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  • 1.
    Morrissey, Lochlan
    et al.
    Karlstad University. Griffith University.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Language, Literature and Intercultural Studies. Griffith University.
    A Lexical Semantics for Refugee, Asylum Seeker and Boat People in Australian English2017In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 37, no 4, 389-423 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms refugee, asylum seeker and boat people are of particular prominence in the Australian discourse surrounding immigration policy, and are widely used in day-to-day conversation among Australians. Despite their frequency of use, a lexico-semantic study of the terms has not been carried out to date. This paper fills this gap by proposing a semantic analysis of them. The study is based on a corpus created from online comments to the Australian television programme Go Back To Where You Came From (Season 1, SBS 2011). After introducing the data and analytical framework—object-oriented semantics—we discuss the terms’ lexical semantics. While the discussion of immigration issues is emotionally laden, our results suggest that the default semantics of the terms do not include evaluative components. Rather, speakers tend to evaluate the agreed-upon semantic specifications differently depending on their political views. We show how each term represents a specific node in a network of concepts for translocating individuals, but may in context also be applied to neighbouring nodes that lack a lexicalization. While the terms are seemingly used interchangeably, our analysis instead emphasizes the influence of the underlying conceptual structure and the resulting constrained plasticity of nominal meaning in context.

  • 2.
    Schalley, Andrea C.
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguistics, Nathan, Qld 4111, Australia.
    Musgrave, Simon
    Monash Univ, Linguist Program, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Haugh, Michael
    Griffith Univ, Sch Languages & Linguist, Brisbane, Qld 4111, Australia..
    Accessing Phonetic Variation in Spoken Language Corpora through Non-standard Orthography2014In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 34, no 1, 139-170 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the sociolinguistic and stylistic variation which is of interest to linguists is phonetic in nature, but the access route to corpus data is typically via a textual transcription. This poses a significant problem for a researcher who wishes to access the original recordings of speech in order to analyse variation: how can they search for relevant data? Many transcription traditions allow for the representation of such variation through non-standard orthography, and such conventions should therefore allow access to data relevant to the study of variation. However, the specific conventions used vary between traditions (and indeed may not be applied consistently by individual transcribers). This then creates another problem where the researcher wishes to access data across an aggregated collection, which is a practical necessity given the relatively limited size of most corpora of spoken language. In this paper, we analyse the conventions used in two of the component collections in the Australian National Corpus, the Australian Radio Talkback Corpus and the Monash Corpus of Spoken English. On the basis of this analysis, we develop a fragment of an ontology which gives an explicit account of the phenomena related to non-standard pronunciation represented in the transcripts and which can therefore act as the basis for better searching of the collections and better access to relevant data for analysing sociolinguistic and stylistic variation.

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