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  • 1. Aalborg, T.
    et al.
    Strandmark, Margaretha
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    The baby was the focus of attention: First-time patients' experiences of their marital relationship2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 15, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning by simulation in prehospital emergency care: an integrative literature review2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acquiring knowledge and experience on high-energy trauma is often difficult due to infrequent exposure. This creates a need for training which is specifically tailored for complex prehospital conditions. Simulation provides an opportunity for ambulance nurses to focus on the actual problems in clinical practice and to develop knowledge regarding trauma care. The aim of this study was to describe what ambulance nurses and paramedics in prehospital emergency care perceive as important for learning when participating in simulation exercises.

    METHODS: An integrative literature review was carried out. Criteria for inclusion were primary qualitative and quantitative studies, where research participants were ambulance nurses or paramedics, working within prehospital care settings, and where the research interventions involved simulation.

    RESULTS: It was perceived important for the ambulance nurses' learning that scenarios were advanced and possible to simulate repeatedly. The repetitions contributed to increase the level of experience, which in turn improved the patients care. Moreover, realism in the simulation and being able to interact and communicate with the patient were perceived as important aspects, as was debriefing, which enabled the enhancement of knowledge and skills. The result is presented in the following categories: To gain experience, To gain practice and To be strengthened by others.

    CONCLUSION: Learning through simulation does not require years of exposure to accident scenes. The simulated learning is enhanced by realistic, stressful scenarios where ambulance nurses interact with the patients. In this study, being able to communicate with the patient was highlighted as a positive contribution to learning. However, this has seldom been mentioned in a previous research on simulation. Debriefing is important for learning as it enables scrutiny of one's actions and thereby the possibility to improve and adjust one's caring. The effect of simulation exercises is important on patient outcome.

  • 3.
    Anclair, Malin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Lappalainen, Raimo
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Muotka, Joona
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Hiltunen, Arto
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Social and Psychological Studies (from 2013).
    Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Parents of children with chronic conditions often experience a crisis with serious mental health problems for themselves as a consequence. The healthcare focus is on the children; however, the parents often worry about their children's health and future but are seldom offered any counselling or guidance.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two group-based behavioural interventions on stress and burnout among parents of children with chronic conditions.

    Design, participants and setting

    After a waiting list control period (n = 28), parents were offered either a cognitive behavioural (CBT, n = 10) or a mindfulness program (MF, n = 9).

    Results

    Both interventions decreased significantly stress and burnout. The within-group effect sizes were large in both interventions (CBT, g = 1.28–1.64; MF, g = 1.25–2.20).

    Conclusions

    Hence, the results of this pilot study show that treating a group using either CBT or mindfulness can be an efficient intervention for reducing stress levels and burnout in parents of children with chronic conditions.

  • 4. Andersson, Ewa Kazimiera
    et al.
    Borglin, Gunilla
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Willman, Ania
    Standing alone when life takes an unexpected turn: being a midlife next of kin of a relative who has suffered a myocardial infarction2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 864-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Suffering a myocardial infarction (MI) is a life-threatening event that impacts not only on the individual concerned but also on the next of kin. However, there seems to be a paucity of naturalistic inquiries that focus specifically on midlife next of kin and their experience of being close to a relative who has suffered an MI. This study aims to elucidate the experience of being a midlife next of kin of a relative who has suffered a myocardial infarction. METHOD: Nine women and four men in midlife participated in the focused interviews, which were conducted and analysed during 2010/2011 using Lindseths and Norbergs' description of the phenomenological hermeneutical method. FINDINGS: Four themes - Solely responsible, Lurking unease, Left out of the picture and Life on hold - formed the basis of the core theme Standing alone when life takes an unexpected turn. The core theme was interpreted as a central phenomenon encompassing the experience of being solely responsible for the well-being of their relative and the family, thus putting their own life on hold. The core theme also reflected the next of kin's experience of being left out of the picture when it came to the relative's care before and after the MI. CONCLUSION: The next of kin's negative feelings of standing alone were further intensified by their experience of being left out of the picture by the healthcare professionals concerning their relative's care. As a cardiac nurse, it would seem essential to have knowledge about the experiences of next of kin in connection with a relative's MI event. Such knowledge can facilitate the planning and organisation of nursing care and at the same time address the next of kin's role in the recovery and rehabilitation process.

  • 5.
    Athlin, Elsy
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hov, Reidun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Being a nurse in nursing homes for patients on the edge of life2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 651-659Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Barthelsson, Cajsa
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Norberg, Åke
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sense of coherence and other predictors or pain and health following laparoscopic cholecystectomy2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is the most common symptom following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and might delay discharge from hospital after day surgery. A patient’s ability to manage stressful situations can be assessed by the sense of coherence (SOC) and has been proposed to predict health. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of average pain the first postoperative week after LC, and predictors of changes in perceived health, with special reference to individual coping resources measured by the Sense of Coherence Scale. Furthermore, a test–re-test was performed on SOC to evaluate the stability in the context of LC surgery.  Method:  Seventy-three patients completed questionnaires about SOC, health status, pain, anxiety, symptom occurrence and symptom distress preoperatively, postoperative day 1–7 and after 1 and 6 months following LC. Results: By multiple regression, 23% of the variability in pain intensity could be explained by the variables age, SOC and education. Age was the strongest predictor. Further, 19% of the change in health between day 7 and 1 month could be explained by the two variables symptom distress the first postoperative day and SOC. The test–re-test of SOC had a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.55. Forty-six patients (63%) remained within ± 10% of their preoperative SOC score at 6 months, 11 patients (15%) decreased and 16 patients (22%) increased their SOC values.  Conclusion: SOC was found to be a significant but weak predictor of pain intensity the first week after LC. Furthermore, patients scoring low SOC values experienced a delay in their health improvement. SOC was more unstable over time than previously suggested. Further, interventional studies are needed to clarify if SOC might be a clinically useful measure to identify vulnerable patients undergoing LC surgery.

  • 7.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademy.
    Modh, Carin
    Silvergrensgatan.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademy.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Akershus university.
    First-time pregnant women's experiences of their body in early pregnancy2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilsson, Jan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

  • 9.
    Eklund, Anna Josse
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Norway.
    Petzäll, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Norway.
    Sandin-Bojö, Ann-Kristin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. City Council Värmland.
    Individual and organisational factors influencing registered nurses' attitudes towards patient advocacy in Swedish community health care of elders2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 486-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and explore individual and organisational factors potentially influencing registered nurses' (RNs) attitudes towards patient advocacy. Methods and Sample: In a quantitative cross-sectional study, data were collected from 226 RNs in community health care of elders. A questionnaire was used to measure a number of factors including attitudes towards patient advocacy, nursing competence, personality traits, individual preferences regarding the quality of health care and working climate. A multiple regression analysis was performed. Results: The results showed that individual factors of nursing competence and individual preferences of the quality of health care, as well as organisational factors of the working climate, explained 26.2% of the variance in the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. Conclusions: Although the mentioned individual factors may be intertwined, the conclusion is that both individual and organisational factors influenced RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The results do not verify that nursing experience, workplace experience, educational level or personality traits influence the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The proportion of explained variance indicates that additional factors also influence attitudes towards patient advocacy, and more research is needed to shed further light on these factors.

  • 10.
    From, Ingrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Johansson, Inger
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Caregivers in older peoples' care: Perception of quality, working conditions, competence and personal health2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 704-714Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kristensson, Per
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Department of Psychology. Karlstad University, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Communication and IT, Service Research Center.
    Öhlund, Lennart
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Swedish upper secondary school pupils’ sense of coherence, coping resources and aggressiveness in relation to educational track and performance2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health of an individual depends on how well he or she can handle various stressors in his or her environment. One vulnerable period occurs during the transition from child to adult. The overall aim of this research project was to determine whether differences in the ability to deal with stress are related to various health indicators, aggression, and school marks during primary and upper secondary school. Data were collected class-wise and 253 Swedish upper secondary school pupils participated. Three wellestablished questionnaires [Sense of Coherence (SOC), Coping Resources Inventory (CRI) and Aggression Questionnaire (AQ)] were used. In addition, blood pressure, teacher evaluation and school marks were collected.

    Some demographic data such as gender, age and type of study programme were also collected. Both SOC and Coping Resources Inventory correlated significantly positively with many of the primary and upper secondary marks, while the AQ had significantly negative correlations with the mark. Females obtained higher values than males in Coping Resources Inventory, but lower in SOC and AQ.

  • 12.
    Lewen, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Gardulf, Ann
    The Red Cross University College.
    Nilsson, Jan
    The Red Cross University College and Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Documented assessments and treatments of patients seeking emergency care because of pain.2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 4, p. 764-771Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lindberg, Nina
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Plast & Reconstruct Surg, NO-0027 Oslo, Norway..
    Berglund, Anna-Lena
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Mothers' experiences of feeding babies born with cleft lip and palate2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 66-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) in newborns have implications for feeding. It might impede the child's attempts to seal around the nipple and to create intraoral pressure. Parents needed support and information about feeding after birth. Mothers' own experiences and how they coped with the challenges related to feeding have not been extensively studied. The aims of this study were twofold: to describe the experiences of feeding for mothers of children born with CLP and to elucidate how the mothers cope with the challenges related to feeding. A qualitative descriptive method and phenomenographic analysis were used to analyse the narratives. Twelve mothers of babies with CLP were strategically selected and interviewed. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Ethical approval for the study was granted by the local ethical committee. The findings resulted in two main categories and five subcategories. The first main category, Being a capable and good mother, included descriptions associated with the mothers' strong desire to do what was best for the child and about how they experienced feeding. The second main category, Coping with the challenges related to feeding, included descriptions of what the mothers perceived as important in order to cope with the challenges related to feeding; of how personal resources were used; of the significance of the father and close family; and of how healthcare professionals contributed. In conclusion, mothers of children born with CLP were in need of individual information by healthcare professionals with expertise, at the time of the diagnosis and until the feeding was manageable. Furthermore, the mothers' personal resources, the fathers and immediate family were of major importance for the mothers to cope with challenges related to feeding.

  • 14.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Missions and thoughts about Nordic College of Caring Science future2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 415-416Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Hilli, Yvonne
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
    35 years of the Nordic College of Caring Science: heading for the future.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 407-408Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Råholm, Maj-Britt
    Western Norway University of Applied Sciences Sogndahl Norway.
    Lohne, Vibeke
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Oslo Norway.
    Caspari, Synnöve
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Oslo Norway.
    Heggestad, Anne Kari Tolo
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Oslo Norway.
    Sæteren, Berit
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Oslo Norway.
    Slettebø, Åshild
    Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences University of Agder Grimstad Norway.
    Høy, Bente
    VIA University College Aarhus Denmark.
    Nåden, Dagfinn
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Oslo Norway.
    Clinical application research through reflection, interpretation and new understanding: A hermeneutic design2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1157-1167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of theoretical knowledge in clinical practice and the implementation of good clinical practice into theory have been of interest in caring science for the last 30 years. The aim of this article was to elaborate and discuss a methodology named clinical application research. The method is grounded in a hermeneutical design inspired by Gadamer's philosophy. The methodology, clinical application research, has been used in a research project A life in dignity and experiences from the researchers forms the bases for the elaboration and discussion. The project was performed in collaboration with residents, family caregivers and healthcare providers at six nursing homes in Scandinavia. The material for this article is based on the previous research, that is the results from 10 different articles showing the meaning of dignity and indignity in daily life in nursing homes. Data were generated from 56 individual interviews and 18 focus-group interviews with a total of 40 staff members with five to eight participants at every interview session. By reflection, interpretation and new understanding our results provide knowledge about dignity and how to preserve dignity for older people in an appropriate ethical way. The methodology was relevant for the research project A life in dignity and relevant to caring practice in nursing homes as it opens new possibilities and new ways of thinking when performing dignified care to older people.

  • 17.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Råholm, MB
    Slettebø, Å
    Nåden, D
    The Need for Methodological Development within Qualitative Clinical Caring Research2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 423-426Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    von Post, I
    Continuity created by nurses in the perioperative dialogue-: a literature review2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 395-401Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Moen, Öyfrid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Norway.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Högskolan i Gjövik, Norway.
    Public health nurses' conceptions of their role related to families with a child having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 515-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common behavioural disorders diagnosed in children. Children who have this disorder have difficulties regarding regulation of their emotions, maintaining attention and impulse control. Parents may need guidance in creating structure and predictable boundaries. One of the personnel who meet these families is the public health nurse. The aim of this study was to explore the public health nurses role in relation to these families. A qualitative explorative design with a phenomenographic approach was used. Interviews were performed with 19 nurses, six in group and one individual. In the data analyses, three descriptive categories emerged: 'supporting the family-unit', which describes the nurses supervising the parents and the child in everyday challenges; 'understanding the child', which describes how the public health nurses use professional competence and choose the time and arena to observe the child and; 'collaborating multidisciplinary', which describes how the public health nurses define their own role and conceive their collaboration with other professionals. The public health nurse (PHN)'s support for the parents and the entire family is important, and the PHN is the first encounter and trustful follower throughout the course of diagnosis and care.

  • 20. Nicolay, Uwe
    et al.
    Östblom, Eva
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Gardulf, A
    Validation of a Disease-Specific Questionnaire for MeasuringParent-Reported Health-Related Quality of Life in Children withAllergies2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 679-687Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Nilsson, Madeleine
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    From, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Högskolan Dalarna.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    The significance of patient participation in nursing care: A concept analysis2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to report on a concept analysis of the meaning of patients’ participation. Participation is commonplace in many areas of health care and has become an important issue in healthcare services. Participation is essential when giving nursing care. Challenges exist throughout clinical practice to make the patient a participant in their own care. The study had a caring science perspective. Method: A literature study based on Walker and Avant's method was used with eight steps. Data were collected using several databases covering the years 1995–2017. The analysis covered fifteen articles, dissertations, reports and textbooks. Findings: Patients’ participation may be defined as a concept that relates to and includes the three caring science concepts: learning, caring relationship and reciprocity (defining attributes). Conclusion: Participation is a concept with vague meaning that is prevalent in nursing practice. Patients’ participation is a complex concept. By using the attributes, it could be more visible in nursing care. The next question for research in this area is how these three attributes can best practically be achieved in a clinical context.

  • 22.
    Nordström, Gun
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Barthelsson, C
    Norberg, Å
    Sense of Coherence and other Predictors of Pain and Health following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Olsson, Helén
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Strand, Susanne
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Reaching a turning point - how patients in forensic care describe trajectories of recovery2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 505-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the duration of treatment is increasing for patients admitted to forensic psychiatric care. To reduce the length of stay, it is important for the forensic rehabilitation and recovery process to be effective and safe. Not much is known about how the process of recovery and transition begins and how it is described by the forensic patients. The purpose of this study was to explore how forensic patients with a history of high risk for violence experienced the turn towards recovery. A qualitative content analysis was used to analyse interviews with 10 patients who had decreased their assessed risk for violence on the risk assessment instrument HCR-20 and who were successfully managed a lower level of security. Three themes were identified: (i) the high-risk phase: facing intense negative emotions and feelings (ii) the turning point phase: reflecting on and approaching oneself and life in a new way (iii) the recovery phase: recognising, accepting and maturing. In the high-risk phase, chaotic and overwhelming feelings were experienced. The turning point phase was experienced as a sensitive stage, and it was marked by being forced to find a new, constructive way of being. The recovery phase was characterised by recognising personal circumstances in life, including accepting the need for structure, a feeling of maturity and a sense of responsibility for their own life. In order to ensure a successful recovery, the forensic nursing staff needs to recognise and support processes related to treatment motivation and turning points. Recommendations for best nursing practice are given accordingly.

  • 24.
    Pulkkinen, Maria
    et al.
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Peijas Hosp, Dept Anesthesia & Operat, Sairaalakatu 1, Vantaa 01400, Finland..
    Junttila, Kristiina
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    The perioperative dialogue: A model of caring for the patient undergoing a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 145-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe how patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia experienced to be a part of the perioperative dialogue as an ideal model of caring. A qualitative approach was chosen as a method. Nineteen patients undergoing either a hip or a knee replacement surgery under spinal anaesthesia participated. These patients and their nurse anaesthetists had three perioperative dialogues in the pre-, intra- and postoperative phase of care. Data were collected by means of conversational interviews by four voluntary nurse anaesthetists who wrote the dialogues from each perioperative phase. The text from the collected data was analysed by qualitative, latent content analysis. The findings of the analysis show three identified themes: Suffering while waiting for surgery (preoperative dialogue), Continuity creates togetherness (intraoperative dialogue) and Uniqueness - the patient has been seen (postoperative dialogue). The findings show evidence that the perioperative dialogue is an ideal model of caring and serves the patients' desires of individual and dignified care. The patients have a deep appreciation when there is time to develop a caring encounter with his or her own nurse. When a caring encounter has been established, the patient is involved in his or her own care. This model of caring offers the perioperative nurses a new way of caring and arouses reflections about their main task caring for the suffering patient. The continuity created by the perioperative dialogue probably has an influence on both patient satisfaction and patient safety.

  • 25.
    Rahm, GullBritt
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Strandmark, Margaretha
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
    Workplace bullying among healthcare professionals in Sweden: a descriptive study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 582-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace bullying is a taboo event which occurs worldwide, although the prevalence varies significantly between and within countries. Nurses have been regarded an occupational risk group for bullying at the work place. Bullying in health and social care contexts is sometimes reported as frequent and, other times, as not occurring, which sparked our interest in mapping the occurrence of bullying in the health and social care system in Sweden. Thus, the purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence of bullying, and to discuss cultural traditions and environmental factors that affect bullying in workplaces. The sample (n = 2810) consisted of employees at inpatient wards at four hospitals, and employees at municipal eldercare wards in Sweden. A questionnaire including NAQ‐22 R was distributed and subsequently analysed with descriptive statistics using SPSS. The youngest group of respondents scored higher than the older groups. Using contrasting estimates of bullying, the prevalence varied between 4.1 and 18.5%, with the lowest prevalence in regards to self‐reported exposure. According to the cut‐off scores, NAQ‐22 R, 8.6% of the respondents were occasionally exposed to bullying while 2.3% were considered to be victims of severe bullying. Work‐related negative acts were more common than personal negative acts. The variations in prevalence of bullying as a result of contrasting estimation strategies are discussed from perspective of the 'law of Jante', the 'tall poppy syndrome' and shame. Bullying deteriorates the working conditions which may have an impact on quality of patient care.

  • 26.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Wangensteen, Sigrid
    Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Relatives of patients with depression: Experiences of everyday life2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 564-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe experiences of everyday life as a relative of a person diagnosed with depression. A qualitative and descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen, and individual interviews with 24 relatives were carried out. Approval was given by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics, Norway (South East) ref 2010/126. The findings show the main category ‘Living on the other person’s terms’, which may be expressed in terms of consideration for the next of kin, thus presenting a challenge and a need to be balanced against taking care of oneself. In addition, three descriptive categories emerged: ‘Ambivalent relationship’, ‘Adjusting daily life’ and ‘Managing the situation’. In conclusion, the relatives of persons with depression may be in danger of developing their own health problems and in need for attention from health personnel.

  • 27.
    Slettebö, Åshild
    et al.
    University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    The significance of meaningful and enjoyable activities for nursing home resident´s experiences of dignity2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 718-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:Living in a nursing home may be challenging to the residents' experience of dignity. Residents' perception of how their dignity is respected in everyday care is important.AIM:To examine how nursing home residents experience dignity through the provision of activities that foster meaning and joy in their daily life.METHOD:A qualitative design was used and 28 individual semistructured interviews conducted with nursing home residents from six nursing homes in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Independent ethical committees in all participating countries granted their approval for the study.FINDINGS:The participants highlight two dimensions of the activities that foster experiences of dignity in nursing homes in Scandinavia. These two categories were (i) fostering dignity through meaningful participation and (ii) fostering dignity through experiencing enjoyable individualised activities.CONCLUSION:Activities are important for residents to experience dignity in their daily life in nursing homes. However, it is important to tailor the activities to the individual and to enable the residents to take part actively. Nurses should collect information about the resident's preferences for participation in activities at the nursing home.

  • 28.
    Todt, Kristina
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Resp Med, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Resp Med, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social & Welf Studies, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Factors associated with low physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 697-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Low physical activity (PA) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with poor prognosis. In addition, physical activity seems to be low early in the disease. The aim of this study was to describe the level of PA in patients with stable COPD and to explore factors associated with low PA, with a focus on fatigue, symptom burden and body composition Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 101 patients (52 women) with COPD were classified having low, moderate or high PA according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Short. Fatigue, dyspnoea, depression and anxiety, symptom burden, body composition, physical capacity (lung function, exercise capacity, muscle strength), exacerbation rate and systemic inflammation were assessed. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent associations with low PA. Results: Mean age was 68 (+/- 7) years, and mean percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 50 (+/- 16.5). Forty-two patients reported a low PA level, while 34 moderate and 25 reported high levels. Factors independently associated with low PA, presented as odds ratio (95% confidence interval), were severe fatigue 5.87 (1.23-28.12), exercise capacity 0.99 (0.99-1.0) and the number of pack-years 1.04 (1.01-1.07). No relationship was found between depression, anxiety, body composition, exacerbation rate or systemic inflammation and PA. Conclusions: Severe fatigue, worse exercise capacity and a higher amount of smoking were independently associated with low PA. Promoting physical activity is important in all patients with COPD. Our result suggests that patients with severe fatigue might need specific strategies to prevent physical inactivity.

  • 29.
    Uwe, Nicolay
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Eva, Östblom
    Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm Universitet.
    Ann-Charlotte, Egmar
    Red Cross University College, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Högskolan i Hedmark.
    Ann, Gardulf
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Validation of a Disease-Specific Questionnaire for Measuring Parent-Reported Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with Allergies2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 679-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the properties and suitability of a disease-specific questionnaire to assess parent-reported health-related quality of life (HRQL) of children and parents of children suffering from food hypersensitivity (FHS) or allergy to furred pets (AFP). Methods: The parents of 202 children with FHS and of 131 children with AFP filled in questionnaires comprising the CHQ-PF28 and the Food-Pet-Allergy in Children (FPAC) Questionnaire. Psychometric properties of the FPAC questionnaire were evaluated separately for FHS and AFP. Results: Analyses resulted in five proposed scales: Limitations of Family/Child Activities (I), Parents Distress (II), Childs Emotions (III), Child in School (IV) and Family Conflicts (V). Convergent/discriminant validity for scales I, II and III of both questionnaires was high; for scale IV it was moderate. All five FHS and four AFP scales were able to distinguish significantly between children with and without clinical allergy symptoms (known-group validity). Internal consistency reliability was good for scales I, II and III, but poor for scale IV. Conclusion: Three valid scales were determined for both FHS and AFP (Limitations of Family/Child Activities, Parents Distress and Childs Emotions) and can be used in clinical research.

  • 30.
    Wallengren, Catarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Friberg, Febe
    School of Health and Sciences, University College of Borås / Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger.
    Segersten, Kerstin
    School of Health and Sciences, University of Borås.
    Like a shadow: on becoming a stroke victim´s relative2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Weimand, Bente
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Sällström, Christina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Life-sharing experiences of relatives of persons with severe mental illness: a phenomenographic study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Life-sharing experiences of relatives of persons with severe mental illness - a phenomenographic study Relatives of those suffering from severe mental illness experience multiple challenges and a complex life situation. The aim of this study was to describe life-sharing experiences from the perspective of relatives of someone with severe mental illness. A qualitative, descriptive study was performed, and interviews were carried out with eighteen relatives of persons with severe mental illness. A phenomenographic analysis, according to the steps described by Dahlgren and Fallsberg, was used to describe the relatives' conceptions of their situation. The findings show that the experiences of these relatives can be summarized in one main category: 'The art of balancing between multiple concerns'. Two descriptive categories emerged: 'Making choices on behalf of others and oneself' and 'Constantly struggling between opposing feelings and between reflections'. Relatives report that they have to manoeuvre between different ways to act and to prioritize between different wishes and needs. In addition, they face a wide range of strong feelings and they search for hope and meaning. Relatives of someone with severe mental illness have to balance multiple concerns, which induce ethical dilemmas. They felt love, compassion or sense of duty towards the mentally ill person. The changeable situation made it difficult for the relatives to establish a balance in their lives. To be able to prioritize some private time was important. Relatives need own support and sufficient follow-up of the mentally ill next of kin from the mental health services.

  • 32.
    Willman, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Petzäll, Kerstin
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    Research Center, Public Dental Service, Region Västra Götaland.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    The psycho-social dimension of pain and health-related quality of life in the oldest old2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 534-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The psycho-social dimension of pain and health-related quality of life in the oldest old Background:  Chronic pain has an impact on the physical and social functioning of older people which in turn may worsen their health-related quality of life. Research with focus on prolonged extensive pain in the most elderly and how pain may interfere with their life situation is scarce. Aims:  The aims were to describe and investigate pain from a multidimensional point of view (duration, location, psycho-social) and health-related quality of life as well as to compare sex and age groups in people aged 80 years and over. Methods:  In this cross-sectional study, a total of 225 of 282 people responded to a questionnaire consisting of two instruments and background questions. The psycho-social dimension of pain was measured using the Multidimensional Pain Inventory-Swedish language version (MPI-S) with five scales: Pain Severity, Interference, Life Control, Affective Distress and Social Support. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Short Form Health Survey-12 (SF-12). Results:  Median duration of pain was 9.0 years, and the mean number of pain locations was 2.04. The MPI-S scale Interference with a negative orientation had the highest mean score, while the mean score for Social Support was the highest for the scales with a positive orientation. The duration of pain was significantly greater for women, and those aged 80-85 years had higher pain severity than those aged >86. Participants with a lower health-related quality of life experienced significantly more severe pain, were more troubled with pain and had less control of their life. Conclusions:  Older people with prolonged pain suffered from a low health-related quality of life. Pain interfered with their lives and contributed to diminished control in their daily lives. Nurses are essential for the identification and prevention of pain and should be aware of how pain affects older people's physical, mental and social health.

  • 33.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Hall-Lord, Marie Louise
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Oral health-related quality of life in older Swedish people with pain problems2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 510-516Article in journal (Refereed)
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