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  • 1.
    Krekula, Clary
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Arvidson, Markus
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Henriksson, Andreas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Olsson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    On gray dancing: Constructions of age-normality through choreography and temporal codes2017In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 42, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the background of population aging, older peoples dance has attracted attention in research and its health promoting effects and social meanings have been brought to the fore. In this article we focus on the context and power dimensions of dance with an emphasis on the organizing of dance among older adults in terms of social discourses and age relationships. On the basis of qualitative interviews with 33 older dancers and 11 dance providers in Sweden, the study illustrates how dance is organized through social discourses on healthism and on the increasing group of older people as a powerful consumer group. The study highlights that older people and their social dance contexts are marked and subordinated in relation to younger age groups through non-verbal practices such as choreography and temporal codes. In short, dancing among older adults is not only a common health promoting and social activity, but also an arena in which age and age normality are negotiated and constructed.

  • 2. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Grafström, Margareta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Zaman, Shahaduz
    Research and Evaluation Division, BRAC.
    Nahar Kabir, Zarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Role and function: Aspects of quality of life of older peoplein rural Bangladesh2005In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, no 19, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the meaning of quality of life (QoL) for elderly people in a rural communityin Bangladesh. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews with 11 elderly persons aged 63–86 years.Interview data were analysed using content analysis to determine the conceptual meaning of elderly peoples’experiences of QoL. Two major themes emerged from the data as being of utmost importance in QoL of elderlypeople in rural Bangladesh. These were: (i) having a role in the family and the community and (ii) beingfunctional, both physically and economically. Results also showed that elderly people in rural Bangladeshprioritise being healthy, having a good social network, social support and a secure financial situation in order tohave good QoL. This study is a step towards a better understanding of QoL experienced by the elderly peoplethemselves in a rural Bangladeshi context.

  • 3.
    Olsson, Eva
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Heikkinen, Satu
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    “I will never quit dancing”. The emotional experiences of social dancing among older persons2019In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, article id 100786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on dancing in later life has mainly focused on the health-promoting effects of dance, including aspects of well-being, while studies focusing on emotions are rare. The purpose of this article is therefore to contribute to research on older people's dancing through examining emotions in social dancing. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 44 older persons. The analysis shows how successful interaction rituals create positive emotions such as joy and pride and contribute to emotional energy. However, there are also unsuccessful interaction rituals which contribute to negative emotions of sadness and anger. These negative emotions can drain emotional energy, but, importantly for this study, they may also contribute to a forceful counter-energy which motivates the interviewees to try again. We discuss these patterns as emotional energy tropism and as negative emotional energy and positive emotional energy working together. The study provides insight into how and why dancing feels good as well as why older people do not give up dancing despite setbacks. Overall, the study contributes to research discussions about emotions in gray dancing as well as sociology of emotions.

  • 4.
    Thoresen, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Ctr Med Eth, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Ahlzén, Rolf
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013). ..
    Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim
    Univ Oslo, Ctr Med Eth, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Advance Care Planning in Norwegian nursing homes-Who is it for?2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 16-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes. We wanted to know how nursing home residents, relatives and nursing home staff take part in the conversations, and to what extent these conversations can be regarded as promoting autonomy, legal rights and individual needs for the residents. We conducted participant observation of seven preparatory conversations, followed by interviews with health care staff (together) and resident and relative (together). In the result section, we present an informative case example of an ACP conversation where common and important characteristics running through our data are present. These are further elaborated under the following headings: Life critical questions, Residents' quiet participation in the conversations, the Dying phase a clinical issue, Nurses and physicians; different domains and Timing. We find that nursing home staff in our study wants to contribute to open awareness, autonomy and a good death, but there are little reflections about the purpose and content of the conversations, how they should be carried out and when, and what frail nursing home residents are able to understand and express in ACP conversations. 

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