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  • 1. Andersson, B. I.
    et al.
    Bishop, K. H.
    Borg, G. C.
    Giesler, G.
    Hultberg, H.
    Huse, M.
    Moldan, F.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nygaard, P. H.
    Nyström, U.
    The covered catchment site: A description of the physiography, climate and vege-tation of three small coniferous forest catchments at Gårdsjön, South-west Sweden1998In: Experimental Reversal of Acid Rain Effects: the Gård-sjön Roof Project, redaktörer: Hultberg H. och Skeffington R., John, England: Wiley & Sons Ltd , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Jan-Olov
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Spatial variation of wetlands and flux of dissolved organic carbon in boreal headwater streams2008In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, no 22, 1965-1975 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to investigate the relation between water chemistry and functional landscape elements, spatial data sets of characteristics for 68 small (0·2–1·5 km2) boreal forest catchments in western central Sweden were analysed in a geographical information system (GIS). The geographic data used were extracted from official topographic maps. Water sampled four times at different flow situations was analysed chemically. This paper focuses on one phenomenon that has an important influence on headwater quality in boreal, coniferous forest streams: generation and export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). It is known that wetland cover (bogs and fens) in the catchment is a major source of DOC. In this study, a comparison was made between a large number of headwater catchments with varying spatial locations and areas of wetlands. How this variation, together with a number of other spatial variables, influences the DOC flux in the streamwater was analysed by statistical methods. There were significant, but not strong, correlations between the total percentages of wetland area and DOC flux measured at a medium flow situation, but not at high flow. Neither were there any significant correlations between the percentage of wetland area connected to streams, nor the percentage of wetland area within a zone 50 m from the stream and the DOC flux. There were, however, correlations between catchment mean slope and the DOC flux in all but one flow situations. This study showed that, considering geographical data retrieved from official sources, the topography of a catchment better explains the variation in DOC flux than the percentage and locations of distinct wetland areas. This emphasizes the need for high-resolution elevation models accurate enough to reveal the sources of DOC found in headwater streams.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Jan-Olov
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Using official map data on topography, wetlands and vegetation cover for prediction of stream water chemistry in boreal headwater catchments2009In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 13, 537-549 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Jan-Olov
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Wetness indices as predictors of boreal wetlandsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5. Andersson, M
    et al.
    Carlsson, B
    Danielsson, K
    Enström, J
    van Hees, P A W
    Lundström, U S
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Försurning av skogsmark i Värmland1996Report (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson-Skold, Yvonne
    et al.
    Statens geotekniska institut.
    Falemo, Stefan
    Statens geotekniska institut.
    Suer, Pascal
    Statens geotekniska institut.
    Grahn, Tonje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Landslide risk and climate change - economic assessment of consequenses in the Göta river valley2011In: / [ed] Anagnostopoulos, A., Pachakis, M., Tsatsanifos, C., Amsterdam, 2011, 1313-1318 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to climate change scenarios, Swedish summers will be drier, but in large parts of Sweden there will also be increased annual precipitation, more intensive precipitation and periods with increased water flows. In many areas the risk for landslides is expected to increase. In response to this the SGI, on commission of the Environmental ministry, has started a risk analysis for the Göta river valley. The results of the analysis will be used in the surveillance of the safety along the Göta river valley. The valley is one of the most frequent landslide valleys in Sweden. The area has a long history of anthropogenic activities such as settlements, shipping, industry, contaminated soil and infrastructure including large roads and railroads. A number of landslides occur every year. The landslide risk analysis of Göta river valley is performed by traditional technical risk analysis, i.e. a function of hazard probability and consequences of the hazard. Elements at risk in the valley include for example, human life, transport and other infrastructure, properties and industrial activities, contaminated land, agriculture and forestry, and intangibles such as biodiversity. Exposure, vulnerability and the monetary value related to the landslide are used to describe the consequence of the landslide. This paper shows the process and structure of this consequence analysis for natural hazards. The consequence analysis methodology can be applied generic both nationally and internationally and for several types of natural hazards such as landslides and flooding.

  • 7.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    SGI.
    Bergman, Ramona
    SGI.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Persson, Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Landslide risk management — A brief overview and example from Sweden of current situation and climate change2013In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, ISSN 2212-4209, Vol. 3, no March, 44-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landslide risk is a function of the probability of the event and its consequences. Previous research has shown that preventive measures to reduce the risk are preferred over reactive measures but, especially in developing countries, rarely undertaken. A contributing factor is the lack of evidence that preventive measures pay. This study includes a brief overview of landslide risk management in general and an investigation of the present risk management situation in Sweden based on interviews in 11 municipalities complemented with interviews in Norway. The result shows that climate change has become part of the general awareness and started to be taken into account in the municipal spatial planning. Landslide susceptibility maps and databases are useful tools in the complex spatial planning. The results indicate that the application of landslide susceptibility and risk maps as previously applied for preventive measures and spatial planning in the landslide prone area Gota alv river valley have been cost effective. Improved documentation and more active communication among different stakeholders would, however, contribute to more effective landslide management.

  • 8.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    et al.
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute .
    Bergman, Ramona
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute .
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Effekter av samhällets säkerhetsåtgärder (ESS) - en kartering av arbetet idag med fokus på översvämningar, ras och skred2012Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Bladh, Gabriel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for the Studies of Social Sciences Didactics.
    Brandin, Elisabeth
    Laskerudsprojektet -helhetssyn på restaureringsarbete i skogslandskapet2005Report (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergman, Ramona
    et al.
    SGI.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    SGI.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Effects of Security actions2010In: Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-7880, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today’s performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today.

    The project includes several aspects such as:

    • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality

    • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis

    • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures

    • in which way do one learn from past accidents

    • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases

    • etc

    There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient “tools” in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of authority the investigation of the security work will be done with authorities on both regional and local scale. At the moment the investigation process are in progress and preliminary results will be presented.

  • 11.
    Bergman, Ramona
    et al.
    SGI.
    Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne
    SGI.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Persson, Erik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Efficiency of preventive actions for landslides and flooding – evaluation of Scandinavian practices 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventive actions can be, and are frequently, taken to reduce accidents and their consequences in different ways. The MSB funded research programme "Effects of Society's Security actions" (ESS, 2009-2013) aims to study the relationship between such actions and their effects. The program is divided into three subgroups: Frequent accidents Natural hazards (such as flooding, erosion and landslide) Chemical and landfill accidents The results presented here covers natural hazards with focus on land slides and flooding. The results are based on Swedish/Scandinavian contexts. Natural events such as erosion,flooding and land slides are common, but the number of accidents (events causing severe negative impact) is rare. Therefore, in such analysis there is limited data and other information available which can be used for example in statistical analysis of actions and their effects. Instead, the analysis must be based on other information. Therefore, the analysis may have to include aspects that only can be assessed by scenario and "what-if" analyses. In this project the main method has been interviews with officials in Swedish municipalities and national agencies in Sweden and Norway. The two levels are chosen since policies are taken on national (or international) level, while the key actionsand actors are on the municipal level. The interviews cover experiences and potential scenarios. In all municipalities, one politician and officials working with planning and rescue service have been interviewed. The study covers hazard and risk mapping, follow up of such maps, physical planning and lessons learned from previous events and activities. The final outcome of the research will be a review of what is found to be well functioning, identification of weak points and recommendations for the management of landslides, erosion and flooding. The present results indicate that hazard/risk maps are of great importance, but the knowledge about the maps and how to use them varies depending on who you ask and between municipalities. Most officials in municipalities are aware of climate change (CC) but, due to high uncertainties and since climate induced events such as natural hazards are rare, the issues are often not prioritized. Further, the results indicate that the documentation, communication and the responsibilities among different units is not always clear, having impacts on for example the knowledge transfer to new personnel. Also databases can be useful tools. The project has found that the use of such tools varies between Norway and Sweden. The aim is to identify the reasons for such deviation. The mostly mentioned suggestions of improvement in the prevention process are increased knowledge, user friendly guidance, clear organisational structure and responsibilities and nationally provided ear marked funding for preventive measures.

  • 12. Bishop, K.
    et al.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Moldan, F.
    Hultberg, H.
    The hydrochemical response of runoff episodes to an experimental reduction of acid deposition1995In: Ecosystem mani-pulation experiments: Scientific approaches, experimental designs and relevant re-sults., vol. 20, redaktörer: Jenkins A., Ferrier R. C. och Kirby C., pp. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Bishop, K.
    et al.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Stähli, M.
    Lindström, G.
    Mellander, P.-E.
    Ottosson Löfvenius, M.
    Tjäle och avrinning från boreal skogsmark - en studie inom Vindelns Försöksparker2000Report (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bishop, Kevin
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Seibert, Jan
    Uppsala University, Switzerland.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala University.
    Water storage in a till catchment: II: Implications of transmissivity feedback for flow paths and turnover times2011In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 25, no 25, 3950-3959 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the flow paths and turnover times within a catchment characterized by the transmissivity feedback mechanism where there is a strong increase in the saturated hydraulic conductivity towards the soil surface and precipitation inputs saturate progressively more superficial layers of the soil profile. The analysis is facilitated by the correlation between catchment water storage and groundwater levels, which made it possible to model the daily spatial distribution of water storage, both vertically in different soil horizons and horizontally across a 6300-m2 till catchment. Soil properties and episodic precipitation input dynamics, combined with the influence of topographic features, concentrate flow in the horizontal, vertical, and temporal dimensions. Within the soil profile, there was a vertical concentration of lateral flow to superficial soil horizons (upper 30 cm of the soil), where much of the annual flow occurred during runoff episodes. Overland flow from a limited portion of the catchment can contribute to peak flows but is not a necessary condition for runoff episodes. The spatial concentration of flow, and the episodic nature of runoff events, resulted in a strong and spatially structured differentiation of local flow velocities within the catchment. There were large differences in the time spent by the laterally flowing water at different depths, with turnover times of lateral flow across a 1-m-wide soil pedon ranging from under 1 h at 10- to 20-cm depth to a month at 70- to 80-cm depth. In many regards, the hydrology of this catchment appears typical of the hydrology in till soils, which are widespread in Fenno-Scandia.

  • 15. Bishop, K.H.
    et al.
    Hauhs, M.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Seibert, J.
    Moldan, F.
    Rodhe, A.
    Lange, H.
    Lischeid, G.
    The hydrology of the covered catchment: Water storage, flowpaths and residence times1998In: Experimental Reversal of Acid Rain Effects: the Gård-sjön Roof Project, redaktörer: Hultberg H. och Skeffington R, England: John Wiley & Sons Ltd , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    När Vänern svämmade över: Händelseutveckling och konsekvenser av översvämningen 2000/20012010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mellan november 2000 och juni 2001 låg Vänerns vattennivå över sjöns dämningsgräns i nästan 6 månader. Situationen orsakades av en utdragen period med ovanligt stora nederbördsmängder över Vänerns tillrinningsområde mellan oktober och mitten av december 2000. Sjöns nivå ökade under denna period i genomsnitt med 2 cm per dygn. Översvämningsproblemen började uppstå längs den ca 2000 km långa kusten (utan öar) från mitten av november. När sjöns nivå kulminerade den 11 januari 2001 hade olika aktörer lyckats vidta omfattande åtgärder i de översvämningshotade områdena som skyddade samhällsviktiga funktioner såsom VA, transporter och elförsörjning, men även bostäder och industrianläggningar.

    I en genomgång av skador och konsekvenser i samband med översvämningen visade det sig inte oväntat att det främst är tangibla1 direkta och indirekta skador som är beskrivna i olika dokument och sammanställningar som har tagits fram inom olika sektorer. Uppföljningar av långsiktiga konsekvenser av översvämningen och beskrivningar av hur interaktionen mellan olika sektorer påverkades av Vänerns höga nivåer saknas däremot med några få undantag. Rapporten kan inte ge någon heltäckande bild av de ekonomiska konsekvenser som Väneröversvämningen 2000/2001 har lett till. För en del sektorer som lantbruk, yrkesfisket och de kommunala verksamheterna i de drabbade Vänerkommunerna kunde ekonomiska värderingar hittas medan de saknas för skogsbruket, delar av transportsektorn och industrierna. I rapporten görs en uppskattning av hushållens skador i Värmland med hjälp skadebeloppen som utbetalades av Länsförsäkringar Värmland i samband med Väneröversvämningen.

    Kommunerna utmed Vänerkusten fick omfattande skador på avlopps- och dagvattennäten och reningsverken. Kommunala, strandnära fritidsområden såsom fritidshamnar, campingplatser, badplatser och sjönära gång- och cykelvägar skadades i nästan alla berörda kommuner. Efter översvämningen gav regeringen kommunerna möjlighet att ansöka om bidrag för direkta fysiska skador och kostnader för förebyggande åtgärder, t ex temporära invallningar. 

    Studien genomfördes med syfte att kunna bevara, återföra och nyttja erfarenheter från översvämningen 2000-2001 inför och under kommande översvämningssituationer med likartade eller högre nivåer. Studien är en del i Centrum för klimat och säkerhets deltagande inom EU–projektet SAWA (Strategic Alliance for integrated Water management Actions) vars målsättning bl a är att utveckla planer för hantering av översvämningsrisker. Studien är det första steget av en sårbarhetsstudie i Vänern som kommer att utföras vid Centrum för klimat och säkerhet under åren 2010/2011.

  • 17.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Grahn, Tonje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Gustafsson, Kristin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hindersson, Emelie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    10 år efter Arvikaöversvämningen2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Efter en mycket regnrik höst kulminerade vattennivån i Glafsfjorden den 29 november 2000 på drygt 3 m över normalnivån. De strandnära områdena i det värmländska Arvika sattes under vatten, vägnätet hotades, många mindre vägar fick stängas av och järnvägstrafiken ställdes in i över tre veckor. Samhällets krafter mobiliserades för att skydda fastigheter och infrastruktur. Många högt uppsatta besökare kom till Arvika för att se översvämningen med egna ögon. Läget var skarpt i en och en halv månad.

    Boken ger en inblick i den meteorologiska och hydrologiska bakgrunden av händelsen. Den beskriver händelseförloppet och skadorna som översvämningen orsakade. I en samhällsekonomisk genomgång summeras de direkta skadekostnaderna till 315 Mkr i 2009 års prisläge. Översvämningen följdes upp i ett stort antal utredningar och boken skildrar hur planerna till ett översvämningsskydd för staden växte fram. Den mänskliga dimensionen av händelsen förtydligas med berättelser av översvämningsdrabbade privatpersoner och intervjuer med kommunanställda.

  • 18.
    Calles, Olle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Löwgren, Marianne
    Fiskvägar och flödesregimåtgärder i reglerade vatten:: Konsekvenser för vattendragets produktivitet och för samhällsnyttan2003Report (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Calles, Olle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Temporal and spatial variation in quality of hyporheic water in one unregulated and two regulated boreal rivers2007In: River Research and ApplicationsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the temporal and spatial variations in hyporheic water quality in three boreal rivers, the River Tobyälven, an unregulated river, the river Mangälven, a regulated river with a minimum discharge requirement and the river Järperudsälven, a

    regulated river without any minimum discharge requirements. A total of 43 permanent piezometers were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, NO3 and NH4 in the hyporheic water at 150mm and 300mm depth, at monthly intervals from October 2001 to October 2002. Another seven piezometers were installed in brown trout redds and monitored during the incubation period, from December 2001 to April 2002. In the river Tobyälven, temporal patterns in hyporheic water chemistry correlated to variations in surface water chemistry and discharge. In the river Jäperudsälven, the hyporheic water chemistry did not correlate to discharge or surface water chemistry. In the river Mangälven, the water chemistry was dominated by releases from a large upstream lake, and there were weak correlations between surface water chemistry and

    hyporheic water chemistry at some sites. The incubation conditions for brown trout eggs were most favourable in the unregulated river, characterized by high DO levels that remained high throughout the incubation period. In the river Järperudsälven the DO

    levels were variable during spawning, and then gradually declined to critically low levels during incubation, whereas in the river Mangälven the DO conditions were intermediate and stable. Thus we observed a stronger coupling between surface water

    conditions and hyporheic conditions, i.e. vertical connectivity, in the unregulated river than in the regulated river with minimum flow requirements, which in turn was stronger than in the river without minimum flow requirements. Copyright # 2007 John

    Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  • 20.
    Calles, Olle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Temporal and spatial variation in quality of hyporheic water in one unregulated and two regulated boreal rivers2007In: River research and applications, ISSN 1535-1459, Vol. 23, no 8, 829-842 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the temporal and spatial variations in hyporheic water quality in three boreal rivers, the River Tobyälven, an unregulated river, the river Mangälven, a regulated river with a minimum discharge requirement and the river Järperudsälven, aregulated river without any minimum discharge requirements. A total of 43 permanent piezometers were used to measure dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, NO3 and NHþ4in the hyporheic water at 150mm and 300mmdepth, at monthly intervals from October 2001 to October 2002. Another seven piezometers were installed in brown trout redds and monitored during the incubation period, from December 2001 to April 2002. In the river Tobyälven, temporal patterns in hyporheic water chemistry correlated to variations in surface water chemistry and discharge. In the river Järperudsälven, the hyporheic water chemistry did not correlate to discharge or surface water chemistry. In the river Mangälven, the water chemistry was dominated by releases from a large upstream lake, and there were weak correlations between surface water chemistry and hyporheic water chemistry at some sites. The incubation conditions for brown trout eggs were most favourable in the unregulated river, characterized by high DO levels that remained high throughout the incubation period. In the river Järperudsälven the DO levels were variable during spawning, and then gradually declined to critically low levels during incubation, whereas in the river Mangälven the DO conditions were intermediate and stable. Thus we observed a stronger coupling between surface water conditions and hyporheic conditions, i.e. vertical connectivity, in the unregulated river than in the regulated river with minimum flow requirements, which in turn was stronger than in the river without minimum flow requirements.

  • 21.
    Calles, Olle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Österling, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Gustafsson, Pär
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Forsberg, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Energy, Environmental and Building Technology.
    Hebrand, M
    Olsson, M
    Renöfält, B
    Karlsson, H
    Johansson, M
    Biokanalers egenskaper och möjligheter2009Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Davies, Jessica
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Beven, Keith
    Lancaster University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala universitet.
    A discrete particle representation of hillslope hydrology: hypothesis testing in reproducing a tracer experiment at Gårdsjön, Sweden2011In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 25, no 23, 3602-3612 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the long history of the continuum equation approach in hydrology, it is not a necessary approach to the formulation of a physically based representation of hillslope hydrology. The Multiple Interacting Pathways (MIPs) model is a discrete realization that allows hillslope response and transport to be simultaneously explored in a way that reflects the potential occurrence of preferential flows and lengths of pathways. The MIPs model uses random particle tracking methods to represent the flow of water within the subsurface alongside velocity distributions that acknowledge preferential flows and transition probability matrices, which control flow pathways. An initial realization of this model is presented here in application to a tracer experiment carried out in Gårdsjön, Sweden. The model is used as an exploratory tool, testing several hypotheses in relation to this experiment.

  • 23.
    Davies, Jessica
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Beven, Keith
    Lancaster University.
    Rodhe, Allan
    Uppsala universitet, Hydrologi.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Application of a Multiple Interacting Pathways model to a shallow hillslope hydrological tracing experiment at Gårdsjön, Sweden.2011In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol 13, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Coherence and inconsistency of European instruments for integrated river basin management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Room for the River projects increase the level of flood protection by enlarging theconveyance and reducing hydraulic roughness. As a consequence sediment transportcapacities are reduced as well, causing shoals and a reduced navigation channel. Thelarge number of Room for the River measures and European Framework Directive(WFD) measures, aiming at an increase of the ecological potential (e.g. sidechannels), will result in much dredging, if no structural measures are implemented.The expected amount of dredging will be too large to handle. Therefore research isexecuted to limit the dredging effort by executing mitigating measures. Old principlesof irrigation are given new attention to be applied to side channels and channelsbetween longitudinal dams and the river bank ('bank channels'). A new round ofnormalisation works may be necessary, to limit dredging activities. Boundaryconditions for river managemant are stopping autonomous bed degradation andeconomic sustainability of sets of measures that can cope with the hydromorphologicconsequences of the Room for the River and WFD measures

  • 25.
    Evers, Mariele
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety. Bonn University.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Svedung, Inge
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Reducing flood risk by integrative land use planning2012In: Proceedings of the 43rd ESReDA seminar on land use planning and risk-informed decision making. Saint-Étienne-du Rouvray, France, Oct 22-23, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Falemo, Stefan
    et al.
    SGI.
    Andersson-Skold, Yvonne
    SGI.
    Suer, Pascal
    SGI.
    Grahn, Tonje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Quantification, economic valuation and visualisation of landslide consequences in the Göta river valley2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27. Giesler, R.
    et al.
    Ilvesniemi, H.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    van Hees, P.
    Starr, M.
    Bishop, K.
    Kareinen, T.
    Lundström, U. S.
    Distribution and mobilization of Al, Fe and Si in three podzolic soil profiles in relation to the humus layer2000In: Geoderma, 94:249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    A Framework for Sustainable Natural Hazards Management2012In: Proceeding for the Global Risk Forum, IDRC DAVOS 2012, 2012, 300-303 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Hedelin, Beatrice
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Criteria for Sustainable Land Use Planning – analogies from the fields of regional water resources and flood risk management.2012In: Proceeding for the 43rd ESReDA seminar: Land Use Planning and Risk-Informed Decision Making, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ibsen, Hilde
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Avdelningen för hälsa och miljö.
    Svensson, EvaKarlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Avdelningen för hälsa och miljö.Nyberg, LarsKarlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Klarälven2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är en strävan inför framtiden att skapa en hållbar utveckling där sociala, ekonomiska och ekologiska aspekter vägs mot varandra i en kontinuerlig process. I denna bok har forskare, författare och lokalt historiskt verksamma personer samlats för att ge olika perspektiv på Klarälven med omnejder som ett bidrag för skapandet av en hållbarare framtid.

  • 31. Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Svedung, Inge
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Lärdomar från första generationens handlingsprogram enligt LSO: Innehållsanalys av 50 kommuners program2006Report (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Svedung, Inge
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Denk, Thomas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Politics and History.
    Institutionalisation of risk and safety management at the local governmental level in Sweden2009In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 12, no 5, 687-708 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this article is the need for empirical knowledge about organizational configuration for societal risk and safety management activities ina modern welfare society. In this paper, we use Sweden as an empirical frame to analyze the administrative management structure at the local governmental level.The analysis is based on statistical analysis of information from a web-survey with administrative chief/head officials (n51283) with responsibilities for different municipal functions and sectors. The sample represented 25% of the Swedish municipalities (n5290) and the response rate was approximately 60% (n5766).The responses to two sets of questions (25 and 45 questions) are used for statistical analyses of management structures and task distribution within themunicipal organizations. Principal component factor analyses with Varimax and Kaisers Normalization was applied as a structure detection method. The resultsindicate a clear and uniform way to institutionalize societal risk and safety management at the local level. Furthermore, the management course of action is found to have different types of value characters. The implications that arise from the patterns identified in this study are considered to be of general relevance and topicality for research and practice in this area

  • 33.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Analys av samhällsekonomisk kostnad. Skredet vid E6 i småröd, 20062009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents consequences and societal costs that arose in connection with the landslide at Småröd north of Gothenburg on the Swedish west-coast the 20th of December 2006. The landslide caused severe damage to motorway E6, railway and a small stream. The accident brought direct consequences to road-users and the business sector, but also indirect consequences related to diverted travelling.

    Total societal costs are estimated to approximately €52 million. This is roughly 3 times more than the total cost earlier compiled by the MSB in their Swedish natural hazards information system from the usual evaluations and follow-ups performed by involved and responsible authorities. The costs have been registered into the categories state, county council, municipality, business, environment and individuals. The state carries 40% of the costs, mainly due to rebuilding the motorway and expenses of diverted roads. Individuals and the business sector carry 50% of the costs, mainly due to increased travel times.

    Compilations within the report are afflicted with uncertainties, e.g. concerning estimation of working hours at different authorities, evaluation of time spent by individuals and businesses, evaluation of environmental impact and benefits from decreased future needs for road support.

  • 34.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Analysis of digital elevation data for palaeosurfaces in south-western Sweden1999In: Geomorphology, Vol. 26, 279-295 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 3873 km² large rectangular area of the Precambrian basement in south-western Sweden has been investigated regarding gross morphology of palaeosurfaces. GIS and digital elevation data were used to construct maps of relative relief and absolute relief and E-W trending height profiles. Three different palaeosurfaces were recognised and delimited; the very even sub-Cambrian peneplain in the east at an intermediate altitudinal position, an uplifted and broken part of the sub-Cambrian peneplain in the centre at the highest present elevation, and in the western coastal areas a joint valley landscape with high relative relief, probably an exhumed Mesozoic etch-surface. Phanerozoic faulting has dissected the different palaeosurfaces into tectonic blocks, which are shown from trend surface analysis to be tilted in different directions and to different degrees, characteristic and decisive for the morphological development

  • 35.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Building memory of lessons learning from natural hazards into systems - a Swedish approach2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lessons learning from systematic analyses of past natural disasters is of great importance for future risk reduction and vulnerability management, not least in times of climate change and emerging climate-related risks. Systematic analyses of impact and assessment of past events have commonly been produced in many sectors, but the knowledge is seldom shared outside the own organization. As a response to a government commission in 2005 to meet up with this problem, the Swedish Rescue Services Agency (SRSA) has built and works on a knowledge database. The work is also one activity within the Swedish multi-sectoral national platform for disaster reduction, which was founded in 2007 in line with commitments to the UN/ISDR Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015. This presentation demonstrates the methodology where over 30 organizations gave their view of requirements, design and common weal. A brief view of the database content and arising holistic perspective is also given. The resulting information system gathers accident reports, investigations and in-depth analyses, together with societal additional costs and mappings of consequences from central and local governments, NGO and private actors. Information is compiled by SRSA about hazard cause, pre-event prevention, early warning and preparedness, hazard evolution and response, consequences to human, society and environment and last, in focus, lessons learned. All material is publicly shared. The compilations offer holistic perspectives and thorough analyses of historical natural hazards where LPHC (low probability high consequences) disasters usually comprise most data, since they often are met with surprise and highlights the failure to integrate resilience into normal societal planning. During the last 50 years, several LPHC events in Sweden has functioned as an alarm clock and entailed major changes and improvements in government policies or legislations, safety management systems, risk assessments, response training, stakeholder communication, etc. The gathered material is useful in educational activities and planning of society to foster a holistic approach towards disaster risk reduction and increased coping capacity. Building a knowledge database of historical disasters that have, or have not, contributed in building resilience in society, makes it possible to incorporate lessons learning into the memory of systems instead of leaving it in the memory of people

  • 36.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Naturen i Västra Götaland - Berggrundsmorfologi2003In: Sveriges Nationalatlas / [ed] Frizell, B. & Werner, M, Örebro: Kartförlaget, Gävle , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    The role of tectonics, structures and etch processes for the present relief in glaciated Precambrian besement rocks of SW Sweden2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In high latitudes, landscapes of low relief are known to contain residues of pre-glacial deep weathering, or etching, which testify to limited modification of the pre-glacial relief by the Pleistocene ice sheets. In this thesis landforms in all scales are classified according to their process of formation. Etched landforms are identified and used as a basis to describe the subsequent glacial reshaping. Large- and medium-scale landform characteristics and patterns of spatial distribution are mapped using digital elevation data on a 50-m grid and air-photos. Medium- and small-scale landforms are studied and documented in field. It is shown that landforms within the glacially scoured Precambrian basement of SW Sweden are closely related to the principal structural pattern of the bedrock. It is concluded that this pattern is more compatible with differential etching than glacial erosion, even if multiple ice flows in different directions are considered. Etched rock basins occur in all levels along the Swedish west coast. Their shape and distribution are clearly adjusted to the joint pattern as shown by their location along joints or joint intersections. The basins coalesce as they grow and start to form a maze-like pattern of topographic depressions separated by more compact upland surfaces. Basin development is identified as an important component of long-term landform evolution and the transformation of a primary upland into a surface of low relief with residual hills. Other forms are directly related to the development of basins. High cliffs occur where master joints form marginal scarps to the basin. Basement areas in between master joints form hills. Deep narrow clefts have developed through etching and in their lower parts small-scale etchforms like corestones, corestone initiations, deeply weathered sheet slabs and thick exfoliation occasionally have been preserved throughout the glaciations.

    Glacial reshaping of the ancient landforms is studied along a profile crossing three different types of palaeorelief, ranging from a pediplain to an etchsurface with relative relief of 20-135 m. It is shown that increased relief promotes enhanced glacial reshaping, but the magnitude of glacial erosion is considerably less than the amplitude of the palaeorelief. The pre-glacially etched relief is decisive for the efficiency of glacial erosion and limited glacial reshaping results when the ice flow crosses this structural relief.

    The thesis emphasises the importance of using a long-term evolutionary approach to glacial landscapes in high latitudes, as well as landform analysis, to separate the sequence of exogenic processes that have formed the landscape.

  • 38.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Att mäta sårbarhet mot naturolyckor: om sårbarhet som begrepp och indikatorer2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Att mäta sårbarhet mot risker och hot i vårt samhälle lyfts i olika sammanhang fram som allt viktigare för att uppnå en effektivare riskhantering och ett robustare samhälle. I klimat- och sårbarhetsutredningen (SOU 2007:60) slår man fast att risken för naturolyckor ökar på många håll och att det är nödvändigt att påbörja anpassningen så snart som möjligt. I det perspektivet är det nödvändigt att inledningsvis skapa en klar bild över hur sårbarheterna ser ut och var de finns. Rimligen bör man också fundera över vad sårbarhet mot naturolyckor ska omfatta och vilka mätetal som är intressanta att ta fram. Avsikten med den här kunskapsöversikten är att ge en orientering av sårbarhet som begrepp och utifrån det diskutera hur sårbarhetsindikatorer kankonstrueras

  • 39.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Att mäta sårberhet mot olyckor.: Om sårbarhet som begrepp och indikatorer.2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att mäta sårbarhet mot risker och hot i vårt samhälle lyfts i olika sammanhang fram som allt viktigare för att uppnå en effektivare riskhantering och ett robustare samhälle. I klimat- och sårbarhetsutredningen (SOU 2007:60) slår man fast att risken för naturolyckor ökar på många håll och att det är nödvändigt att påbörja anpassningen så snart som möjligt. I det perspektivet är det nödvändigt att inledningsvis skapa en klar bild över hur sårbarheterna ser ut och var de finns. Rimligen bör man också fundera över vad sårbarhet mot naturolyckor ska omfatta och vilka mätetal som är intressanta att ta fram. Avsikten med den här kunskapsöversikten är att ge en orientering av sårbarhet som begrepp och utifrån det diskutera hur sårbarhetsindikatorer kan konstrueras.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Learning lessons from natural disasters - sectorial or holistic perspectives?2009In: Geophysical research abstracts, Vol 11. Extended abstracts, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lessons learning from systematic analyses of past natural disasters is of great importance for future risk reduction and vulnerability management. It is one crucial piece of a puzzle towards disaster resilient societies, together with e.g. models of future emerging climate-related risks, globalization or demographic changes. Systematic analyses of impact and management of past events have commonly been produced in many sectors, but the knowledge is seldom shared outside the own organization or produced for other actors. To increase the availability of reports and documents, the Swedish Rescue Services Agency has created the Swedish Natural Hazards Information System, in accordance with a government commission from 2005. The system gathers accident reports, investigations and in-depth analyses, together with societal additional costs and mappings of consequences from central and local governments, NGOs and private actors. Evaluation of the collection reveals large differences in quality, systematic approach, depth and extent, clearly consistent with the lack of coherent harmonization of investigation and reporting approaches. Type of hazard, degree of impact and time elapsed since present are decisive for the collectedvolume. LPHC (low probability high consequences) disasters usually comprise most data and analytical activities, since they often are met with surprise and highlight the failure to integrate resilience into normal societal planning. During the last 50 years, several LPHC events in Sweden have functioned as alarm clocks and entailed major changes and improvements in government policies or legislations, safety management systems, risk assessments,response training, stakeholder communication, etc. Such an event occurred in January 2005 when Northern Europe was confronted with one of the most severe storms in modern history. Accidents that caused 24 fatalities occurred (17 in Sweden), several regions in UK and Germany were flooded and extensive areas of storm-felled forests left nearly one million households in Scandinavia without electricity. In Sweden the quantity of storm-felled trees was equivalent to the combined volume felled by other storms during the whole of the 20th century, which caused exceptional damage to forests, roads, railways and electricity and telecommunications networks, including cellphones. Follow-ups and evaluations at local level, as regulated by law, together with government commissions to central authorities and interest from research communities, have resulted in an extensive production of documented lessons learning. Our case study describes their thematic extent, identifies different perspectives in relation to their basis for analyses, emphasizes the complementary need of a holistic perspective and puts the Swedish systematic procedure into an international comparison

  • 41.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hilldén, A.
    Naturen i Västra Götaland - spår efter inlandsisarna2003In: Sveriges Nationalatlas / [ed] Frizell, B. & Werner, M, Örebro: Kartförlaget, Gävle , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Johansson, Å.
    Lind, B.
    Naturen i Västra Götaland - Landskap i förändring2003In: Sveriges nationalatlas / [ed] Frizell, B. & Werner, M, Örebro: Kartförlaget, Gävle , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Migon, P.
    Olvmo, M
    Development of joint-controlled rock basins in Bohus granite, SW Sweden2001In: Geomorphology, Vol. 40, 145-161 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The granite area of Bohuslän along the Swedish west-coast is characterised by an abundance of rock basins of different sizes. Within a 163 km2 large part of the area over 400 basins occur, ranging in size from less than 0.005 km2 up to almost 2 km2. These basins were measured, described and classified from air-photos according to their length, width, area, altitude, shape, boundaries, openness and relation to joint configuration. The depth of basins was collected from digital elevation data. Their distributions and shapes are clearly associated with the visible jointing patterns, as shown by their location along joints or joint intersections, by joint-guided enlargement and similarity between directions of long axis of basins and principal tectonic lineaments in the Bohus granite. The patterns and characteristics of basins suggest that deep selective weathering had been the primary process involved in the origin and evolution of basins. Later they have been reshaped and possibly stripped of saprolites by glacial processes in the Pleistocene. Dating of deep weathering responsible for basin initiation and origin is difficult, although the complex story of Mesozoic weathering, Late Cretaceous burial and Late Tertiary exhumation is not without support

  • 44.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Blumenthal, Barbara
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evaluating the range of perspectives on lessons-learning from the 2005 storm in Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lessons learning from systematic analyses of past natural disasters is of great importance for future risk reduction and vulnerability management. It is one crucial piece of a puzzle towards disaster resilient societies, together with e.g. models of future emerging climate-related risks, globalization or demographic changes. Systematic analyses of impact and management of past events have commonly been produced in many sectors, but the knowledge is seldom shared outside the own organization or produced for other actors. LPHC (low probability high consequences) disasters usually comprise most analytical activities, since they often are met with surprise and highlight the failure to integrate resilience into normal societal planning. During the last 50 years, several LPHC events in Sweden have functioned as alarm clocks and entailed major changes and improvements in government policies or legislations, safety management systems, risk assessments, response training, stakeholder communication, etc. Such an event occurred in January 2005 when Northern Europe was confronted with one of the most severe storms in modern history. Accidents that caused 24 fatalities occurred (17 in Sweden), several regions in UK and Germany were flooded and extensive areas of storm-felled forests left nearly one million households in Scandinavia without electricity. In Sweden the quantity of storm-felled trees was equivalent to the combined volume felled by other storms during the whole of the 20th century, which caused exceptional damage to forests, roads, railways and electricity and telecommunications networks, including cell-phones. Follow-ups and evaluations at local level, as regulated by law, together with government commissions to central authorities and interest from research communities, have resulted in an extensive production of documented lessons learning. The production of in total 24 reports, 7 scientific articles and 2 economic reports from business associations divides thematically quite equally within coping capacity and exposed and susceptible elements. Most attention allots crisis management and response issues (45 %). Only one attempt is made to present a holistic view of the event and it is not a law bounded initiative. Evaluations from other recent events, e.g. the flood 2000 in Arvika and the landslide at Munkedal 2006, show the same clear focus on crisis management and less or none consideration taken to environmental, social or socioeconomic consequences. It reflects the traditional political financial will to invest in a high level on response capacity on expense of preventive work

  • 45.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hansson, Max
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Social learning in education – an important step in practical integration of preventive risk reduction and adaptation to climate change2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of linking the preventive phase of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) with the adaptation in human society to forecasted consequences from climate change, has received growing acceptance internationally, but the integration of both fields is still at an embryonic stage. Integration in this case implies transdisciplinary approaches in complex fields where liabilities and stakeholders normally are found in different sectors and levels in society. For integration to be successful, a first step is to create platforms and contexts where participants may generate raised awareness about each other’s roles and evolve a shared problem identification. Social learning is a concept that has been used in many different contexts where uncertainty and change are crucial and challenging. It has earlier been linked as a suitable approach to issues such as public participation, governance or natural resource management. Here it is used in education, gathering among others stakeholders working within the fields of Flood Risk Management, DRR and Climate Change Adaptation at local or regional level around the two Swedish lakes Vänern and Mälaren. Teaching arrangements and didactic elements are described for the two pilot-courses that were held 2009-2010. The academic institutional arrangements favoured an open exchange and knowledge building, with local examples of management and strategies repeatedly in focus during several study visits in different cities along the shoreline. The elements of social learning facilitated the build-up of shared holistic perspectives, identified areas in need of development or research efforts and contributed to informal as well as formal relationships among participants.

  • 46.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Evers, Mariele
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Hansson, Max
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Using education and social learning in capacity building- the IntECR concept2013In: Disaster Prevention and Management, ISSN 0965-3562, E-ISSN 1758-6100, Vol. 22, no 1, 17-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to present a concept where social learning is used in education. Thematically, the concept is suitable for complex, interdisciplinary, societal challenges with a high degree of uncertainty regarding future changes. It is exemplified here by the need to link disaster risk reduction (DRR) with climate change adaptation (CCA) and flood risk management (FRM). The concept answers to the variety of adopted solutions and build-up of knowledge that exist, as a consequence of far-reaching local liabilities and initiatives. The concept advocates building of platforms and procedures where managers, stakeholders, researchers, policy makers, and regular students can meet, interact and learn from local examples.

    Design/methodology/approach – The concept IntECR (integrated education, research and collaboration) has been tested in two courses during 2009 and 2010 around the Swedish lakes Vanern and Malaren. Seminars and field visits were arranged in ten different cities. Participants replied anonymously to a course evaluation and were questioned in groups about their perceived benefit from the concept.

    Findings – Informal networking, holistic perspective, shared problem identification and the positive possibility to study several examples of local management in arrangements with high degree of structural openness, were mentioned by the participants as positive outcome of the concept.

    Originality/value – The use of this educational concept aims to increase the adaptive capacity of societal entities through raised capacity of their individual members. The applied example is timely, relevant and a contribution to DRR and CCA

  • 47.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Olvmo, M
    Development of granite sheet fractures in response to long-term morphotectonic evolution in SW Sweden2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Configuration of granite sheet fractures has been reconstructed for the island Ramsvik (c. 9 km²) at the Swedish west-coast. The reconstruction suggests that the sheeting once formed eight antiformal domes separated by valleys or basin-like depressions connected with a rhombic joint pattern. Today the domes are dissected and eroded into c.70 separate hills. Long-term landform development invol-ves Mesozoic deep weathering with subsequent stripping of saprolite and Quaternary glacial reshap-ing of ancient relief. Same type of sheet structures has developed through both 920 Ma granite and a 50-70 m wide Permian rhomb porphyry dyke, which constrain their oldest possible age. We suggest that this type of large scale sheet structures results from vertical unloading of rocks that formed at depth under high triaxial compression. Thick sequences of coarse clastic sediments in Triassic rift basins westwards indicate that unloading of Palaeozoic cover rocks occurred after uplift and erosion. The unloading released the high N-S crustal compression built up in the granite during the Variscan tectonic regime. Mesozoic differential weathering and stripping exposed the domical relief before renewed burial beneath cover rocks in connection with the Late Cretaceous transgression. It is un-certain when exhumation of the Mesozoic surface started, with a possible second weathering phase, but studies of sediment compaction offshore point at a Neogene uplift in the area

  • 48.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Olvmo, M.
    Lidmar-Bergström, K.
    Inherited landforms and glacial impact of different palaeosurfaces in southwest Sweden2001In: Geografiska Annaler, 83 A (1-2), Vol. 83 A, 67-89 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landforms are used as analytical tools to separate inherited features from the glacial impact on Precambrian basement rocks in southwest Sweden. The study covers three different palaeosurfaces, the sub-Cambrian peneplain (relative relief 0-20 m) with the character of a pediplain, an uplifted and dissected part of the sub-Cambrian peneplain (r.r. 5-40 m) and an etchsurface (r.r. 20-135 m), presumably sub-Mesozoic. The surfaces were recently re-exposed, probably due to a Neogene upheaval with some pre-glacial reshaping. Strong structural control and no alignment with glacial erosional directions other than those coinciding with structures, are arguments for etch processes as a most important agent for relief differentiation. This is strengthened by the occurrence of saprolite residues and etchforms in protected positions.

    The glacial reshaping of the sub-Cambrian flat bedrock surfaces is negligible. The glacial impact becomes more evident in the uplifted and dissected parts of the peneplain and within the hilly sub-Mesozoic surface. The higher the initial relief the more effect of glacial erosion on individual hills, both on the abrading side with formation of roches moutonnées and on the plucking side. Detailed etchforms are preserved in protected positions in spite of erosion by a clearly wet-based ice. The magnitude of the Pleistocene glacial erosion is considerably less than the amplitude of the palaeorelief in the entire area.

    Landscapes of areal glacial scouring have been described as comprised of irregular depressions with intervening bosses scraped by ice and labelled knock and lochan topography, but we suggest that an etched bedrock surface is a prerequisite for this type of landscape to develop.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    Olvmo, M.
    Söderström, M.
    Application of digital elevation and geological data in studies of morphotectonics and relief - a case study of the sub-Cambrian peneplain in SW Sweden1999In: Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie, Vol. 43, 505-520 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 357 km2 wide area in south-western Sweden is examined regarding Tertiary morphotectonics and characteristic relief of the sub-Cambrian peneplain. The relief of the sub-Cambrian peneplain is studied in a geographical information system (GIS) and geostatistical modelling is applied to digital elevation and geological data. Linear trend surface analysis is used for the purpose of describing the morphotectonics of fragmented parts of the sub-Cambrian peneplain. The trend surface analysis requires digital information of outcrops, bedrock type, tectonic pattern and elevation data and it is described in the report how this information can be produced digitally. The analysis reveals that the sub-Cambrian peneplain is separated into fault bounded blocks, which are arranged in a stepwise manner with blocks leaning towards NNW, with an inclination in the range of 0.2-0.4 %.



    Spatial interpolation techniques, distance-weighted moving averages and triangulation, are used on regolith thickness data from wells, to describe the relief of the Precambrian bedrock surface below the Quaternary loose deposits in the immediate contact with Cambro-Silurian cover rocks. The resulting patterns from the interpolations of the Quaternary regolith thickness unveil a varied relief, different from the extremely flat Precambrian surface usually described near Cambro-Silurian cover rocks in southern Sweden.

  • 50. Jonasson, C.
    et al.
    Nyberg, Rolf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Centre for Climate and Safety.
    The rainstorm of August 1998 in the Abisko area, northern Sweden: preliminary report on observations of erosion and sediment transport1999In: Geografiska Annaler 81A (3), 1999Article in journal (Refereed)
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