing conditions concerning architecture and shared accommodation, could stimulate or hinder ‘patient participation’. Conclusions and implications.  The study highlighted the great impact of the personnel’s presence in body, mind and morality on the participation capacity of the residents. The great importance of the nurse leaders was stressed, as they were responsible for organizational issues and served as role models. Group supervision of the personnel and their leaders would be an implication to propose, as these kinds of reflection groups offer opportunities to reflect on values, actions and routines.

  • 22. Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Patient participation in everyday life in special care units for persons with dementia.“A matter of precence”.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Helgesen, Ann Karin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Patient participation in special care units for persons with dementia: A losing principle?2014In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 108-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of nursing personnel with respect to patient participation in special care units for persons with dementia in nursing homes, with focus on everyday life. The study has an explorative grounded theory design. Eleven nursing personnel were interviewed twice. Patient participation is regarded as being grounded in the idea that being master of one's own life is essential to the dignity and self-esteem of all people. Patient participation was described at different levels as letting the resident make their own decisions, adjusting the choices, making decisions on behalf of the residents and forcing the residents. The educational level and commitment of the nursing personnel and how often they were on duty impacted the level that each person applied, as did the ability of the residents to make decisions, and organizational conditions, such as care culture, leadership and number of personnel.

  • 24.
    Helgesen, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Østfold.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Athlin, Elsy
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Patient participation for persons with dementia living in sheltered accommodation in nursing homes2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Henoch, I.
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ahlberg, K.
    Sahlgrenska Akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Symptom dimensions as outcomes in interventions for patients with cancer: A systematic review2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: Symptom experience in patients with cancer consists of several dimensions, often measured descriptively within various populations but seldom used as intervention outcomes. This review aims at describing symptom dimensions as outcomes of interventions designed to alleviate symptoms in patients with cancer and to describe these interventions' effects on at least two symptom dimensions. LITERATURE SEARCH: The PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews was used. Searches were undertaken in various indexing sites. DATA EVALUATION: Extracted data included design, participants, intervention and control group treatment, targeted symptom dimension, and summary of results. SYNTHESIS: 2,041 articles were identified and 15 were included. The symptom dimensions were intensity, distress, prevalence, frequency, consequences, and quality. Eleven interventions had significant effect on symptom dimensions, mostly on intensity and distress. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Oncology nurses need clinical skills to be able to understand patients' experiences through their narratives. Various interventions are targeted at symptoms, and these need to be implemented to provide evidence-based symptom management.

  • 26.
    Jansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Specialister i prehospital akutsjukvård eller generalister anpassade till ett bredare och mera varierat uppdrag2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lilja Andersson, Petra
    Lunds universitet.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Höhskolan i Halmstad.
    Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne
    Lunds universitet.
    Use of a National Clinical Final Examination in a Bachelor’s Programme in Nursing to Assess Clinical Competence: Students’, Lecturers’ and Nurses’ Perceptions2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 11 p.-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Östlinder, Gertrud
    Svensk Sjuksköterskeförening.
    Nationell klinisk slutexamination för sjuksköterskeexamen – ett verktyg för en säker och likvärdig bedömning av klinisk kompetens2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kennedy, Catriona
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Brookes Young, P
    Edinburgh Napier University NHS.
    Gray-Brunton, C
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Larkin, P
    Connoly, M
    University College Dublin.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University.
    Smith, T
    University College Dublin.
    Chater, S
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Diagnosing dying: An integrative literature review.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kennedy, Catriona
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Brooks-Young, Patricia
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Brunton Gray, Carol
    Edinburgh Napier University.
    Larkin, Phil
    University College Dublin.
    Connolly, Michael
    University College Dublin.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Smith, Tracy
    Department of Palliative Medicine, St Columba’s.
    Chater, Susie
    Department of Palliative Medicine, St Columba’s.
    Diagnosing dying: an integrative literature review2014In: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, ISSN 2045-435X, E-ISSN 2045-4368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To ensure patients and families receive appropriate end-of-life care pathways and guidelines aim to inform clinical decision making. Ensuring appropriate outcomes through the use of these decision aids is dependent on timely use. Diagnosing dying is a complex clinical decision, and most of the available practice checklists relate to cancer. There is a need to review evidence to establish diagnostic indicators that death is imminent on the basis of need rather than a cancer diagnosis.

    Aim To examine the evidence as to how patients are judged by clinicians as being in the final hours or days of life.

    Design Integrative literature review.

    Data sources Five electronic databases (2001–2011): Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The search yielded a total of 576 hits, 331 titles and abstracts were screened, 42 papers were retrieved and reviewed and 23 articles were included.

    Results Analysis reveals an overarching theme of uncertainty in diagnosing dying and two subthemes: (1) ‘characteristics of dying’ involve dying trajectories that incorporate physical, social, spiritual and psychological decline towards death; (2) ‘treatment orientation’ where decision making related to diagnosing dying may remain focused towards biomedical interventions rather than systematic planning for end-of-life care.

    Conclusions The findings of this review support the explicit recognition of ‘uncertainty in diagnosing dying’ and the need to work with and within this concept. Clinical decision making needs to allow for recovery where that potential exists, but equally there is the need to avoid futile interventions.

  • 31.
    Kling, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Grundel, Karina
    Arvika kommun.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Säker och bättre vård vid livets slut: Erfarenheter av Liverpool Care Pathway i Arvika kommun2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Säker och bättre vård vid livets slut – Erfarenheter av Liverpool Care Pathway i Arvika kommun

    Bakgrund: Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) är en standardvårdplan som syftar till att säkerställa en god vård vid livets slutskede oavsett vårdform. Genom bedömning av centrala behov och symtom, tydliga mål, samt utvärdering av given vård innebär LCP en struktur för att kvalitetssäkra vården. I en strävan efter en god vård i livets slut för alla har användningen av LCP blivit alltmer utbredd, men trots detta är den utvärderad i begränsad omfattning. Mot denna bakgrund, samt att LCP under de senaste åren ifrågasatts är det angeläget att studera effekter av LCP på kvaliteten av vården i livets slutskede.

     

    Syfte: var att undersöka hur sjuksköterskor och omvårdnadspersonal i kommunal vård uppfattade att vården i livets slutskede påverkades efter införandet av LCP, samt vilken betydelse de anser att LCP fått för vården i livets slutskede.

     

    Metod: Deskriptiv tvärsnittsstudie med kvantitativ ansats. Data samlades in mellan januari och juni 2014 med en studiespecifik enkät (50 frågor) med utgångspunkt i LCP. Tjugotvå sjuksköterskor och 120 omvårdnadspersonal (svarsfrekvens 63 %) verksamma på en korttidsavdelning, fem särskilda boende och inom fyra hemtjänstgrupper deltog. Icke parametrisk statistik användes för att testa skillnader inom- och mellan grupper.

     

    Resultat: Både sjuksköterskor och omvårdnadspersonal ansåg att implementering av LCP inneburit att vårdens kvalitet i livet slut förbättrats. Omvårdnadspersonalen uppfattade att införandet av LCP innebar att patienterna erhöll bästa möjliga omvårdnad och medicinska vård i högre grad än sjuksköterskorna (p=.011). Att arbeta enligt LCP när patienten var döende innebar en vård som uppfattades både säker och av hög kvalitet av båda personalkategorierna. Vidare uppfattades LCP underlätta bedömning av patienternas symtom och behov, samt underlätta kommunikation och överföring av information mellan olika personalkategorier.

     

    Slutsats: Att vårda patienter i livets slut i kommunal vård innebär en stor utmaning för både omvårdnadspersonal och sjuksköterskor. Genom att strukturera och systematisera vården vid livets slut med LCP säkerställs bedömning av patienters symtom och behov, bemötande av patienter och närstående samt kommunikation inom teamet. Parametrar som är betydelsefulla för en säker och god vård.

  • 32.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Att leva med ätproblem - upplevelser hos patienter med cancer i huvud- och halsområdet2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Eating problems in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy: Needs, problems and support during the trajectory of care2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck cancer is a physically and emotionally devastating disease. These cancer forms have a profound impact on the most fundamental activities of the patients' daily life such as the ability to speak, breath, eat and drink, and socialize. Even though treatment of head and neck cancer differs worldwide, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy or surgery, either as single modality or in combination. Sometimes brachytherapy or chemotherapy are given as well. Therefore, multidisciplinary care is needed that requires coordinated interventions of several different health care professionals during the trajectory of care. There is a lack of studies exploring the occurrence of eating problems in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, and these patients' nutritional situation over a longer period of time, from diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the rehabilitation period. Furthermore, few studies have focused on these patients' own experiences of having eating problems and few studies identify adequate nursing interventions to deal with these problems during the trajectory of care. This thesis is an attempt to contribute to the knowledge and understanding of these patients' experiences, situation and needs in daily life regarding these issues during the whole trajectory of care. I hope that the findings of this thesis will contribute to the development of a high quality of care for this vulnerable group of patients

  • 34.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional care during and after chemo- and radiotherapy2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nutritional support and monitoring during chemo- and radiotherapy2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nutritional support to cancer patients – from the nurses’ perspective2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    SIV- projektet - Sjuksköterskemottagningar I samVerkan: en modell för vård och omhändertagande av patienter med cancer i huvud- och halsområdet2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsson, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Upplevelser av ätproblem hos patienter med cancer i huvud och halsområdet2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Bjuresater, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    A Supportive Nursing Care Clinic for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: Effects on Nutritional Status and Health Related Quality of Life2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, p. S325-S326Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing. Univ Karlstad, Dept Nursing, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Bjuresater, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing. Univ Karlstad, Dept Nursing, Karlstad, Sweden..
    A Supportive Nursing Care Clinic for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: Effects on Nutritional Status, Nutritional Treatment and Admissions to Hospital2011In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 47, p. S298-S298Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    A supportive nursing care clinic: Effects  on nutritional status and health related quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer2010In: Clinical Nutrition Supplements: Abstracts of the 32nd ESPEN Congress, Elsevier, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    A supportive nursing care clinic for patients with head and neck cancer: effects on nutritional status, nutritional treatment and admissions to hospital2011In: The 2011 Eoropean Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    A supportive nursing care clinic for patients with head and neck cancer: effects on nutritional status, nutritional treatment and admissions to hospital2011In: Clinical Nutrition Supplements, Elsevier, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    A supportive nursing care clinic: the effect on eating problems, weight loss and quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    A supportive nursing care clinic: the effect on eating problems, weight loss, and quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro universitet.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bjuresäter, Kaisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Betydelsen av en sjuksköterskemottagning under rehabilitering efter cancer i huvud- och halsområdet: patienters perspektiv2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, B.
    Athlin, E.
    Lived experiences of daily life during the trajectory of care for patients with head and neck cancer2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, B.
    Athlin, E.
    Lived experiences of daily life during the trajectory of care for patients with head and neck cancer2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, B.
    Athlin, E.
    Lived experiences of eating problems for patients with head and neck cancer during radiotherapy2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Larsson, Maria
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, B.
    Athlin, E.
    Lived experiences of eating problems for patients with head and neck cancer during radiotherapy2002Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 81
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf