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  • 1.
    Abbas, Muhammad Tahir
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Eklund, Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Grinnemo, Karl-Johan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Brunström, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Alfredsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Alay, Özgü
    University of Oslo and Simula Metropolitan, NOR.
    Katona, Sándor
    Ericsson AB.
    Seres, Gergely
    Ericsson AB.
    Rathonyi, Bela
    Ericsson AB.
    Guidelines for an Energy Efficient Tuning of the NB-IoT Stack2020In: 45th IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN), IEEE Communications Society, 2020, p. 60-69, article id 9363265Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study the energy consumptionof Narrowband IoT devices. The paper suggests that key tosaving energy for NB-IoT devices is the usage of full Discontinuous Reception (DRX), including the use of connected-mode DRX (cDRX): In some cases, cDRX reduced the energy consumption over a 10-year period with as much as 50%. However, the paper also suggests that tunable parameters, such as the inactivity timer, do have a significant impact. On the basis of our findings, guidelines are provided on how to tune the NB-IoT device so that it meets the target of the 3GPP, i.e., a 5-Wh battery should last for at least 10 years. It is further evident from our results that the energy consumption is largely dependent on the intensity and burstiness of the traffic, and thus could be significantly reduced if data is sent in bursts with less intensity,irrespective of cDRX support.

  • 2.
    Alamäki, Ari
    et al.
    Haaga-Helia, FIN.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Section VI, Introduction: Learning in Projects and Programming & Case Studies: Models and Concepts2021In: Techne series: Research in sloyd education and crafts science. A, ISSN 1238-9501, E-ISSN 1893-1774, Vol. 28, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Al-Hilfi, Muna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Daniels, Erika
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Grönområdens betydelse i en förtätad stad: Vilken påverkan har förtätning2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 4.
    AlMotasem, Ahmed Tamer
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Department of Physics, Faculty of ScienceAssiut University Assiut Egyp.
    Bergström, Jens
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Gåård, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Krakhmalev, Pavel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Holleboom, Thijs Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Atomistic insights on the wear/friction behavior of nanocrystalline ferrite during nanoscratching as revealed by molecular dynamics2017In: Tribology letters, ISSN 1023-8883, E-ISSN 1573-2711, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using embedded atom method potential, extensive large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoindentation/nanoscratching of nanocrystalline (nc) iron have been carried out to explore grain size dependence of wear response. MD results show no clear dependence of the frictional and normal forces on the grain size, and the single-crystal (sc) iron has higher frictional and normal force compared to nc-samples. For all samples, the dislocation- mediated mechanism is the primary cause of plastic deformation in both nanoindentation/nanoscratch. However, secondary cooperative mechanisms are varied significantly according to grain size. Pileup formation was observed in the front of and sideways of the tool, and they exhibit strong dependence on grain orientation rather than grain size. Tip size has significant impact on nanoscratch characteristics; both frictional and normal forces monotonically increase as tip radii increase, while the friction coefficient value drops by about 38%. Additionally, the increase in scratch depth leads to an increase in frictional and normal forces as well as friction coefficient. To elucidate the relevance of indentation/scratch results with mechanical properties, uniaxial tensile test was performed for nc-samples, and the result indicates the existence of both the regular and inverse Hall-Petch relations at critical grain size of 110.9 angstrom. The present results suggest that indentation/scratch hardness has no apparent correlation with the mechanical properties of the substrate, whereas the plastic deformation has.

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  • 5.
    Arnberg, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Torrsubstansförluster vid lagring och hantering av träspån vid Härjeåns Energi AB2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Härjeåns Energi AB in Sveg is a company consisting a brand-new cogeneration plant and a biofuel plant where the company produces pellets out of wooden sawdust. Before pelleting, the sawdust is stored in a large stack. However, the company had noted that the amount of sawdust delivered to the stack minus the sawdust taken from the stack for pelleting did not add up to the sawdust left in the stack. At some point during storage and handling of the sawdust large quantities has disappeared. The purpose of this study was to investigate how and when the dry matter losses occur and the magnitude of the losses regarding two things: the dry matter losses associated with storing of the sawdust and the dry matter losses related to the handling of the sawdust. The most important goal of this study, for the company, was to create an equation that describes the amount of dry matter losses that reasonably should have disappeared from the stack depending on for how long the sawdust has been stored. Simply to be able to make a write-off of the sawdust inventory balances on a regular basis. The purpose and goals were answered by conducting a literature study on the subject, studying the company’s sawdust accounts and their way of handling the sawdust, and also by constructing two simulation models of the dry matter losses in the stack of sawdust.

    Dry matter losses resulting from the storage of biomass may occur through the decomposition mechanisms; respiration, biodegradation and thermal and chemical degradation. But the storage effect on fuel quality is complex. Time of storage, climatic conditions and the geometry and structure of the stacks are some factors that affect the change in biomass properties.

    This degradation, along with how the company manages the sawdust, contributes to dry matter losses. However, the largest contributing factor to the dry matter losses is the storage part. Some contributing factors are the size of the stack, if it’s been compacted and if the sawdust is stored open without coverage. When the models were built it turned out that the result was well in line with what actually had disappeared in the stack, according to the sawdust inventory, during the investigated years 2013-2017.

    For example, by reducing the maximum height of the stack to a maximum of 5-7 meters and apply the last-in-first-out-method on the spruce, while the pine can be stored for a longer time, would certainly contribute to reduced dry matter losses and, consequently, economic losses.

    In the future, however, more resources should be invested in research about storing the fraction of sawdust, as well as storing wood in stacks larger than a maximum height of 5-7 meters. Today there are no research at all within these two categories, but if there were, it could facilitate many energy-producing companies.

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  • 6.
    Arvidsson, Minna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Asplund, Stig-Börje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Step by step - moving forward: Different resources for learning at vocational education on the handicraft programme2023In: Book of abstracts: NordYrk Conference 2023, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the vocational education classroom settings, teaching and learning are done in interaction between teacher and students. This study is a part of a larger VR-funded project (dnr 2017-03552) which explores vocational learning in technical upper secondary vocational education. In our study we aim to shed light on how learning takes place in a vocational classroom at the handicraft programme (hair- and makeup stylist) in actual teaching situations. When studying how learning takes place in a vocational and educational training classroom, we can reach more in-depth knowledge about the teacher-student interaction in a narrower scale.   

    The purpose is to contribute with knowledge regarding how learning takes place and can be made visible with support of the concepts critical aspects features within variation theory (cf. Marton, 2015) and how learning is done in interaction (Sahlström, 2012) between the teacher and the student(s) in the learning settings.    

    Methods/Methodology

    Our empirical data consists of video material of lessons in the Handicraft programme. Conversation Analysis and Variation Theory (CAVTA) are the basis of this study described by Kilbrink and Asplund (2020). To reach a more comprehensive knowledge of the what- and the how-aspects of learning, Conversation analysis and Variation Theory are merged into one common approach (cf. Emanuelsson & Sahlström, 2008). CAVTA is used as the analytical tool when analyzing the video material. 

    Expected outcomes

    In the data we can see that it takes about 3-7 rounds of interactions where the student gets guidance step by step, before the student reach the learning content regarding the whole makeup procedure. The teacher comes back to the students learning process and negotiates continuously during the lesson. Learning occurs through negotiating when using artefacts, embodied movements, mirrors and tools.     

    References 

    Emanuelsson, J., & Sahlström, F. (2008). The price of participation: Teacher control versus student participation in classroom interaction. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 52(2), 205-223. https://doi.org/10.1080/00313830801915853Kilbrink, N., &

    Asplund, S.-B. (2020). “This angle that we talked about”: learning how to weld in interaction. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 30(1), 83-100. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-018-9490-z

    Marton, F. (2015). Necessary conditions of learning. Routledge. 

    Sahlström, F. (2012). "The truth lies in the detail": On student and teacher epistemic-stance displays in classroom interaction. In B. Kaur (Ed.), Understanding teaching and learning: Classroom research revisited. (pp. 79-90). Sense publishers. 

  • 7.
    Arvidsson, Minna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Enochsson, Ann-Britt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Utbildningsvetenskapliga studier av barn och barndom, UBB. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Byman Frisén, Liliann
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies (from 2013).
    Fredholm, Kent
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Hedelin, Zara
    Nissen, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Ådefors, Annica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Micro-Teaching for Pre-Service Academic and Vocational Teachers’ Transformation of Content Knowledge2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student teachers who previously have gained academic knowledge or vocational skills often find it challenging to transform content knowledge into teaching activities that contribute to their future secondary students’ learning. Student teachers express a need for pedagogical tools, time to practice, and opportunities for reflection. Previous research has shown that this can be achieved through micro-teaching, which in our interpretation implies that student teachers practice teaching 1) with a limited subject-specific content 2) for a limited amount of time 3) in a low-stakes situation. The aim of this study is to investigate in what ways micro-teaching can support student teachers in designing and conducting subject-specific and pedagogical teaching activities. Our research method is inspired by action research, and conducted in four steps. The first step is to carefully plan how to implement micro-teaching for student teachers in our own teaching. The second step is the implementation. In a third step, we evaluate student teachers’ experiences from conducting micro-teaching through a survey and individual interviews. The fourth step involves analyzing the results, and adjusting our initial plan for implementation of micro-teaching, if needed. Together, these four steps make up the first cycle. We plan to conduct a second cycle before the research questions can be answered. At the time of writing, we are conducting a first cycle in different subjects. Since the study is still in its infancy, there are no results to report, but we expect to find both similarities and differences between the different subjects in how micro-teaching can support student teachers in transforming existing content knowledge into teaching activities.

  • 8.
    Arvidsson, Minna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Asplund, Stig-Börje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Using the Mirror as a Working Tool in Handicraft Education2023In: The 40th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference Proceedings 2023, 1(October) / [ed] Sara Davies, Matt McLain, Alison Hardy, and David Morrison-Love, Liverpool, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In interaction between students and vocational teachers, technical artefacts constitute an essential part for the development of vocational students’ future professional knowledge. Although vocational learning has been an under-researched area, there has been an increased interest within the vocational education research to examine the teaching and learning processes that take place when vocational students and teachers interact in vocational school settings. The presence of physical objects such as tools, machines and material in the teaching and learning processes within vocational education, which encompass a central aspect of a vocational subjects’ specific characteristics, is a dimension which is often overlooked. In the Handicraft programme (specialization hair- and makeup stylist) at Swedish upper secondary vocational education, a large part of the practical work that students are engaged in is to view their work through the mirror. Therefore, the focus in this study is what learning content is made relevant when teacher and student(s) are interacting in front of the mirror. The data for the study consists of video recorded lessons from the Handicraft Programme, and the study is based on CAVTA (Conversation Analysis and Variation Theory). Based on CAVTA, the process of learning includes what is being learned and how learning is done in interaction between the teacher and student(s) in the authentic and enacted teaching session. At the conference, we will present results from detailed analysis of sequences when the teacher and the students interact in front of the mirror and what vocational knowledge is made possible to learn in these interactions.

  • 9.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Hur allt smälter samman i handlingens centrum: En yrkesämnesdidaktisk studie av transformation, variation och interaktion i svetsundervisning2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis focuses on the pedagogy of practical objects of learning in technical vocational education. The overarching aim of the thesis is to contribute with knowledge of teaching and learning processes when welding teachers systematically transform subject specific contents and vocational knowing to teaching sessions in welding. With the use of the concept transformation, aspects which impact the welding education are highlighted. The thesis explores how welding teachers can visualize practical objects of learning and encourage students to display their comprehension and abilities in the teaching situations of practical objects of learning. The data has been collected from a practice-based research project, where the approach CAVTA, a combination of conversation analysis and variation theory, has served as the theoretical framework. A modified version of the learning study model has been used to develop the teaching and learning processes of practical welding education at an upper-secondary school in Sweden. 

    Different perspectives of the overarching aim surface in the two studies included in the thesis.  The first study explores the teaching and learning processes when welding teachers transform subject specific contents and vocational knowing to welding teaching sessions of MIG/MAG welding. The variation of sound in relation to the object of learning, the settings of the equipment, is manifested in this study, as is the way the teacher in the interaction encourages the students to display their comprehension and abilities to set the equipment adequately.  The second study deals with a practical object of learning in the welding method TIG. Variation and interaction in the teaching and learning processes are explored in this study as well with a focus on the use of CAVTA and the learning study model.

    In the findings, it is manifested how the vaguely defined subject specific contents of the curriculum, via the vocational knowing of the welding teachers, are transformed to welding teaching sessions in the workshop. The thesis shows how the teaching systematically is developed and how the teachers are supported by the theoretical framework CAVTA in combination with the cyclic design of the learning study model. A narrow focus on a defined object of learning enables the teacher to vary specific aspects of the object of learning, thus supporting the students discerning these aspects. A simultaneous focus on the interaction with the students and what the students display in the interaction supports the teacher in revising the teaching accordingly. Suggestions regarding  how to develop the learning study model in relation to practical objects of learning in technical vocational education are proposed. Implications of the study concern mainly welding education, where a systematic integration of variation theoretic principles in combination with a focus on interaction seems promising, although challenges are highlighted. The findings may also be of interest for those who want to explore teaching and learning processes in other areas of technical vocational education. 

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  • 10.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Let's Vary the Travel Speed: Interaction and Critical Aspects in WeldingEducation2021In: Trends in vocational education and training research, Vol. IV.: Proceedings of the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER), Vocational Education and Training Network (VETNET). / [ed] Nägele, C., Kersh, N., & Stalder, B. E., 2021, Vol. IV, p. 17-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to weld in vocational education is an action research project and its purpose is to meet the demand of research regarding the relation between teaching and learning in technical vocational education.

    In the research project the welding education at an upper secondary vocational school in Sweden is video-recorded in iterative cycles. The two theoretical perspectives conversation analysisand variation theory are combined and a new didactic approach is formed – CAVTA (ConversationAnalysis and Variation Theory Approach). CAVTA permeates the complete process ofthe study, where analytic tools deriving from the two theoretical perspectives have been used in the design of the teaching and in the data analysis. Learning to weld in vocational education is inspired by the learning study method but the traditional pre- and post tests have been removed. This paper focuses the second year of Learning to weld in vocational education, developing previously published material. The systematic implementation of CAVTA into welding education is in focus. The research question is formulated: How can the didactic approach CAVTA be implemented in TIG welding education?

    Preliminary results of the second year of the study confirm the results of the first year. The implementation of CAVTA affects the design of the welding lessons and the evaluation of the lessons. The vocational teachers’ discussions concentrate on subject specific issues. There is an increased focus on the object of learning with its critical aspects. The discussions about how todesign the teaching to make the critical aspects discernable result in adjustment of the welding lessons. The systematic teacher and student interactions, including other semiotic resources than verbal language, gradually increase throughout the cycles.

    The main implications of the paper concern the forms of teaching subject specific contents within welding education. Nevertheless, the results of the second year of Learning to weld in vocational education, may spur development of the teaching of other objects of learning. The project also contributes with knowledge in other fields, such as theoretical framework and methodology, with its combination of conversation analysis and variation theory. The collaboration between researchers and a team of vocational teachers might be of interest to anyone interested in professional development.

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  • 11.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teori i praktik: att implementera en undervisningsteori i teknisk yrkesutbildning2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Axelsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Asplund, Stig-Börje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    ”Du hör att nu liksom spinner han som en katt”: Transformation av ett yrkeskunnande till ett undervisningsinnehåll2023In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 29-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transformation of welding teachers’ vocational knowing into subject-specific educational content is focused in this study. The article displays the process of a learning study, in which welding teachers make the sound visible as an aspect of making the correct settings in MIG/MAG welding and give the students’ the opportunity to display their understanding in the interaction. The aim of the study is to contribute with knowledge regarding what happens when welding teachers in a learning study systematically transform subject-specific vocational knowledge to an object of learning in the welding method MIG/MAG. 

    The data consists of the welding teacher team’s documented meetings and film material from teaching situations. The complexity of subject-specific education within VET is shown with the use of the transformation concept. 

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  • 13.
    Axelsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Asplund, Stig-Börje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Learning study i svetsundervisning: en yrkeslärares professionsutveckling2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Axelsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Materials Science. Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Asplund, Stig-Börje
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Subject Specific Pedagogy in Technical Vocational Education: The Implementation of a New Way of Teaching.2023In: The 40th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Educational Research Conference 2023, Liverpool. / [ed] [ed] Sara Davies, Matt McLain, Alison Hardy, and David Morrison-Love, 2023, Vol. 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research regarding classroom pedagogy of subject specific contents in the field of technical vocational education is scarce, nationally in Sweden, but also in an international perspective. This paper presents results from a Swedish action research project and it aims at exploring the process of a learning study, which deals with the settings in MIG/MAG welding and the intervention of the new pedagogic approach CAVTA (Conversation Analysis and Variation Theory Approach). The empiric material consists of video recorded welding education in a workshop and documented meetings in a welding teacher team. The theoretical toolbox of CAVTA permeates the teaching and learning processes as the teachers in the intervention try to implement patterns of variation in the planning, enactment and evaluation of the teaching and learning processes. In combination with the variation theoretic principles embedded in the teaching, ideas inspired by conversation analysis are implemented – the main element being an enhanced interaction, thus enabling for the students to display their understanding of the subject specific contents. The results show how CAVTA can be integrated in the teaching of settings regarding MIG/MAG welding, so that certain aspects of the object of learning is visualized. Furthermore, the findings show how the integration of CAVTA support the manifestation of a student’s understanding of the object of learning. How variation and the use of several senses and simultaneous different semiotic resources are activated as essential components in the teaching and learning processes, is made explicit in the paper. Plans for a recently launched research project including several different technical vocational education programs are also presented. The lack of classroom studies regarding technical vocational education calls for exploration in research, but should not avoid the ambition of development. This study captures the design and the development of a new pedagogic approach. Our hope is that the study will contribute to a growing body of knowledge within the field of technical vocational education and spur on further studies in this field of research. 

  • 15.
    Berglund, Teresa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Diversity in views as a resource for learning?: Student perspectives on the interconnectedness of sustainable development dimensions2022In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 354-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the different arguments put forward by Swedish upper secondary students on the interconnectedness of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development (SD). The aim is to study the diversity in views among students in order to find out whether this can be used as a resource in a holistic and pluralistic approach to ESD. The study design was based on a two-step process in which the first step was to identify students representing four different, broadly coherent, views on the interconnections between sustainability dimensions, with a specific focus on the role of the economy in SD. Thereafter, focus group interviews were undertaken with the selected groups of students representing the four different views. The findings indicate a diversity of arguments in discussions of SD and the potential that this plurality brings for perspective shifting. Moreover, the economic dimension appears as central to promoting discussions that aim to examine the overall interconnectedness of sustainability dimensions. A further conclusion is that omitting the economic dimension in ESD risks excluding the core of students’ ideas of how SD may be realized.

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  • 16.
    Berglund, Teresa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Forssten Seiser, Anette
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Mogren, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    ESD-facilitators’ conditions and functions as sustainability change agents2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proposal information 

    This study seeks to investigate the experiences of teachers working as ESD-facilitators within a whole school approach project designed to implement education for sustainable development (ESD) in their schools. The program activities included school leaders, teachers, and ESD- facilitators. During a period of three school years, five schools in a municipality in Sweden took part in order to integrate ESD in their organization and teaching practice. The ESD-facilitators took part in the design of the development process, workshop activities and content, and facilitated each school’s internal work. This study aims to identify in what ways ESD-facilitators function as sustainability change agents and how contextual factors might contribute to success or form hindrances in their work.The project was designed based on teachers’ learning and collaborative and reflexive work (Desimone, 2009). The purpose was to direct the development work of the schools towards a whole school approach (Mogren et al. 2019), meaning that ESD is fully integrated in the local curriculum. The main areas of development were to increase interdisciplinary teaching with focus on ESD as holistic pedagogical idea, and that ESD should permeate the work in all levels of the internal and external organization of the school (Sund & Lysgaard, 2013), implying that the different actors in the school and its societal context (students, teachers, school leaders and the outer society) work towards sustainability (Mogren et al., 2019). An additional aim was to integrate pluralistic approaches in the teachers’ classroom practice.The project included two project leaders, who also participated as researchers in the project. Together with the school leaders and ESD-facilitators, they took a leading role in the development of the project, which included joint seminars, and meetings between project leaders and a) school leaders (across schools), b) school leaders and facilitators (within schools), and c) facilitators (across schools). The ESD-facilitators were intended to function as a link between school leader, project leaders and the teaching staff. They were supposed to support the teacher work teams in their discussions and implementation work with transforming ESD principles into practice.A recent study by Van Poeck et al. (2017) explored different change agent roles by mapping the different ways in which change agents actively contribute to sustainability. In relation to different roles, various types of learning is being made possible. The authors identified four types of change agents that position themselves in different ways along the two axes of personal detachment vs. personal involvement, and instrumental vs. open-ended approaches (to change and learning). This study investigates the views and practices of the ESD-facilitators in relation to these two dimensions. Thus, different change agent positions may be taken.The ESD-facilitators have a middle leading role in their schools, which means that they enact leading practices from a position in between the teaching staff and the school leader (Grootenboer, Edwards-Groves & Rönnerman, 2015). There is limited research focusing on practitioners who facilitate processes of professional development (Perry & Boylan, 2018). Thus, little is known about how facilitators, and particularly those who facilitate a whole school approach to ESD, could be supported to carry out their role and tasks in an effective way, and what adequate conditions and arrangements for this might be. Taken together, this implies a gap in current knowledge about ESD implementation strategies, which this study aims to help bridging.The research questions guiding the research are twofold: in the ESD-facilitators’ descriptions of their roles, functions and practices:        

    • What kinds of sustainability change agent roles can be identified?
    • What contextual factors are experienced as successful and/or hindering?

    Methodology or Methods

    After the project ended, interviews were carried out between November 2020 and April 2021 with seven ESD-facilitators from five different schools. Two of the schools had appointed two facilitators, who either focused on different programs (in upper secondary school) or on different levels in compulsory school (primary or secondary level).The interviews followed a semi-structured approach (Bryman, 2018) and included pre-defined areas concerning the ESD-facilitators’ view on: a) the long term purposes and goals of the project, b) in what ways they viewed their role in the development work in their school, and c) their experiences of factors that were of central importance in order for them to be able to perform their task effectively. Their responses were followed up by the interviewer in a flexible manner.The analysis of data followed a multi-step process. The three parts above constitute the basis for the first step of the analysis, which was performed inductively and followed a broad approach to data driven thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006). The next step was analyzed deductively, based on the typology of sustainability change agents by Van Poeck et al. (2017). In this step, the utterances connected to the ESD-facilitators’ role in the development work, together with utterances concerning their view of long-term purposes and goals of the project, were analyzed in relation to the four different types of sustainability change agents in the typology. The analysis concerning their role focused mainly on the two dimensions identified as open-ended or instrumental, and personal detachment vs. -involvement. Utterances were identified that could be associated with a specific role description under the four ideal types of change agents. Moreover, utterances of how they viewed the purpose and goal of the ESD development work were analyzed, mainly connected to how different types of change agents may enable different forms of learning (Van Poeck et al., 2017). However, research on middle leading practices as well as research of sustainability change agents emphasizes that roles and practices should be interpreted in relation to the context they are enacted within (Grootenboer, Edwards-Groves & Rönnerman, 2015; Van Poeck et al., 2017). Therefore, the analysis also focused on identifying how different contextual factors affect and enable the roles and practices of the ESD-facilitators. Thus, the final step is to look for relationships between expressed purposes and goals, roles, and what factors are experienced as promoting and/or hindering their role and mission.

    Findings and conclusions 

    The analysis indicates that teachers struggle with transforming ESD theory into teaching practice. The school culture has great impact on the readiness of teacher teams to engage in transformation of their teaching. The ESD-facilitator’ functions and practices are affected by the school culture and whether teacher teams are well functioning or not in terms of collaborative work.All the four roles in the typology (Van Poeck et al., 2017) were identified in their expressions, and different contextual factors were emphasized as either promoting or hindering their functions. Clear support and leadership from the school leader and the presence of a well-defined long term goal was important to provide direction and legitimize the ESD-facilitator role in schools where a broad anchoring of ESD among the staff was missing. Moreover, roles and processes became more open-ended in schools where there was room for collaborative work and reflexive discussions. In those schools where the culture encouraged collaborative work and shared agency, the ESD-facilitators pointed out their functions in mediating the process in terms of initiator, facilitator, mobilizer and/or awareness raiser (ibid.). When there was little space for collaborative work, or the culture was hindering it, the ESD-facilitator role and approach became more instrumental and it became harder to create agency and integrate ESD as a holistic pedagogical idea (see Mogren et al. 2019) among the community of teachers. Those facilitators emphasized their functions in terms of experts, councellors, managers, solution providers and exemplars (Ibid.).A challenge was how to transform ESD theories, which the facilitators expressed as abstract and far from everyday teaching, into concrete practice. In the school where a collaborative culture was present, a way to solve this was to start doing by daring to explore new ways of teaching, and then evaluate in a collaborative, open and reflexive manner

    References

    Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative research in psychology, 3(2), 77-101.

    Bryman, A. (2018). Samhällsvetenskapliga metoder.(tredje upplagan). Liber.

    Desimone, L. M. (2009). Improving impact studies of teachers’ professional development: Toward better conceptualizations and measures. Educational researcher, 38(3), 181-199.

    Grootenboer, P.,  Edwards-Groves, C., & Rönnerman, K. (2015). Leading practice development: voices from the middle, Professional Development in Education, 41(3), 508-526, DOI: 10.1080/19415257.2014.924985

    Mogren, A., Gericke, N., & Scherp, H.-Å. (2019). Whole school approaches to education for sustainable development: a model that links to school improvement. Environmental Education Research, 25(4), 508-531.

    Perry, E., & Boylan, M. (2018). Developing the developers: supporting and researching the learning of professional development facilitators. Professional development in education, 44(2), 254-271.

    Sund, P., & Lysgaard, J. G. (2013). Reclaim “education” in environmental and sustainability education research. Sustainability, 5(4), 1598-1616.

    Van Poeck, K., Læssøe, J., & Block, T. (2017). An exploration of sustainability change agents as facilitators of nonformal learning: Mapping a moving and intertwined landscape. Ecology and Society, 22(2).

  • 17.
    Berglund, Teresa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Forssten Seiser, Anette
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Mogren, Anna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Sustainability change agents in whole school approaches to education for sustainable development (ESD).2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the experiences of teachers working as ESD-facilitators in a whole school approach project designed to implement education for sustainable development (ESD). The project included ESD-facilitators, teachers, and school leaders. The ESD-facilitators took part in designing joint seminars and workshop activities, and facilitated each school’s internal work. This study aims to contribute with knowledge concerning in what ways ESD-facilitators function as change agents in development processes and how their work can be supported. Different types of sustainability change agents who position themselves differently along the two dimensions of personal detachment vs. personal involvement, and instrumental vs. open-ended approaches (to change and learning) have been identified in previous research (Van Poeck et al., 2017). This study investigates the views and practices of ESD-facilitators in relation to these two dimensions, and focuses on what sustainability change agent functions are enacted, and what contextual factors they experience as successful and/or hindering in their work. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with seven ESD-facilitators from five schools. Focus areas were their views on: a) the long term goals of the project, b) their role in the internal development work, and c) factors of central importance for their ability to perform their task effectively. The findings indicate that roles and processes become more open-ended in schools where there is room for collaborative and reflexive work. In schools where the culture encourages shared agency, the ESD-facilitators point to their functions in mediating the process in terms of mobilizer, facilitator, initiator, and/or awareness raiser (Ibid.). When there is little room for collaborative work, or the culture impedes it, the ESD-facilitator role and approach become more instrumental and it is harder to integrate ESD and create agency. Those facilitators emphasized their functions in terms of managers, solution providers, experts, exemplars and councellors (Ibid.). 

  • 18. Bergqvist, Tomas
    et al.
    Österholm, Magnus
    van Bommel, Jorryt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Liljekvist, Yvonne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Resultat av utvärderingen av Matematiklyftet angående undervisning och fortbildning2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Bergwall, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mellroth, Elisabet
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teachers’ choice of a challenging task through collaborative learning2021In: Teachers’ choice of a challenging task through collaborative learning, Svensk förening för MatematikDidaktisk Forskning - SMDF, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Challenging mathematical tasks are important for all students’ learning processes, and the demanding job of finding and developing such tasks is preferably done through teacher collaboration. Using cultural-historical activity theory, we analyze three upper secondary teachers’ collaborative learning process in choosing and rejecting tasks for a collection of challenging tasks they have agreed to develop. They collaboratively chose one task to fulfil the criteria of challenging tasks; one task was rejected as it did not fulfil the criteria, and another was temporarily rejected as not all the teachers knew how to solve it themselves. The analysis revealed a positive and open atmosphere among the teachers, with content-focused discussion highlighting mathematical content and teaching related to the tasks discussed. While their discussion showed several signs of collaborative learning, whether their work will result in changes to teaching practice remains to be explored.

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    Teachers' choice of a challenging task through collaborative learning.
  • 20.
    Bergwall, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Mellroth, Elisabet
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Örebro universitet.
    Jansson, Torbjörn
    Tullängsgymnasiet, Örebro kommun.
    Nordin, Johan
    Tullängsgymnasiet, Örebro kommun.
    Teachers’ characterizations of challenging introductory and enrichment tasks2022In: Proceedings of the Twelfth Congress of  European Research Society in Mathematics Education (CERME12) / [ed] J. Hodgen; E. Geraniou; G. Bolondi; F. Ferretti, European Society for Research in Mathematics Education, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing tasks for use in mixed-ability classrooms presents teachers with several dilemmas. By making one such dilemma an explicit object of inquiry, this study aims to capture characteristics for challenging tasks suitable for introduction or enrichment. It is based on eight teachers’ collaborative and retrospective analysis of challenging tasks developed in a combined research and school development project. Among the results are the observation that introductory tasks should have an easy entry level and not require pre-knowledge of the upcoming concept, while an enrichment task should require relatively deep conceptual pre-knowledge. It is suggested that attention to seemingly contradictory features of introductory and enrichment tasks can fuel collaborative learning processes so that they include several important aspects of tasks aimed at challenging all students. Teachers’ verbalization of task characteristics is one outcome of such a process.

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    Teachers’ characterizations of challenging introductory and enrichment tasks
  • 21.
    Björkholm, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, Teknikdidaktik.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Focusing on a specific learning content in primary technology education2015In: 29th PATT Conference : Plurality and Complementarity of Approachers in Design and technology Education: Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design adn Technology Education / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille, France: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015, p. 55-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss findings from two previous studies in technology education using the Learning study model and the Variation theory of learning. The Learning study is a collaborative approach where teachers and researchers work together in the classroom with the aim to enhance students’ learning concerning a specific content. In a Learning study, focus is on a specific “object of learning”, i.e. what the students are expected to learn. The aim of this paper is to show what knowledge concerning specific objects of learning in technology education is generated in a Learning study and to discuss the potential contribution of this knowledge to technology teaching practice. We will provide examples from two Learning studies conducted in primary technology education in Sweden. The findings from the studies are of two kinds; identified aspects of the object of learning that are critical in order to learn, and aspects that could be referred to the teaching of the specific content.

  • 22.
    Bjørnebye, Morten
    et al.
    Høgskolen i Innlandet, Norway.
    Helseth, Anita
    Høgskolen i Innlandet, Norway.
    van Bommel, Jorryt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Aesthetics in embodied task design in mathematics2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) research emphasises interdisciplinary approaches to developing skills needed for the 21st century. In this paper, we explore three aesthetically rich mathematical activities involving dance and bodily performance (e.g., creative body postures) with 6-year-old students. Supported by an embodied perspective of task design and a Deweyan view of aesthetics, we argue that a high degree of bodily engagement and a high degree of task integration allow space for creativity and imagination that may involve aesthetic dimensions. Specifically, we argue that body postures, bodily rotation, rhythm, and fluency in composite sequences of movement may connect art and mathematics in a way that treats the students as active creators of aesthetic experiences, in contrast to other STEAM approaches that do not consider bodily performance as a way of connecting art and mathematics.

  • 23.
    Boeve-de Pauw, Jelle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). University of Antwerp, Belgien.
    De Loof, Haydée
    University of Antwerp, Belgien.
    Walan, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Van Petegem, Peter
    University of Antwerp, Belgien.
    Teachers’ self-efficacy and role when teaching STEM in high-tech informal learning environments2022In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Informal learning environments (ILEs) like Fablabs and Makerspaces have potential to facilitate development of STEM skills. However, these environments might be difficult for teachers to adopt in their teaching because of teaching approaches grounded in constructionism where the role of the teacher changes from a transmissive instructor to an active co-creator, and using high-tech equipment not normally found in schools.PURPOSE The aim is to investigate teachers’ self-efficacy and perceived role when teaching STEM in Fablabs and Makerspaces. This is investigated related to teaching in ILEs and using high-tech equipment. The study was conducted in two countries/regions, Flanders (Belgium) and Sweden We also compare differences between teachers depending on nationality, gender, and years of teaching experience.SAMPLE A total of 347 secondary school teachers completed an online survey. Quantitative analyses was used for all questions in the survey, except one open-ended question, which was analysed through inductive thematic coding.RESULTS The teachers reported moderate self-efficacy for teaching in ILEs , and low self-efficacy for using high-tech equipment. Some teachers described themselves as having active roles as a coach or as co-learner during visits with their students. Others saw themselves as having a passive role. Many teachers did not know what kind of role to take. The teachers who perceived an active role as a teacher in high-tech ILEsreported higher self-efficacy to teach in these environments than other teachers.CONCLUSIONS This study shows that a constructionist approach to teaching is important if teachers are to develop self-efficacy to teach in high-techILEs. Thus, developing teacher practices in line with constructionism in relation to teaching in high-techILEsis imperative, in teacher education. The results also highlight that staff in Fablabs and Makerspaces are important for handling high-tech equipment. Hence, collaboration between staff in ILEs and teachers is of importance.

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  • 24.
    Boeve-de Pauw, Jelle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). University Utrecht, NLD.
    Olsson, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Berglund, Teresa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teachers' ESD self-efficacy and practices: a longitudinal study on the impact of teacher professional development2022In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 867-885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal quantitative study investigated teachers' development of self-efficacy and teaching practices relating to education for sustainable development (ESD) in four compulsory schools in a Swedish municipality. The teachers participated in a professional development program over three school years designed to support them in implementing ESD. The program was based on five seminars that supported teachers to discuss and experiment with the principles, complexities and challenges of ESD. Data was collected at five different time points strategically planned at key moments in the program, using a questionnaire including scales measuring teachers' self-efficacy for ESD and their self-reported ESD practices. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to follow the teachers evolution across a time span of about three years. Results show that the teachers' self-efficacy was boosted early in the program, but fell back to initial levels after confrontation with practice. Through further experimentation in practice, the teachers' self-efficacy increased back to the initial level toward the end of the program. Furthermore, teachers started self-reporting ESD practices as the program progressed, and the correlation between self-efficacy for ESD and ESD practices grew. These results highlight the importance of providing teachers with long-term opportunities for bringing ESD into their own educational practice. The results also caution against using self-efficacy as an outcome measure in short-term professionalization initiatives.

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  • 25.
    Boeve-de Pauw, Jelle
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). University Utrecht, NLD.
    Olsson, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Berglund, Teresa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teachers' ESD self-efficacy and practices: A longitudinal study on the impact of teacher professional development2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal quantitative study investigated teachers’ development of self-efficacy andteaching practices relating to education for sustainable development (ESD) in four compulsory schools in a Swedish municipality. The teachers participated in a professional development program over three school years designed to support them in implementing ESD. The program was based on five seminars that supported teachers to locally discuss and experiment with the principles, complexities and challenges of ESD. Data was collected at five different time points using a questionnaire including scales measuring teachers’ self-efficacy for ESD and their self-reported ESD practices. Results show that the teachers’ self-efficacy was boosted early in the program, but it fell back to initial low levels after confrontation with practice. Through further experimentation in their own practices, the teachers’ self-efficacy for ESD increased back to the initial level toward the end of the program. Furthermore, teachers started self-reporting actual implementation of ESD practices as the program progressed, and the correlation between teachers’ self-efficacy for ESD and self-reported ESD practices grew. These results highlight the importance of providing teachers with long-term opportunities for bringing ESD into their own educational practice. The results also caution against using self-efficacy as an outcome measure in short-term professionalization initiatives.

  • 26.
    Borg, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    A historical overview on the use of programming in mathematics and mathematics education2022Report (Refereed)
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  • 27.
    Borg, Andreas
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Fahlgren, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Ruthven, Kenneth
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Programming as a mathematical instrument: the implementation of an analytic framework2020In: Mathematics Education in the Digital Age (MEDA) PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Ana Donevska-Todorova, Eleonora Faggiano, Jana Trgalova, Zsolt Lavicza, Robert Weinhandl, Alison Clark-Wilson, Hans-Georg Weigand, 2020, p. 435-442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper relates to an ongoing project using design-based research as a methodol- ogical approach in which students with no prior experiences of using programming as a mathematical tool are observed trying to solve mathematical problems with the help of programming. The Instrumental Approach is used as conceptual framework in which the concept of instrumental genesis describes the process where the programming environment as an artefact together with student-developed mental schemes forms an instrument in order to solve mathematical problems. The development of schemes is of special interest in this paper where Vergnaud’s components of a scheme provide a framework for analysing transcripts of talk between student pairs and the programming code that they generate.

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  • 28.
    Borg, Farhana
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Local and Global Aspects: Teaching Social Sustainability in Swedish Preschools2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 3838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although policy documents emphasize the importance of integrating social, economic, andenvironmental dimensions into education for sustainability (EfS), there is a lack of studies investigating how social sustainability can be included in preschool teaching. Therefore, this study aimsto increase knowledge about preschool teachers’ teaching practices relating to social sustainability.This study uses EfS as a conceptual framework that includes a holistic view of sustainability addressing social, economic, and environmental aspects, as well as pluralistic teaching approach from atransformative perspective. To explore the views and teaching practices, individual interviews wereconducted with 12 preschool teachers from eight preschools that took part in a school developmentproject. The project included professional development workshops for teachers on EfS and localimplementation efforts. Thematic content analysis was conducted. The interviews made it apparentthat the teachers initially viewed sustainability from an environmental perspective; however, afterinvolvement in the school development project, they began to integrate the social sustainabilitydimension into their teaching. The teachers associated local sustainability challenges with those facedinternationally. To a certain extent, children’s agency was noted in pluralistic educational activitiesthat supported children’s active participation. The level at which preschool teachers integrated socialsustainability into their teaching varied.

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  • 29.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Computer aided design in gifted students’ technology education2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital design tools as computer aided design (CAD) are commonly used when teaching about design and product development in Swedish lower secondary school technology education. From a previous phenomenographical study (Brink et al., 2021), it is known that teachers are experiencing teaching with CAD to be complex, challenging and include several learning outcomes. Teaching with CAD thus enables differentiated teaching and it is important to learn more about this teaching, especially regarding gifted students.  

    The aim of this ongoing study is to describe gifted students’ needs in technology education and identifying important features in technology education regarding gifted students’ needs. The study also aims to develop knowledge about teaching with digital design tools as CAD in inclusive and differentiated settings and describe from a teacher perspective, if and how teaching with digital design tools can stimulate and challenge gifted students in lower secondary school.

    The first part of this study is planned as a scoping review and a content analysis of policy document and available resources for Swedish technology education. This will result in a theoretical framework for use in the second part of the study. The second part is planned as an intervention study where researcher and teachers together develop, analyze and document a CAD activity through three different workshops (3 – 5 teachers at each workshop), for use in lower secondary school technology education. Data will be collected through observations, documents from the workshops and from semi-structured interviews with the participating teachers after the workshops. The qualitative data will be analyzed with the theoretical framework from the first part of the study. It is expected that the result of the study can be used to guide teachers in technology to better include and challenge gifted students in learning. The results are also expected to increase the knowledge base of differentiated technology education in inclusive settings, with relevance for Nordic educational research with interests in technology education and gifted education. The results can also be important for technology teachers and teacher educators. 

    Brink, H., Kilbrink, N., & Gericke, N. (2021). Teaching digital models: Secondary technology teachers’ experiences. International Journal of Technology and Design Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-021-09659-5

  • 30.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Digital design tools in gifted students’ technology education2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is common to teach about design and product development using digital design tools when teaching technology in lower secondary school in Sweden, and all students are supposed to develop digital competence. Digital design tools enable differentiated teaching and it is important to learn more about this, especially regarding gifted students.

    The aim of this study is to develop knowledge about teaching design and product development to gifted students, and to explore if and how digital design tools can stimulate and challenge these students. The study also aims to identify important features regarding gifted students’ technology education, of use for both teachers and teacher educators. 

    The study is planned as a design study where researcher and teachers together develop and analyze the teaching. It is expected that the result of the study can be used to guide teachers in technology to better include their gifted students in learning, the results are also expected to increase the knowledge base of differentiated teaching in technology in inclusive settings.

  • 31.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gifted students' needs in technology education2023In: The 40th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference Proceedings / [ed] Sara Davies, Matt McLain, Alison Hardy, and David Morrison-Love, Liverpool: John Moores University , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students who are gifted and students with high abilities can have special educational needs. Teaching should be challenging and stimulating and teachers and educators in inclusive settings have a variety of needs to consider, included the gifted students’ needs. However, when it comes to secondary technology education, little is known about gifted students’ needs. The aim of this ongoing study is to describe and synthesize knowledge about gifted students’ needs in technology education through a systematic research literature review and a thematic analysis. The tentative results are four themes describing gifted students’ needs in technology education as Complexity, Autonomy, Support, and Authenticity. The themes can be used by teachers and guide them in their efforts to plan and implement diverse and differentiated technology teaching as a proactive response to the gifted students’ needs in inclusive settings.

  • 32.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Modeller och modellering med digitala verktyg i högstadiets teknikundervisning2021Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis is about secondary school technology teachers’ experiences of teaching with models and modelling using digital tools.

    The aim of this thesis is to gain new in-depth knowledge of teaching in relation to digital models and digital modelling, and create better preconditions for technology teachers when it comes to their choices of content and methods of teaching in the area.  Two studies have been conducted and phenomenology of the lifeworld has been used as a theoretical framework. Data was collected through 12 semi-structured interviews. In the first study, the focus was on technology teachers’ experiences of teaching digital models. In the second study, the focus was on a specific part of digital modelling, teachers’ experiences of teaching with computer aided design, CAD.

    The results show that teaching with digital models and digital modelling can comprise a combination of theoretical and practical activities. Further, teaching varies from instruction to a more explorative teaching where pupils seek solutions to problems on their own. Digital models are used descriptively as well as for predicting technology not yet developed. The study shows that there is not one way to understand the concept digital models in steering documents or teaching practice and there is a need for more nuanced and specific discussions to address different learning outcomes. Moreover, technology teachers experience CAD as an important and central part of teaching with digital models.

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  • 33.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Swedish Technology Teachers’ Understandings of Computer Programming as Modelling2023In: Programming and computational thinking in technology education: Swedish and international perspectives / [ed] Jonas Hallström; Marc J. de Vries, Brill Academic Publishers, 2023, p. 234-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about computer programming and knowledge in computer programming are important features in technology education in Swedish compulsory schools, and therefore mentioned in the technology syllabus. Knowledge about computer programming is necessary to understand the contemporary world we live in, where much of the technology is connected and programmed. To develop knowledge in computer programming, pupils can be offered teaching which allows the pupils to program. In this chapter, results from a previous study (Brink et al., 2021) will be discussed, where interviews about models and modelling were conducted with lower secondary school technology teachers. The results reveal that teachers can understand computer programming as modelling in technology education and experience similarities between the two concepts, modelling and computer programming. Implications for teaching practice can be to teach more explicitly when modelling in different modes of representation and when different modes are preferable. This study contributes to development of the body of concepts relevant to technology education.

  • 34.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Technology teachers’ experiences of teaching with models and modelling represented with digital tools2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish compulsory school, pupils are supposed to develop digital competence. The technology subject for lower secondary school (pupils at age 13-15) serves several opportunities for pupils to work with and develop their digital competence. For instance, when pupils are working with designing models and at the same time are using digital tools. The aim of this study, conducted within a research school with teachers as researchers, was to develop knowledge about teachers’ experiences of teaching with models and modelling represented with digital tools. Swedish technology teachers have been interviewed about their experiences of this teaching, and the interviews have been analyzed using thematical and phenomenographical approaches. The results show that the teaching has more learning outcomes then are expressed by the teachers. Based on the results, it is arguable that it is important for teacher students, as for in-service teachers, to notice, identify and conceptualize these non-expressed outcomes when planning and enacting their lessons. With this poster session, some examples of outcomes when teaching with models represented with digital tools are presented; a possible teaching progression; and finally, the importance of interweaving theoretical and practical elements from this specific area of technology education, and how this could be done in practice.

  • 35.
    Brink, Helen
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Tekniklärares erfarenheter av undervisning om digitala modeller i högstadiets teknikundervisning2021In: Forum för forskningsbaserad NT‐ undervisning: Bidrag från konferensen FobasNT19 17‐18 oktober 2019 i Norrköping / [ed] Andreas Larsson; Karin Stolpe; Gunnar Höst, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2021, p. 7-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I grundskolans teknikundervisning på högstadiet är det vanligt att elever skapar och tillverkar modeller av olika konstruktioner, processer eller artefakter. Modellerna är ett sätt för eleverna att testa konstruktionens design och funktion, men också ett sätt att kommunicera idéer och lösningar. Idag kan modeller visas digitalt via en skärm, digitala modeller, och många lärare har infört digitala modeller i sin undervisning. I den här studien kartläggs tekniklärares erfarenheter om undervisning i detta specifika område. Tolv tekniklärare har intervjuats och intervjuerna har analyserats tematiskt. Resultaten visar att undervisning med digitala modeller bedrivs för att a) förstärka och integrera andra ämnen, b) synliggöra teknik för eleverna, c) undervisa om digital modellering samt för att d) förbereda eleverna för framtiden. En slutsats utifrån studiens resultat är att eleverna ges olika förutsättningar för lärande i området och lärarna som intervjuats uttrycker osäkerhet i vad de ska undervisa och hur undervisningen ska bedrivas. Resultaten kan bidra till teknikämnets utveckling genom att mer specifikt och nyanserat diskutera dessa olika delar av undervisning om digitala modeller. 

  • 36.
    Brink, Helen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teaching digital models: secondary technology teachers’ experiences2022In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 32, p. 1755-1775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In secondary technology education, models of artifacts, systems and processes, visualized and simulated through digital tools (digital models) are a relatively new element. Technology teachers teach digital models to meet syllabus criteria of digital competence, applicable to for instance problem solving and documentation using digital tools. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning how teachers use digital models in their teaching, what their intentions are, and what content they choose. It is known, though, that teachers’ experiences influence the teaching. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate teachers’ experiences of teaching digital models in compulsory school, to contribute to more knowledge of teaching in this area. This study takes a phenomenological lifeworld approach, and 12 semi-structured interviews with lower secondary technology teachers form the empirical data. The data were analyzed thematically and the results are four themes of experiencing the teaching of digital models, indicating that technology teachers teach with different aims and purposes; Enhancing and integrating other subjects, Visualizing technology to the pupils, Enabling digital modelling, and Preparing pupils for the future. Further, the results also indicate that the content and methods of teaching differ and that teachers did not experience digital models as one single idea but as an amalgam of multiple ideas. These findings can be used as a basis for further research and development of teaching concerning digital models.

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  • 37.
    Brink, Helen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teaching Modelling Using Digital Design Tools: Experiences of Swedish Secondary School Technology Teachers2021In: Techne series: Research in sloyd education and crafts science. A, ISSN 1238-9501, E-ISSN 1893-1774, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 432-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling using digital design tools is a relatively new element in secondary technology education, though modelling using concrete material is common and has been practiced regularly. Many technology teachers now teach modelling using digital design tools, to meet the new criteria in the syllabus concerning problem solving and documentation using digital technology. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning how technology teachers teach modelling using digital design tools and how they choose content and present it to the pupils. It is known, though, that teachers’ experiences affect how they plan the lessons. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate technology teachers’ experiences to gain more understanding in this particular area of technology education. Taking a phenomenographic approach, twelve semi-structured interviews with secondary technology teachers were conducted. The results show that teachers have different experiences teaching modelling using digital design tools, and four categories have emerged: 1) Handling the software and using simple geometries, 2) Using ready-made objects from databases, 3) Manufacturing via 3D-printers, and 4) Design and problem solving. The results indicate that teachers teach modelling using digital design tools with different aims; the intended object of learning differs. The results also indicate that teachers experience that they lack knowledge of teaching modelling using digital design tools and therefore have difficulties teaching in this area, which can affect the pupils’ problem-solving skills. The results, described in this article, can be used as a basis for further discussion.

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  • 38.
    Brink, Helen
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Kilbrink, Nina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Teaching modelling using digital tools in secondary technology education: Teachers’ experiences2019In: Proceedings PATT37: Developing a knowledge economy through technology and engineering education / [ed] S. Pulé and M. de Vries, 2019, p. 95-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models can be used for communicating and for sharing information. In technology education in Swedish compulsory school, pupils have long created models using simple materials to test their designs, such as cardboard and wooden sticks. Models have also been used by teachers to assess pupils’ technology knowledge in particular areas (Elmer & Davies, 2000). We live in a world where technology is highly developed, where digital technology plays an important role and where models are created in digital environments (Kress, 2010). Technology as a school subject undergoes the same development, which can be seen in the technology syllabus (Skolverket, 2011). However, there is a lack of research on technology teachers’ experiences of teaching modelling using digital tools. According to previous research, teachers’ experiences of a phenomenon (Marton & Tsui, 2004) along with their pedagogical and technological knowledge (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) affect how they plan their lessons. The aim of this pilot study is therefore to examine secondary school teachers’ experiences of teaching modelling using digital tools, thereby contributing to understanding this area of technology education. The study takes a phenomenographic approach (Marton & Booth, 1997) and is based on semi-structured interviews with teachers. The interviews are analyzed, focusing on how technology teachers experience teaching modelling using digital tools. Their different experiences are divided into categories. So far, four categories have been identified: a) Modelling using digital tools as inspiration, b) Handling the modelling software as the object of learning, c) Handling 3D printing as the object of learning and d) Modelling for teaching technological content. A tentative result is that teachers have different aims and purposes when teaching modelling using digital tools.

  • 39.
    Brunström, Mats
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Fahlgren, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Vinerean, Mirela
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Technology and Science, Department of Mathematics. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Wondmagegne, Yosief
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Designing for a combined use of a dynamic mathematics software environment and a computer-aided assessment system2022In: Proceedings of the Twelfth Congress of the European Research Society in Mathematics Education (CERME12) / [ed] J. Hodgen, E. Geraniou, G. Bolondi, & F. Ferrettti, ERME , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a pilot study with the focus on (re)design of a digitized task environment utilizing two types of technology – a dynamic mathematics software and a computer-aided assessment system. The data consist of responses from 256 first year engineering students, taking their first Calculus course, on two different types of task. The results are discussed in relation to (re)design of tasks as well as possible feedback design options to enable a formative assessment approach.

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  • 40.
    Brunström, Mats
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Fahlgren, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Vinerean-Bernhoff, Mirela
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Wondmagegne, Yosief
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Computer-aided assessment based on dynamic mathematics investigations2020In: Proceedings of the Tenth ERME Topic Conference (ETC 10) on Mathematics Education in the Digital Age (MEDA), 16-18 September 2020 in Linz, Austria / [ed] A. Donevska-Todorova, E. Faggiano, J. Trgalová, Z. Lavicza, R. Weinhandl, A. Clark-Wilson, & H.-G. Weigand, Linz, Austria, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the poster, we will present a planned study focusing on the design of DMS tasks and elaborated feedback within a CAA system. The study will be conducted in a first year engineering mathematics course during autumn 2020.

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  • 41.
    Carlson, Philip
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics, Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Konstruktions- och Materialförbättring hos Superkritiska Ventiler2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 42.
    Casanoves, Marina
    et al.
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Solé-Llussà, Anna
    Universitat de Lleida, ESP.
    Haro, Juan
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Valls, Cristina
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Assessment of the ability of game-based science learning to enhance genetic understanding2023In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 1496-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Game-based science learning (GBSL) provide an alternative route for learning genetics, but its effects on students' conceptual learning is contested. In this paper we assess the utility, in primary teacher education, of Recal: a game designed to promote participants' learning of key genetic concepts through acting as detectives investigating a case. Purpose The purpose of the study was to analyse and compare teacher students' learning of genetics through the game, and both their attitudes towards and experiences of it. Tests were conducted in Spanish and Swedish contexts to assess its potential utility in contrasting cultural and educational contexts to obtain indications of the potential breadth of its application. Samples Participants included 120 pre-service teacher students from a university in north-eastern Spain and 51 from a university in western Sweden. Design and methods The research involved an intervention, in which students played the game, and assessment of its efficacy by questionnaires designed to investigate students' knowledge of genetics before and after the game, their expectations and experience of it, and their satisfaction with it. The results were analysed statistically. Results The game appeared to enhance both Spanish and Swedish participants' knowledge of genetics, and they reportedly found it both educationally beneficial and engaging. It was also assessed in terms of the following characteristics of GBSL, based on experiential data: contextualisation, authenticity, collaboration, problem-solving, guided paths and competition. Conclusion The results clearly indicate that the game has utility in different countries and educational contexts. The article discusses how the six characteristics of GBSL facilitate or hinder learning, and implications (for educational professionals and researchers) of the findings.

  • 43.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Sustainable Societal Transformation. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013).
    Att synliggöra skogens subjektiva värden - explorativ metodutveckling2020In: Skogen som resurs i en gränsregion / [ed] C. Bianchi Strömme; S. Heldt Cassel; T. Mitander, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2020, p. 37-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Societal Risk Research, CSR (from 2020).
    Haglund, Jesper
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Design of learning activities that target students’ risk perception in promoting climate literacy2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mittenzwei et al. (2019) recognise the need for a broadened view on climate literacy among students that takes into account a deep understanding of the energy concept, but also matters of risk perception, and attitudes towards climate change, and a willingness to change towards a more climate-friendly behaviour. In a collaboration between Karlstad University and the Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) in Kiel, we run a project aiming to contribute to understanding of prerequisites for secondary students’ development of resilience in relation to human-made climate change. Towards this aim we develop learning activities in different contexts that show varying degrees of authenticity of risk. Contexts in the Swedish part of the project involve: the increased risk of flooding due to climate change in western Sweden; increasing frequency of forest fires in Sweden the last decade; students’ understanding of energy transfer and transformations by use of infrared cameras. In the presentation we focus on results from pilot studies in relation to the flooding and infrared-camera contexts. Regarding the risk of flooding, through the game Riskville preservice teacher students have experienced in a hands-on manner the conflicts and connections urban planning, conflicting interests, and climate related risk (Christenson et al., 2019). By using infrared cameras, students get the opportunity to see otherwise invisible phenomena, such as heat convection and radiation (Haglund et al., 2015).

  • 45.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Societal Risk Research, CSR (from 2020).
    Hindersson, Emelie
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Center for Societal Risk Research, CSR (from 2020). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Jakobsson, Martin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for the Studies of Social Sciences Didactics (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, David
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    Thörne, Karin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Undervisning för krisberedskap i grundskolans tidigare år – en förstudie2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Omvärldsutvecklingen, Sveriges rustning av det civila försvaret, barnrättsfrågor och att barn är särskilt utsatta i krissituationer är starka skäl till att krisberedskapsundervisning i skolans lägre årskurser bör införas.

    I denna rapport presenteras en förstudie med syfte att undersöka förutsättningar för undervisning för krisberedskap i skolans lägre årskurser. Rapportens inledande forskningsöversikt visar att krisberedskapsundervisning för barn stärker krismedvetenheten och krishanteringsförmågan i det omgivande samhället och att det är gynnsamt att undervisa om krisberedskap redan i tidig ålder. Undervisning som anammar elevaktiva metoder och samverkar med föräldrar och lokalsamhälle har särskilt positiva effekter på elevers lärande. Resultaten från förstudien visar att svenska kursplaner och läroböcker riktade mot årskurserna ett till sex inte ger någon explicit vägledning för undervisning om krisberedskap. Dock visar kursplane- och läroboksanalysen att befintliga skrivningar och innehållsteman ger öppningar för att inkludera undervisning om krisberedskap inom ramen för flera olika ämnen.

    Riskerna för att grundläggande samhällsfunktioner störs eller slås ut motiverar att ge plats åt krisberedskapsundervisning i skolan, men det är viktigt att sådan undervisning vilar på en solid grund. Därför avslutas rapporten med en rekommendation om ett kombinerat forsknings- och utvecklingsarbete där yrkesverksamma lärare, forskare och beredskapsexperter tillsammans bidrar med sin expertis i framtagandet av ett undervisningsmaterial för krisberedskap i skolans lägre årskurser.

    Förstudien tar tagits fram av forskare vid Karlstads universitet knutna till Centrum för forskning om samhällsrisker inom ramen för ett projekt, Krisberedskap i skolan (etapp 1), med Räddningstjänsten Karlstadsregionen som projektledare och Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap (MSB) som finansiär.

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    Undervisning för krisberedskap i grundskolans tidigare år - en förstudie
  • 46.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Walan, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Pre-service teachers' use and reflections on a model for assessing socioscientific argumentation2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-service science teachers’ use and reflections on a model for assessing socioscientific argumentation

     

    Teaching socioscientific argumentation (SSA) is a challenging task. One difficulty is the assessment of students’ performances. Based on an earlier framework for teachers’ assessment of SSA (TAF), we developed a model called Practical Assessment of Socioscientific argumentation Model (PASM). The aim of this study is to present PASM and explore how pre-service science teachers (PSTs) develop their skills in assessing SSA by using PASM. Ten science PSTs were asked to prepare arguments for and against the use of nuclear power and GMO. PASM comprised several rounds where the PSTs (divided into small groups) argued in favour of, or against, the topic discussed, or acted as examiner assessing the argumentation. After the PSTs had tried all roles, including regular discussions where the examiner gave feedback to those arguing, the SSI shifted from nuclear power to GMO and the whole cycle was repeated. Data were collected as audio-recordings of the group discussions, field notes taken by both authors during joint discussions and PSTs individual written reflections, and were analysed using thematic analysis. Six main themes and several subthemes were identified in the data analysis: focus in the assessment, the tools in PASM such as the matrix and TAF, the nature of PASM, such as the roles and iterative cycles, and coping strategies. The exercise made PSTs aware of the quality criteria that should be included in assessment of SSA. The nature of PASM, with its iterative cycles and repeated reflections, expanded PSTs view of SSA assessment, which showed a progression through the different stages of data collection. We conclude that it is of great importance to include training assessment of SSA in teacher education and that using the PASM model could be one way of doing this. 

    Keywords: SSI, argumentation, assessment

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  • 47.
    Christenson, Nina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Weldemariam, Kassahun
    Rethinking Teacher Education in the Anthropocen2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education in general and teacher education in particular is believed to play a key role for a sustainable world. In recent years, there has been discussion on the need to reorient teacher education towards sustainable development. These discussions elucidated that teacher education is no longer about just a mastery of content knowledge and skill in a particular discipline that one is trained for, and necessitates the need for the development of key competences and skills. Yet it is not well documented how teacher education programmes in different nations have successfully transformed and integrated sustainable development into the core of teacher education programmes. What can teacher education contribute in terms of providing directions to rethink humans’ relationship with the planet in today’s Anthropocene era? What kind of (fresh) approach to teacher education is required in the Anthropocene/in 21st century? How can teacher education responds/is responding to the challenges posed by the Anthropocene? The discussion is anchored around two particular teacher training programmes, i.e. primary school teacher training at the University of Gothenburg and Karlstad University, and presented as a comparison format. Both of these programmes includes one single objective related to sustainable development in the study plan for teacher education for primary school respectively. During the fourth semester students can choose one specialization and in two of these, technology and natural sciences and the specialization for social sciences includes one course objective dealing with sustainability perspectives respectively. We conclude that sustainability perspectives are very limited during all of the courses for future primary teachers at both Karlstad University and the University of Gothenburg.

  • 48.
    Clucas, Paul
    et al.
    Malmö universitet, Sverige.
    Lunde, Torodd
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Sju lärarroller i mellanstadiets NO-undervisning2023In: ATENA Didaktik, E-ISSN 2003-3486, Vol. 5, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskare har i en studie identifierat sju olika lärarroller i mellanstadiets NO-undervisning. Lärarrollerna tydliggör olika sätt att förverkliga NO-undervisning och synliggör antaganden som dessa vilar på.

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  • 49.
    Daouacher, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics, Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Rearward facing travel for every child's safety2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study was made within the Child Safety group at Volvo Car Corporation.  The purpose of this bachelor thesis was to study the different aspects of rearward facing child restraint systems, which is the safest way for small children to travel, in order to suggest improvements in the development of child restraint systems. The studies included scientific articles regarding child safety and fatally injured children in car accidents, both in Sweden and internationally. The overall aim is to find factors that enables the increase in usage of rearward facing child restraint systems, including the increase of usage time to as long as possible.

     

    Swedish accident data, obtained by the Swedish Traffic Data Acquisation, was studied. It was found that the fatally injured children during car accidents in Sweden between the years 2000-2016 commonly were involved in extraordinarily accident scenarios with an outcome independent of how they were restrained. The literature study and the survey that was made were both supporting the statement of inconvenience while using rearward facing child restraint systems. The inconvenience often corresponded to different types of misuse. The main issue with rearward facing according to the responding parents was lack of leg space, both for their child but also for the driver and the front seat passenger. These issues made some parents turning their children forward facing at early age, whereas they could still fit in the rearward facing child restraint system.

     

    One key in order to increase the global use of rearward facing child restraint systems lies in changes of the materials and design. A more lightweight and compact design is suggested, providing a more spacious travel environment for the children and easier mounting for the parents. The need of education is apparent, preferable by means of social media due to the easiness of sending information globally with low cost.

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  • 50.
    de la Hoz, Marina Casanoves
    et al.
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Sole-Llussa, Anna
    Universitat de Lleida, ESP.
    Haro, Juan
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education Research.
    Valls, Cristina
    Universitat Rovira i Virgili, ESP.
    Student Primary Teachers’ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Biotechnology: Are They Prepared to Teach Biotechnological Literacy?2022In: Journal of Science Education and Technology, ISSN 1059-0145, E-ISSN 1573-1839, Vol. 31, p. 203-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The speed of development of biotechnology within agriculture, industry, and medicine has changed our lives, and we need a biotechnological literacy to understand it. This implies that teachers in primary schools need to be biotechnologically literate in order to educate future generations. The aim of this study was to investigate Swedish pre-service primary school teachers’ knowledge of and attitudes towards biotechnology and contextualize the results by comparing them with a corresponding group of Spanish teachers. Data was collected using the established questionnaire instrument Biotech XXI and analyzed statistically. The findings demonstrate that Swedish pre-service primary school teachers have knowledge gaps relating to the basic genetic concepts that underpin biotechnology, although they are aware of biotechnological applications. Their attitudes are quite positive towards biotechnological applications in health, but less so to buying and using genetically modified products. Higher levels of knowledge were correlated with more positive attitudes, indicating an attitudinal basis for expanding the knowledge of and teaching practices for biotechnology among primary teachers. The level of knowledge and attitudes in the Swedish sample were similar to those of the Spanish teachers, suggesting a similar situation may be prevalent in many countries. The results indicate a need to reconsider the science curricula within pre-service primary school teacher training programs in order to better prepare primary teachers for teaching biotechnological literacy.

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