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  • 1. Aronsson, G.
    et al.
    Eklund, J.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, L.
    Inte bara här och nu utan också där och då - reflektioner om arbetslivsforskningen och hållbarhetsprojektet2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Gonäs, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Network of Socio-Economic Experts (SEN) in the Non-Discrimination Field2009Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gonäs, Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Network of Socio-economic Experts (SEN)in the Non-Discrimination Field2009Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Greenwood, I
    et al.
    England.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Team-working, Restructuring and Skills in UK and Sweden2007In: European journal of industrial relations, ISSN 0959-6801, E-ISSN 1461-7129, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 361-377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Greenwood, I
    et al.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Teige, B
    Svensson, L
    Organisational change, teamworking and the learning agenda:: Cases from Sweden, and the UK2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Kevätsalo, K
    et al.
    Svensson, L
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Reflective learning at work - an organisational and participatory perspective2003Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Kristiansson, M.
    et al.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Adult learning and working life in Sweden2007Report (Other academic)
  • 8. Kristiansson, M.
    et al.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Adult learning and working life in Sweden2007Report (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    A partnership approach: - strategies for organisational change2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Conditions for learning, - flexibility to promote learning and education2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    COUNTRY REPORT 1 2011. ON ACTIVE AGEING2011Report (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    From a steel worker to a nurse: The story of Carl2006In: Promoting lifelong learning for older workers. An international overview / [ed] Tikkanen, T. & Nyhan, B., Luxenbourg: Cedefop reference series; 65 , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Lärande på arbetsplatsen i flexibla former på Nammo Vingåkersverken: Uppföljning av en utbildningssatsning hösten 20002002Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Staying alive!2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract

    This paper is based on a research project called Learnpartner. The work was organized as a joint research project between Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Spain, and Germany. Our project task was to describe best practice for partnership-based work on the labour market within the European steel and metal industry when responding to the process of restructuring. The research results presented in the paper discusses issues such as why does restructuring lead to developing different outcomes at organisational and at individual level and what factors determines if restructuring can result in developing sustainable conditions?



    The paper describes empirical findings regarding the consequences of change processes taking place at organisational and at individual level. The research design entailed using qualitative methods such as work shadowing and interviews with trade union people, employees, managers, human resource personnel, researchers. The data collection was based on case studies conducted at two companies supplemented by interactive methods during discussions, workshops, and seminars, which meant involving practitioners from both the companies and the trade unions in interpreting the results (Aagaard Nielsen & Svensson 2006). Many people have taken part in interpreting and analysing the research findings as a method of validating and discussing the research results, and to learn from experience. The theoretical framework relates to work organisations, work environment, employee participation, industrial relations (Huzzard 2004), competence development as well as conditions for sustainable development (Hvid & Lund 2002). In order to describe the research findings, a model was used to highlight different factors that can influence change processes.



    The results show that both the companies have been successful when it comes to responding to the restructuring process; however, there are some differences at individual level. Some workers experience deteriorating working conditions resulting in work intensification (Docherty et al. 2002) and an increase in work related stress (Karasek & Theorell 1990) as other workers experience a boost in their working conditions as well as increased opportunities for personal development and organisational development (Shapiro 2001). I will on the basis of the different outcomes discuss how different factors mediate to create barriers and precondition in the change process. Important factors are; management strategies, trade union involvement, workteams, employee participation, work conditions and work environment, as they act to influence the entire process and influence the outcomes of restructuring work, and ultimately create conditions for sustainable development. When employees have the option to participate in planning the restructuring process, the process is more likely to lead to sustainable conditions (Hvid 2006)

  • 15.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Staying alive!: The restructuring process in two Swedish steel and metal companies2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is based on a research project called Learning-in-partnership, abbreviated to “Learnpartner”. The work was organized as a joint research project between Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Spain, and Germany, and managed by Leeds University Business School in the UK. Our project task was to describe best practice for partnership-based work on the labour market within the European steel and metal industry when responding to the process of restructuring.The research was based on case studies in two Swedish companies, where we conducted interviews with trade union people, employees, managers, and human resource personnel. The qualitative design was supplemented with interactive methods during discussions, workshops, and seminars, which meant involving practitioners from both the companies and the trade unions in interpreting the results. The theoretical framework relates to work organisations, industrial relations, competence development as well as conditions for sustainable development. In order to describe the research findings in this thesis, a model was used to highlight different factors that can influence change processes.The report describes empirical findings regarding the consequences of change processes taking place at organisational and at individual level. The results show that both the companies have been successful when it comes to responding to the restructuring process; however, there are some differences at individual level. The thesis highlights certain factors such as; management strategies, trade union involvement, workteams, employee participation and follow-up and discusses how they influence the entire process and the outcomes of restructuring work.Hanne knows the steel industry from her childhood. She grew up in a small district in Sweden where the steel mill was the biggest and (almost) the only employer. Her parents and brothers worked there until the rolling mill was closed down. Her previous relationship with the world of steel helped her while working on the thesis, and gave her some kind of justification to be inquisitive.

    Hanne Randle is a researcher and PhD-student at Karlstad University – department of Working Life Science. Besides from industrial relations and partnership, Hanne has researched; conditions for developing sustainable public sector jobs, developing a European standard for vocational education and training for explosive sector workers, older workers and lifelong learning, and workplace learning. As a mean to develop a joint learning process between researchers and practitioner her method in research is to involve participants into the whole process of the research.

     

  • 16.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Strategies for restructuring: A partnership approach2004Report (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Theory in Practice2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Aronsson, G
    Svensson, L
    Eklund, J
    Inte bara här och nu utan också där och då - reflektioner om arbetslivsforskningen och hållbarhetsprojektet2009In: Arbetslivsforskning och hållbarhet: empiriska illustrationer och framtidsvisioner / [ed] Porsfelt, D, Växjö: Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Bergqvist, S
    Ekström, J
    Hedström, R
    Stakeholder Cooperation for Employability and Employment2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract

    Stakeholder cooperation for employability and employment

    Both private and public employers in health and social service (in Sweden) are finding it more and more difficult to recruit people. As a consequence of deregulation in the health and social sector public organisations are undergoing restructuring while private alternatives are established. This means that public employers have to find new ways to increase workers retention at the same time as new private companies must find ways to recruit employees. Due to restructuring in the public sector and periods of lay offs of nurses and support staff the average age of workers has increased which means that many workers are reaching the age of retirement. Demographic prognosis in Sweden show that there will be a shortage of workers in the health and care sector as younger people do not wish to work in health or social care they rather pursue other careers. Looking at the future the health and care sector will need to replenish the workers in one way or another. This paper will give an example how private companies and local authorities and municipal services can work together to develop new ways for recruitment, where training is combined with work practice as methods to develop employable workers.



    Different initiatives have been tried out to find new ways to recruit people into training and work, by education agencies, by the ministry of education and through local initiatives. Government initiatives are mainly based on developing vocational training systems that can fast track people into care work, through systems of accreditation of previous experience. Education agencies provide tailor made courses in order to match previous experience with supplementary training. Still young people are not cueing up to take part in these training courses. However local and company-led initiatives are in a sense more successful, as training providers they have the opportunity to recruit workers with company or service specific skills (Randle et al. 2008).



    The local initiative is led by a private company providing personal assistants to people with functional disorders. As a result of changes in regulations in 1994 the Swedish government allowed private companies to provide the service of personal assistants, up until then the service was provided by the municipalities. People with functional disorders cannot function on a daily basis without the help of others, and therefore they are entitled by Swedish law, to have assistants to help them with their basic functions. Initially when private companies started their business they employed people who were not members of trade unions as they did not accept unionised workers which resulted in the workers accepting bad working conditions and low wages. The company described in the paper wishes to change the image of the business by providing better working conditions for their employees and by educating their workers in collective agreements and employers responsibilities, thus the company employs about 150 personal assistants. Still a job as a personal assistant is regarded by many workers as a temporary and low status job which means that company has to put a lot of effort into retaining workers.



    The company described in this paper is called Aktiv Assistans Tillsammans which translates to Active Assisstance together. The training initiative described in the paper is led by the company but developed together with the local municipality and the department of language training for immigrants. The idea is to develop employable workers in a specific area of work by providing a training programme for unemployed immigrants where they can link language training with work practice. The paper will present the training programme, results regarding employability, work status, language skills and integration

  • 20.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Eriksson, I
    Haunch, P
    Bennett, T
    Learning to become employable by learning to work in the health & social sector. A new career path in life2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Gonäs, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    COUNTRY REPORT 1 2010 ON THE SITUATION OF LGBT PEOPLE: Network of socio-economic experts in the Anti-discrimination Field2010Report (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Gonäs, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Country report 1 2010 on the situation of the LGBT people in Sweden.: Report to the network of socio-economic experts in the anti-discrimination field VT 2008-0072010Report (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Gonäs, Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Country report 2 2010, On employment, ethnicity and migrants.: Report to the network of socio-economic experts in the anti-discrimination field VT 2008-0072010Report (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Haunch, Paul
    Corporate Social Responsibility - good for employers, good for trade unions?2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has, until recently, played little part in the industrial relations process. Emerging evidence suggests that employers and trade unions have common ground in their wish to see greater emphasis placed on the needs of those groups not in employment and commonly referred to as socially excluded.



    Empirical results of trade union led training initiatives from the public sector municipal services in Sweden and an employer/employee partnership the Health Service in the UK show that positive, new opportunities for employers, employees and participants are emerging. The promotion of a learning environment and learning culture free from anxiety and shame helps people to grow and develop employability skills, self-confidence and pursue new careers. Trade union representatives are also developing new interests and skills, whilst employers make a greater, corporate contribution to society.

  • 25.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Heniemann, A
    Learning to cope with Displacement2004Report (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Ljungzell,, M
    Qualifications - through workplace training2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will present how qualified vocational training and education can play an important role in developing arenas for lifelong learning. Workplace learning can develop opportunities for individual development, develop company competitiveness, reduce risk of competence drain when employees retire and promote recruitment of younger employees. The paper is based on experiences from a European project EUExcert, which has the ambition to develop a European system for qualifications for the Explosives sector.

  • 27.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Persson, T
    Modin, M.
    Eriksson, I
    Changing workers to nurses2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Persson, T.
    Modin, M.
    Eriksson, I.
    Men learning nursing as a job2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a practical example of boundary crossing collaboration and innovative solutions in a community development project in north of Sweden. The idea was to develop job opportunities in a region which had suffered redundancies due to restructuring. Community stakeholders such as local authorities, education agencies, labour market offices, county commissioners, and public healthcare employers worked together to develop favourable conditions for regional development. Introducing new learning initiatives by adapting learning techniques to untraditional learners were part of the innovative solutions. Workplace learning was used as a method to prepare and inspire older unemployed men to work in healthcare. Individual competencies where strengthened as a mean to develop individual employability

  • 29.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Persson, T
    Modin, M.
    Eriksson, I.
    Older male workers breaking traditional work patterns2008In: Cedefop Panorama Series 159 / [ed] Cedefop, Luxenbourg: Cedefop Panorama Series 159 , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Randle, Hanne
    COUNTRY REPORT 2 2011. ECONOMIC CASE FOR ANTI-DISCRIMINATION2011Report (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, L.
    A system for education, adapted to the idea of lifelong learning, a possibility or a vision?2002Report (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, L
    Team work and restructuring: Self-exploitation or empowerment?2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, L
    Trade unions, partnership, and the learning agenda2002Report (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, L
    Eklund, J
    Aronsson, G
    Interaktiv forskning: tillämpningar vid utvärdering och arbetsmiljöutveckling2009In: Perspektiv på arbetsmiljöarbete / [ed] Marita Christmansson & Sven-Åke Hört, Halmstad: Högskolan i Halmstad , 2009, no 20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, Lennart
    From a Supply based to a Demand based Model of Vocational Training - the Swedish Example2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government has by tradition, based on the Swedish model, taken great responsibility for developing an employable workforce and to organise a lifelong learning strategy. However, this national and supply based strategy for learning seems to have failed to respond to the demands from the labour market. Instead, different demand based strategies have been developed outside of the formal educational system. These attempts have been successful in terms of making the training more flexible and accessible for companies and employees. But the problems with this demand based strategy is obvious when it comes to quality control, in keeping a joint national standard and in giving the participants an employability on the whole labour market.



    This paper is of a tentative character. We are critical of both of these one sided attempts to organise vocational training the supply based driven from above and the demand based driven from the market. Instead we propose a third way that tries to overcome the deficiencies with both a supply and demand based strategy.



    The new strategy is based on a partnership between the educational and workplace system in which a joint learning and development is taken place in order to promote the interests of the employers, the employees and the society. The paper builds on several cases of change projects both from the public and private sector in Sweden. In the introduction we will give an outline of the Swedish system for training and competence development.

  • 36.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Bennich, Maria
    Organising Workplace Learning - an Inter organisational perspective2009In: Journal of European Industrial Training, ISSN 0309-0590, E-ISSN 1758-7425, Vol. 33, no 8/9, p. 771-786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Tikkanen, Tarja
    Guðmundsson, Bernharður
    Hansen, Leif Emil
    Paloniemi, Susanna
    Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka
    Sandvik, Jon
    Social partners: out with early exit, in with learning and career development?2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract

    The purpose of the paper is to present findings from a new Nordic survey on social partners policy and practice in regards older workers. The goal of the survey was to find out to what extent the social partners have developed policies and outlined strategies, which explicitly address the demographic change and promote opportunities for lifelong learning and career development among their senior members (45+). Workforce in the Nordic countries tend to be highly organised especially the older workers. The social partners involvement in the discussion of sustainable society and the contribution of lifelong learning to the needs and potential of older workers is crucial, as the demographic situation already today, and in particular the one to be expected within the next about 40 years, is historically without a precedent. The idea of continuous learning and the need for a meaningful work has been included in the agreements between the working life parties in all the Nordic countries. However, not all people are provided with or take an advantage of the possibilities to continue learning relevant to their career development. Studies show that trade unions are in an especially difficult position regarding this matter, but also that they should develop clearer strategy in response to demographic change, and communicate it to their members. The OWNsurvey was carried out as a part of the work in the network Older workers in the Nordic countries (OWN) supported by the Nordic Council. The findings showed, on one hand, that while some social partners have started very good work, for many the issues of lifelong learning and opportunities for career development for older workers are not on their agenda. Besides differences between the unions in regards many aspects and within most countries, the findings also revealed systematic differences between the Nordic countries. Targeted policy measures regarding the older workers showed to be in place in Denmark and Norway, while this seems to be least the case in Sweden. Finland and Iceland have been prioritizing general policies. Targeted measures provide strongest, and in many cases much needed support to older workers competence and career development. However, even a strong lifelong learning policy seems not alone to guarantee real opportunities for and participation in learning during the latter half of the lifetime job careers, especially if the implementation of these policies is not followed up. On another note, also general policies can provide the necessary support, provided that other policy domains and practice are aligned with them. Overall, there is a need for a more active approach from social partners, in policy and practice, to promote lifelong learning and career development to their senior members during their last 15-20 years in working life. In this issue the social partners can and should play an active role indeed, a leading role if needed among the other key actors in society.

  • 38.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Tilander, K.
    Reflection - a method for organisational and individual development2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how organisational development can be the results when politicians, managers, social workers and teaching staff take part in reflection. The results are based on a government-funded initiative in Sweden for lowering sick absenteeism. Three local governments introduced reflection as a strategy to combat work related stress and a method for employee development. The aim was to develop empowered workers who could learn a new approach in their work situation. Professional workers sometimes feel shame when management directives make them supply a lower standard in service than they perceive as a good enough standard.



    The results show that reflection as part of work can help individuals to cope with work related stress and stabilise staff retention figures and result in organisational changes in municipal services such as public elementary schools, homecare and social work.



    The reflection process involves three steps preparation for reflection, period of reflection and follow-up meetings and networking. Reflection takes place in small groups of three people. Two people participate in reflection and one person act as a reflection leader. Reflection takes place during working hours, as part of work and the reflection period is freed from normal work duties, which actually means that the person is taking a time-out.



    Reflection can lead to organisational and individual development. Management and employees can develop a reflective community as they learn new methods for critical thinking. Individual reflection means to mirror the self in relation to work and the demands from clients/students and private life the self in relation to context. Reflection functions today as a method for organisational and individual development.



    This paper is the result of a longitudinal qualitative study with an interactive approach. Basis for data collection are group and individual interviews, study visits and participation in seminars and conferences and joint paper productions.

  • 39.
    Randle, Hanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Tilander, Kristian
    Department of Employment and Social Services, Karlstad Municipality, Karlstad SE-65184, Sweden).
    Reflection: a method for organisational and individual development2007In: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613, E-ISSN 1930-1529, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents how organisational development can be the results when politicians, managers, social workers and teaching staff take part in reflection. The results are based on a government-funded initiative in Sweden for lowering sick absenteeism. Three local governments introduced reflection as a strategy to combat work related stress and a method for employee development. The aim was to develop empowered workers who could learn a new approach in their work situation. Professional workers sometimes feel shame when management directives make them supply a lower standard in service than they perceive as a good enough standard. The results show that reflection as part of work can help individuals to cope with work related stress and stabilise staff retention figures and result in organisational changes in municipal services such as public elementary schools, homecare and social work. This paper is the result of a longitudinal qualitative study with an interactive approach. Basis for data collection are group and individual interviews, study visits and participation in seminars and conferences and joint paper productions.

  • 40. Svensson, L.
    et al.
    Aronsson, G.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Eklund, J.
    Hållbart arbetsliv - projekt som gästspel eller strategi i hållbar utveckling2007Book (Refereed)
  • 41. Svensson, L
    et al.
    Eklund, J
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    Aronsson, G
    Interactive Research: applications in connection with evaluation and efforts to develop the work environment2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and discusses an interactive research approach used as a method in an assignment to evaluate a major national programme with the aim to promote health and reduce the level of sick-absenteeism. The primary objectives when adopting an interactive research approach are to pursue theoretical development and acquire generally-applicable knowledge.



    We demonstrate how research can be conducted in close co-operation with those concerned within the framework of a critical and reflective community. We sought to see whether evaluation and learning were used to make the results of the projects more sustainable and if development work had become more strategic, long-term and systematic.

  • 42. Svensson, L
    et al.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
    How to bridge the gap: experiences in connecting the educational and work system2006In: Working, Learning and Living, Mapping the terrain of Working Life Learning / [ed] Antonacopoulou, E., Jarvis, P., Andersen, V., Elkjær, B., & Høyrup, S, Hampshire: Palgrave McMillan , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43. Svensson, L
    et al.
    Randle, Hanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Working Life Science.
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