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  • 1.
    Gottfridsson, Hans Olof
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Värmlänningar i rörelse: En studie av värmlänningars vardagsmobilitet2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: Politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Norell, P O & NIlsson, Lennart, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 361-384Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Gottfridsson, Hans Olof
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Värmlänningarnas syn på satsningar på länets kommunikationer2016In: Värmländska utmaningar: Politik, ekonomi, samhälle, kultur, medier / [ed] Norell, P O & Nilsson, Lennart, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 343-360Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gottfridsson, Hans Olof
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Öjehag-Pettersson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Att gränspendla: samma fast olika2012In: På gränsen: interaktion, attraktivitet och globalisering i Inre Skandinavien / [ed] Eva Olsson, Atle Hauge och Birgitta Ericsson, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, 1, p. 95-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Grip, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Journalism as Livelihood: gender, space and mobility2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a large body of research on how journalistic work has changed in the past few decades, very little attention has been paid to what journalists do outside work (e.g. their lifestyles, personal networks, family situations, overall work and life situation), nor to how journalists negotiate their work lives and their private lives, despite the fact that such factors also may have an impact on the ability of journalists to fulfil some kind of public/democratic function. Such questions are arguably becoming more and more salient as journalistic work is becoming more mobile, more contingent, and more insecure.

    In this paper we propose a multi-disciplinary approach to analyzing the interplay between journalistic work and lifestyles/life situation that combines intersectional feminist theories and methods in human geography with media studies through the concept of livelihood (rather than paid work, profession, occupation, etc.) at the center. We argue that this concept better captures aspects of mobility, place restraints, contingency and mutual interrelation between the public and private spheres in relation to journalistic work. The livelihood concept provides a tool for critically analyzing the gendered spaces and mobilities of journalism and the consequences for men’s and women’s daily life.

  • 5.
    Hoppstadius, Fredrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    ‘You have to try being a role model’: Learning for sustainability among tourism entrepreneurs in a swedish biosphere reserve2018In: European Journal of Tourism Research, ISSN 1994-7658, E-ISSN 1314-0817, Vol. 20, p. 28-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pursuit for sustainability in biosphere reserve (BR) tourism entails the need not merely for tourism businesses to adapt to the changing environmental preferences of tourists but also for entrepreneurs to gain new knowledge about sustainability. Our study illustrates how place is central to grasp the processes of learning for sustainability. Drawing on qualitative interviews, we examine place-specific and social learning processes for sustainability among small-scale tourism entrepreneurs in a Swedish BR. The findings are discussed using an analytic framework, based on themes of place-specific learning emerging from the interviews. Learning for sustainability among tourism entrepreneurs entails an emphasis on both social and spatial processes. Our findings show how the small-scale tourism entrepreneurs engage in learning through their interactions with tourists at their tourism establishments, through networking with other tourism businesses and regional stakeholders, through engaging with local resources and cultural norms of the BR, and through their experiences and practices connected to their everyday lives and the private sphere.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Michael
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for HumanIT. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Lindell, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Ryan Bengtsson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013).
    Fast, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Jansson, André
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    OMNIBUS NEWS: Engagement or bussed?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer of 2013 the municipal public bus system, Karlstadbuss, installed television sets (BUSS-TV) on all city buses. These TV sets are airing user-generated content, and traffic information, weather forecasts as well as news from the hybrid commercial/public service broadcaster TV4. This paper addresses the phenomenon from the theoretical intersection of communication geography and journalism studies. This means understanding the city-buses, at once mobile and semi-public spaces, as decorated with a new “communicative texture” that is renegotiating the time-space nexus traditionally tied to news consumption. Furthermore, it potentially implies that a basic news diet become more or less dispersed amongst commuters across the city, and across previous class-demarcations that would engender divergent news diets. This constitutes a potential challenge to the notion of the fragmented news audience and related worries over the increased number of “news avoiders”. From previous research we know that news consumption, even accidental, is linked with political and civic engagement. In an era where media consumption is increasingly fragmented or even avoided, the buss-news reinstalls the almost inescapable news of the 1970’s albeit in a highly situated and limited context. Nevertheless, this new space of ‘news on the move’ is yet to be explored theoretically and empirically. Thus, we ask about the role of Karlstadbuss as a carrier of omnibus news in the media ecology. The paper uses data derived from representative surveys (Värmlands-SOM) conducted before (2010) and after (2014) the introduction of BUSS-TV to study the impact of travelling with the city-buses on political interest and civic engagement as well as general news interest and consumption.

  • 7.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Communicating Disaster Spaces of the In-Between: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters. In tourism studies, few studies have explored the use of social media in disaster situations. This paper puts focus on the tourists’ roles and participation in disasters and crisis communication, based on a case study from Fiji, following tropical cyclone Winston in February 2016. The study explores the spatial and virtual dimensions of how disasters are handled, communicated and (de)constructed by tourists through social media as “spaces of the in-between”. In this context, tourists become not merely ‘victims’ by disaster events, but also powerful mediators in how the tourism destination is reshaped during a disaster, reflecting complex geographies of (im)mobility, (dis)connectedness, (un)control and inequalities. Thus, crucial questions include for what/whose purpose tourists use social media and if social media provides an arena for self-reflexivity among tourists about their own roles and impact as (potential) visitors to the disaster area in relation to other actors, including the local community. The paper has a qualitative netnographic approach, which involves studying social and cultural dimensions of online activities and how they relate and intersect with people’s everyday life. The netnographic fieldwork includes analysis of social media content (Tripadvisor and Facebook), interviews with Australian tourists who visited Fiji during and after the cyclone, as well as with hotels, resorts and tourism organisations in Fiji.   

  • 8.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Communicating Tourism Riskscapes: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters. In the field of tourism geography, few studies have explored the use of social media in disaster situations. This paper puts focus on the tourists’ roles and participation in disasters and crisis communication, based on a case study from Fiji, following tropical cyclone Winston in February 2016. The study explores spatial and virtual dimensions of how disasters are handled, communicated and (de)constructed by tourists through social media by using the concept ‘tourism riskscapes’. In this context, tourists become not merely ‘victims’ by disaster events, but also powerful mediators in how the tourism destination is reshaped during a disaster, reflecting complex geographies of (im)mobility, (dis)connectedness, (un)control and inequalities. Thus, crucial questions include for what/whose purpose tourists use social media and if social media provides an arena for self-reflexivity among tourists, bringing ethical issues of tourists’ roles and impacts into focus in relation to other actors, including the local community. The paper has a qualitative netnographic approach, which involves studying social and cultural dimensions of online activities and how they relate and intersect with people’s everyday life. The netnographic fieldwork includes analysis of social media content (Tripadvisor and Facebook), interviews with Australian tourists who visited Fiji during and after the cyclone, as well as with hotels, resorts and tourism organisations in Fiji.  

  • 9.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Det sjungande folket: Musik och turism i Lettland2007In: Aronsson, Lars et al (red) (2007) Kulturell ekonomi. Skapandet av värden, platser och identiteter i upplevelsesamhället. Polen: Studentlitteratur / [ed] Aronsson Lars, Bjälesjö Jonas & Johansson, Susanne, Polen: Studentlitteratur , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Gendered entrepreneurship in rural Latvia: exploring femininities, work, and livelihood within rural tourism2012In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 75-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores different geographies of tourism, femininities and livelihood in post-socialist rural Latvia, with a focus on women’s entrepreneurship within rural tourism. Based on a case study in the Cēsis district, its aim is to analyze women’s livelihood strategies, including both economic and lifestyle-oriented motives behind entrepreneurship within tourism. The study illustrates women’s day-to-day livelihood practices and how they organize their lives in time and space. The article reveals how women negotiate their ‘livelihood action space,’ which includes a number of paradoxes between the quest for independence while facing both economic and social restrictions.

  • 11.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Tourism as a genderised ordering: seductions of Riga as a sex tourism destination2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract

    The Latvian post-socialist nation state has been re-imagined and re-packaged through the prism of tourism marketing. The country is re-positioned within a Western (geo)political and economic context, while at the same time claiming traditional Latvian cultural values. The (re)ordering of the capital Riga is spatial, but also gendered and sexualised. Riga is debated as a sex tourism destination for Western tourists, and yet embodied and commercialized as an erotic and sinful feminine Eastern Other. The paper discusses the ambivalent roles of Riga as a tourism destination in general, as a space in-between East and West. Specifically, the paper analyses a Latvian campaign against sex tourism portraying women primarily as fallen girls and potential prostitutes in the new market economy. The campaign claims that women have failed to live up to their traditional roles as Mothers of the nation, and thereby absolving foreign men and holding Latvian women responsible for Rigas deteriorating tourism image

  • 12.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Transforming geographies of rurality and femininities. Exploring women's livelihood strategies and practices within rural tourism in Latvia2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract

    This paper explores different geographies of tourism, femininities and livelihood in post-socialist rural Latvia, with a focus on womens employment and entrepreneurship within rural tourism. Based on a case study in the Csis district, one aim is to analyse womens livelihood strategies, including both economic and lifestyle-oriented motives behind their employment or entrepreneurship within tourism. The study also illustrates womens day-to-day livelihood practices, in how they organise their lives in time and space, including paid and unpaid work within both the private and the public sphere. Three different ideals of femininities and work are distinguished: traditional, Western, and the continuity of socialist ideals, which women relate to in their everyday life, but also take part in shaping through their practices. The paper reveals how women negotiate their livelihood action space, which includes a number of paradoxes between the quest for independence while facing both economic and social restrictions. These are, for example, related to how they influence their positions within the private sphere, since being an entrepreneur within rural tourism tends to blur the boundaries between the private and the public and be based on a more traditional division of labour between women and men within the family

  • 13.
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Transforming geographies of tourism and gender: Exploring women's livelihood strategies and practices within tourism in Latvia2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores different geographies of tourism, gender, work and liveli­hood in post-socialist Latvia. The study puts focus on the overall transforma­tion process and the reshaping of the tourism sector, in how Latvia is reimag­ined both as a nation state and as a tourism destination. One central aim is to analyse the transformation process as genderised, and how existing gender identi­ties in general and femininities more specifically are being transformed and mirrored within tourism. The thesis first contain an analysis of how Latvian tourism-mar­ket­ing carries genderised meanings and identities, based on three interrelated ‘geog­raphies’ as part of the transforming ‘national common space’: geogra­phies of neo-nationalism, geographies of Euro­peanisation and geographies of relic-communism. These hold certain imaginations and conceptions of space and place, and in­clude aims and priorities of the transition process. Secondly, focus is placed on the chang­ing conditions for women’s livelihood within rural tourism in the Cēsis district, and spa/health tourism in Jūrmala. The thesis has mainly a quali­tative approach, including semi-structured interviews and text analysis, but the case studies also comprise a survey.

    The thesis illustrates how tourism becomes an arena for reclaiming a Latvian national identity rooted in a pre-Soviet past, while also manifesting a Western European identity, and negotiating the remains of the controversial Soviet heritage. This process reveals, for example, traditional feminised features of the nation state, portraying women as the ‘mothers’ of the nation. Two case studies of female employees and entrepreneurs within rural tourism and spa/health tourism also show how women negotiate different ideals of femininities, in­cluding ‘traditional’, ‘Western’ and ‘socialist’ ideals, through their everyday live­lihood practices within both the public and the private sphere. Their negotia­tions for a more independent liveli­hood are also affected by structural factors, such as wages and taxes, but also by the local socio-cultural context and related gender identities, including class, family structure, age and ethnicity.

  • 14.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development (from 2013).
    Alfredsson-Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Ericsson, Birgitta
    Eastern Norway Research Institute, Norway.
    Overvåg, Kjell
    Department of Travel and Tourism, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    The border as an engine for mobility and spatial integration: A study of commuting in a Swedish-Norwegian context2018In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 217-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to analyse how cross-border commuting differed from intranational commuting in Sweden, and how cross-border mobilities affected spatial integration. The authors analysed patterns and spatial flows of cross-border commuting by comparing them with characteristics of intranational commuting. In the article, they explore the assumption that the border constitutes an ‘engine’ for work-related mobility, which affects processes of spatial integration in cross-border areas. The empirical material comprised data from surveys of commuting from the Swedish county of Värmland to Norway and commuting within Värmland. The findings showed that cross-border commuting shared common features with intranational commuting, including how the frequency of commuting was dependent on distance. The motives for commuting differed, and the reasons for working in Norway were economic rather than professional. In terms of spatial integration, cross-border commuting was mainly one-directional, from Sweden to Norway, while leisure mobility and migration tended to be in the opposite direction. The authors conclude that the border region is characterised by integration through specialisation, which involves a permanent state of ‘transient’ mobility. Thus, a win-win situation can be distinguished, in which the border serves as a resource and an ‘engine’ for cross-border integration, mobility and economic activities.

  • 15.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Eide, Trude
    Östlandsforskning, Norge.
    Culture of Learning2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Ericsson, Birgitta
    Overvaag, Kjell
    Sesongarbeidere på vintersportsteder: En undersokelse i indre Skandinavia2010Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Ericsson, Birgitta
    Østlandsforskning.
    Overvaag, Kjell
    Østlandsforskning.
    Säsongsarbetare i svenska och norska skidorter – tillfällig arbetskraft eller potentiella inflyttare?2012In: På gränsen: interaktion, attraktivitet och globalisering i Inre Skandinavien / [ed] E. Olsson, A. Hauge & B. Ericsson, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, p. 183-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Ericsson, Birgitta
    Østlandsforskning.
    Overvåg, Kjell
    Østlandsforskning.
    Seasonal Workers in Swedish and Norwegian Ski Resorts: Potential In-migrants?2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 385-402Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Gender and cross-border commuting in a Swedish-Norwegian context: strategies, obstacles and possibilities2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores gendered commuting patterns in a Swedish-Norwegian border region. In Swedish Värmland, 5462 inhabitants commuted to Norway in 2009, of which a significant share (36 percent) represented commuters from Torsby, Eda and Årjäng municipalities. Cross-border commuting is here defined as work related mobility across a national border, including daily and weekly mobility. Previous studies have shown that cross-border commuting may be beneficial for the ‘sending’ municipalities, contributing to a low unemployment rate, local tax revenues, fewer social allowances and even a healthier population. Research has described cross-border commuting as a deliberately chosen lifestyle, as well as being driven by economic motives in terms of higher Norwegian salaries. Statistics show that men are overrepresented both as ‘ordinary’ commuters on a national scale as well as cross-border commuters. Moreover, women constitute only 30 percent of cross-border commuters compared to 40 percent of commuters crossing a municipal border. Previous research has shown that men commute farther and more frequent compared to women due to women’s family obligations and everyday life puzzle strategies. Few studies have explored gendered commuting patterns in border regions and how women and men’s participation in cross-border commuting vary depending on distance, motives, experiences, possibilities and obstacles.  

    The purpose of this study is to analyse the patterns of cross-border commuting with a focus on women’s and men’s motives, strategies and conditions for commuting from Sweden to Norway. The research questions include; what differences and similarities of men and women’s commuting can be distinguished in terms of age, family, income and other social factors? How do women and men experience the effects of their commuting on their everyday life, including participation in their family life, social relations and domestic responsibilities? The study is based on both quantitative and qualitative data, comprising a survey of cross-border commuters in Årjäng, Eda and Torsby municipalities as well as interviews with cross-border commuting women and men. One central question includes how women’s and men’s commuting patterns reflect existing spatial gender and intersectionality contracts. An intersectionality perspective is here used to study the interrelations between gender and other social variables such as class, ethnicity and age. These are (re)produced and negotiated in a place specific and socio-cultural context, affecting relations in the family, the local community and the labour market.   

    The results of the study point to that the higher wages in Norway are of relevance for both women and men’s motives to seek employment in Norway. In the interview study, women described the higher wages as important markers of independence, both in relation to their husbands and in relation to the local community. Single mothers describe the possibility to work part-time due to higher wages, while commuting a shorter distance, which in turn improves their work-life balance. Still, the salaries have spatial and occupational variations, partly due to that women tend to work closer to the border where the salaries are lower. Partly, cross-border commuting reflect gender coded occupations between women and men, where women’s work within public services are lower paid compared to sectors such as construction work where men are overrepresented. Women spend less time on daily commuting compared to men, which can be related to their family obligations. This is evident also within weekly commuting. In the survey, men are highly overrepresented as weekly commuters, while none of the weekly commuting women have children in their household.  

  • 20.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Gender and cross-border commuting: the case of the Swedish-Norwegian border region2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Öjehag, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    ”Harryland”?: gränshandel i tre värmländska kommuner2012In: På gränsen: interaktion, attraktivitet och globalisering i inre Skandinavien / [ed] Eva Olsson, Atle Hauge och Birgitta Ericsson, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2012, 1, p. 79-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Wang, Jie
    School of Business, The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Nguyen, Hanh Thuy
    School of Business, The University of Queensland, Australia.
    #strongerthanwinston: Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following tropical cyclones in Fiji2018In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 69, p. 272-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because the tourism industry can be affected by various natural disasters, the media landscape with increasing social media, brings to tourism new possibilities and challenges in its preparing for, and handling, such disasters. The literature has paid little attention to social media's part in such phenomena. Therefore, this study explores how social media are used by hotels following Tropical Cyclone Winston in Fiji using mixed methods, based on interviews (n = 12) and hotels' real time Facebook posts (n = 1288). While we find that social media were underused in preparing for the disaster and response that followed, it played a crucial role in raising funds and donations during the recovery phase. We apply the social mediated disaster resilience (SMDR) model to allow this study to fill the knowledge gap in organizational disaster resilience literature. We show how social media are integrated in resilience-building and its potential for increasing hotel resilience.

  • 23.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Wang, Jie
    School of Business, The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Nguyen, Hanh Thuy
    School of Business, The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following cyclone Winston in Fiji2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media and mobile technology, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters for tourism stakeholders. On the one hand, the participatory nature of social media such as Twitter and Facebook may involve new and faster ways of sharing and responding to urgent crises, while triggering formal response efforts. On the other hand, the use of social media may also give rise to false information, lack of accountability and control of the information flows. This paper is based on the results of a case study of how Facebook was used for crisis communication by hotels and tourists following tropical cyclone Winston in Fiji in 2016. The aim of the study is to analyse the communication activity and digital engagement between stakeholders through social media during different phases of the crisis. The project is based on (1) Qualitative and quantitative Facebook data (posts, comments, likes etc.) from selected hotels in areas affected by the cyclone, based on location, size, operation and Facebook fans (2) An interview study with hotel managers in Fiji, conducted in June 2016.

  • 24.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    Westlindh, Sara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Regional Development.
    På lika villkor: Utvärdering av ett projekt för anhöriginvandrade kvinnor2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Möller, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Örnebring, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Liquid geographies of journalism: gender, place and identity among ex-journalists2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on journalistic work has traditionally tended to privilege the workplace and newsroom as the main scene for journalistic practice, while reproducing male norms of work and professionalism and a clear work/life separation. Following staff cuts throughout the newspaper and media sectors across Europe and North America, there has been a sharp rise in scholarly interest in journalists’ not working, i.e. the experiences and effects of job loss and job insecurity among journalists.

    We argue that due to increased precarity and blurred boundaries in/of journalistic work, livelihood is a suitable concept for analyzing both change and continuity within the gendered occupation of journalism. In this paper, we examine the liquid geographies of journalistic livelihoods by studying how (ex)journalists negotiate the tensions between occupational identities (privileging professionalism, mobility and career) and place based identities (mobilizing a sense of community belonging) in the experience of job loss.

    The study is based on exploratory interviews with Swedish journalists who have left the occupation, either voluntarily or involuntarily. The paper analyzes their whole life situation, both their work lives and their private lives, when transitioning to a new profession. The study shows how both female and male (ex)journalists’ livelihood strategies are strongly rooted in the local community, revealing a wish to stay and work locally, choosing alternative work and improving their work-life balance - rather than striving to maintaining a journalistic identity. This contradicts earlier findings, which indicate that the professional identities of journalists are strong, even in the face of professional adversity.

  • 26.
    Örnebring, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Möller, Cecilia
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    In the Margins of Journalism: Gender and livelihood among local (ex-) journalists in Sweden2018In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1051-1060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on journalists and journalistic work has focused on journalists with permanent, full-time employment. Given the rapid decrease of such employment opportunities, we argue that journalism research needs to pay more attention to those who those who have had to leave their jobs and either stopped doing journalism entirely, or who have switched to a freelance career (sometimes combining journalism with other work). This category of people is at once becoming more marginalized and “the new normal” within the occupation: In this paper, we furthermore focus on local (Swedish) journalists and ex-journalists. Based on a set of semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with ex-journalists who share the experience of having lost their permanent, full-time jobs, we use the concept of livelihood as an analytical tool. The concept of livelihood highlights the shift from journalism as a job practiced exclusive of other jobs to an activity conducted alongside other income-generating activities and makes it possible to analyse leaving the occupation from a context that incorporates the whole life situation of the respondents. This also contributes to the current wave of studies of journalism and job loss by adding qualitative data about individual experiences of job loss to the existing quantitative survey evidence.

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