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  • 1.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reichenberg, Avi
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Wikström, Sverre
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Koch, Holger M.
    Institute of the Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany.
    Jonsson, B. A.
    Lund University.
    Swan, Shanna H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen and children's language development at 30 months2018In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 51, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine prenatal APAP exposure in relation to language development in offspring at 30 months of age. Method: A population-based pregnancy cohort study including 754 women who enrolled in the Swedish Environmental Longitudinal, Mother and child, Asthma and allergy (SELMA) study in pregnancy week 8-13. Two exposure measures were used: (1) maternally reported number of APAP tablets taken between conception and enrollment; (2) APAP urinary concentration at enrollment. Language development at 30 months was assessed by nurse's evaluation and parental questionnaire, including the number of words the child used (<25, 25-50 and >50). Main study outcome; parental report of use of fewer than 50 words, termed language delay (LD). Results: 59.2% of women enrolled in weeks 8-13 reported taking APAP between conception and enrollment. APAP was measurable in all urine samples and urinary APAP was correlated with the number of APAP taken during pregnancy (P < 0.01). Language delay was more prevalent in boys (12.6%) than girls (4.1%) (8.5% in total). Both the number of APAP tablets and urinary APAP concentration were associated with greater LD in girls but not in boys. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for LD among girls whose mothers reported >6 vs. 0 APAP tablets was 5.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-31.94). The OR for LD in girls whose mothers' urinary APAP was in the highest compared to the lowest quartile was 10.34 (95% CI 1.37-77.86). While it cannot be ruled out, our available data do not support confounding by indication. Conclusions: Given the prevalence of prenatal APAP use and the importance of language development, these findings, if replicated, would suggest that pregnant women should limit their use of this analgesic during pregnancy. (C) 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reichenberg, Avi
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Unenge Hallerbäck, Maria
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Wikström, Sverre
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Koch, Holger M.
    Institute of the Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany.
    Swan, Shanna H.
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
    Reply to Shukla et al., Commentary on: Prenatal exposure to acetaminophen and children's language development at 30 months2018In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 51, p. 86-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Helldin, L.
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies. NU Hlth Care Hosp, Dept Psychiat, S-46185 Trollhattan, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Dept Psychol, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Cavallaro, R.
    San Raffaele Univ, Sci Inst Vita Salute, Dept Clin Neurosci, I-20132 Milan, Italy..
    Galderisi, S.
    Univ Naples SUN, Dept Psychiat, I-80123 Naples, Italy..
    A functional comparison of patients with schizophrenia between the North and South of Europe2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 442-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The main objective of this study was to compare clinical and functional outcomes of patients with schizophrenia in Italy and Sweden with a special focus on daily functioning performance and real life milestones. Also, to study if outcome is to be regarded as a consequence of premorbid function, the level of symptom control and functional capacity or if other influences, such as cultural differences, must parallel be considered. Method: Ninety-five patients from three centres, Milan and Naples in Italy and Trollhattan in Sweden were investigated. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment - Brief version were used together with patients' school history and their status of accommodation and occupation. Results: Patients in Trollhattan were more likely to live independently and patients in Naples to have a work or take part in education. Differences in symptoms and the performance test were present but subtle. Discussion: Differences in real life milestones were not explained by corresponding differences in symptoms, premorbid function or the performance-based test. It is therefore not appropriate only to present functional outcome as an expression of how successful treatment has been. (C) 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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