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  • 1. Augustsson, C.
    et al.
    Patriksson, G.
    Stråhlman, O.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Vilka får de bästa tiderna? En analys av fördelningen av träningstider inom föreningsidrotten2008In: I G. Patriksson (Red.), SVEBI:s årsbok, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Augustsson, Christian
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, G.
    Stråhlman, O.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Analys av träningstider inom föreningsidrotten en studie av sju lagidrotter sett ur ett alders- och könsperspektiv2007Report (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Augustsson, Christian
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, G.
    Stråhlman, O.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Analys av träningstider inom föreningsidrotten- en studie av sju lagidrotter sett ur ett ålders- och könsperspektiv2008Report (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Augustsson, Christian
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Idrottshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Stråhlman, Owe
    Idrottshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Tillgänglighet och nyttjande av träningstider i idrottsanläggningar2010In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 58-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Carlman, P.
    et al.
    Augustsson, C.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Larv- ett hälsofrämjande skolprojekt: En utvärdering av åren 2004-20082008In: I A. Östnäs (Red.), Idrottsforskaren. E-tidsskrift. SVEBI. Svensk förening för beteende- och samhällsvetenskaplig idrottsforskning, nr 3, s. 27-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Carlman, Peter
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Idrottshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Causes and consequences of dropping out from organized youth sports2013In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 26-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine dropout reasons and various types ofdropouts in relation to demographic variables, various types of sports, physicalactivity, and underlying motivational processes. Retrospective data was collected fromthree cohorts including 1,176 participants, of which 712 stated that they hadsometimes dropped out of organized sport. Findings showed that time-related reasonswere the primary causes for dropping out. It was also revealed that athletes with lowversus high levels of perceived physical competence dropped out to a higher extentbecause of experiencing too much pressure, and athletes reporting low versus highsocial competence withdrew to a higher extent because they did not like theirteammates. Results also showed that girls with a foreign background had a higher rateof dropouts compared to boys with the same background. Girls with foreignbackgrounds were also found to be less physically active after dropping out fromorganized sports.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Föräldrar och idrott. Föräldrainitierat motivationsklimat.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Carlin, Maicon
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Helena
    Örebro universitet.
    Perfectionism and athlete burnout: Does the motivational climate matter?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hill, Andrew
    Leeds University.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå universitet.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    The interaction betweenperfectionism and parent-initiated climate when predicting burnout among juniorcompetitive athletes2013In: The 13th ISSP World congress in sport psychology, Beijing, China, June, 2013., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hill, A.P.
    UK.
    Stenling, A.
    Umeå University.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Profiles of perfectionism, parental climate, and burnout among competitive junior athletes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1256-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research suggests that groups of athletes which differ in terms of perfectionism and perceptions of achievement climate can be identified. Moreover, these groups also differ in terms of burnout symptoms. The purpose of the current study was to extend this research by examining whether discernible groups can be identified based on scores of perfectionism and perceptions of parent-initiated climate and, then, whether these groups differ in terms of burnout. Two-hundred and thirty-seven Swedish junior athletes (124 males and 113 females aged 16-19) from a variety of sports completed measures of athlete burnout, multidimensional perfectionism, and parent-initiated motivational climate. Latent profile analysis identified four groups: non-perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, moderately perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, highly perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, and highly perfectionistic athletes in a mixed climate. The latter two groups reported higher levels of burnout in comparison to other groups. The findings suggest that junior athletes high in perfectionism may be at comparatively greater risk to burnout and that this may especially be the case when they perceive their parents to emphasize concerns about failure and winning without trying one’s best.

  • 11.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Skoog, Thérese
    Örebro universitet.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 640-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

    Methods

    Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15–19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

    Results

    Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

    Conclusion

    The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome.

  • 12.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Föräldrar och idrott: Föräldrainitierat motivationsklimat.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Hedström, P.
    et al.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    En genomlysning av Må bra-projektet i Säffle kommun2008In: Idrottsforskaren, ISSN 0348-9787, no 3, p. 17-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Patriksson, G.
    et al.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Föräldraengagemang i barns idrottsföreningar2004Report (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Podlog, Leslie
    et al.
    University of Utah.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro universitet.
    Relationships between Hope and Training Hours Among Adolescent Swedish Soccer Players2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Tobacco habits among Swedish youth athletes and the influence of the social environment.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Rolandsson, Margot
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hugoson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Tobacco use habits among Swedish female youth athletes and the influence of the social environment2014In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examined the prevalence of tobacco habits and the influence of the social environment among Swedish female athletes representing both individual and team sports in Sweden. Material and method: A self-reported cross-sectional survey was performed with 791 female athletes 15-24 years old representing ten of the most common sports in Sweden. The questions related to the participants' involvement in sports and their tobacco habits. Results: Findings revealed that a large proportion of the female athletes had never smoked (65%) or used snus (74%). However, a considerable portion of the participants had tried smoking (27%) or using snus (20%), especially those involved in team sports. Results also showed statistically significant associations between female athletes' smoking habits and those of both their mothers and their peers, but not with the tobacco habits of their coaches, indicating that coaches do not influence the female athletes' use of tobacco. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study indicated that the vast majority of female athletes did not use tobacco. A significant portion had sometimes tried tobacco, especially members of team sports, but this behaviour did not seem to be influenced by the tobacco habits of their coaches.

  • 18.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    De engagerade idrottsföräldrarna-vilka är de?2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Den fostrande idrotten?2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Föreningsidrott som socialisationsmiljö: En studie av idrottens betydelse för barns och ungdomars psykosociala utveckling2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this study was to examine organized youth sports in Sweden and the possible influences over time (2 years) on some of the intended socialisation effects in terms of children’s and adolescent’s self-esteem, perceived physical and social competence, self reported pro- and antisocial behaviours, self reported psychosomatic health, and use of alcohol and tobacco. In an attempt to capture some of the complex social interactions in sports, which undoubtedly leads to different socialisation experiences, an additional purpose of this study was to examine possible relations between children and adolescent athletes’ dispositional goal orientations (task and ego), perceived motivational climate in sports, perceived sport-specific competence, perceived prosocial coaching and presumptive psychosocial effect variables.

    This study’s theoretical framework was primarily based on previous works by Bronfenbrenner (1979, 1992, 1995, 2001), Bronfenbrenner and Morris (1998), Nicholls (1984, 1989) and Patriksson (1995).

    The design of the study was a three-occasion longitudinal multiple cohort design including elements of retrospective questions. Data was collected from pupils residing in schools situated in Western and Middle parts of Sweden. The sample was based on a randomly stratified sampling procedure and comprised of 1378 pupils in total (10-18 years) distributed in primary school, lower secondary school and upper secondary school. The answering rate was high (T1=85%; T2=80%; T3=80%), but wave non-response made it necessary to impute missing data values. In total 1212 respondents were included in the final analyses.

    The main results showed that sport socialisation effects on youth’s prosocial development in general were rather small, with some minor exception for perceived physical competence and smoking tobacco. Consequently the results challenge the public notion that participating in organized sport “builds character.” Results related to the specific sport environment, though showed that organized sports have the potential to act as a more positive socialisation arena. It is proposed that creating a mainly task-oriented motivational climate, and helping the individual to foster a balance between task- and ego-oriented goal orientations, will increase the probability that young athletes will perceive higher levels of competence. This will, in turn, enhance the chance that participation in organized sports will have a positive effect on youths’ psychosocial development.

  • 21.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Föreningsidrotten som socialisationsmiljö för barn och ungdomar2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Idrotten som fostransmiljö - vilken betydelse har den egentligen?2011In: Sveriges Centralförening för Idrottens Främjande (SCIF) Blå Boken. Årsbok 2011, s.90-96, ISSN 2000-7272, Vol. 104, p. 90-96Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Idrotten som socialisationsmiljö: En resurs med potential för mer?2010In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 26-29Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Socialization Through Organized Sports in Sweden2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Idrottsföräldrars syn på den kommersialiserade barn- och ungdomsidrotten.2015In: Idrottens pris: om idrottens kostnader och medlemskapets betydelse / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Pihlblad, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2015, , p. 58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Kommersiell idrott ger föräldrar huvudbry2015In: Svensk idrottsforskning, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science.
    Associations between sport involvement and youth psychosocial development in Sweden: a longitudinal study2013In: Journal of Sport for Development, ISSN 2330-0574, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a widespread belief that organized sport can be used as a tool for positive youth development. However, phenomena such as parental pressure, binge drinking, doping, bullying and marginalization are also present within the sport milieu, with potential risks for negative outcomes to occur. The aim of the present study was to examine the longitudinal effects of organized sport involvement on indicators of youth psychosocial development over 24 months. Surveys assessing reported sport involvement and psychosocial development indicators were carried out at baseline (T1), 12 months (T2), and 24 months (T3). The results, based on self-reports of 920 youth, ages 10-18 years from Sweden, showed strong evidence of an association between baseline sports involvement and end line selfesteem (SE) (r=.15; p<.001), perceived physical competence (PPC) (r=.47; p<.001), and social competence (PSC) (r=.21; p<.001), reported grades (GRAD) (r=.13; p<.001) and alcohol use (ALC) (r=.10; p=.016). After adjusting for selection effects (i.e. dropping out of sport) and prior level outcomes, the effects of sport involvement on indicators of youths’ psychosocial development used in this study, were in general negligible (SE=.05, p=.20;PSC=.05, p=.20;GRAD=.04, p=.60;ALC=.03, p=.49) except for PPC (PPC=.14, p<.001). The results of this study highlight the importance of using longitudinal studies that account for variances explained by prior level outcomes, sociodemographic variables and dropouts from sports.

  • 28.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Idrottshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    The effects of organized sport involvement on indicators of youth’s psychosocial developmentArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    The effects of organized sport on indicators of youth´s psychosocial development: A matter of selection effectsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Youth Sports Participation in Different Sports: A Matter of Socioeconomic Inequality?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Youth’s participation in different sports: A matter of socioeconomic inequality?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Stråhlman, O
    Patriksson, G
    Användning av idrottsanläggningar-: en studie av tillgänglighet till och fördelning av tider i idrottsanläggningar ur ett jämställdhetsperspektiv2010Report (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    The Relation Between Perceived Parent Created Motivation Climate and Elite Youth Soccer Player´s Moral Decisions in Sports: The importance of mothers2012In: The Relation Between Perceived Parent Created Motivation Climate and Elite YouthSoccer Player´s Moral Decisions in Sports: The importance of mothers. Oral presentation at the International Convention on Science, Education and Medicine in Sport (ICSEMIS). Glasgow, United Kingdom. 19-24 July, 2012., 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Relation Between Perceived Parent Created Motivation Climate and Elite Youth Soccer Player´s Moral Decisions in Sports: The importance of mothers

    BACKGROUND: There is a widespread belief that participating in organized sports contributes to character building and the development of moral attitudes.  However, the direction of the outcomes is to a large extent dependent on the influence of social environmental factors. Using Achievement Goal Theory (AGT) as a framework, several researchers have examined the link between a coach created motivation climate and morality aspects while the influence of the perceived motivation climate created by parents and morality has largely been overlooked.  Parents have shown to be the most significant socialization agents for children, but participation in elite sports in specializing and the investment years require continuously parental involvement and are therefore hypothesized to influence the moral attitudes of elite athletes in later adolescents.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between perceived parent created motivational climate (PPCM) and elite youth soccer player´s moral decision making in sports.

    METHODS: Swedish soccer players (n=144 males and 56 females) aged 16-19 years completed a questionnaire assessing perceptions of parent created motivational climate (PIMCQ-2) and Attitudes to moral decision in youth sport (AMDYSQ).

    RESULTS: Bivariate correlations were consistent with AGT contentions indicating positive relations between Worry Conducive Climate (WCC) and Acceptance of Cheating (AOC) and negative relations between Learning and Enjoyment Climate (LEC) and AOC for both parents (see table). A linear multiple regression analysis using fathers and mothers WCC and LEC as independent variables and AOC as the dependent variable revealed that WCC created by mothers were the only significant predictor of AOC (β=.18, p<.05).

    DISCUSSION: The results highlight the importance of creating a Learning and Enjoyment Climate and avoid creating a Worry Conducive Climate, especially by mothers, in order to enhance moral decision making in elite youth sports.

  • 34.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hammar, S.
    Hofstedt, M.
    Gillgren, K.
    Örnstedt, H.
    SMARTIS-den rätta vägen till ökad rörelse? Delrapport/Utvärdering år 12006Report (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Göteborgs universitet. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Participation in organized sport and self-esteem across adolescence: the mediating role of perceived sport competence2014In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 584-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to test longitudinal (2 years across three occasions) associations between sport participation (SP) and self-esteem (SE) across adolescence (10–18 years), addressing the mediating role of perceived sport competence (PSC) from a developmental perspective. Three waves of data were collected from three age cohorts (10–12, 13–15, and 16–18 years) of school-aged youth (N = 1358). The results demonstrate that SP and SE are related across time and that PSC has an important mediating role in this relationship, both from a skill development and a self-enhancement perspective. In the skill development model, the mediating role of PSC was significantly stronger in the youngest cohort whereas the effect of PSC on subsequent SP in the self-enhancement model was significantly stronger in the 13–15 age group compared with the youngest age group.

  • 36.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Löfdahl, Annica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.
    Segerblom, Lina
    ”Vi går till skogen” – En kartläggning av den planerade grovmotoriska träningen i förskolan2012In: Karlstads Pedagogiska Tidskrift, ISSN 1653-4743, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 67-89-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte var att kartlägga förekomsten av planerad grovmotorisk träning (PGMT) i förskolepraktiker, och därtill undersöka om förekomsten av planerade grovmotoriska aktiviteter förändrats genom åren. Ytterligare ett delsyfte med studien var att studera om den motoriska träningen fått stå tillbaka för undervisningsformer som syftar till att utveckla mer kognitiva färdigheter. En webbaserad enkät skickades ut till samtliga förskollärare i Karstads kommun varav 49 procent (n=295) valde att besvara enkäten. Resultaten visar att den övervägande delen av förskollärarna (89 procent) har någon form av PGMT med förskolebarnen, minst en gång i veckan. Dock uppger endast en mindre andel (12 procent) att de bedriver denna pedagogiska verksamhet varje dag. På frågan om vilka de vanligaste förekommande grovmotoriska aktiviteter som utfördes svarar de flesta att de besöker och leker i skogen samt låter barnen få ta del av färdigregisserade gymnastik- och rörelseprogram (t ex ”RÖRIS” av Friskis och Svettis). Vidare uppger majoriteten att de har PGMT lika ofta (54 procent) eller oftare (27 procent) jämfört när de började med sitt nuvarande yrke. Den övervägande delen av förskollärarna (78 procent) svarar också att de inte upplever att aktiviteter, som syftar att stimulera kognitiv utveckling tar tid från PGMT.

  • 37.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Olson, P.
    Gillgren, K.
    Hofstedt, M.
    Örnstedt, H.
    SMARTIS - Blev det smartare än det låter? En utvärdering av SMARTIS-projektet på uppdrag av Värmlands Idrottsförbund. Delrapport/Utvärdering år 22008Report (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, G.
    Föräldrarnas engagemang i barnens idrottsföreningar - myt eller verklighet?2005In: Svensk Idrottsforskning 2005;14(2):44-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, G.
    Parents Involvement in their Childrens Sports Clubs2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, G.
    Specialisering i barn- och ungdomsidrotten2007In: Svensk idrottsforskning, 16 (1),s. 6-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Patriksson, Göran
    Idrottshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Carlman, Peter
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    The longitudinal changes of  participation and drop-out patterns inchildren and youth sports.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since there is a widespread belief that sports contributes to a healthy development, coaches, parents and other representatives acting in the sport environment are often expressing a concern about the high drop-out rate in organized youth sports. However, drop-out decisions made by youths are not a static phenomenon (Patriksson, 1988). In order to be able to capture the mobility, the aim of the study was to examine longitudinal (2 years, 3 waves) changes of participation and drop-out patterns based on self-reports of 920 youth (10-18 years) from Sweden. Results showed that a vast majority (93%) of participants had, to some extent been involved in organized sports when entering the last wave. The participation rate decreased with 7% (75-68%) between 10-12 years, with 13% (66-53%) between 13-15 years and with 8% (42-34%) between 16-18 years. The attrition rate was highest between the ages of 14-16 (19%). Every year, a significant proportion (19%) of those who dropped out of sports returned. Almost a fifth of those who have dropped out of sports returned, but once again withdraw in the same year. A higher proportion of girls than boys (46% vs 37%) withdraw from sports. Further analyses revealed that it is primarily girls with foreign background who drops out. Results also showed that those who drop-out of sports to a larger extent are physical more active (twice a week or more) when compared with those who never have been involved in organized sports (64-66% vs 45-50%). The results are discussed in relation to longitudinal trends shown in previous research (e.g., Findlay, Garner & Kohen, 2009; Patriksson, 1988; Seippel, 2005) but also in relation to studies that have only used cross-sectional or retrospective designs (e.g., Butcher, Lindner & Johns, 2002).

  • 42.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, P.
    Socialization Through Organised Children and Youth Sports in Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, P
    Socialization through organized youth sports. A study of young peoples psychosocial development2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, P.
    Specialiseringsgrad inom barn- och ungdomsidrotten2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Patriksson, P.
    Vad lär sig barn och ungdomar i idrottsföreningar?2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Augustsson, Christian
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Swedish youth football players' attitudes towards moral decision in sport as predicted by the parent-initiated motivational climate2016In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 25, p. 110-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between late adolescent football players' perceptions of the motivational climate as initiated by mothers and fathers and attitudes towards moral decision making in sports. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Participants were 213 Swedish football players (144 males, 67 females) aged 16-19 years who completed measures assessing perceived parent-initiated motivational climate (i.e., success-without effort climate [SWEC]; worry conducive climate [WCC]; and learning/enjoyment climate [LEC]) and attitudes towards moral decision-making in sport (i.e., acceptance of cheating [AOC]; acceptance of gamesmanship [AOC.] and keeping winning in proportion [KWIP]). Results: Canonical correlations demonstrated moderate positive relations between parent initiated both mother and father performance climates (WCC and SWEC) and AOC and AOG. Moreover, the relationship between mother and father-initiated learning/enjoyment climate (LEC) were shown to be moderately and positively associated with the prosocial attitude dimension of KWIP. Results also showed that a mother-initiated LEC and a mother-initiated SWEC were stronger predictors of the criterion variables (AOC, AOG, and KWIP) than equivalent father-initiated climate dimensions. Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of considering the relationship between parent initiated climates especially initiated by mothers and the development of moral decision-making among youth football players.

1 - 46 of 46
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