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  • 1.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Education system stratification and health complaints among school-aged children2019Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 220, s. 159-166Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that the school environment is an important social determinant of health among children and adolescents. However, we know virtually nothing of the health consequences of national education systems and policies, for example the stratification of pupils by academic ability. This study aimed to investigate if education system stratification is related to self-reported psychological and somatic health complaints of pupils aged 11 to 15, and social inequalities in such health complaints.

    Survey data from the Health Behaviors of School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, covering 33 countries and more than 180 000 pupils in primary and lower secondary school, were used. Multilevel models showed that education system stratification was not associated with the average levels of health complaints of pupils, but cross-level interaction effects showed that stratification moderated the relationship between social background and health complaints, such that inequalities in health complaints were smaller in countries with more stratified systems. Moreover, this moderating effect was mediated by the school learning environmentand social relations in school. Specifically, social inequalities in school pressure, academic self-concept, school climate, and school satisfaction were smaller in more stratified education systems, which in turn accounted for smaller inequalities in health complaints in these countries.

  • 2.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för hälsa och miljö.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för samhälls- och livsvetenskaper, Avdelningen för hälsa och miljö.
    Economic development as a determinant of injury mortality: a longitudinal approach2008Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, nr 8, s. 1699-1708Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sectional studies have produced clear inverted U-shaped curves between injury mortality and economic development; yet, this does not mean that single countries will necessarily follow similar curves as they grow richer over time. This study was conducted to examine whether previous cross-sectional findings can be verified using a longitudinal approach. Data for both injury mortality and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita were obtained from an official health database for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for the period of 1960–1999. Regression models were then used to examine the longitudinal relationship between these two variables. Substantial improvements in injury mortality were observed in all income categories in the selected countries. For higher and middle high-income countries, injury mortality rates (all causes) increased until 1972, peaking in 1972 and then declining. For industrialized countries with relatively low GDP, injury mortality rates increased until 1977 and then declined. Using cubic regression lines for injury mortality rates, for all income categories, injury mortality rates increased up to a GDP per capita of $3000–$4000, then decreased significantly. The rising trends of suicide and homicide rates were observed until countries attained a GDP per capita of around $13,000–$14,000 for all income categories. It is noteworthy that compared to the intentional injury categories, mortality due to road traffic accidents and injuries from falls declined earlier on in the economic development process. Longitudinal analysis among high-income countries confirms earlier cross-sectional findings; that is, most injury categories seem to follow inverted U-shaped trend lines, with declining trends after peaking at various stages of temporal and economical development. A comparison between time and economy suggests that differences in peaking time between countries for the same injury category is partly a reflection of temporal differences in economic development.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Alcohol Use and Social Interactions among Adolescents: Do peer effects exist within and/or between the majority population and immigrants?2010Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 70, nr 11, s. 1858-1864Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för ekonomi, kommunikation och IT, Avdelningen för nationalekonomi och statistik.
    Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?2007Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 65, nr 4, s. 833-41Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent papers in the literature have documented a pro-cyclical effect between business cycles and mortality. In this paper, I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence, mortality and lethality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987-2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence, mortality and lethality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. Hence, previous recent results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality.

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